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MOODYS CORP 10-K 2011
Form 10-K
Table of Contents

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

(MARK ONE)

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010

OR

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM              TO             .

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER 1-14037

 

 

MOODY’S CORPORATION

(EXACT NAME OF REGISTRANT AS SPECIFIED IN ITS CHARTER)

DELAWARE   13-3998945
(STATE OF INCORPORATION)   (I.R.S. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NO.)

7 World Trade Center at 250 Greenwich Street, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10007

(ADDRESS OF PRINCIPAL EXECUTIVE OFFICES)

(ZIP CODE)

REGISTRANT’S TELEPHONE NUMBER, INCLUDING AREA CODE: (212) 553-0300.

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:

 

TITLE OF EACH CLASS   NAME OF EACH EXCHANGE ON WHICH REGISTERED

COMMON STOCK, PAR VALUE $.01 PER SHARE

PREFERRED SHARE PURCHASE RIGHTS

 

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT:

NONE

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes x  No ¨

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes ¨  No x

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant: (1) has filed all reports required by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes x  No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes x  No ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer or a non-accelerated filer (see definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Exchange Act Rule 12b-2).

Large Accelerated Filer x    Accelerated Filer  ¨    Non-accelerated Filer ¨    Smaller reporting company ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes ¨  No x

The aggregate market value of Moody’s Corporation Common Stock held by nonaffiliates* on June 30, 2010 (based upon its closing transaction price on the Composite Tape on such date) was approximately $4.6 billion.

As of January 31, 2011, 229.4 million shares of Common Stock of Moody’s Corporation were outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement for use in connection with its annual meeting of stockholders scheduled to be held on April 19, 2011, are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.

The Index to Exhibits is included as Part IV, Item 15(3) of this Form 10-K.

 

* Calculated by excluding all shares held by executive officers and directors of the Registrant without conceding that all such persons are “affiliates” of the Registrant for purposes of federal securities laws.

 

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Table of Contents

MOODY’S CORPORATION

INDEX TO FORM 10-K

 

     Page(s)  
   Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations      4-7   
PART I.   
Item 1.    BUSINESS      8   
   Background      8   
   The Company      8   
   Prospects for Growth      9-10   
   Competition      10   
   Moody’s Strategy      11-12   
   Regulation      12-14   
   Intellectual Property      14   
   Employees      15   
   Available Information      15   
   Executive Officers of the Registrant      15-16   
Item 1A.    RISK FACTORS      17-22   
Item 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS      22   
Item 2.    PROPERTIES      22   
Item 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS      22-23   
Item 4.    RESERVED      23   
PART II.   
Item 5.    MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES      24   
   Moody’s Purchase of Equity Securities      24   
   Common Stock Information and Dividends      25   
   Equity Compensation Plan Information      25-26   
   Performance Graph      26   
Item 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA      27   
Item 7.    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS      28   
   The Company      28   
   Critical Accounting Estimates      28-34   
   Operating Segments      34-35   
   Results of Operations      35-46   
   Market Risk      46-47   
   Liquidity and Capital Resources      47-53   
   2011 Outlook      53   
   Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements      54   
   Contingencies      54-56   
   Forward-Looking Statements      56-57   
Item 7A.    QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK      57   
Item 8.    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS      58-101   
Item 9.    CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE      102   
Item 9A.    CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES      102   
Item 9B.    OTHER INFORMATION      102   

 

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Table of Contents
     Page(s)  
PART III.   
Item 10.    DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE      103   
Item 11.    EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION      103   
Item 12.    SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS      103   
Item 13.    CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE      103   
Item 14.    PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES      103   
PART IV.   
Item 15.    EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES      104   
SIGNATURES      105   
INDEX TO EXHIBITS      106-109   
             

 

Exhibits
Filed Herewith

    
21    SUBSIDIARIES OF THE REGISTRANT
23.1    CONSENT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM – 2010 and 2009
31.1    Chief Executive Officer Certification Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
31.2    Chief Financial Officer Certification Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.1    Chief Executive Officer Certification Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
32.2    Chief Financial Officer Certification Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

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GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

The following terms, abbreviations and acronyms are used to identify frequently used terms in this report:

 

TERM

  

DEFINITION

ACNielsen    ACNielsen Corporation – a former affiliate of Old D&B
Analytics    Moody’s Analytics – reportable segment of MCO formed in January 2008 which combines MKMV, the sales of MIS research and other MCO non-rating commercial activities
AOCI    Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss); a separate component of shareholders’ equity (deficit)
ASC   

The FASB Accounting Standards Codification; the sole source of authoritative

GAAP as of July 1, 2009 except for rules and interpretive releases of the SEC, which are also sources of authoritative GAAP for SEC registrants

ASU    The FASB Accounting Standards Updates to the ASC. It also provides background information for accounting guidance and the bases for conclusions on the changes in the ASC. ASUs are not considered authoritative until codified into the ASC
Basel II    Capital adequacy framework published in June 2004 by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision
Board    The board of directors of the Company
Bps    Basis points
Canary Wharf Lease    Operating lease agreement entered into on February 6, 2008 for office space in London, England, occupied by the Company in the second half of 2009
CDOs    Collateralized debt obligations
CFG    Corporate finance group; an LOB of MIS
CMBS    Commercial mortgage-backed securities; part of CREF
Cognizant    Cognizant Corporation – a former affiliate of Old D&B, which comprised the IMS Health and NMR businesses
Commission    European Commission
Common Stock    The Company’s common stock
Company    Moody’s Corporation and its subsidiaries; MCO; Moody’s
Corporate Family Ratings    Rating opinion of a corporate family’s ability to honor all of its financial obligations which is assigned to the corporate family as if it had a single class of debt and a single consolidated legal entity structure. This rating is often issued in connection with ratings of leveraged finance transactions
COSO    Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission
CP    Commercial paper
CP Notes    Unsecured CP notes
CP Program    The Company’s CP program entered into on October 3, 2007
CRAs    Credit rating agencies
CREF    Commercial real estate finance which includes REITs, commercial real estate CDOs and CMBS; part of SFG
CSI    CSI Global Education, Inc.; an acquisition completed in November 2010; part of the MA segment; a provider of financial learning, credentials, and certification in Canada
D&B Business    Old D&B’s Dun & Bradstreet operating company
DBPPs    Defined benefit pension plans
DCF    Discounted cash flow; a fair value calculation methodology whereby future projected cash flows are discounted back to their present value using a discount rate
Debt/EBITDA    Ratio of Total Debt to EBITDA
Directors’ Plan    The 1998 Moody’s Corporation Non-Employee Directors’ Stock Incentive Plan
Distribution Date    September 30, 2000; the date which Old D&B separated into two publicly traded companies – Moody’s Corporation and New D&B

 

4   MOODY’S 2010 10-K


Table of Contents

TERM

  

DEFINITION

EBITDA    Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, amortization and extraordinary items
ECAIs    External Credit Assessment Institutions
ECB    European Central Bank
EMEA    Represents countries within Europe, the Middle East and Africa
Enb    Enb Consulting; an acquisition completed in December 2008; part of the MA segment; a provider of credit and capital markets training services
EPS    Earnings per share
ESPP    The 1999 Moody’s Corporation Employee Stock Purchase Plan
ETR    Effective Tax Rate
EU    European Union
EUR    Euros
Excess Tax Benefit    The difference between the tax benefit realized at exercise of an option or delivery of a restricted share and the tax benefit recorded at the time that the option or restricted share is expensed under GAAP
Exchange Act    The Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended
FASB    Financial Accounting Standards Board
Fermat    Fermat International; an acquisition completed in October 2008; part of the MA segment; a provider of risk and performance management software to the global banking industry
FIG    Financial institutions group; an LOB of MIS
Fitch    Fitch Ratings, a part of the Fitch Group which is a majority-owned subsidiary of Fimalac, S.A.
Financial Reform Act    Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act
FSF    Financial Stability Forum
FX    Foreign exchange
GAAP    U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
GBP    British pounds
G-8    The finance ministers and central bank governors of the group of eight countries consisting of Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, U.S. and U.K.
G-20    The G-20 is an informal forum that promotes open and constructive discussion between industrial and emerging-market countries on key issues related to global economic stability. By contributing to the strengthening of the international financial architecture and providing opportunities for dialogue on national policies, international co-operation, and international financial institutions, the G-20 helps to support growth and development across the globe. The G-20 is comprised of: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Turkey, U.K., U.S. and the EU, which is represented by the rotating Council presidency and the ECB
HFSC    House Financial Services Committee
IMS Health    A spin-off of Cognizant, which provides services to the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries
Indenture    Indenture and supplemental indenture dated August 19, 2010, relating to the 2010 Senior Notes
Indicative Ratings    These are ratings which are provided as of a point in time, and not published or monitored. They are primarily provided to potential or current issuers to indicate what a rating may be based on business fundamentals and financial conditions as well as based on proposed financings
Intellectual Property    The Company’s intellectual property, including but not limited to proprietary information, trademarks, research, software tools and applications, models and methodologies, databases, domain names, and other proprietary materials
IOSCO    International Organization of Securities Commissions
IOSCO Code    Code of Conduct Fundamentals for CRAs issued by IOSCO
IRS    Internal Revenue Service

 

MOODY’S 2010 10-K   5


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TERM

  

DEFINITION

Legacy Tax Matter(s)    Exposures to certain tax matters in connection with the 2000 Distribution
LIBOR    London Interbank Offered Rate
LOB    Line of Business
MA    Moody’s Analytics – a reportable segment of MCO formed in January 2008 which includes the non-rating commercial activities of MCO
Make Whole Amount    The prepayment penalty relating to the Series 2005-1 Notes and Series 2007-1 Notes; a premium based on the excess, if any, of the discounted value of the remaining scheduled payments over the prepaid principal
MCO    Moody’s Corporation and its subsidiaries; the Company; Moody’s
MD&A    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
MIS    Moody’s Investors Service – a reportable segment of MCO
MIS Code    Moody’s Investors Service Code of Professional Conduct
MKMV    Moody’s KMV – a reportable segment of MCO prior to January 2008
Moody’s    Moody’s Corporation and its subsidiaries; MCO; the Company
Net Income    Net income attributable to Moody’s Corporation, which excludes the portion of net income from consolidated entities attributable to non-controlling shareholders
New D&B    The New D&B Corporation – which comprises the D&B business after September 30, 2000
NM    Not-meaningful percentage change (over 400%)
NMR    Nielsen Media Research, Inc.; a spin-off of Cognizant; a leading source of television audience measurement services
NRSRO    Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organization
Old D&B    The former Dun and Bradstreet Company which distributed New D&B shares on September 30, 2000, and was renamed Moody’s Corporation
Post-Retirement Plans    Moody’s funded and unfunded U.S. pension plans, the U.S. post-retirement healthcare plans and the U.S. post-retirement life insurance plans
PPIF    Public, project and infrastructure finance; an LOB of MIS
Profit Participation Plan    Defined contribution profit participation plan that covers substantially all U.S. employees of the Company
PPP   

Profit Participation Plan

RD&A    Research, Data and Analytics; an LOB within MA that distributes investor-oriented research and data, including in-depth research on major debt issuers, industry studies, commentary on topical credit events, economic research and analytical tools such as quantitative risk scores
Reform Act    Credit Rating Agency Reform Act of 2006
REITs    Real estate investment trusts
Reorganization    The Company’s business reorganization announced in August 2007 which resulted in two new reportable segments (MIS and MA) beginning in January 2008
RMBS    Residential mortgage-backed securities; part of SFG
RMS    The Risk Management Software LOB within MA which provides both economic and regulatory capital risk management software and implementation services
S&P    Standard & Poor’s, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
SEC    Securities and Exchange Commission
Series 2005-1 Notes    Principal amount of $300.0 million, 4.98% senior unsecured notes due in September 2015 pursuant to the 2005 Agreement

 

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TERM

  

DEFINITION

Series 2007-1 Notes    Principal amount of $300.0 million, 6.06% senior unsecured notes due in September 2017 pursuant to the 2007 Agreement
SFG    Structured finance group; an LOB of MIS
SG&A    Selling, general and administrative expenses
Stock Plans    The Old D&B’s 1998 Key Employees’ Stock Incentive Plan and the Restated 2001 Moody’s Corporation Key Employees’ Stock Incentive Plan
T&E    Travel and entertainment expenses
TPE    Third party evidence, as defined in the ASC, used to determine selling price based on a vendor’s or any competitor’s largely interchangeable products or services in standalone sales transactions to similarly situated customers
Total Debt    Current and long-term portion of debt as reflected on the consolidated balance sheets, excluding current accounts payable and accrued liabilities incurred in the ordinary course of business
U.K.    United Kingdom
U.S.    United States
USD    U.S. dollar
UTBs    Unrecognized tax benefits
UTPs    Uncertain tax positions
VAT    Value added tax
VSOE    Vendor specific objective evidence; evidence, as defined in the ASC, of selling price limited to either of the following: the price charged for a deliverable when it is sold separately, or for a deliverable not yet being sold separately, the price established by management having the relevant authority
WACC    Weighted average cost of capital
1998 Plan    Old D&B’s 1998 Key Employees’ Stock Incentive Plan
2000 Distribution    The distribution by Old D&B to its shareholders of all of the outstanding shares of New D&B common stock on September 30, 2000

2000 Distribution

Agreement

   Agreement governing certain ongoing relationships between the Company and New D&B after the 2000 Distribution including the sharing of any liabilities for the payment of taxes, penalties and interest resulting from unfavorable IRS determinations on certain tax matters and certain other potential tax liabilities
2001 Plan    The Amended and Restated 2001 Moody’s Corporation Key Employees’ Stock Incentive Plan
2005 Agreement    Note purchase agreement dated September 30, 2005 relating to the Series 2005-1 Notes
2007 Agreement    Note purchase agreement dated September 7, 2007 relating to the Series 2007-1 Notes
2007 Facility    Revolving credit facility of $1 billion entered into on September 28, 2007, expiring in 2012
2007 Restructuring Plan    The Company’s 2007 restructuring plan approved December 31, 2007
2008 Term Loan    Five-year $150.0 million senior unsecured term loan entered into by the Company on May 7, 2008
2009 Restructuring Plan    The Company’s 2009 restructuring plan approved March 27, 2009
2010 Senior Notes    Principal amount of $500.0 million, 5.50% senior unsecured notes due in September 2010 pursuant to the Indenture
7WTC    The Company’s corporate headquarters located at 7 World Trade Center
7WTC Lease    Operating lease agreement entered into on October 20, 2006

 

MOODY’S 2010 10-K   7


Table of Contents

.

PART I

 

ITEM 1.   BUSINESS

BACKGROUND

As used in this report, except where the context indicates otherwise, the terms “Moody’s” or the “Company” refer to Moody’s Corporation, a Delaware corporation, and its subsidiaries. The Company’s executive offices are located at 7 World Trade Center at 250 Greenwich Street, New York, NY 10007 and its telephone number is (212) 553-0300. Prior to September 30, 2000, the Company operated as part of The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation.

THE COMPANY

Moody’s is a provider of (i) credit ratings, (ii) credit and economic related research, data and analytical tools, (iii) risk management software and (iv) quantitative credit risk measures, credit portfolio management solutions, training and financial credentialing and certification services. In 2007 and prior years, Moody’s operated in two reportable segments: Moody’s Investors Service and Moody’s KMV. Beginning in January 2008, Moody’s segments were changed to reflect the Reorganization announced in August 2007 and Moody’s now reports in two new reportable segments: MIS and Moody’s Analytics. As a result of the Reorganization, the rating agency remains in the MIS operating segment and several ratings business lines have been realigned. All of Moody’s other non-rating commercial activities are included within the new MA segment. Financial information and operating results of these segments, including revenue, expenses, operating income and total assets, are included in Part II, Item 8. Financial Statements of this annual report, and are herein incorporated by reference.

MIS, the credit rating agency, publishes credit ratings on a wide range of debt obligations and the entities that issue such obligations in markets worldwide, including various corporate and governmental obligations, structured finance securities and commercial paper programs. Revenue is derived from the originators and issuers of such transactions who use MIS ratings to support the distribution of their debt issues to investors. MIS provides ratings in more than 110 countries. Ratings are disseminated via press releases to the public through a variety of print and electronic media, including the Internet and real-time information systems widely used by securities traders and investors. As of December 31, 2010, MIS had ratings relationships with approximately 11,000 corporate issuers and approximately 22,000 public finance issuers. Additionally, the Company has rated and currently monitors ratings on approximately 102,000 structured finance obligations (representing approximately 15,000 transactions). The aforementioned amounts relating to the number of issuers and transactions represent issuers or transactions that had an active rating at any point during the year ended December 31, 2010. The MA segment develops a wide range of products and services that support the risk management activities of institutional participants in global financial markets. Within its Research, Data and Analytics business, MA distributes investor-oriented research and data developed by MIS as part of its ratings process, including in-depth research on major debt issuers, industry studies, commentary on topical credit related events and also provides economic research and credit data and analytical tools such as quantitative credit risk scores. Within its Risk Management Software business, MA provides both economic and regulatory capital risk management software and implementation services. Within its Professional Services business it provides quantitative credit risk measures, credit portfolio management solutions, training and financial credentialing and certification services. MA customers represent more than 4,100 institutions worldwide operating in approximately 115 countries. During 2010 Moody’s research web site was accessed by over 185,000 individuals including 27,000 client users.

The Company operated as part of “Old D&B” until September 30, 2000, when Old D&B separated into two publicly traded companies – Moody’s Corporation and New D&B. At that time, Old D&B distributed to its shareholders shares of New D&B stock. New D&B comprised the business of Old D&B’s Dun & Bradstreet operating company. The remaining business of Old D&B consisted solely of the business of providing ratings and related research and credit risk management services and was renamed Moody’s Corporation. For purposes of governing certain ongoing relationships between the Company and New D&B after the 2000 Distribution and to provide for an orderly transition, the Company and New D&B entered into various agreements including a distribution agreement, tax allocation agreement and employee benefits agreement.

 

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PROSPECTS FOR GROWTH

Over recent decades, global fixed-income markets have grown significantly in terms of outstanding principal amount and types of securities or other obligations. Beginning in mid-2007 there was a severe market disruption and decline in issuance activity for some significant asset classes of securities in the U.S. and internationally. Despite the market disruption, Moody’s believes that the overall long-term outlook remains favorable for continued secular growth of fixed-income markets worldwide. Moody’s business prospects correspond closely to the health of the world’s major economies and capital markets. Throughout 2010 there were signs of recovery in the U.S. economy while the global economy has been more volatile with European sovereign debt and related banking sector concerns offset by strong economic growth in emerging markets. Continued improvement of the U.S. economy and housing sector, specifically, along with the stabilization of the European sovereign debt concerns should influence the Company’s growth over the near term. Moody’s is well positioned to benefit from a long-term recovery in global credit market activity and a more informed use of credit ratings, research and related analytical products in an environment of renewed attention to risk analysis and risk management. Moody’s expects that these developments will support continued long-term demand for high-quality, independent credit opinions, research, data and risk management tools and services. An expectation of recovery-driven growth in capital market activity, supported by initiatives to increase market share, leverage pricing opportunities, capture disintermediation activity in developed and developing markets and develop additional data, research and rating products, represent key growth drivers for Moody’s.

Growth in global fixed-income markets is attributable to a number of forces and trends. Advances in information technology make information about investment alternatives widely available throughout the world. Technology facilitates issuers’ ability to place securities outside their national markets and investors’ capacity to obtain information about securities issued outside their national markets. Technology also allows issuers and investors the ability to more readily obtain information about new financing techniques and new types of securities that they may wish to purchase or sell, which in the absence of the appropriate technology may not be easily obtainable. This availability of information promotes the ongoing integration and development of worldwide financial markets and a greater need for credible, globally comparable opinions about credit risk. As a result, existing capital markets have expanded and a number of new capital markets have emerged. In addition, more issuers and investors are accessing developed capital markets. Information technology also provides opportunities to further build a global platform to support Moody’s continued expansion in developing markets.

Another trend in the world’s capital markets is the disintermediation of financial systems. Issuers increasingly raise capital in the global public capital markets, in addition to, or in substitution for, traditional financial intermediaries. Moreover, financial intermediaries have sold assets in the global public capital markets, in addition to or instead of retaining those assets. Recent credit market disruptions have slowed the trend of disintermediation globally, but Moody’s believes that debt capital markets offer advantages in capacity and efficiency compared to the traditional banking systems. Thus, disintermediation is expected to accelerate in the longer-term, with Moody’s continuing to target investment and resources to growing international markets where disintermediation and bond issuance should remain more robust.

The strong growth trend seen in the issuance of structured finance securities from the mid-1990’s reversed dramatically in 2008 due to market turmoil, with continued declines seen in 2009 and 2010. The market disruptions that escalated in 2008 are expected to continue in the immediate term, however Moody’s expects to see some revenue stabilization from this market in the future. Despite significant declines from peak market levels, Moody’s believes that structured finance securities will continue to play a role in global credit markets, and provide opportunities for longer term revenue growth. Moody’s will continue to monitor this market and adapt to meet the changing needs of its participants.

Rating fees paid by debt issuers account for most of the revenue of MIS. Therefore, a substantial portion of MIS’s revenue is dependent upon the dollar-equivalent volume and number of ratable debt securities issued in the global capital markets. MIS’s results can be affected by factors such as the performance, and the prospects for growth, of the major world economies, the fiscal and monetary policies pursued by their governments, and the decisions of issuers to request MIS ratings to aid investors in their investment decision process. However, annual fee arrangements with frequent debt issuers, annual debt monitoring fees and annual fees from commercial paper and medium-term note programs, bank and insurance company financial strength ratings, mutual fund ratings, subscription-based research and other areas partially mitigate MIS’s dependence on the volume or number of new debt securities issued in the global capital markets.

Moody’s operations are also subject to various risks inherent in conducting business internationally. Such risks include currency fluctuations and possible nationalization, expropriation, exchange and price controls, changes in the availability of data from public sector sources, limits on providing information across borders and other restrictive governmental actions. Management believes that the risks of nationalization or expropriation are reduced because the Company’s basic service is the creation and dissemination of information, rather than the production of products that require manufacturing facilities or the use of natural resources. However, the formation of, for example, a new government-sponsored regional or global rating agency would pose a risk to MIS’s growth prospects. Management believes that this risk, compared to other regulatory changes under consideration for the credit rating industry, is relatively low because of the likelihood that substantial investments over a sustained period would be required, with uncertainty about the likelihood of financial success for the entity.

 

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Legislative bodies and regulators in the U.S., Europe and selective other jurisdictions continue to conduct regulatory reviews of CRAs, which may result in, for example, an increased number of competitors, changes to the business model or restrictions on certain business activities of MIS, or increased costs of doing business for MIS. Therefore, in order to broaden the potential for expansion of non-ratings services, Moody’s reorganized in January 2008 into two distinct businesses: MIS, consisting solely of the ratings business, and MA. MA conducts all non-ratings activities including the sale of credit research produced by MIS and the production and sale of other economic and credit-related products and services. The reorganization broadens the opportunities for expansion by MA into activities which may have otherwise been restricted for MIS, due to the potential for conflicts of interest with the ratings business. At present, Moody’s is unable to assess the nature and effect that any regulatory changes may have on future growth opportunities.

MA expects to benefit from the growing demand among credit market participants for information that enables them to make sound investment and risk management decisions. These customers require advanced qualitative and quantitative tools to support their management of increasingly complex capital market instruments. Such complexity creates analytical challenges for market participants, including financial intermediaries, asset managers and other investors. In recent years, reliable third-party ratings and research served to supplement or substitute for traditional in-house research as the scale, geographic scope and complexity of financial markets grew. MA remains focused on driving improvements in customer retention, product placements and new customer acquisition in this area. Credit market conditions improved in 2010, helping to raise customer retention level after a period of higher than normal customer attrition in MA.

Growth in MA is also expected as financial institutions adopt active credit portfolio management practices and implement internal credit assessment tools for compliance with Basel II regulations. MA offers products that respond to these needs. This growth will be realized by, for example, the development of new private firm default probability models for specific countries and by expanding analysis capabilities of new asset classes.

The 2010 acquisition of CSI Global Education, Inc., Canada’s leading provider of financial learning, credentials and certification, strengthens MA’s capabilities for delivering credit training programs, and represents another means for the Company to pursue its objectives of enhancing risk management practices, furthering financial education and promoting efficiency in the capital markets.

COMPETITION

The MIS business competes with other CRAs and with investment banks and brokerage firms that offer credit opinions and research. Many users of MIS’s ratings also have in-house credit research capabilities. Moody’s largest competitor in the global credit rating business is Standard & Poor’s, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. There are some rating markets, based on industry, geography and/or instrument type, in which Moody’s has made investments and obtained market positions superior to S&P’s while in other markets, the reverse is true.

In addition to S&P, MIS’s competitors include Fitch, Dominion Bond Rating Service Ltd. of Canada, A.M. Best Company Inc, Japan Credit Rating Agency Ltd., Rating and Investment Information Inc. of Japan and Egan-Jones Ratings Company. In 2008 two more firms were granted the Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organizations status in the U.S: LACE Financial Corp. and Realpoint LLC. In 2010 these two firms were acquired by Kroll Bond Rating Agency, Inc. and Morningstar, Inc., respectively, to enable them to compete as NRSROs. Additional rating agencies may emerge in the U.S. as the SEC continues to expand the number of NRSROs. Other competition may arise in the U.S. from credit opinion providers who do not operate as NRSRO’s, such as Bloomberg. Competition may also increase in developed or developing markets outside the U.S. over the next few years as the number of rating agencies may increase, although a more regulated credit ratings industry, both in the U.S. and internationally, may provide for a less appealing expansion opportunity.

The increased regulatory focus on credit risk presents both opportunities and challenges for Moody’s. Global demand for credit ratings and risk management services may rise, but regulatory actions may result in a greater number of rating agencies and/or additional regulation of Moody’s and its competitors. Alternatively, banking or securities market regulators could seek to reduce the use of ratings in regulations, thereby reducing certain elements of demand for ratings, or otherwise seek to control the analysis or business of rating agencies.

Credit rating agencies such as MIS also compete with other means of managing credit risk, such as credit insurance. Competitors that develop quantitative methodologies for assessing credit risk also may pose a competitive threat to Moody’s.

MA competes broadly in the financial information space against diversified competitors such as Thomson-Reuters, Bloomberg, RiskMetrics, S&P, Fitch, Dun & Bradstreet, and Markit Group among others. MA’s main competitors within RD&A include S&P, Fitch Algorithmics, CreditSights, Thomson-Reuters, Intex, IHS Global Insight, BlackRock Solutions and other smaller boutique providers of fixed income analytics, valuations, economic data and research. In RMS, MA faces competition from Fitch Algorithmics, SunGard, SAS, Oracle and other various smaller vendors and in-house solutions. Within professional services, MA competes with Oliver Wyman for certain credit risk advisory services, with Omega Performance, DC Gardner, and a host of boutique providers for financial training.

 

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MOODY’S STRATEGY

Moody’s continues to follow growth strategies that adapt to market conditions and capitalize on emerging opportunities.

Given recent market turmoil, Moody’s immediate focus is on making effective business decisions to adapt to challenging economic, market and regulatory conditions while positioning the Company to benefit from gradual recovery in global credit market activity.

Given the renewed attention to risk analysis and risk management, Moody’s is committed to further encouraging the informed use of credit ratings, research and related analytics products.

Moody’s seeks to differentiate itself from incumbent and potential competitors with predictive, uniquely thoughtful and forward-looking opinions about credit and the credit industry.

Adapting to market changes is a key factor in maintaining market relevance. Moody’s continuously monitors opportunities to selectively diversify its revenue base through organic growth and acquisitions, in order to replace areas of lost revenue and position the Company for new sources of business.

In support of those goals Moody’s intends to continue its focus in the following areas:

Expansion in Financial Centers

Moody’s serves its customers through its global network of offices and business affiliations. Moody’s currently maintains comprehensive rating and commercial operations in financial centers including Beijing, Buenos Aires, Dubai, Frankfurt, Hong Kong, London, Madrid, Mexico City, Milan, Moscow, New York, Paris, Sao Paolo, Seoul, Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo and Toronto. Moody’s expects that its global network will position it to benefit from the expansion of worldwide capital markets and thereby increase revenue. Moody’s also expects that the growth of its MIS business in Europe will return once there is clarity on the resolution of the European sovereign debt crisis. Additionally, Moody’s expects to continue its expansion into developing markets either directly or through joint ventures. This will allow Moody’s to extend its credit opinion franchise to local and regional obligors, through domestic currency ratings and national scale ratings.

New Rating Products

Moody’s continues to respond to investor demand for new products and enhancements. In the recent market turmoil, attention to core strengths has been crucial and enhancements have and continue to be focused on quality and transparency. Given the particular disruption in the structured finance markets, MIS has been developing enhanced structured finance offerings to meet investor demands for more information content. Leveraging the diversity of its research data and analytics, Moody’s has introduced cross-sector analysis to better illustrate the broader impacts of recent market events. This is further enhanced by the incorporation of macroeconomics to frame conditions and assumptions. MIS continues to capitalize on market developments and enhance ratings surveillance efficiency, focusing on new ratings products and to identify, design, develop and maintain value-added research, analytics and data products serving the capital markets.

Internet-Enhanced Products and Services

Moody’s is expanding its use of the Internet and other electronic media to enhance customer service. The Company’s website provides the public with instant access to ratings and provides the public and subscribers with credit research and risk assessment tools. Internet delivery also enables Moody’s to provide services to more individuals within a customer organization and to offer higher-value services because of more timely delivery. Moody’s expects that access to these applications will increase customer use of the Company’s services. Moody’s expects to continue to invest in electronic media to capitalize on these and other opportunities.

Expansion of Credit Research Products and Investment Analytic Tools

Moody’s plans to expand its research and analytic services through internal development and potentially through acquisitions. Most new product initiatives are more analytical and data-intensive than traditional narrative research offerings. Such services address investor interest in replicating the types of monitoring activities conducted by Moody’s analysts and provide the means for customers to gain access to raw data and financial statistics and ratios used by MIS in the rating process for municipalities, companies and financial institutions. These products represent important sources of growth for MA’s RD&A business. MA is developing products in the fixed-income valuations and pricing arena that facilitate price transparency in global fixed income markets, especially for complex structured securities and derivative instruments. Moreover, Moody’s continues to pursue opportunities to extend its research relevance in new domestic or regional markets (e.g., China) as well as new functional markets (e.g., hedge funds).

New Quantitative Credit Risk Assessment Services

Moody’s will continue to provide banks and other institutions with quantitative credit risk assessment solutions. The Company believes that there will be increased demand for such services because they assist customers trading or holding credit-sensitive assets to better manage risk and deliver better performance. Also, international bank regulatory authorities are assessing the

 

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adequacy of banks’ internal credit risk management systems for the purpose of determining regulatory capital. The acquisition of Fermat in 2008 accelerated Moody’s capabilities in this area. Such regulatory initiatives create demand for, and encourage adoption of, related services by banks from third-party providers.

REGULATION

In the U.S., since 1975, MIS has been designated as an NRSRO by the SEC. The SEC first applied the NRSRO designation in that year to companies whose credit ratings could be used by broker-dealers for purposes of determining their net capital requirements. Since that time, Congress, the SEC and other governmental and private bodies have used the ratings of NRSROs to distinguish between “investment-grade” and “non-investment-grade” securities, among other purposes.

In September 2006, the Credit Rating Agency Reform Act of 2006 was passed, which created a voluntary registration process for rating agencies wishing to be designated as NRSROs. The Reform Act provided the SEC with authority to oversee NRSROs, while prohibiting the SEC from regulating the substance of credit ratings or the procedures and methodologies by which any NRSRO determines credit ratings. In June 2007, the SEC published its first set of rules implementing the Reform Act. These rules address the NRSRO application and registration process, as well as oversight rules related to recordkeeping, financial reporting, prevention of misuse of material non-public information, conflicts of interest, and prohibited acts and practices. In February 2009, the SEC published a second set of rules applicable to NRSROs, the majority of which provide requirements for managing conflicts of interest, enhancing record keeping requirements, and improving transparency of ratings performance and methodologies. In November 2009, the SEC published a third set of final rules for NRSROs. These rules, which came into force in June 2010, require additional disclosure of rating histories and prohibit NRSROs from rating structured finance products unless the issuer makes the same information accessible to all NRSROs that it provides to an NRSRO hired to determine the rating. In 2009, the SEC also determined to eliminate references to NRSRO ratings in certain regulations, retain some references and seek additional comments on other references.

MIS has been registered as an NRSRO with the SEC under the Exchange Act as of September 2007, and as of that time MIS has been subject to the SEC’s oversight rules described above. As required by the rules, MIS has made its Form NRSRO Initial Application, its Annual Certification of Form NRSRO, and any associated updates publicly available by posting it on the Regulatory Affairs page of the Company’s website.

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act was signed into law on July 21, 2010. The subtitle of the Financial Reform Act that addresses the CRA industry is Title IX, Subtitle C. This subtitle seeks, among other things, to enhance transparency and accountability in the credit rating agency industry, and to reduce the regulatory reliance on credit ratings. The majority of the provisions of Subtitle C of Title IX of the Financial Reform Act seek to regulate the activities of those CRAs that are registered under the SEC’s regulatory framework for NRSROs. Therefore, these provisions will apply to any CRAs in MIS’s corporate family that fall under the NRSRO regime.

Provisions of the Financial Reform Act applicable to NRSROs include, among others:

 

 

heightened compliance standards, including the adoption of enhanced corporate governance and conflicts of interest policies and procedures, implementation of professional standards for credit analysts and periodic compliance examinations;

 

 

increased public disclosures, including disclosure of the ratings process and methodology, factors relied upon in formulating ratings, results of third-party due diligence and accuracy of prior ratings;

 

 

replacement of references to credit ratings in certain federal laws with broader references to the “credit-worthiness” of a security;

 

 

a mandate that the SEC study the feasibility of establishing a system in which a utility or a self-regulatory organization assigns NRSROs to determine the credit ratings of structured finance products to address so-called “rating-shopping” by issuers and underwriters of structured financial products; and

 

 

rescission of Rule 436(g) under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “Securities Act”), which provided NRSROs with an exemption from expert liability under the Securities Act for ratings information included in registration statements.

Certain of the above mentioned provisions were effective immediately. These include provisions that potentially impact CRAs’ liability environment. The enhanced regulatory regime for CRAs could potentially increase the costs associated with the operation of a CRA and increase the legal risk associated with the issuance of credit ratings. Moreover, it is possible that the number of legal proceedings, especially as related to future ratings, may increase materially and the potential exposure of CRAs thereunder may also increase. It is possi-

 

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ble that implementing changes to the Company’s operations to address the changed liability environment may result in lower revenues and/or increased expenses and may significantly change the manner in which the Company conducts its credit rating business.

The majority of the provisions in the Financial Reform Act as it pertains to CRAs are to be implemented through rule-making by the SEC and other regulatory authorities. The SEC has published a schedule for its rule making activity over the coming year, and it appears that the majority of the rule-making as it pertains to the CRA industry will be conducted and completed in the first half of 2011. Specifically, the SEC has indicated that it expects to propose various rules for NRSROs to implement the relevant provisions of the Financial Reform Act before the end of March 2011. One provision that the SEC has already implemented, in accordance with the mandated time-line under the Financial Reform Act, is the elimination of the specific exemption from Regulation Fair Disclosure for information provided by issuers to CRAs, for the purpose of developing a rating.

In addition, the SEC has several pending rule proposals on CRAs, including: 1) a rule proposal to require disclosure about credit ratings when ratings are used in connection with the sale of registered securities; 2) a rule proposal regarding the NRSRO compliance function and disclosure about revenues received for credit rating services; and 3) rule proposals regarding structured finance regulations. In January 2011, the SEC adopted a rule, which will come into effect on September 26, 2011, requiring NRSROs to disclose information about the representations and warranties of the structured finance securities they rate. The bank regulators also have begun their rule making activities, and in October 2010 they closed a comment period requesting views from market participants on alternatives to credit ratings that could be incorporated into banking supervision. MIS and MA both provided comments, and these can be found on the Company’s website.

Finally, as part of the ongoing debate surrounding the financial crisis, MIS participated in a hearing held by the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission (“FCIC”) on June 2, 2010. The FCIC’s report and two dissenting opinions were published on January 27, 2011.

Internationally, several regulatory developments have occurred:

The G-8 and the G-20—In November 2008, the Heads of State of the G-20 reached agreement on a wide-ranging set of proposals to better regulate financial systems. Among other things, the G-20 committed to implement oversight of the CRAs, consistent with the strengthened International Organization of Securities Commissions’ Code of Conduct (see below) and agreed that, in the medium term, the countries should implement a registration system for CRAs. The G-20 also committed to formulate their regulations and other measures in a consistent manner and recommended that IOSCO review CRAs’ adoption of the standards and mechanisms for monitoring compliance. On April 2, 2009, the G-20 Heads of State meeting was held in London, where the G-20 provided a six-part action plan to address the financial crisis: (1) to restore confidence, growth, and jobs; (2) to repair the financial system to restore lending; (3) to strengthen financial regulation and rebuild trust; (4) to fund and reform international financial institutions to overcome the current crisis and prevent future ones; (5) to promote global trade and investment and reject protectionism; and (6) to build an inclusive, green, and sustainable recovery. The G-20’s plan also contains a number of provisions that are specific to CRAs. In particular, the G-20 member states agreed to extend regulatory oversight to and require registration of CRAs in order to ensure that they adhere to the international code of good practice. On July 10, 2009, the G-8 restated its commitment to implement the G-20’s statement.

In September 2009, the G-20 met in Pittsburgh and developed a progress report on actions to promote global financial regulatory reform. With respect to CRAs, the G-20 acknowledged that stronger oversight regimes for CRAs have been developed in the EU, the U.S. and Japan, and recognized that the development of good practices for due diligence by asset managers investing in structured finance products will result in reduced reliance on credit ratings. The G-20 also expressed concern about the creation of globally inconsistent regulations.

More recently, on October 23, 2010, the G-20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors met in Seoul, Korea in preparation for the November 2010 meeting of the G-20 Heads of State. Broadly, the Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors have agreed to continue to work in cooperation with one another. In advance of this meeting, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the Financial Stability Board (FSB) published a report and a statement, respectively with the FSB publishing a more detailed report on October 27, 2010. As pertaining to CRAs, both institutions advocate that governments reduce their reliance on credit ratings in regulation. While both entities acknowledge that the process will take time, they believe that the mechanistic use of ratings by governments should over time be discontinued.

IOSCO—In December 2004, the Technical Committee of IOSCO published its Code of Conduct Fundamentals for Credit Rating Agencies. In May 2008, IOSCO published the revised IOSCO Code. The changes made to the IOSCO Code broadly address greater transparency of methodologies and processes by CRAs. In July 2008, IOSCO also announced that it will monitor the CRAs implementation of the IOSCO Code changes and it will explore the means by which IOSCO members might work together to verify the proper and complete disclosure by CRAs of information required by the IOSCO Code.

On March 12, 2009, IOSCO published its second review of the CRAs implementation of the IOSCO Code. The report noted that seven out of the 21 CRAs reviewed had implemented the IOSCO Code in their own codes of conduct. In particular, MIS was found to have substantially implemented the 2008 revisions to the IOSCO Code. In addition, IOSCO announced the establishment of a new standing committee that will address global issues regarding the CRA industry.

 

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MIS has revised its Code of Professional Conduct (fashioned on the IOSCO Code) on several occasions to reflect the changes made to the IOSCO Code and the broader changes in the regulatory environment for CRAs. Beginning in 2006, MIS has annually published a report that describes its implementation of its Code. The MIS Code and implementation reports can be found on the Company’s website.

EU—In late April 2009, the European Parliament voted and passed a new regulation (“EU Regulation”) that establishes an oversight regime for the CRA industry in the European Union. The framework for the EU Regulation requires the registration, formal regulation and periodic inspection of CRAs operating in the EU. The EU Regulation also sets out specific requirements for the use of ratings that are produced outside of the EU and used for regulatory purposes in the EU. Among these is a requirement for the relevant competent authority in the EU and the competent authority of the non-EU jurisdiction where that rating has been produced to enter into a cooperation agreement containing provisions related to the exchange of information and the coordination of supervisory activities. At this time it is too early to give a more precise assessment of the impact of the EU Regulation on MIS. The Company expects that there will be increases in our operational and compliance costs on a one-time and recurring basis. In addition, the European Securities and Market Authority (ESMA) was established in January 2011, and will have direct supervisory responsibility for the CRA industry in the EU. It is expected to be fully operational by June 2011. Also, the regulatory framework of the CRA industry continues to be discussed in the European Union. The European Commission recently published a consultation document on the need for additional measures to supervise the CRA industry and the European Parliament is debating and modifying an Own Initiative Report on the topic. MIS’s response to the Commission’s consultation document can be found on the Company’s website. Among the issues being debated are the issuer-pay business model, use of ratings in regulation, sovereign ratings, competition and CRAs’ liability environment. It is expected that in the near future the European Commission will publish a proposal for additional regulation that will consider some or all of these topics.

The Basel Committee—In June 2004, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision published a bank capital adequacy framework, called Basel II, to replace its initial 1988 framework. Under Basel II, ratings assigned by recognized CRAs or ECAIs, can be used by banks in determining credit risk weights for many of their institutional credit exposures. Recognized ECAIs could be subject to a broader range of oversight. National authorities have begun the ECAI recognition process. MIS has been recognized as an ECAI in several jurisdictions and the recognition process is ongoing in many others. As a result of the recent developments in the financial markets, the banking authorities of the Basel Committee have been reconsidering the overall framework. Work on the new framework, Basel III, substantially has been completed. It is to be implemented in stages, beginning in 2010 and concluding in 2018. Basel III continues to use credit ratings as a tool in bank supervision.

Other legislation and regulation relating to credit rating and research services is being considered by local, national and multinational bodies and this type of activity is likely to continue in the future. In addition, in certain countries, governments may provide financial or other support to locally-based rating agencies. For example, governments may from time to time establish official rating agencies or credit ratings criteria or procedures for evaluating local issuers. If enacted, any such legislation and regulation could change the competitive landscape in which MIS operates. The legal status of rating agencies has been addressed by courts in various decisions and is likely to be considered and addressed in legal proceedings from time to time in the future. Management of MIS cannot predict whether these or any other proposals will be enacted, the outcome of any pending or possible future legal proceedings, or regulatory or legislative actions, or the ultimate impact of any such matters on the competitive position, financial position or results of operations of Moody’s.

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY

Moody’s and its affiliates own and control a variety of intellectual property, including but not limited to proprietary information, trademarks, research, software tools and applications, models and methodologies, databases, domain names, and other proprietary materials (“Intellectual Property”) that, in the aggregate, are of material importance to Moody’s business. Management of Moody’s believes that each of the trademarks and related corporate names, marks and logos containing the term “Moody’s” are of material importance to the Company. The Company, primarily through Moody’s Analytics, licenses certain of its databases, software applications, credit risk models, training courses in credit risk and capital markets, research and other publications and services that contain Intellectual Property to its customers. These licenses are provided pursuant to standard fee-bearing agreements containing customary restrictions and intellectual property protections. In addition, Moody’s is licensed to use certain technology and other intellectual property rights owned and controlled by third parties. Specifically, Moody’s licenses financial information (including market and index data, financial statement data, third-party research, default data, and security identifiers), as well as software applications. The Company obtains such technology and intellectual property rights from a variety of sources. The Company considers its Intellectual Property to be proprietary, and Moody’s relies on a combination of copyright, trademark, trade secret, patent, non-disclosure and other contractual safeguards for protection. Moody’s also pursues instances of third-party infringement of its Intellectual Property in order to protect the Company’s rights.

The names of Moody’s products and services referred to herein are trademarks, service marks or registered trademarks or service marks owned by or licensed to Moody’s or one or more of its subsidiaries.

 

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EMPLOYEES

As of December 31, 2010 the number of full-time equivalent employees of Moody’s was approximately 4,500.

AVAILABLE INFORMATION

Moody’s investor relations Internet website is http://ir.moodys.com/. Under the “SEC Filings” tab at this website, the Company makes available free of charge its annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after they are filed with, or furnished to, the SEC.

The SEC maintains an internet site that contains annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy and other information statements that the Company files electronically with the SEC. The SEC’s internet site is http://www.sec.gov/.

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

 

NAME, AGE AND POSITION                                                                   

BIOGRAPHICAL DATA                                                                                                                                                

 

Mark E. Almeida, 51 President—Moody’s Analytics

Mr. Almeida has served as President of Moody’s Analytics since January 2008. Prior to this position, Mr. Almeida was Senior Vice President of Moody’s Corporation from August 2007 to January 2008, Senior Managing Director of the Investor Services Group (ISG) at Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. from December 2004 to January 2008 and was Group Managing Director of ISG from June 2000 to December 2004. Mr. Almeida joined Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. in April 1988 and has held a variety of positions with the company in both the U.S. and overseas.

 

Richard Cantor, 53 Chief Risk Officer

Mr. Cantor has served as Chief Risk Officer of Moody’s Corporation since December 2008 and as Chief Credit Officer of Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. since November 2008. From July 2008 to November 2008, Mr. Cantor served as Acting Chief Credit Officer. Prior thereto, Mr. Cantor was Managing Director of Moody’s Credit Policy Research Group from June 2001 to July 2008 and Senior Vice President in the Financial Guarantors Rating Group. Mr. Cantor joined Moody’s in 1997 from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, where he served as Assistant Vice President in the Research Group and was Staff Director at the Discount Window. Prior to the Federal Reserve, Mr. Cantor taught Economics at UCLA and Ohio State and has taught on an adjunct basis at the business schools of Columbia University and New York University.

 

Robert Fauber, 40 Senior Vice President—Corporate Development

Mr. Fauber has served as Senior Vice President—Corporate Development of Moody’s Corporation since April 2009 and as Vice President-Corporate Development since he joined Moody’s in September 2005 to April 2009. Prior to joining Moody’s, Mr. Fauber served in several roles at Citigroup from 1999 to 2005, including most recently, Director of Planning and Business Development for Citigroup’s Alternative Investments division. Prior to that, Mr. Fauber worked as a Director in Corporate Strategy & Business Development for Citigroup and a Vice President and Associate in the Financial Sponsor and Telecom investment banking groups at the firm’s Salomon Smith Barney subsidiary. From 1992-1996, Mr. Fauber worked at NationsBank (now Bank of America), working in the middle market commercial banking group and also ran the firm’s Global Finance college recruiting program in 1997.

 

John J. Goggins, 50 Senior Vice President and General Counsel

Mr. Goggins has served as the Company’s Senior Vice President and General Counsel since October 1, 2000. Mr. Goggins joined Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. in February 1999 as Vice President and Associate General Counsel. Prior thereto, he served as counsel at Dow Jones & Company from 1995 to 1999, where he was responsible for securities, acquisitions and general corporate matters. Prior to Dow Jones, he was an associate at Cadwalader, Wickersham & Taft from 1985 to 1995, where he specialized in mergers and acquisitions.

 

Linda S. Huber, 52 Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Ms. Huber has served as the Company’s Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since May 2005. Prior thereto, she served as Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer at U.S. Trust Company, a subsidiary of Charles Schwab & Company, Inc., from

 

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NAME, AGE AND POSITION                                                                   

BIOGRAPHICAL DATA                                                                                                                                                

 

 

2003 to 2005. Prior to U.S. Trust, she was Managing Director at Freeman & Co. from 1998 through 2002. She served PepsiCo as Vice President of Corporate Strategy and Development from 1997 until 1998 and as Vice President and Assistant Treasurer from 1994 until 1997. She served as Vice President in the Energy Investment Banking Group at Bankers Trust Company from 1991 until 1994 and as an Associate in the Energy Group at First Boston Corporation from 1986 through 1990. She also held the rank of Captain in the U.S. Army where she served from 1980 to 1984.

 

Michel Madelain, 55 President and Chief Operating Officer—Moody’s Investors Service

Mr. Madelain has served as President of Moody’s Investors Service Inc. since November 2010 and as Chief Operating Officer since May 2008. Prior to this, Mr. Madelain served as Executive Vice President, Fundamental Ratings from September 2007 to May 2008, with responsibility for all Global Fundamental Ratings, including Corporate Finance, Financial Institutions, Public Finance and Infrastructure Finance. He managed the Financial Institutions group from March 2007 until September 2007. Mr. Madelain served as Group Managing Director, EMEA Corporate Ratings from November 2000 to March 2007 and prior thereto held several Managing Director positions in the U.S. and U.K. Fundamental Rating Groups. Prior to joining Moody’s in 1994, Mr. Madelain served as a Partner of Ernst & Young, Auditing Practice. Mr. Madelain is qualified as a Chartered Accountant in France.

 

Joseph (Jay) McCabe, 60 Senior Vice President—Corporate Controller

Mr. McCabe has served as the Company’s Senior Vice President—Corporate Controller since December 2005. Mr. McCabe joined Moody’s in July 2004 as Vice President and Corporate Controller. Before joining the Company, he served as Vice President—Corporate Controller at PPL Corporation, an energy and utility holding company, from 1994 to 2003. Prior to PPL Corporation, he served Deloitte & Touche as Partner from 1984 to 1993 and as a member of the firm’s audit practice from 1973 to 1984.

 

Raymond W. McDaniel, Jr., 53 Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Raymond W. McDaniel, Jr., has served as the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Company since April 2005 and serves on the MIS and International Business Development Committees of the Board of Directors. Mr. McDaniel served as the Company’s President from October 2004 until April 2005 and the Company’s Chief Operating Officer from January 2004 until April 2005. He has served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Moody’s Investors Service, Inc., a subsidiary of the Company, since October 2007 and held the additional title of President from November 2001 to August 2007 and December 2008 to November 2010. Mr. McDaniel served as the Company’s Executive Vice President from April 2003 to January 2004, and as Senior Vice President, Global Ratings and Research from November 2000 until April 2003. He served as Senior Managing Director, Global Ratings and Research, of Moody’s Investors Service from November 2000 until November 2001 and as Managing Director, International from 1996 to November 2000. Mr. McDaniel currently is a Director of John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

 

Lisa S. Westlake, 49 Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resource Officer

Ms. Westlake has served as the Company’s Senior Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer since November 2008. Prior to this position, Ms. Westlake served as Vice President—Investor Relations from December 2006 to December 2008 and Managing Director—Finance from September 2004 to December 2006. Prior to joining the Company, Ms. Westlake was a senior consultant with the Schiff Consulting Group from 2003 to 2004. From 1996 to 2003 Ms. Westlake worked at American Express Company where she held several different positions such as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer for the OPEN Business Network, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer for Establishment Services and Vice President and Chief Financial Officer for Relationship Services. From 1989 to 1995 Ms. Westlake held a range of financial management positions at Dun & Bradstreet Corporation and its subsidiary at the time, IMS International. From 1984 to 1987 Ms. Westlake served at Lehman Brothers in both the investment banking and municipal trading areas.

 

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ITEM 1A.   RISK FACTORS

The following risk factors and other information included in this annual report on Form 10-K should be carefully considered. The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones the Company faces. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known to the Company or that the Company’s management currently deems minor or insignificant also may impair its business operations. If any of the following risks occur, Moody’s business, financial condition, operating results and cash flows could be materially adversely affected.

Laws and Regulations Affecting the Credit Rating Industry are Rapidly Evolving and May Negatively Impact the Nature and Economics of the Company’s Business

Credit rating agencies are regulated in both the U.S. and in other countries (including by state and local authorities). Over the past few years, many jurisdictions have adopted or proposed new laws and regulations that impact the operation of credit rating agencies and the markets for securities that are rated. Additional laws and regulations have been proposed or are being considered, and further legislation or regulation may be proposed or implemented in the future. Some of the more prominent developments are discussed below or under the section entitled “Regulation” in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-K. These laws and regulations are intended to cause, or may result in, increased competition in the credit rating business. In addition, these laws or regulations may cause or result in (i) alternatives to credit ratings, (ii) regulations or restrictions on how information is used in the development or maintenance of credit ratings, (iii) increased regulatory oversight of the credit markets and credit rating agency operation, or (iv) changes in the pricing of credit ratings. All of these items could result in an increase in costs that Moody’s may not be able to pass through to customers and a decrease in the demand for or changes in the use of credit ratings.

New pleading and liability standards that have been adopted in the U.S. and proposed elsewhere potentially subject credit rating agencies to a greater number of legal proceedings claiming liability for losses suffered by investors on rated securities, could result in such legal proceedings continuing for a greater period of time before being resolved, and could result in increased uncertainty over and exposure to liability of credit rating agencies. As new laws and regulations applicable to credit ratings and rating agencies rapidly evolve, the costs of compliance is expected to increase, and Moody’s may not be able to pass on these costs through the pricing of its services. In addition, there may be greater uncertainty over the scope, interpretation and administration of new laws and regulations, which may increase compliance costs and increase the possibility of fines, penalties or other sanctions (including restrictions on activities) being imposed.

Given the comparatively recent adoption and the number of additional reforms that have been or will be adopted, including those under the legislative and regulatory initiatives discussed below, Moody’s is unable to accurately assess the future impact of any regulatory changes that may result or the impact on Moody’s competitive position or its current practices. Although these recent and pending legislative and regulatory initiatives apply to rating agencies and credit markets generally, they may affect Moody’s in a disproportionate manner. Responding to these developments will increase Moody’s fixed and variable costs of operations, perhaps to a degree that is significantly greater than Moody’s currently expects, and Moody’s may not be able to pass through or otherwise recoup such costs. These developments may alter MIS’s communications with issuers as part of the rating assignment process, alter the manner in which MIS’s ratings are developed, assigned and communicated, and decrease demand or affect the manner in which MIS or its customers or users of credit ratings operate, and alter the economics of the credit ratings business, including by restricting or mandating the business models under which a rating agency is permitted to operate. Moody’s stock price may also be affected by speculation regarding legislative and regulatory initiatives and their potential impact on Moody’s business and by increased uncertainty over potential liability and adverse legal or judicial determinations. Each of these developments increase the costs and legal risk associated with the issuance of credit ratings and may negatively impact Moody’s operations or profitability, the Company’s ability to compete, or result in changes in the demand for credit ratings, in the manner in which ratings are utilized and in the manner in which Moody’s operates in ways that cannot presently be predicted.

In the U.S., MIS is designated as an NRSRO pursuant to SEC regulations adopted under the Reform Act. One of the central tenets of the Reform Act was to encourage competition among rating agencies. The Reform Act established standards for the SEC to have direct jurisdiction over credit rating agencies that seek NRSRO status and to inspect their operations.

In the U.S., one of the tenets of the recently enacted Financial Reform Act is that credit rating agencies perform a “gatekeeper” role and should be subject to enhanced oversight standards that could result in enhanced liability. The Financial Reform Act amends a number of laws and regulations, requires the SEC to adopt a number of rules affecting rating agencies and the use of credit ratings, especially in structured finance markets, and authorizes a number of studies relating to the operations and legal standards applicable to CRAs. Provisions of the Financial Reform Act and other rules that may be adopted by the SEC in furtherance of the Financial Reform Act that pose risks to the Company’s business include, among others:

 

 

heightened compliance standards;

 

 

increased disclosure obligations;

 

 

provisions seeking to diminish regulatory and investor reliance on credit ratings;

 

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rules potentially mandating disclosure of sensitive issuer information provided to CRAs for the purpose of developing a rating;

 

 

a mandate that the SEC study the feasibility of establishing a system in which a utility or a self-regulatory organization assigns NRSROs to determine the credit ratings of structured finance products to address so-called “rating-shopping” by issuers and underwriters of structured financial products; and

 

 

changes to the pleading standards and, by repealing Rule 436(g) under the Securities Act, the liability standards under the federal securities laws if a CRA consents to have a rating included in a registration statement or prospectus.

The Financial Reform Act rescission of Rule 436(g) under the Securities Act, which was an exemption from expert liability under the Securities Act for ratings information included in registration statements, could impact Moody’s in a number of ways. SEC rules relating to offerings of asset-backed securities that are registered with the SEC require certain disclosures regarding credit ratings if, as is common in the market for such securities, the issuance or sale of any class of such asset-backed securities is conditioned on the assignment of a rating by one or more rating agencies. As a result of the repeal of Rule 436(g) under the Securities Act and accordingly the imposition of a heightened liability standard that would result from such disclosures, MIS and other credit rating agencies have declined to consent to issuers of such securities making such disclosures regarding their ratings. The staff of the SEC has informally advised issuers of asset-backed securities that, pending further review of rulemaking required under the Financial Reform Act, the SEC staff will not recommend enforcement action if an issuer omits the ratings disclosure required by SEC rules for registered offerings of asset-backed securities. If the SEC staff position were reversed or if SEC rules otherwise were adopted or applied in a manner that resulted in rating agencies being subject to heightened standards of liability in such offerings, it could adversely impact the volume of securities sold in such offerings, demand for MIS’s ratings, the pricing structure for ratings issued by MIS and/or Moody’s exposure to liability and could have other effects that Moody’s is not able to predict, any of which could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business.

In addition, in October 2009, the SEC proposed a rule providing that, if credit ratings are used in connection with an offering of any other type of security that is registered under the Securities Act (which as proposed would include use of a credit rating for certain unregistered securities offerings that are subsequently subject to a registered exchange offer), the ratings must be included in the registration statement. If adopted, this proposal, coupled with the Financial Reform Act’s rescission of Rule 436(g), would mean that common practices used in the U.S. to market and sell securities in such offerings would have to be altered unless MIS or other credit rating agencies consented to subject themselves to expert liability provisions of the Securities Act with respect to their credit ratings. Adoption of this or a similar rule could impact the volume of securities sold in such offerings, demand for MIS’s ratings, the pricing structure for ratings issued by MIS and/or Moody’s exposure to liability and could have other effects that Moody’s is not able to predict, any of which could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business.

Both the G-8 and the G-20 have sought to analyze and arrive at a consistent approach for addressing the various areas of the financial market and have made a variety of recommendations as to regulation of rating agencies and the markets for ratings. Specifically, the G-20 has also agreed to require the registration of rating agencies in their home jurisdiction. As a result of the internationally coordinated approach, countries other than the U.S. (which as noted above had already adopted a registration regime for NRSROs) have begun the process of implementing registration regimes for the oversight of CRAs. In particular, the EU adopted a new regulatory framework for rating agencies operating in the EU. The regulation seeks to introduce a common EU regulatory approach to the oversight of CRAs. Its primary objective is to enhance the integrity, transparency, responsibility, governance and reliability of credit rating activities, by establishing conditions for the issuance of credit ratings and rules on the organization and conduct of credit rating agencies, including restrictions on certain activities that are deemed to create a conflict of interest and special requirements for the rating of structured finance instruments. The regulation became fully effective on September 6, 2010. MIS applied for registration in August 2010.

In addition, the European Securities and Market Authority has been formed which is expected to be fully operational in June 2011 and will have direct supervisory authority for CRAs in the EU.

The European Commission has also published a consultation paper that discusses:

 

 

the potential for increasing the liability or changing the basis of liability of CRAs for their ratings;

 

 

the issuer-pay CRA business model;

 

 

amending existing regulations to reduce reliance on ratings by governments and regulated industries;

 

 

proposed changes to the business model associated with the rating of sovereigns; and

 

 

increasing competition among CRAs;

The EU Parliament is working on its own report discussing a number of these issues.

 

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The foregoing initiatives, if implemented and depending on their terms, could negatively impact Moody’s operations or profitability, ability to compete or the markets for its products and services in ways that Moody’s presently is unable to predict. In particular, exposure to increased liability under future EU regulation may further increase costs and legal risks associated with the issuance of credit ratings and materially and adversely affect Moody’s results of operations.

In addition to the foregoing, in the wake of the credit crisis, legislative and regulatory bodies in both the U.S. and in other countries have adopted or are studying or pursuing new laws and regulations addressing CRAs and the use of credit ratings, particularly in the area of structured finance securities, and the role of CRAs leading up to the credit crisis.

Moody’s believes that there is still the potential for additional rulemaking that can significantly impact Moody’s business. It is likely that other jurisdictions will adopt additional laws or regulations affecting Moody’s operations or the markets for its products and services. This could include adopting regulations that affect the need for debt securities to be rated, establish criteria for credit ratings or authorize only certain entities to provide credit ratings. However, Moody’s cannot predict the extent of the regulations that may be implemented, or the effect that they may have on Moody’s operations or the potential for increased exposure to liability.

Exposure to Litigation Related to Moody’s Rating Opinions

Moody’s has received subpoenas and inquiries from states attorneys general and governmental authorities as part of ongoing investigations following the credit crisis, and is responding to those inquiries. In addition, Moody’s faces a greater amount of litigation than has historically been the case from parties claiming damages relating to ratings actions, as well as other related business practices. Due to the difficult economic times and turbulent markets over the last several years, the market value of credit-dependent instruments has declined and defaults have increased, significantly increasing the number of legal proceedings, including investigations, Moody’s is currently facing. These proceedings impose additional expenses on the Company, which may increase over time as these matters progress procedurally, require the attention of senior management to an extent that may significantly reduce their ability to devote time addressing other business issues, and, given the number of these proceedings, present a greater risk that Moody’s may be subject to fines or damages if Moody’s is deemed to have violated any laws or regulations. In jurisdictions outside the U.S., these types of proceedings may increase or become more costly because foreign jurisdictions may not have legal protections or liability standards comparable to those that currently exist in the U.S. (such as protections for the expression of credit opinions as provided by the First Amendment) and may pose a greater risk of criminal rather than civil penalties. These risks often are and may continue to be difficult to assess or quantify. Moody’s may not have adequate insurance or reserves to cover these risks, and their existence and magnitude often remains unknown for substantial periods of time. Furthermore, to the extent that Moody’s is unable to achieve dismissals from the various litigation at an early stage and matters proceed to trial, the aggregate legal defense costs to be incurred by Moody’s could increase substantially, regardless of the ultimate outcome.

In addition, as discussed above, the Financial Reform Act revised pleading and liability standards and other provisions potentially subjecting CRAs to increased liability under securities law claims. The Financial Reform Act and regulations that will be adopted as a result of it may result in a material increase in the number of legal proceedings, especially as related to future ratings, and, together with judicial decisions under the Financial Reform Act and under pre-existing legal standards, may increase the potential legal exposure of CRAs. Changes in liability standards applicable in markets outside the U.S. also could create a greater potential for liability from operating in such markets. The Company believes that adoption of these provisions could negatively impact credit markets, including causing CRAs to cease to issue ratings on certain securities or issuers, increasing the cost of ratings, delaying issuances of ratings and restricting the public availability of ratings, which changes could materially negatively impact the Company’s business and prospects. It is possible that implementing changes to the Company’s operations to address the changed pleading and liability standards may result in lower revenues and/or increased expenses that the Company may not be able to recoup or offset, which could be material, and the Company may not be successful in avoiding or mitigating the impact of the heightened or changed pleading and liability standards.

Changes in the Volume of Debt Securities Issued in Domestic and/or Global Capital Markets and Changes in Interest Rates and Other Volatility in the Financial Markets

Approximately 57% of MIS’s revenue for 2010 was transaction-based, compared to 50% of MIS’s revenue in 2009 and 49% of MIS’s revenue in 2008. Revenue from rating transactions is dependent on the number and dollar volume of debt securities issued in the capital markets. Accordingly, any conditions that either reduce investor demand for debt securities or reduce issuers’ willingness or ability to issue such securities could reduce the number and dollar-equivalent volume of debt issuances for which MIS provides ratings services and thereby have an adverse effect on the fees derived from the issuance of ratings.

A significant disruption in world financial markets, particularly in the credit markets, began in mid-2007, when many credit markets experienced a severe lack of liquidity. This disruption continues to be felt as the markets gradually recover. Credit market disruptions together with an economic slowdown have negatively impacted the volume of debt securities issued in global capital markets and the demand for credit ratings. Notwithstanding a strong increase in debt issuances in the corporate, financial institutions and U.S. public finance sectors in 2010, future debt issuances could be negatively affected by a sharp increase in long-term interest rates or factors which cause instability or volatility in the global capital markets. New debt issuances in the structured finance market are likely to con-

 

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tinue to be significantly below peak levels reached in the middle of the past decade. Consequently, the Company has experienced a reduction in the overall demand for rating newly issued debt securities. Changes in the markets for such securities and in the role and regulation of rating agencies may materially adversely affect the Company even if the volume of securities issuances in all sectors recovers to or exceeds those experienced prior to 2007.

The timing, nature, extent and sustainability of any recovery in the credit and other financial markets remains uncertain, and there can be no assurance that overall market conditions will improve in the future, that recent improvements will be sustained or that Moody’s financial results will not continue to be adversely affected. A sustained period of market decline or weakness, especially if it relates to credit sensitive securities, for which there was historically a high level of demand for ratings, could have a material adverse effect on Moody’s business and financial results. Initiatives that the Company has undertaken to reduce costs may not be sufficient, and further cost reductions may be difficult or impossible to obtain in the near term, due in part to rent, technology, compliance and other fixed costs associated with some of the Company’s operations as well as the need to monitor outstanding ratings. Further, the cost-reduction initiatives undertaken to date could result in strains in the Company’s operations if the credit markets and demand for ratings in all sectors return to levels that prevailed prior to mid-2007 or otherwise unexpectedly increase. Other factors that could further reduce investor demand for debt securities or reduce issuers’ willingness or ability to issue such securities include increases in interest rates or credit spreads, continued volatility in financial markets or the interest rate environment, significant regulatory, political or economic events, the use of alternative sources of credit including financial institutions and government sources, defaults of significant issuers and other unfavorable market and economic conditions.

Furthermore, issuers of debt securities may elect to issue securities without ratings or securities which are rated or evaluated by non-traditional parties such as financial advisors, rather than traditional credit rating agencies, such as MIS. Changing regulatory considerations and other market developments could negatively affect the demand for credit ratings even if debt security issuances and activities increase. As such, no assurance can be given as to the amount of revenues that may be derived therefrom.

Legal, Economic and Regulatory Risks of Operating in Foreign Jurisdictions

Moody’s maintains offices outside the U.S. and derives a significant portion of its revenue from sources outside the U.S. In addition to the regulatory risks discussed above, operations in different countries expose Moody’s to a number of legal, economic and regulatory risks such as restrictions on the ability to convert local currency into U.S. dollars and currency fluctuations; U.S. laws affecting overseas operations including domestic and foreign export and import restrictions, tariffs and other trade barriers; political and economic instability; the possibility of nationalization, expropriation, price controls and other restrictive governmental actions; longer payment cycles and possible problems in collecting receivables; and potentially adverse tax consequences.

In its non-U.S. operations, Moody’s is subject to regulations applicable under the Office of Foreign Asset Control, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”) and other anti-corruption laws that generally prohibit U.S. companies and their intermediaries from offering, promising, authorizing or making improper payments to foreign government officials (which may include companies affiliated with foreign governments) for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Violations of the FCPA and other anti-corruption laws may result in severe criminal and civil sanctions as well as other penalties and the SEC and U.S. Department of Justice have increased their enforcement activities with respect to the FCPA. Internal controls, policies and procedures and employee training and compliance programs that the Company has implemented to deter prohibited practices may not be effective in prohibiting its employees, contractors or agents from violating or circumventing its policies and the law. If Moody’s employees or agents fail to comply with applicable laws or Company policies governing its international operations, the Company may face investigations, prosecutions and other legal proceedings and actions which could result in civil penalties, administrative remedies and criminal sanctions. Any determination that the Company has violated the FCPA could have a material adverse effect on Moody’s financial condition. Compliance with international and U.S. laws and regulations that apply to the Company’s international operations increases the cost of doing business in foreign jurisdictions.

In addition to competition from other rating agencies that operate in a number of international jurisdictions and specialized companies that provide ratings for particular types of financial products or issuers (such as A.M. Best Company, Inc., with respect to the insurance industry), in many foreign countries MIS competes with rating agencies that may have a stronger local presence and greater familiarity or a longer operating history in those markets. These local providers or comparable competitors that may emerge in the future may receive support from local governments or other institutions that MIS does not receive, putting MIS at a competitive disadvantage.

Increased Pricing Pressure from Competitors and/or Customers

In the credit rating, research and credit risk management markets, competition for customers and market share has spurred more aggressive tactics by some competitors in areas such as pricing and service, as well as increased competition from non-NRSROs that evaluate debt risk for issuers or investors. At the same time, bankruptcies and consolidation of customers, particularly those involved in structured finance products, and other factors affecting demand may enhance the market power of customers. While Moody’s seeks to compete primarily on the basis of the quality of its products and service, if its pricing and services are not sufficiently competitive with its current and future competitors, Moody’s may lose market share. In addition, one of the central goals of the Reform Act was to encourage competition among rating agencies. The formation of additional NRSROs may increase pricing, as well as other competitive pressures.

 

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Exposure to Reputational and Credibility Concerns

Moody’s reputation is one of the key bases on which the Company competes. To the extent that the rating agency business as a whole or Moody’s, relative to its competitors, has suffered a loss in credibility in the course of the credit crisis, or, in the future, suffers a loss in credibility, Moody’s business could be adversely affected. Factors that may have already affected credibility and could potentially continue to have an impact in this regard include the appearance of a conflict of interest, the performance of securities relative to the rating assigned to such securities by a particular rating agency, the timing and nature of changes in ratings, adverse publicity as to the ratings process, a major compliance failure, publicity associated with ongoing litigation and new laws and regulations and increased criticism by users of ratings, regulators and legislative bodies. These concerns may be disclosed or highlighted in the course of various investigations or lawsuits that have been or may be instituted, through legislative or regulatory hearings or special studies that are mandated by legislation, or through journalists or others attempting to chronicle or report on the recent credit crisis.

Introduction of Competing Products or Technologies by Other Companies

The markets for credit ratings, research and credit risk management services are highly competitive. The ability to provide innovative products and technologies that anticipate customers’ changing requirements and to utilize emerging technological trends is a key factor in maintaining market share. Competitors may develop quantitative methodologies or related services for assessing credit risk that customers and market participants may deem preferable, more cost-effective or more valuable than the credit risk assessment methods currently employed by Moody’s, or may price or market their products in manners that differ from those utilized by Moody’s. Customers or others may develop alternative, proprietary systems for assessing credit risk. Such developments could affect demand for Moody’s products and its growth prospects. In addition, Moody’s growth prospects also could be adversely affected by limitations of its information technologies that fail to provide adequate capacity and capabilities to meet increased demands of producing quality ratings and research products at levels achieved by competitors.

Significant Amount of Intangible Assets

Moody’s has a significant amount of intangible assets on its balance sheet consisting of $465.5 million of goodwill and $168.8 million of amortizable intangible assets. Approximately 98% of these intangibles reside in the MA business and are allocated to the four reporting units within MA: RD&A; RMS; Training, and CSI. Failure to achieve business objectives and financial projections in one or all of these reporting units could result in an asset impairment charge which would reduce net income in the period the impairment is recorded. Impairment of goodwill or intangibles would result in a non-cash charge to operating expenses. An impairment would be recorded if the fair value of a reporting unit or asset group which holds goodwill or any intangible assets is less than the carrying amount of its net assets. A significant factor in the determination of the fair value of a reporting unit or asset group is its projected cash flows. Future cash flows of MA are dependent on a variety of factors such as, but not limited to, general economic growth, capital market activity, product innovation, pricing, market share and competition. Changes in these factors or in the conduct of Moody’s operations in response to such factors could lead to reduced cash flows resulting in an asset impairment charge.

Possible Loss of Key Employees and Related Compensation Cost Pressures

Moody’s success depends in part upon recruiting, retaining and motivating highly skilled, experienced financial analysts and other professionals. Competition for qualified staff in the financial services industry is intense, and Moody’s ability to attract staff could be impaired if it is unable to offer competitive compensation and other incentives or if the regulatory environment mandates restrictions on or disclosures about individual employees that would not be necessary in competing analytical industries. Investment banks, investors and competitors may seek to attract analyst talent by providing more favorable working conditions or offering higher compensation than Moody’s. Moody’s also may not be able to identify and hire employees in some markets outside the U.S. with the required experience or skills to perform sophisticated credit analysis.

The Trading Price of Moody’s Stock Could be Affected by Third Party Actions

Ownership of Moody’s stock is highly concentrated with a majority of shares held by a few institutional stockholders. Due to this concentrated stockholder base, the trading price of Moody’s stock could be affected considerably by actions of significant stockholders to increase or decrease their positions in Moody’s stock.

Moody’s Operations and Infrastructure may Malfunction or Fail

Moody’s ability to conduct business may be adversely impacted by a disruption in the infrastructure that supports its businesses and the communities in which Moody’s is located, including having its headquarters in New York City and offices in major cities worldwide. This may include a disruption involving electrical, communications or other services used by the Company or third parties with or through whom Moody’s conducts business, whether due to human error, natural disasters, power loss, telecommunication failures, break-ins, sabotage, computer viruses, intentional acts of vandalism, acts of terrorism or war or otherwise. Moody’s efforts to secure and plan for potential disruptions of major operating systems may not be successful. The Company does not have fully redundant systems for most of its smaller office locations and low-risk systems, and its disaster recovery plan does not include restoration of non-essential services. If a disruption occurs in one of Moody’s locations or systems and its personnel in those locations or those who rely on such systems are unable to utilize other systems or communicate with or travel to other locations, their ability to service and

 

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interact with Moody’s clients and customers may suffer. The Company’s operations also rely on the secure processing, storage and transmission of confidential and other information in its computer systems and networks. The business relies upon and processes a great deal of data through its systems, the quality of which must be maintained in order for the business units to perform. Protective measures that Moody’s takes may be circumvented or may not be sufficient to guard its computer systems, software and networks from unauthorized access, computer viruses or other malicious events that could have a security impact. If one or more of such events occur, this could jeopardize Moody’s or its clients’ or counterparties’ confidential and other information processed and stored in, and transmitted through, its computer systems and networks, or otherwise cause interruptions or malfunctions in the Company’s, its clients’, its counterparties’ or third parties’ operations. Moody’s may be required to expend significant additional resources to modify its protective measures or to investigate and remediate vulnerabilities or other exposures, and the Company may be subject to litigation and financial losses that are either not insured against or not fully covered through any insurance maintained by Moody’s.

 

ITEM 1B.   UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

 

ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES

Moody’s corporate headquarters is located at 7 World Trade Center at 250 Greenwich Street, New York, New York 10007, with approximately 668,513 square feet of leased space. As of December 31, 2010, Moody’s operations were conducted from 15 U.S. offices and 43 non-U.S. office locations, all of which are leased. These properties are geographically distributed to meet operating and sales requirements worldwide. These properties are generally considered to be both suitable and adequate to meet current operating requirements.

 

ITEM 3.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

From time to time, Moody’s is involved in legal and tax proceedings, governmental investigations, claims and litigation that are incidental to the Company’s business, including claims based on ratings assigned by MIS. Moody’s is also subject to ongoing tax audits in the normal course of business. Management periodically assesses the Company’s liabilities and contingencies in connection with these matters based upon the latest information available. Moody’s discloses material pending legal proceedings pursuant to SEC rules and other pending matters as it may determine to be appropriate.

Following the events in the U.S. subprime residential mortgage sector and the credit markets more broadly over the last several years, MIS and other credit rating agencies are the subject of intense scrutiny, increased regulation, ongoing investigation, and civil litigation. Legislative, regulatory and enforcement entities around the world are considering additional legislation, regulation and enforcement actions, including with respect to MIS’s compliance with newly imposed regulatory standards. Moody’s has received subpoenas and inquiries from states attorneys general and other governmental authorities and is responding to such investigations and inquiries.

In addition, the Company is facing litigation from market participants relating to the performance of MIS rated securities. Although Moody’s in the normal course experiences such litigation, the volume and cost of defending such litigation has significantly increased in the current economic environment.

On June 27, 2008, the Brockton Contributory Retirement System, a purported shareholder of the Company’s securities, filed a purported shareholder derivative complaint on behalf of the Company against its directors and certain senior officers, and the Company as nominal defendant, in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of New York. The plaintiff asserts various causes of action relating to the named defendants’ oversight of MIS’s ratings of RMBS and constant-proportion debt obligations, and their participation in the alleged public dissemination of false and misleading information about MIS’s ratings practices and/or a failure to implement internal procedures and controls to prevent the alleged wrongdoing. The plaintiff seeks compensatory damages, restitution, disgorgement of profits and other equitable relief. On July 2, 2008, Thomas R. Flynn, a purported shareholder of the Company’s securities, filed a similar purported shareholder derivative complaint on behalf of the Company against its directors and certain senior officers, and the Company as nominal defendant, in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of New York, asserting similar claims and seeking the same relief. The cases have been consolidated and plaintiffs filed an amended consolidated complaint in November 2008. The Company removed the consolidated action to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York in December 2008. In January 2009, the plaintiffs moved to remand the case to the Supreme Court of the State of New York, which the Company opposed. On February 23, 2010, the court issued an opinion remanding the case to the Supreme Court of New York. On October 30, 2008, the Louisiana Municipal Police Employees Retirement System, a purported shareholder of the Company’s securities, also filed a shareholder derivative complaint on behalf of the Company against its directors and certain officers, and the Company as a nominal defendant, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. This complaint also asserts various causes of action relating to the Company’s ratings of RMBS, CDO and constant-proportion debt obligations, and named defendants’ participation in the alleged

 

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public dissemination of false and misleading information about MIS’s ratings practices and/or a failure to implement internal procedures and controls to prevent the alleged wrongdoing. On December 9, 2008, Rena Nadoff, a purported shareholder of the Company, filed a shareholder derivative complaint on behalf of the Company against its directors and its CEO, and the Company as a nominal defendant, in the Supreme Court of the State of New York. The complaint asserts a claim for breach of fiduciary duty in connection with alleged overrating of asset-backed securities and underrating of municipal securities. On October 20, 2009, the Company moved to dismiss or stay the action in favor of related federal litigation. On January 26, 2010, the court entered a stipulation and order, submitted jointly by the parties, staying the Nadoff litigation pending coordination and prosecution of similar claims in the above and below described federal derivative actions. On July 6, 2009, W. A. Sokolowski, a purported shareholder of the Company, filed a purported shareholder derivative complaint on behalf of the Company against its directors and current and former officers, and the Company as a nominal defendant, in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. The complaint asserts claims relating to alleged mismanagement of the Company’s processes for rating structured finance transactions, alleged insider trading and causing the Company to buy back its own stock at artificially inflated prices.

Two purported class action complaints have been filed by purported purchasers of the Company’s securities against the Company and certain of its senior officers, asserting claims under the federal securities laws. The first was filed by Raphael Nach in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois on July 19, 2007. The second was filed by Teamsters Local 282 Pension Trust Fund in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York on September 26, 2007. Both actions have been consolidated into a single proceeding entitled In re Moody’s Corporation Securities Litigation in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. On June 27, 2008, a consolidated amended complaint was filed, purportedly on behalf of all purchasers of the Company’s securities during the period February 3, 2006 through October 24, 2007. Plaintiffs allege that the defendants issued false and/or misleading statements concerning the Company’s business conduct, business prospects, business conditions and financial results relating primarily to MIS’s ratings of structured finance products including RMBS, CDO and constant-proportion debt obligations. The plaintiffs seek an unspecified amount of compensatory damages and their reasonable costs and expenses incurred in connection with the case. The Company moved for dismissal of the consolidated amended complaint in September 2008. On February 23, 2009, the court issued an opinion dismissing certain claims and sustaining others.

Moody’s Analytics is cooperating with an investigation by the SEC concerning services provided by that unit to certain financial institutions in connection with the valuations used by those institutions with respect to certain financial instruments held by such institutions.

For claims, litigation and proceedings not related to income taxes, where it is both probable that a liability is expected to be incurred and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated, the Company records liabilities in the consolidated financial statements and periodically adjusts these as appropriate. In other instances, because of uncertainties related to the probable outcome and/or the amount or range of loss, management does not record a liability but discloses the contingency if significant. As additional information becomes available, the Company adjusts its assessments and estimates of such matters accordingly. In view of the inherent difficulty of predicting the outcome of litigation, regulatory, enforcement and similar matters and contingencies, particularly where the claimants seek large or indeterminate damages or where the parties assert novel legal theories or the matters involve a large number of parties, the Company cannot predict what the eventual outcome of the pending matters will be or the timing of any resolution of such matters. The Company also cannot predict the impact (if any) that any such matters may have on how its business is conducted, on its competitive position or on its financial position, results of operations or cash flows. As the process to resolve the pending matters referred to above progresses, management will continue to review the latest information available and assess its ability to predict the outcome of such matters and the effects, if any, on its operations and financial condition. However, in light of the inherent uncertainties involved in these matters, the large or indeterminate damages sought in some of them and the novel theories of law asserted, an estimate of the range of possible losses cannot be made at this time. For income tax matters, the Company employs the prescribed methodology of Topic 740 of the ASC which requires a company to first determine whether it is more-likely-than-not (defined as a likelihood of more than fifty percent) that a tax position will be sustained based on its technical merits as of the reporting date, assuming that taxing authorities will examine the position and have full knowledge of all relevant information. A tax position that meets this more-likely-than-not threshold is then measured and recognized at the largest amount of benefit that is greater than fifty percent likely to be realized upon effective settlement with a taxing authority.

 

ITEM 4.   RESERVED

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5.   MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Information in response to this Item is set forth under the captions below.

MOODY’S PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

For the Three Months Ended December 31, 2010

 

Period

   Total Number
of Shares Purchased (1)
     Average Price
Paid per Share
     Total Number of
Shares Purchased as

Part of Publicly
Announced Program
     Approximate Dollar
Value of Shares That May
yet be Purchased  Under

the Program (2)
 
October 1 – 31      257,231       $ 25.28         257,231       $  1,305.1 million   
November 1 – 30      1,241,166       $ 27.42         1,241,166       $ 1,271.1 million   
December 1 – 31      2,366,558       $ 26.83         2,365,909       $ 1,207.6 million   
                       
Total      3,864,955       $ 26.92         3,864,306      
                       

 

(1) Includes the surrender to the Company of 649 shares of common stock in December to satisfy tax withholding obligations in connection with the vesting of restricted stock issued to employees.

 

(2) As of the last day of each of the months. On July 30, 2007, the Company’s Board authorized a $2.0 billion share repurchase program which the Company began utilizing in January 2008 upon completion of the June 2006 authorization. There is no established expiration date for the remaining authorization.

During the fourth quarter of 2010, Moody’s issued 0.4 million shares under employee stock-based compensation plans and repurchased 3.9 million shares of its common stock, at an aggregate cost of $104.0 million.

 

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COMMON STOCK INFORMATION AND DIVIDENDS

The Company’s common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “MCO”. The table below indicates the high and low sales price of the Company’s common stock and the dividends declared and paid for the periods shown. The number of registered shareholders of record at January 31, 2011 was 3,181. A substantially greater number of the Company’s common stock is held by beneficial holders whose shares are held of record by banks, brokers and other financial institutions.

 

     Price Per Share      Dividends Per Share  
     High      Low      Declared      Paid  
2010:            
First quarter    $ 31.04       $ 26.12       $       $ 0.105   
Second quarter      30.31         18.50         0.105         0.105   
Third quarter      26.13         19.46         0.105         0.105   
Fourth quarter      28.93         24.82         0.22         0.105   
                       
Year ended December 31, 2010          $ 0.43       $ 0.42   
                       
2009:            
First quarter    $ 26.38       $ 15.57       $       $ 0.10   
Second quarter      31.79         21.21         0.10         0.10   
Third quarter      29.53         18.50         0.10         0.10   
Fourth quarter      27.81         19.44         0.205         0.10   
                       
Year ended December 31, 2009          $ 0.405       $ 0.40   
                       

During 2008, the Company paid a quarterly dividend of $0.10 per share of Moody’s common stock in each of the quarters, resulting in dividends paid per share during the year ended December 31, 2008 of $0.40.

On December 14, 2010, the Board of the Company approved the declaration of a quarterly dividend of $0.115 per share of Moody’s common stock, payable on March 10, 2011 to shareholders of record at the close of business on February 20, 2011. The continued payment of dividends at the rate noted above, or at all, is subject to the discretion of the Board.

EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN INFORMATION

The table below sets forth, as of December 31, 2010, certain information regarding the Company’s equity compensation plans.

 

Plan Category

   Number of
Securities to be
Issued Upon
Exercise of
Outstanding
Options,
Warrants and
Rights
     Weighted-
Average Exercise
Price of
Outstanding
Options,
Warrants and
Rights (2)
     Number of
Securities
Remaining
Available for
Future Issuance
Under Equity
Compensation
Plans (excluding
Securities Reflected
in Column (a)
 
     (a)      (b)      (c)  
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders      22,058,789 (1)     $ 38.11         16,268,167 (3) 
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders            $           
                          

Total

     22,058,789       $ 38.11         16,268,167   
                          

 

(1) Includes 16,792,337 options and unvested restricted shares outstanding under the Company’s 2001 Key Employees’ Stock Incentive Plan, 4,414,885 options and unvested restricted shares outstanding under the Company’s 1998 Key Employees’ Stock Incentive Plan, and 127,285 options and unvested restricted shares outstanding under the 1998 Non-Employee Directors’ Stock Incentive Plan. This number also includes a maximum of 724,282 performance shares outstanding under the Company’s 2001 Key Employees’ Stock Incentive Plan, which is the maximum number of shares issuable pursuant to performance share awards assuming the maximum payout at 200% of the target award.

 

     Assuming payout at target, the number of shares to be issued upon the vesting of performance share awards is 362,141.

 

(2) Does not reflect unvested restricted shares or performance share awards included in column (a) because these awards have no exercise price.

 

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(3) Includes 12,858,830 shares available for issuance as options, shares of restricted stock, performance shares or other stock-based awards under the 2001 Stock Incentive Plan and 165,365 shares available for issuance as options, shares of restricted stock or performance shares under the 1998 Directors Plan, and 3,243,972 shares available for issuance under the Company’s Employee Stock Purchase Plan. No new grants may be made under the 1998 Stock Incentive Plan, which expired by its terms in June 2008.

PERFORMANCE GRAPH

The following graph compares the total cumulative shareholder return of the Company to the performance of Standard & Poor’s Stock 500 Composite Index and the Russell 3000 Financial Services Index. Both of the aforementioned indexes are easily accessible to the Company’s shareholders in newspapers, the internet and other readily available sources for purposes of the following graph.

The comparison assumes that $100.00 was invested in the Company’s common stock and in each of the foregoing indices on December 31, 2005. The comparison also assumes the reinvestment of dividends, if any. The total return for the common stock was (54%) during the performance period as compared with a total return during the same period of (41%) for the Russell 3000 Financial Services Index and 12% for the S&P 500 Composite Index.

Comparison of Cumulative Total Return

Moody’s Corporation, Russell 3000 Financial Services Index and S&P 500 Composite Index

COMPARISON OF 5-YEAR CUMULATIVE TOTAL RETURN AMONG MOODY’S CORPORATION,

S&P 500 COMPOSITE AND RUSSELL 3000 FINANCIAL SERVICES

LOGO

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2005      2006      2007      2008      2009      2010  
Moody’s Corporation    $ 100.00       $ 112.94       $ 58.74       $ 33.47       $ 45.38       $ 45.73   
S&P 500 Composite Index      100.00         115.79         122.16         76.96         97.33         111.99   
Russell 3000 – Financial Services Index      100.00         115.55         93.33         45.75         53.81         59.24   

The comparisons in the graph above are provided in response to disclosure requirements of the SEC and are not intended to forecast or be indicative of future performance of the Company’s common stock.

 

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ITEM 6.   SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The Company’s selected consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with Item 7. “MD&A” and the Moody’s Corporation consolidated financial statements and notes thereto.

 

     Year Ended December 31,  

amounts in millions, except per share data

   2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
Results of operations           

Revenue

   $ 2,032.0      $ 1,797.2      $ 1,755.4      $ 2,259.0      $ 2,037.1   

Operating and SG&A expenses

     1,192.8        1,028.1        934.6        1,035.1        898.7   

Depreciation and amortization

     66.3        64.1        75.1        42.9        39.5   

Restructuring

     0.1        17.5        (2.5 )     50.0          

Gain on sale of building

                                 (160.6 )
                                        
Operating income      772.8        687.5        748.2        1,131.0        1,259.5   

Non-operating (expense) income, net (1)

     (58.4 )     (41.3 )     (18.4 )     (9.0 )     4.4   
                                        
Income before provision for income taxes      714.4        646.2        729.8        1,122.0        1,263.9   

Provision for income taxes

     201.0        239.1        268.2        415.2        506.6   
                                        
Net income (2)      513.4        407.1        461.6        706.8        757.3   

Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests

     5.6        5.1        4.0        5.3        3.4   
                                        
Net income attributable to Moody’s    $ 507.8      $ 402.0      $ 457.6      $ 701.5      $ 753.9   
                                        
Earnings per share           

Basic

   $ 2.16      $ 1.70      $ 1.89      $ 2.63      $ 2.65   

Diluted

   $ 2.15      $ 1.69      $ 1.87      $ 2.58      $ 2.58   
Weighted average shares outstanding           

Basic

     235.0        236.1        242.4        266.4        284.2   

Diluted

     236.6        237.8        245.3        272.2        291.9   
Dividends declared per share    $ 0.43      $ 0.405      $ 0.40      $ 0.34      $ 0.29   
     December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
Balance sheet data           
Total assets    $ 2,540.3      $ 2,003.3      $ 1,773.4      $ 1,714.6      $ 1,497.7   
Long-term debt    $ 1,228.3      $ 746.2      $ 750.0      $ 600.0      $ 300.0   
Total Moody’s shareholders’ (deficit) equity    $ (309.6 )   $ (606.2 )   $ (994.4 )   $ (783.6 )   $ 167.4   

 

(1) The 2010, 2009, 2008 and 2007 amounts include a benefit of $2.5 million, $6.5 million, $13.3 million and $31.9 million, respectively, related to the favorable resolution of certain Legacy Tax Matters.

 

(2) The 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007 and 2006 amounts include benefits of $4.6 million, $8.2 million, $10.7 million, $52.3 million and $2.4 million, respectively, related to the resolution of certain Legacy Tax Matters.

 

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ITEM 7.   MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

This discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with the Moody’s Corporation consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K.

This MD&A contains Forward-Looking Statements. See “Forward-Looking Statements” commencing on page 56 and Item 1A. “Risk Factors” commencing on page 17 for a discussion of uncertainties, risks and other factors associated with these statements.

THE COMPANY

Moody’s is a provider of (i) credit ratings, (ii) credit and economic related research, data and analytical tools, (iii) risk management software and (iv) quantitative credit risk measures, credit portfolio management solutions, training and financial credentialing and certification services. Moody’s operates in two reportable segments: MIS and MA.

MIS, the credit rating agency, publishes credit ratings on a wide range of debt obligations and the entities that issue such obligations in markets worldwide. Revenue is derived from the originators and issuers of such transactions who use MIS ratings in the distribution of their debt issues to investors.

The MA segment develops a wide range of products and services that support the risk management activities of institutional participants in global financial markets. Within its RD&A business, MA distributes investor-oriented research and data developed by MIS as part of its ratings process, including in-depth research on major debt issuers, industry studies and commentary on topical credit related events. The RD&A business also produces and provides economic research and credit data and analytical tools such as quantitative credit risk scores. Within its RMS business, MA provides both economic and regulatory capital risk management software solutions. Within its professional services business it provides quantitative credit risk measures, credit portfolio management solutions, training and financial credentialing and certification services.

Beginning in January 2008, Moody’s segments were changed to reflect the Reorganization announced in August 2007. As a result of the Reorganization, the rating agency is reported in the MIS segment and several ratings business lines were realigned. All of Moody’s other non-rating commercial activities are represented in the MA segment.

As part of the Reorganization there were several realignments within the MIS LOBs. Sovereign and sub-sovereign ratings, which were previously part of financial institutions; infrastructure/utilities ratings, which were previously part of corporate finance; and project finance, which was previously part of structured finance, were combined with the public finance business to form a new LOB called public, project and infrastructure finance. In addition, real estate investment trust ratings were moved from financial institutions and corporate finance to the structured finance business. Furthermore, in August 2008 the global managed investments ratings group, previously part of the structured finance business, was combined with the financial institutions business.

In 2008 within MA, various aspects of the legacy MIS research business and MKMV business were combined to form the subscriptions, software and professional services businesses. The subscriptions business included credit and economic research, data and analytical models that are sold on a subscription basis; the software business included license and maintenance fees for credit risk, securities pricing and valuation software products; and the professional services business included advisory services associated with risk modeling, credit scorecard development, and other specialized analytical projects, as well as credit training and other professional development education services that are typically sold on a per-engagement basis. Subscription services are typically sold for an initial 12-month term, with renewal features for subsequent annual periods.

In 2009, the aforementioned MA businesses were realigned and renamed to reflect the reporting unit structure for the MA segment. Pursuant to this realignment the subscriptions business was renamed Research Data and Analytics and the software business was renamed Risk Management Software. The revised groupings classify certain subscription-based risk management software revenue and advisory services relating to software sales to the redefined RMS business. In November 2010, Moody’s purchased CSI, which is currently a reporting unit within MA and for which revenues are reported within the professional services LOB.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES

Moody’s discussion and analysis of its financial condition and results of operations are based on the Company’s consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of these financial statements requires Moody’s to make estimates and judgments that affect reported amounts of assets and liabilities and related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the dates of the financial statements and revenue and expenses during the reporting periods. These estimates are based on historical experience and on other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. On an ongoing basis,

 

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Moody’s evaluates its estimates, including those related to revenue recognition, accounts receivable allowances, contingencies, goodwill and intangible assets, restructuring liabilities, pension and other post-retirement benefits, UTBs and stock-based compensation. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. The following accounting estimates are considered critical because they are particularly dependent on management’s judgment about matters that are uncertain at the time the accounting estimates are made and changes to those estimates could have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated results of operations or financial condition.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue is recognized when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, delivery has occurred or the services have been provided and accepted by the customer when applicable, fees are determinable and the collection of resulting receivables is considered probable.

In October 2009, the FASB issued ASU No. 2009-13, “Multiple-Deliverable Revenue Arrangements” (“ASU 2009-13”). The new standard changes the requirements for establishing separate units of accounting in a multiple element arrangement and requires the allocation of arrangement consideration based on the relative selling price of each deliverable. The Company has elected to early adopt ASU 2009-13 on a prospective basis for applicable transactions originating or materially modified on or after January 1, 2010. If applied in the same manner to the year ended December 31, 2009, ASU 2009-13 would not have had a material impact on net revenue reported for both its MIS and MA segments in terms of the timing and pattern of revenue recognition. The adoption of ASU 2009-13 did not have a significant effect on the Company’s net revenue in the period of adoption and is also not expected to have a significant effect on the Company’s net revenue in periods after the initial adoption when applied to multiple element arrangements based on the currently anticipated business volume and pricing.

For 2010 and future periods, pursuant to the guidance of ASU 2009-13, when a sales arrangement contains multiple deliverables, the Company allocates revenue to each deliverable based on its relative selling price which is determined based on its vendor specific objective evidence if available, third party evidence if VSOE is not available, or estimated selling price if neither VSOE nor TPE is available.

The Company’s products and services will generally continue to qualify as separate units of accounting under ASU 2009-13. The Company evaluates each deliverable in an arrangement to determine whether it represents a separate unit of accounting. A deliverable constitutes a separate unit of accounting when it has stand-alone value to the customers and if the arrangement includes a customer refund or return right relative to the delivered item, the delivery and performance of the undelivered item is considered probable and substantially in the Company’s control. In instances where the aforementioned criteria are not met, the deliverable is combined with the undelivered items and revenue recognition is determined as one single unit.

The Company determines whether its selling price in a multi-element transaction meets the VSOE criteria by using the price charged for a deliverable when sold separately. In instances where the Company is not able to establish VSOE for all deliverables in a multiple element arrangement, which may be due to the Company infrequently selling each element separately, not selling products within a reasonably narrow price range, or only having a limited sales history, the Company attempts to establish TPE for deliverables. The Company determines whether TPE exists by evaluating largely similar and interchangeable competitor products or services in standalone sales to similarly situated customers. However, due to the difficulty in obtaining third party pricing, possible differences in the Company’s market strategy from that of its peers and the potential that products and services offered by the Company may contain a significant level of differentiation and/or customization such that the comparable pricing of products with similar functionality cannot be obtained, the Company generally is unable to reliably determine TPE. Based on the selling price hierarchy established by ASU 2009-13, when the Company is unable to establish selling price using VSOE or TPE, the Company will establish an ESP. ESP is the price at which the Company would transact a sale if the product or service were sold on a stand-alone basis. The Company establishes its best estimate of ESP considering internal factors relevant to its pricing practices such as costs and margin objectives, standalone sales prices of similar products, percentage of the fee charged for a primary product or service relative to a related product or service, and customer segment and geography. Additional consideration is also given to market conditions such as competitor pricing strategies and market trend. The Company reviews its determination of VSOE, TPE and ESP on an annual basis or more frequently as needed.

In the MIS segment, revenue attributed to initial ratings of issued securities is recognized when the rating is issued. Revenue attributed to monitoring of issuers or issued securities is recognized ratably over the period in which the monitoring is performed, generally one year. In the case of commercial mortgage-backed securities, derivatives, international residential mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities, issuers can elect to pay the monitoring fees upfront. These fees are deferred and recognized over the future monitoring periods based on the expected lives of the rated securities, which ranged from two to 51 years at December 31, 2010. At December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, deferred revenue related to these securities was approximately $76 million, $78 million and $82 million, respectively.

Multiple element revenue arrangements in the MIS segment are generally comprised of an initial rating and the related monitoring service. Beginning January 1, 2010, in instances where monitoring fees are not charged for the first year monitoring effort, fees are allo-

 

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cated to the initial rating and monitoring services based on the relative selling price of each service to the total arrangement fees. The Company generally uses ESP in determining the selling price for its initial ratings as the Company rarely sells initial ratings separately without providing related monitoring services and thus is unable to establish VSOE or TPE for initial ratings. Prior to January 1, 2010 and pursuant to the previous accounting standards, for these types of arrangements the initial rating fee was first allocated to the monitoring service determined based on the estimated fair market value of monitoring services, with the residual amount allocated to the initial rating. Under ASU 2009-13 this practice can no longer be used for non-software deliverables upon the adoption of ASU 2009-13.

MIS estimates revenue for ratings of commercial paper for which, in addition to a fixed annual monitoring fee, issuers are billed quarterly based on amounts outstanding. Revenue is accrued each quarter based on estimated amounts outstanding and is billed when actual data is available. The estimate is determined based on the issuers’ most recent reported quarterly data. At December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, accounts receivable included approximately $25 million, $27 million and $34 million, respectively, related to accrued commercial paper revenue. Historically, MIS has not had material differences between the estimated revenue and the actual billings.

In the MA segment, products and services offered by the Company include software licenses and related maintenance, subscriptions, and professional services. Revenue from subscription based products, such as research and data subscriptions and certain software-based credit risk management subscription products, is recognized ratably over the related subscription period, which is principally one year. Revenue from sale of perpetual licenses of credit processing software is generally recognized at the time the product master or first copy is delivered or transferred to and accepted by the customer. Software maintenance revenue is recognized ratably over the annual maintenance period. Revenue from services rendered within the professional services line of business is generally recognized as the services are performed. If uncertainty exists regarding customer acceptance of the product or service, revenue is not recognized until acceptance occurs.

Products and services offered within the MA segment are sold either stand-alone or together in various combinations. In instances where a multiple element arrangement includes software and non-software deliverables, revenue is allocated to the non-software deliverables and to the software deliverables, as a group, using the relative selling prices of each of the deliverables in the arrangement based on the aforementioned selling price hierarchy. Revenue is recognized for each element based upon the conditions for revenue recognition noted above.

If the arrangement contains more than one software deliverable, the arrangement consideration allocated to the software deliverables as a group is allocated to each software deliverable using VSOE. In the instances where the Company is not able to determine VSOE for all of the deliverables of an arrangement, the Company allocates the revenue to the undelivered elements equal to its VSOE and the residual revenue to the delivered elements. If the Company is unable to determine VSOE for an undelivered element, the Company defers all revenue allocated to the software deliverables until the Company has delivered all of the elements or when VSOE has been determined for the undelivered elements.

Prior to January 1, 2010 and pursuant to the previous accounting standards, the Company allocated revenue in a multiple element arrangement to each deliverable based on its relative fair value, or for software elements, based on VSOE. If the fair value was not available for an undelivered element, the revenue for the entire arrangement was deferred.

Accounts Receivable Allowance

Moody’s records an allowance for estimated future adjustments to customer billings as a reduction of revenue, based on historical experience and current conditions. Such amounts are reflected as additions to the accounts receivable allowance. Additionally, estimates of uncollectible accounts are recorded as bad debt expense and are reflected as additions to the accounts receivable allowance. Billing adjustments and uncollectible account write-offs are charged against the allowance. Moody’s evaluates its accounts receivable allowance by reviewing and assessing historical collection and adjustment experience and the current aging status of customer accounts. Moody’s also considers the economic environment of the customers, both from an industry and geographic perspective, in evaluating the need for allowances. Based on its analysis, Moody’s adjusts its allowance as considered appropriate in the circumstances. This process involves a high degree of judgment and estimation and could involve significant dollar amounts. Accordingly, Moody’s results of operations can be affected by adjustments to the allowance. Management believes that the allowance for accounts receivable is adequate to cover anticipated adjustments and write-offs under current conditions. However, significant changes in any of the above factors, or actual write-offs or adjustments that differ from the estimated amounts could impact the Company’s consolidated results of operations.

Contingencies

Accounting for contingencies, including those matters described in the “Contingencies” section of this “MD&A”, commencing on page 54 is highly subjective and requires the use of judgments and estimates in assessing their magnitude and likely outcome. In many cases, the outcomes of such matters will be determined by third parties, including governmental or judicial bodies. The provisions made in the consolidated financial statements, as well as the related disclosures, represent management’s best estimates of the then current status of such matters and their potential outcome based on a review of the facts and in consultation with outside legal counsel where

 

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deemed appropriate. The Company would record a material loss contingency in its financial statements if the loss is both probable of occurring and the loss can be reasonably estimated. The Company regularly reviews contingencies and as new information becomes available may, in the future, adjust its associated liabilities.

Goodwill and Other Acquired Intangible Assets

Moody’s evaluates its goodwill for impairment at the reporting unit level, defined as an operating segment or one level below an operating segment, annually as of November 30 or more frequently if impairment indicators arise in accordance with ASC Topic 350. These impairment indicators could include significant events or circumstances that would reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying value. These events or circumstances could include a significant change in the business climate, legal factors, operating performance indicators, competition or sale or disposition of a significant portion of a reporting unit.

At November 30, 2010, the Company had five primary reporting units: one in MIS that encompasses all of Moody’s ratings operations and four reporting units within MA: RD&A, RMS, training and CSI. The RD&A reporting unit encompasses the distribution of investor-oriented research and data developed by MIS as part of its ratings process, in-depth research on major debt issuers, industry studies, economic research and commentary on topical events and credit analytic tools. The RMS reporting unit consists of credit risk management and compliance software that is sold on a license or subscription basis as well as related advisory services for implementation and maintenance. The training reporting unit consists of the portion of the MA business that offers both credit training as well as other professional development training. Additionally, in November 2010, the Company acquired CSI, which was tested separately as its own reporting unit for the annual goodwill impairment test as of November 30, 2010. CSI is Canada’s leading provider of financial learning, credentials and certification.

The Company evaluates the recoverability of goodwill using a two-step impairment test approach at the reporting unit level as required by ASC Topic 350, “Intangibles—Goodwill and Other”. In the first step, the fair value of the reporting unit is compared to its carrying value including goodwill. If the fair value of the reporting unit exceeds the carrying value of the net assets assigned to that unit, goodwill is not impaired and the Company is not required to perform further testing. If the fair value of the reporting unit is less than the carrying value, the Company must perform a second step of the impairment test to determine the implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill. The implied fair value of the goodwill is determined based on the difference between the fair value of the reporting unit and the net fair value of the identifiable assets and liabilities of the reporting unit. If the implied fair value of the goodwill is less than the carrying value, the difference is recognized as an impairment charge.

Determining the fair value of a reporting unit or an indefinite-lived acquired intangible asset involves the use of significant estimates and assumptions. These estimates and assumptions include revenue growth rates and operating margins used to calculate projected future cash flows, risk-adjusted discount rates, future economic and market conditions, and appropriate market comparables. The Company bases its fair value estimates on assumptions believed to be reasonable. However, as these estimates and assumptions are unpredictable and inherently uncertain, actual future results may differ from these estimates. In addition, the Company also makes certain judgments and assumptions in allocating shared assets and liabilities to determine the carrying values for each of its reporting units.

Goodwill is assigned to a reporting unit at the date when an acquisition is integrated into one of the established reporting units, and is based on which reporting unit is expected to benefit from the synergies of the acquisition. Other assets and liabilities, including applicable corporate assets, are allocated to the extent they are related to the operation of respective reporting units.

Based on the result of the above test, the Company does not believe any of its reporting units are at risk of failing Step 1 of the impairment test as the fair value for all reporting units is well in excess of the respective reporting unit’s carrying value, except for CSI as the purchase price represents the fair value of the net assets acquired.

The following table identifies the amount of goodwill allocated to each reporting unit as of December 31, 2010 as well as the amount by which the net assets of each reporting unit would exceed the fair value under Step 1 of the goodwill impairment test as prescribed in ASC Topic 350, assuming hypothetical reductions in their fair values as of November 30, 2010:

 

            Step One Sensitivity Analysis  
            Deficit Caused by a Hypothetical Reduction to Fair Value  
     Goodwill      10%      20%      30%      40%  
MIS    $ 11.8       $       $       $       $   
RD&A      157.9                                   
RMS      170.7                                   
Training      17.8                                 (1.5
CSI      107.3         *         *         *         *   
                                            

Totals

   $ 465.5       $       $       $       $ (1.5 )
                                            

 

*CSI was excluded from the sensitivity analysis in the table above as well as the sensitivity analyses on the WACC and future cash flow assumptions discussed below as it was acquired in November 2010. Accordingly the carrying value of the net assets acquired approximates fair value at November 30, 2010.

 

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The following discussion regarding the Company’s methodology for determining the fair value of its reporting units excludes the CSI which was acquired in November 2010:

The fair value of each reporting unit is estimated using a discounted cash flow methodology. The results of the DCF are evaluated against comparable public company and precedent transaction multiples in order to assess the reasonableness of the DCF fair values. The DCF analysis requires significant judgments regarding the derivation of fair value, including estimation of future operating results and cash flows of each reporting unit, which is based on internal budgets and strategic plans, expected long-term growth rates, terminal values, weighted average cost of capital and the effects of external factors and market conditions. Changes in these estimates and assumptions could materially affect the determination of the fair value and goodwill impairment for each reporting unit which could result in an impairment charge to reduce the carrying value of goodwill, which could be material to the Company’s financial position and results of operations. Moody’s allocates newly acquired goodwill to reporting units based on the reporting unit expected to benefit from the acquisition. The Company evaluates its reporting units on an annual basis, or more frequently if there are changes in the reporting structure of the Company due to acquisitions or realignments.

The following discusses the key assumptions utilized in the discounted cash flow valuation methodology which requires significant management judgment:

 

 

WACC—The WACC is the rate to discount each reporting unit’s estimated future cash flows. The WACC is calculated based on the proportionate weighting of the cost of debt and equity. The cost of equity is based on a risk-free interest rate, an equity risk factor which is derived from public companies similar to the reporting unit and which captures the perceived risks and uncertainties associated with the reporting unit’s cash flows. The cost of debt component is calculated as the weighted average cost associated with all of the Company’s outstanding borrowings as of the date of the impairment test and was immaterial to the computation of the WACC. The cost of debt and equity is weighted based on the debt to market capitalization ratio of publicly traded companies with similarities to the reporting unit being tested. The WACC for all reporting units ranged from 10% to 12% in 2010. Differences in the WACC used between reporting units is due primarily to distinct risks and uncertainties regarding the cash flows of the different reporting units. A sensitivity analysis of the WACC was performed on all reporting units. An increase in the WACC of one percentage point for each of the reporting units would not have resulted in the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeding its respective estimated fair value under step one of the goodwill impairment test as prescribed in ASC Topic 350.

 

 

Future cash flow assumptions—The projections for future cash flows utilized in the models are derived from historical experience and assumptions regarding future growth and profitability of each reporting unit. These projections are consistent with the Company’s operating and strategic plan. Cash flows for each of the next five years beginning in 2011 were estimated based on annual revenue growth rates ranging from 4% to 14%. The growth rates assumed a gradual increase in revenue from financial service customers based on a continued improvement in the global economy and capital markets which began in the second half of 2009. Beyond five years a terminal value was determined using a perpetuity growth rate based on inflation and real GDP growth rates. A sensitivity analysis of the growth rates was performed on all reporting units. A decrease in the growth rates used in the discounted cash flow calculation of 10% for each of the reporting units would not have resulted in the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeding its respective estimated fair value under step one of the goodwill impairment test as prescribed in ASC Topic 350.

Amortizable intangible assets are reviewed for recoverability whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. There were no such events or changes during 2010 that would indicate that the carrying amount of amortizable intangible assets in any of the Company’s reporting units may not be recoverable. This determination was made based on improving market conditions which has resulted in higher projected cash flows for all reporting units than was projected in 2009. Additionally, there were no events or circumstances during 2010 that would indicate the need for an adjustment of the remaining useful lives of the Company’s amortizable intangible assets.

Pension and Other Post-Retirement Benefits

The expenses, assets and liabilities that Moody’s reports for its Post-Retirement Plans are dependent on many assumptions concerning the outcome of future events and circumstances. These assumptions include the following:

 

 

future compensation increases, based on the Company’s long-term actual experience and future outlook

 

 

long-term return on pension plan assets, based on historical portfolio results and the expected future average annual return for each major asset class within the plan’s portfolio (which is principally comprised of equity and fixed-income investments)

 

 

future healthcare cost trends, based on historical market data, near-term outlooks and assessments of likely long-term trends

 

 

discount rates, based on current yields on high-grade corporate long-term bonds

 

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The discount rates selected to measure the present value of the Company’s benefit obligation for its Post-Retirement Plans as of December 31, 2010 were derived using a cash flow matching method whereby the Company compares each plan’s projected payment obligations by year with the corresponding yield on the Citibank pension discount curve. The cash flows by plan are then discounted back to present value to determine the discount rate applicable to each plan.

Moody’s major assumptions vary by plan and assumptions used are set forth in Note 11 to the consolidated financial statements. In determining these assumptions, the Company consults with outside actuaries and other advisors as deemed appropriate. While the Company believes that the assumptions used in its calculations are reasonable, differences in actual experience or changes in assumptions could have a significant effect on the expenses, assets and liabilities related to the Company’s Post-Retirement Plans.

When actual plan experience differs from the assumptions used, actuarial gains or losses arise. Excluding differences between the expected long-term rate of return assumption and actual experience on plan assets, the Company amortizes, as a component of annual pension expense, total outstanding gains or losses over the estimated average future working lifetime of active plan participants to the extent that the gain/loss exceeds 10% of the greater of the beginning-of-year projected benefit obligation or the market-related value of plan assets. For Moody’s Post-Retirement Plans, the total losses as of December 31, 2010 that have not been recognized in annual expense are $72.1 million, and Moody’s expects to recognize net periodic pension expense of $4.8 million in 2011 related to the amortization of actuarial losses.

For Moody’s funded U.S. pension plan, the differences between the expected long-term rate of return assumption and actual experience could also affect the net periodic pension expense. As permitted under ASC Topic 715, the Company spreads the impact of asset experience over a five-year period for purposes of calculating the market-related value of assets that is used in determining the expected return on assets’ component of annual expense and in calculating the total unrecognized gain or loss subject to amortization. As of December 31, 2010, the Company has an unrecognized asset loss of $11.8 million, of which $7.1 million will be recognized in the market-related value of assets that is used to calculate the expected return on assets’ component of 2012 expense.

The table below shows the estimated effect that a one percentage-point decrease in each of these assumptions will have on Moody’s 2011 operating income. These effects have been calculated using the Company’s current projections of 2011 expenses, assets and liabilities related to Moody’s Post-Retirement Plans, which could change as updated data becomes available.

 

     Assumption Used for 2011      Estimated Impact on
2011 Operating Income
(Decrease)/Increase
 
Weighted Average Discount Rates*      5.39% / 5.15%       $ (7.4 )
Weighted Average Assumed Compensation Growth Rate      4.00%       $ 1.4   
Assumed Long-Term Rate of Return on Pension Assets      8.35%       $ (1.4 )

 

* Weighted average discount rates of 5.39% and 5.15% for pension plans and other post-retirement plans, respectively.

A one percentage-point increase in assumed healthcare cost trend rates will not affect 2011 projected expenses. Based on current projections, the Company estimates that expenses related to Post-Retirement Plans will be $23.0 million in 2011 compared with $20.2 million in 2010, excluding the effect of pension settlement charges. The expected expense increase in 2011 reflects the effects of higher benefit obligations primarily due to lower discount rate assumptions and higher amortization of actuarial losses.

Stock-Based Compensation

The Company records compensation expense for all share-based payment award transactions granted to employees based on the fair value of the equity instrument at the time of grant. This includes shares issued under employee stock purchase plans, stock options, restricted stock and stock appreciation rights. The fair value of each option award is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model that uses assumptions and estimates that the Company believes are reasonable. Some of the assumptions and estimates, such as share price volatility and expected option holding period, are based in part on Moody’s experience during the period since becoming a public company. The use of different assumptions and estimates in the Black-Scholes option pricing model could produce materially different estimated fair values for option awards and related expense.

An increase in the following assumptions would have had the following estimated effect on operating income in 2010 (dollars in millions):

 

    

Assumption Used for
2006-2010 grants

  

Increase in Assumption

   Estimated Impact on
Operating Income in 2010
Increase/(Decrease)
 
Average Expected Dividend Yield    0.4% - 2.1%    0.10%    $ 0.5   
Average Expected Share Price Volatility    23% - 45.5%    5%    $ (3.1
Expected Option Holding Period    5.5 - 6.0 years    1.0 year    $ (2.3

 

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Income Taxes

The Company is subject to income taxes in the U.S. and various foreign jurisdictions. The Company’s tax assets and liabilities are affected by the amounts charged for service provided and expenses incurred as well as other tax matters such as intercompany transactions. The Company accounts for income taxes under the asset and liability method in accordance with ASC Topic 740. Therefore, income tax expense is based on reported income before income taxes, and deferred income taxes reflect the effect of temporary differences between the amounts of assets and liabilities that are recognized for financial reporting purposes and the amounts that are recognized for income tax purposes.

Moody’s is subject to tax audits in various jurisdictions which involve Legacy Tax and other tax matters. The Company regularly assesses the likely outcomes of such audits in order to determine the appropriateness of liabilities for UTPs. The Company classifies interest related to income taxes as a component of interest expense in the Company’s consolidated financial statements and associated penalties, if any, as part of other non-operating expenses.

For UTPs, ASC Topic 740 requires a company to first determine whether it is more-likely-than-not (defined as a likelihood of more than fifty percent) that a tax position will be sustained based on its technical merits as of the reporting date, assuming that taxing authorities will examine the position and have full knowledge of all relevant information. A tax position that meets this more-likely-than-not threshold is then measured and recognized at the largest amount of benefit that is greater than fifty percent likely to be realized upon effective settlement with a taxing authority. As the determination of liabilities related to UTPs and associated interest and penalties requires significant estimates to be made by the Company, there can be no assurance that the Company will accurately predict the outcomes of these audits, and thus the eventual outcomes could have a material impact on the Company’s operating results or financial condition.

For certain of its foreign subsidiaries, the Company has deemed a portion of the undistributed earnings relating to these subsidiaries to be indefinitely reinvested within its foreign operations. Accordingly, the Company has not provided deferred income taxes on these indefinitely reinvested earnings. A future distribution or change in assertion regarding reinvestment by the foreign subsidiaries relating to these earnings could result in additional tax liability for the Company. It is not practicable to determine the amount of the potential additional tax liability due to complexities in the tax laws and in the hypothetical calculations that would have to be made.

Other Estimates

In addition, there are other accounting estimates within Moody’s consolidated financial statements, including recoverability of deferred tax assets, anticipated dividend distributions from non-U.S. subsidiaries and valuation of investments in affiliates. Management believes the current assumptions and other considerations used to estimate amounts reflected in Moody’s consolidated financial statements are appropriate. However, if actual experience differs from the assumptions and other considerations used in estimating amounts reflected in Moody’s consolidated financial statements, the resulting changes could have a material adverse effect on Moody’s consolidated results of operations or financial condition.

See Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements for further information on significant accounting policies that impact Moody’s.

OPERATING SEGMENTS

Beginning in January 2008, Moody’s segments were changed to reflect the Reorganization announced in August 2007. As a result of the Reorganization, the rating agency is reported in the MIS segment and several ratings business lines have been realigned. All of Moody’s other non-rating commercial activities are represented in the MA segment.

As part of the Reorganization there were several realignments within the MIS LOBs. Sovereign and sub-sovereign ratings, which were previously part of financial institutions; infrastructure/utilities ratings, which were previously part of corporate finance; and project finance, which was previously part of structured finance, were combined with the public finance business to form a new LOB called public, project and infrastructure finance. In addition, real estate investment trust ratings were moved from financial institutions and corporate finance to the structured finance business. Furthermore, in August 2008 the global managed investments ratings group, previously part of the structured finance business, was combined with the financial institutions business.

The MIS segment now consists of four lines of business—corporate finance, structured finance, financial institutions and public, project and infrastructure finance—that generate revenue principally from fees for the assignment and ongoing monitoring of credit ratings on debt obligations and the entities that issue such obligations in markets worldwide.

As part of the Reorganization, various aspects of the legacy MIS research business and MKMV business were combined to form the subscriptions, software and professional services businesses within MA. The subscriptions business included credit and economic research, data and analytical models that are sold on a subscription basis for an initial 12-month term, with renewal features for subsequent annual periods; the software business included license and maintenance fees for credit risk, securities pricing and valuation

 

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software products; and the professional services business included credit training associated with risk modeling, credit scorecard development, and other specialized analytical projects, as well as credit and other professional development education services that are typically sold on a per-engagement basis.

In 2009, the aforementioned MA businesses were realigned and renamed to reflect the reporting unit structure for the MA segment at December 31, 2009. Pursuant to this realignment the subscriptions business was renamed Research, Data and Analytics and the software business was renamed Risk Management Software. The revised groupings classify license software sales, certain subscription-based risk management software revenue, maintenance and advisory services relating to software sales to the redefined RMS business. The following tables are reconciliations of the revenue groupings previously disclosed to the new groupings for the year ended December 31, 2008:

 

Revenue reported as per filings in prior years:

        Year Ended
December 31, 2008
 
Subscriptions       $ 475.9   
Software         49.2   
Professional Services         25.6   
           
   Total MA    $ 550.7   
           

Reclassification for 2009 realignment:

        Year Ended
December 31, 2008
 
Subscriptions       $ (57.2 )
Software         59.6   
Professional Services         (2.4 )
           
   Total MA    $   
           

2009 revenue reported:

        Year Ended
December 31, 2008
 
RD&A       $ 418.7   
RMS         108.8   
Professional Services         23.2   
           
   Total MA    $ 550.7   
           

Additionally, in November 2010, a subsidiary of the Company acquired CSI, which is Canada’s leading provider of financial learning, credentials and certification. CSI is part of the MA segment and its revenue is included in the professional services LOB within MA.

The following is a discussion of the results of operations of these segments, including the intersegment royalty revenue for MIS and expense charged to MA for the rights to use and distribute content, data and products developed by MIS. Additionally, overhead costs and corporate expenses of the Company are allocated to each segment based on a revenue-split methodology. Overhead expenses include costs such as rent and occupancy, information technology and support staff such as finance, human resource, information technology and legal.

Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current presentation.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Year Ended December 31, 2010 compared with Year Ended December 31, 2009

Executive Summary

Moody’s revenue for the year ended December 31, 2010 totaled $2,032.0 million, an increase of $234.8 million compared to the same period in 2009. Total expenses were $1,259.2 million, an increase of $149.5 million compared to 2009. Operating income of $772.8 million in 2010 increased $85.3 million compared to the same period in the prior year. Excluding the restructuring charge in 2009 and minor restructuring-related adjustments in both years, operating income increased $67.9 million from $705.0 million in the prior year period. Diluted EPS of $2.15 for the year ended December 31, 2010 increased $0.46, or 27% over the prior year period and included a benefit of $0.02 associated with the resolution of a Legacy Tax Matter as well as other tax benefits of $0.15 in 2010 relating to foreign earnings that are indefinitely reinvested, foreign tax credits and lower state taxes. Excluding the aforementioned Legacy Tax Matter in

 

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2010, diluted EPS of $2.13 increased $0.43, or 25%, from $1.70 in 2009, which excludes a prior year favorable impact of $0.04 related to the resolution of a Legacy Tax Matter and an unfavorable $0.05 impact for restructuring.

Moody’s Corporation

The table below provides a summary of revenue and operating results, followed by further insight and commentary:

 

     Year Ended December 31,     % Change
Favorable
(Unfavorable)
 
   2010     2009    
Revenue:       

United States

   $ 1,089.5      $ 920.8        18
                  

International:

      

EMEA

     627.4        624.7        —  

Other

     315.1        251.7        25
                  

Total International

     942.5        876.4        8
                  

Total

     2,032.0        1,797.2        13
                  
Expenses:       

Operating

     604.8        532.4        (14 )% 

SG&A

     588.0        495.7        (19 )% 

Restructuring

     0.1       17.5        99

Depreciation and amortization

     66.3        64.1        (3 )% 
                  

Total

     1,259.2        1,109.7        (13 )% 
                  
Operating income    $ 772.8      $ 687.5        12
                  
Interest (expense) income, net    $ (52.5   $ (33.4     (57 )% 
Other non-operating (expense) income, net    $ (5.9   $ (7.9     25
Net income attributable to Moody’s    $ 507.8      $ 402.0        26
Diluted EPS    $ 2.15      $ 1.69        27

The table below shows Moody’s global staffing by geographic area:

 

     December 31,         
   2010      2009      % Change  
United States      2,333         2,144         9 %
International      2,128         1,834         16 %
                    
Total      4,461         3,978         12 %
                    

Global revenue of $2,032.0 million in 2010 increased $234.8 million compared to the same period in 2009, reflecting good growth in both ratings and MA revenue. The growth in ratings revenue is primarily due to strong issuance activity in 2010 within the corporate finance, financial institution and public finance debt markets. The growth in MA is due to higher revenue across all LOBs. Transaction revenue accounted for 44% of global MCO revenue in 2010 compared to 37% in the same period of the prior year. Transaction revenue in the MIS segment represents the initial rating of a new debt issuance as well as other one-time fees while relationship revenue represents the recurring monitoring of a rated debt obligation and/or entities that issue such obligations, as well as revenue from programs such as commercial paper, medium-term notes and shelf registrations. In the MA segment, relationship revenue represents subscription-based revenues and software maintenance revenue. Transaction revenue in MA represents software license fees and revenue from the professional services line of business which offers credit risk management advisory and training services, which are typically sold on a per-engagement basis.

U.S. revenue increased $168.7 million over 2009 reflecting growth in all ratings LOBs, most notably in rated issuance volumes for bank loans and speculative-grade corporate bonds. There was also good growth over the prior year in U.S. public finance and CREF rated issuance. Additionally, there was growth in all LOBs within the MA segment, most notably in RMS.

International revenue increased $66.1 million compared to the same period in 2009 primarily reflecting growth in CFG revenue, particularly in speculative-grade ratings in EMEA, coupled with higher banking related revenue across all regions. Additionally, the growth

 

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reflects higher revenue across all MA LOBs, primarily from within the Asia and the Americas regions. These increases were partially offset by declines in most asset classes within SFG as well as declines in investment-grade rated issuance within the EMEA region.

Operating expenses were $604.8 million in 2010, an increase of $72.4 million from the same period in 2009 and were primarily due to both higher compensation and non-compensation costs. Compensation costs increased approximately $63 million reflecting approximately $30 million higher incentive compensation primarily resulting from greater achievement against targeted results compared to achievement against targeted results in the prior year period, a $7 million global profit sharing contribution due to the Company’s growth in diluted EPS over 2009 and approximately $29 million higher salaries and related employee benefits primarily due to annual merit increases coupled with higher headcount in both operating segments to support business growth. Non-compensation costs increased approximately $9 million reflecting higher professional service costs for ongoing investments in technology infrastructure as well as higher travel-related costs which reflects improving business conditions compared to 2009.

SG&A expenses of $588.0 million in 2010 increased $92.3 million from the same period in 2009. Non-compensation expenses increased approximately $47 million over the prior year primarily reflecting higher professional service costs relating to ongoing investments in technology infrastructure as well as higher legal and litigation-related costs related to ongoing matters. Compensation costs increased approximately $45 million primarily due to higher salaries and related employee benefits which reflects annual merit increases and headcount growth in sales personnel within MA as well as in support areas such as compliance and IT. Additionally there was approximately $10 million higher incentive compensation costs compared to 2009 which primarily reflects greater achievement against targeted results compared to the achievement of targeted results in the prior year period. Furthermore, there was an approximate $6 million profit sharing contribution in 2010 due to the Company’s year-over-year growth in diluted EPS.

Restructuring expense in 2009 reflects severance costs associated with the 2009 Restructuring Plan approved on March 27, 2009 and adjustments to the previous estimates for both the 2007 and 2009 Restructuring Plans.

Operating income of $772.8 million, was up $85.3 million from the same period in 2009, reflecting the 13% increase in revenue being partially offset by the $149.5 million increase in expenses. Excluding the restructuring charge in 2009 and minor restructuring-related adjustments in both periods, operating income increased $67.9 million over 2009.

Interest (expense) income, net for the year ended December 31, 2010 was $(52.5) million, a $19.1 million increase in expense compared to the same period in 2009. The increase relates primarily to an interest expense reduction of approximately $12 million in the first quarter of 2009 for UTBs and other tax-related liabilities that did not recur in 2010. Also, there was an approximate $7 million increase in interest expense on borrowings which primarily reflects interest on the 2010 Senior Notes issued in the third quarter of 2010. Additionally, there was interest income related to the favorable settlement of Legacy Tax Matters of $2.5 million and $6.5 million in 2010 and 2009, respectively.

Other non-operating (expense) income, net of $(5.9) million in 2010 decreased $2.0 million compared to the prior year. This decrease primarily reflects FX losses of approximately $(5) million in 2010 compared to losses of approximately $(10) million in 2009. The FX losses in both periods primarily reflect the weakening of the euro to the British pound over both of the twelve month periods ended December 31, 2010 and 2009.

Moody’s ETR was 28.1% for the year ended December 31, 2010, down from 37.0% in 2009 and was primarily due to increased taxable income internationally; indefinite reinvestment of certain foreign earnings; utilization of foreign tax credits; lower state taxes; and a resolution of a non-U.S. tax audit resulting in a reduction of UTBs. Additionally, the 2009 ETR reflects a non-taxable $12 million interest expense reduction related to UTBs and other tax-related liabilities. The 2010 and 2009 tax expense included benefits of $2.1 million and $1.7 million, respectively, relating to the favorable resolution of Legacy Tax Matters (see “Contingencies – Legacy Tax Matters” below for further information). Excluding the Legacy Tax Matters in both years, the ETR in 2010 of 28.5% decreased 910 Bps from 2009.

Net Income for the year ended December 31, 2010 was $507.8 million, or $2.15 per diluted share, and increased $105.8 million, or $0.46 per diluted share, compared to the prior year. Included in the 2010 Net Income were tax benefits of approximately $36 million, or $0.15 per diluted share, relating to the indefinite reinvestment of certain foreign earnings, utilization of foreign tax credits and lower state taxes. Excluding benefits for favorable resolutions of Legacy Tax Matters in both 2010 and 2009, as well as the restructuring charge in 2009 and related adjustments in both years, Net Income increased $98.6 million, or 24%, to $503.3 million, resulting in a $0.43, or 25%, increase in diluted EPS compared to the prior year.

 

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Segment Results

Moody’s Investors Service

The table below provides a summary of revenue and operating results, followed by further insight and commentary:

 

     Year Ended December 31,      % Change
Favorable
(Unfavorable)
 
     2010      2009     
Revenue:         

Corporate finance (CFG)

   $ 563.9       $ 408.2         38

Structured finance (SFG)

     290.8         304.9         (5 )% 

Financial institutions (FIG)

     278.7         258.5         8

Public, project and infrastructure finance (PPIF)

     271.6         246.1         10
                    

Total external revenue

     1,405.0         1,217.7         15

Intersegment royalty

     61.3         60.0         2
                    

Total MIS revenue

     1,466.3         1,277.7         15
Expenses:         

Operating and SG&A

     783.0         680.1         (15 )% 

Restructuring

     0.1         9.1         99

Depreciation and amortization

     33.8         31.3         (8 )% 
                    

Total

     816.9         720.5         (13 )% 
                    
Operating income    $ 649.4       $ 557.2         17
                    

The following is a discussion of external MIS revenue as well as operating expenses:

Global MIS revenue of $1,405.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2010 increased $187.3 million compared to the same period in 2009. The increase reflects strong growth in rated issuance volumes for high-yield corporate debt and bank loans within CFG as well as good growth from public finance and banking related issuance within PPIF and FIG, respectively. These increases were partially offset by declines in derivatives and investment-grade corporate debt rated issuance volumes within SFG and CFG, respectively. Transaction revenue for MIS in 2010 was 57% of total revenue compared to 50% in 2009, with the increase primarily reflecting the aforementioned strong rated issuance in the high-yield corporate debt and bank loan sectors within CFG.

In the U.S., revenue was $815.4 million in 2010, an increase of $152.3 million, or 23%, compared to the same period in 2009. The increase relates primarily to strong rated issuance volumes in bank loans and high-yield corporate debt within CFG, higher rated issuance in the CREF sector within SFG and good growth in PPIF. These increases were partially offset by declines in derivatives and consumer asset-backed securities rated issuance within SFG.

Non-U.S. revenue was $589.6 million in 2010, an increase of $35.0 million, or 6%, over the prior year. The increase reflects growth in banking related revenue across all non-U.S. regions as well as higher speculative-grade corporate debt issuance in the EMEA region. Additionally, there was higher revenue in 2010 for Indicative Ratings and Corporate Family Ratings in the EMEA region. These increases were partially offset by declines within the EMEA region in most asset classes within SFG coupled with lower rated issuance volumes for investment-grade corporate debt.

Global CFG revenue of $563.9 million in 2010 increased $155.7 million from the prior year primarily due to higher rated issuance volumes in the high-yield corporate debt and bank loan sectors, coupled with an increase in Indicative Ratings and Corporate Family Ratings. The aforementioned growth was partially offset by declines in rated issuance for investment-grade corporate debt which reflects a strong prior year comparative period where many companies were refinancing their debt ahead of expected maturities. Transaction revenue represented 73% of total CFG revenue in 2010, compared to 64% in the prior year. In the U.S., revenue in 2010 was $369.5 million, or 47% higher than the same period in 2009. This increase is primarily due to higher bank loan issuance reflecting the narrowing of credit spreads and the low interest rate environment in 2010 which has resulted in a high volume of refinancing activity coupled with increased issuance related to leveraged buy-out activity. Additionally, there was higher speculative-grade corporate debt issuance reflecting increased investor appetite for high-yield instruments as stability has gradually returned to the corporate credit markets. Internationally, revenue of $194.4 million in 2010 increased 24% compared to the same period in 2009, driven primarily by growth in rated issuance volumes for speculative-grade corporate debt across all regions which reflects the aforementioned increased

 

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investor confidence in the high-yield markets coupled with higher revenue from Indicative Ratings and Corporate Family Ratings in the EMEA region. These increases were partially offset by declines in investment-grade rated issuance in EMEA reflecting a strong comparative prior year period where many companies were refinancing their debt ahead of expected maturities.

Global SFG revenue of $290.8 million in 2010 decreased $14.1 million compared to the same period in 2009 reflecting lower revenue in the derivatives and consumer asset-backed securities asset classes partially offset by increased rated issuance activity in U.S. CREF. Transaction revenue represented 43% of total SFG revenue in 2010 compared to 41% in the prior year period. In the U.S., revenue of $142.9 million in 2010 increased $0.8 million compared to the prior year reflecting growth in both commercial mortgage-backed securities and real estate investment trusts rated issuance resulting from the low interest rate environment and narrowing credit spreads in these sectors. The aforementioned growth was almost completely offset by continued declines in the derivatives sector as well as declines in consumer asset-backed securities issuance reflecting continued lack of investor demand as well as regulatory uncertainties pertaining to these asset classes. Non-U.S. revenue of $147.9 million in 2010 decreased $14.9 million compared to the prior year, reflecting declines in most asset classes within the EMEA region as uncertainties surrounding the EU sovereign debt markets at various times throughout 2010 has reduced investor demand for structured products.

Global FIG revenue of $278.7 million in 2010 increased $20.2 million from the prior year, primarily reflecting higher banking related revenue. Transaction revenue increased to 37% of global FIG revenue, up from 31% in the prior year period. In the U.S., revenue of $114.4 million in 2010 increased $7.1 million compared to the prior year. The growth over the prior year was driven by higher insurance related rated issuance which reflected insurers taking advantage of the low interest rate environment in 2010 to refinance debt ahead of expected maturities as well as issuance to fund acquisition activity. Outside the U.S., revenue in 2010 was $164.3 million, or 9% higher than in the prior year, and was primarily due to growth in banking revenue across all non-U.S. regions, most notably in the Asia and Americas regions, compared to a challenging prior year period.

Global PPIF revenue was $271.6 million in 2010, an increase of $25.5 million compared to the same period in 2009, primarily reflecting increases in public and project finance revenue. Revenue generated from new transactions was 59% of total PPIF revenue in 2010, unchanged from the prior year period. In the U.S., revenue for the year ended December 31, 2010 of $188.6 million increased 16% over the prior year primarily due to growth in public finance revenue which reflects modest price increases compared to the prior year coupled with issuance relating to the Build America Bond Program which was implemented in the U.S. as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Additionally, there was higher project and infrastructure finance revenue as issuers took advantage of the low interest rate environment and the Build America Bond Program to fund capital expenditure needs. Outside the U.S., PPIF revenue decreased 1% compared to prior year reflecting declines in infrastructure and project finance revenue within the EMEA region due to uncertainties in the EU debt markets at various times during 2010 coupled with a strong comparative prior year period. These decreases were offset by higher project finance rated issuance in the Asia and Americas regions.

Operating and SG&A expenses in 2010 increased $102.9 million compared to the prior year and reflected increases in compensation and non-compensation expenses of approximately $63 million and $40 million, respectively. The increase in compensation expenses relates to higher salaries reflecting annual merit increases, modest headcount growth within the ratings LOBs as well as support areas such as compliance and IT for which the costs are allocated to each segment based on a revenue-split methodology. Additionally, there was higher incentive compensation due to greater achievement against targeted results in 2010 compared to the achievement against targeted results in the prior year. Furthermore, there was a profit sharing contribution in 2010 reflecting the Company’s diluted EPS growth over 2009. The increase in non-compensation expenses primarily reflects higher legal and litigation- related costs relating to ongoing matters and higher IT consulting costs relating to investments in technology infrastructure.

The restructuring charge of $9.1 million in the prior year period reflects costs associated with the 2009 Restructuring Plan approved in the first quarter of 2009 as well as minor adjustments made to both the 2009 and 2007 restructuring plans.

Operating income in 2010 of $649.4 million, which includes the intersegment royalty revenue, increased $92.2 million from the prior year and reflects the 15% increase in total MIS revenue exceeding the 13% increase in operating expenses. Excluding the restructuring-related amounts in both periods, operating income in 2010 was $649.5 million, an increase of $83.2 million from the same period in 2009.

 

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Moody’s Analytics

The table below provides a summary of revenue and operating results, followed by further insight and commentary:

 

     Year Ended December 31,      % Change
Favorable
(Unfavorable)
 
     2010      2009     
Revenue:         

Research, data and analytics (RD&A)

   $ 425.0       $ 413.6         3

Risk management software (RMS)

     173.2         145.1         19

Professional services

     28.8         20.8         38
                    

Total

     627.0         579.5         8
                    
Expenses:         

Operating and SG&A (including intersegment royalty)

     471.1         408.0         (15 )% 

Restructuring

             8.4         100

Depreciation and amortization

     32.5         32.8         1
                    

Total

     503.6         449.2         (12 )% 
                    
Operating income    $ 123.4       $ 130.3         (5 )% 
                    

Global MA revenue in 2010 increased $47.5 million over the prior year primarily reflecting growth in all three LOBs. Recurring revenue, which includes subscriptions and software maintenance fees, comprised 85% of MA revenue in 2010, down from 89% in the same period of 2009.

Revenue in the U.S. increased $16.4 million, or 6%, over the prior year and reflected growth across all LOBs, most notably in RMS. International revenue, which represented 56% of total MA revenue in both 2010 and 2009, increased 10% over the prior year reflecting growth in all LOBs.

Global RD&A revenue, which comprised over 67% of total MA revenue in both 2010 and 2009, increased $11.4 million, or 3%, over the prior year. The increase reflects greater demand for products that support analysis for investment and commercial credit applications and also the gradual stabilization among capital markets customers as disruption from the global financial crisis recedes. Global RMS revenue in 2010 increased $28.1 million over the prior year primarily due to the final delivery and client acceptance of software licenses and implementations, primarily from within the U.S and Asia regions. Revenue from professional services increased $8.0 million compared to 2009, with approximately 40% of the growth related to the acquisition of CSI in the fourth quarter of 2010. Revenue in the RMS and professional services LOBs are subject to quarterly volatility resulting from the variable nature of project timing and the concentration of revenue in a relatively small number of engagements.

Operating and SG&A expenses in 2010, which include the intersegment royalty for the right to use and distribute content, data and products developed by MIS, increased $63.1 million compared to 2009 reflecting both higher compensation and non-compensation costs of approximately $46 million and $16 million, respectively. The increase in compensation costs is primarily due to higher incentive compensation reflecting greater achievement against targeted results in 2010 compared to achievement against targeted results in the prior year coupled with a profit sharing contribution in 2010 reflecting the Company’s diluted EPS growth over 2009. Additionally, there were higher salaries reflecting annual merit increases and headcount increases to support business growth coupled with an increase in commission expense compared to the prior year reflecting higher MA sales. The increase in non-compensation costs reflects higher legal and litigation- related costs relating to ongoing matters that Moody’s Corporation is exposed to, which are allocated to MA as part of the allocation of overhead and corporate expenses which is based on a revenue-split methodology. Additionally, the increase in non-compensation expenses reflects higher travel and entertainment costs due to improving business conditions over the prior year.

The restructuring charge of $8.4 million in the prior year period reflects severance costs associated with the 2009 Restructuring Plan approved in the first quarter of 2009, which includes costs related to the divestiture of non-strategic assets and contract termination costs for office closures as well as minor adjustments made to original estimates for the 2007 Restructuring Plan.

Operating income of $123.4 million in 2010, which includes the intersegment royalty expense, decreased $6.9 million compared to the prior year, reflecting the $54.4 million increase in total expenses exceeding the $47.5 million increase in revenue. Excluding the 2009 restructuring charge and minor restructuring-related adjustments for both restructuring plans in 2009, operating income decreased $15.3 million from the same period in 2009.

 

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Year Ended December 31, 2009 compared with Year Ended December 31, 2008

Executive summary

Moody’s revenue for the year ended December 31, 2009 totaled $1,797.2 million, an increase of $41.8 million from 2008. Excluding the negative impact from changes in FX translation rates, revenue in 2009 increased $76.6 million compared to the same period in 2008. Total expenses for 2009 were $1,109.7 million, an increase of $102.5 million from 2008, and included approximately $32 million in favorable changes from FX translation rates. Operating income of $687.5 million in 2009 decreased $60.7 million compared to 2008. Excluding the impact of restructuring in both years, operating income was $705.0 million, a decrease of $40.7 million from the prior year. Diluted EPS of $1.69 in 2009 included a $0.05 unfavorable impact from restructuring actions and a $0.04 favorable impact relating to the resolution of a Legacy Tax Matter. Excluding the aforementioned items in 2009, diluted EPS of $1.70 decreased $0.12, or 7%, from $1.82 in 2008, which excludes the prior year favorable per-share impacts of $0.01 and $0.04 for restructuring and the resolution of Legacy Tax Matters, respectively.

Moody’s Corporation

The table below provides a summary of revenue and operating results, followed by further insight and commentary:

 

     Year Ended December 31,     % Change
Favorable
(Unfavorable)
 
   2009     2008    
Revenue:       

United States

   $ 920.8      $ 910.1        1 %
                  

International:

      

EMEA

     624.7        603.1        4 %

Other

     251.7        242.2        4 %
                  

Total International

     876.4        845.3        4 %
                  

Total

     1,797.2        1,755.4        2 %
                  
Expenses:       

Operating

     532.4        493.3        (8 )%

SG&A

     495.7        441.3        (12 )%

Restructuring

     17.5        (2.5 )     NM   

Depreciation and amortization

     64.1        75.1        15 %
                  

Total

     1,109.7        1,007.2        (10 )%
                  
Operating income    $ 687.5      $ 748.2        (8 )%
                  
Interest (expense) income, net    $ (33.4 )   $ (52.2 )     36 %
Other non-operating (expense) income, net    $ (7.9 )   $ 33.8        (123 )%
Net income attributable to Moody’s    $ 402.0      $ 457.6        (12 )%
Diluted EPS    $ 1.69      $ 1.87        (10 )% 

The table below shows Moody’s global staffing by geographic area:

 

     December 31,         
   2009      2008      % Change  
United States      2,144         2,130         1 %
International      1,834         1,817         1 %
                    
Total      3,978         3,947         1 %
                    

Global revenue of $1,797.2 million in 2009 increased $41.8 million compared to 2008 with modest growth in both MIS and MA. The MIS growth is reflective of gradual improvement in the credit markets throughout 2009 which resulted in increased issuance volumes for fundamental ratings, particularly for investment-grade and high-yield corporate debt, partially offset by continued declines in structured finance issuance. The MA growth is primarily due to higher international RMS revenue which resulted from the Fermat acquisition made in the fourth quarter of 2008. Excluding the negative impact from changes in FX translation rates, Moody’s revenue in 2009 increased $76.6 million compared to 2008. Transaction revenue accounted for 37% of global MCO revenue in 2009 compared to 36% in the prior year.

 

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In the U.S., revenue increased $10.7 million with modest growth in MIS being partially offset by declines in MA. The increase in ratings revenue primarily reflects the aforementioned recovery in the investment-grade and high-yield corporate bond markets partially offset by declines in structured finance ratings. Revenue declined for all LOBs within MA.

International revenue of $876.4 million for 2009 was $31.1 million higher than 2008 and reflected growth in investment-grade and high-yield rated issuance within CFG as well as MA revenue which benefited from acquisitions made in the fourth quarter of 2008.

These increases were partially offset by significant declines in SFG revenue within MIS as well as approximately $35 million in unfavorable impact from changes in FX translation rates.

Total expenses for 2009 were $1,109.7 million, an increase of $102.5 million from 2008. The increase primarily reflects the impact of acquisitions made in the fourth quarter of 2008, costs associated with the 2009 Restructuring Plan and higher incentive compensation reflecting greater achievement against 2009 targeted results. Additionally, there were higher rent and occupancy costs in 2009 related to the Canary Wharf lease in London, higher professional services costs which include legal and IT consulting as well as a charge for an international VAT matter. The aforementioned increases were partially offset by an approximate $32 million favorable impact from changes in FX translation rates.

Operating expenses were $532.4 million, an increase of $39.1 million from the prior year, resulting primarily from higher compensation costs of approximately $28 million compared to the same period in 2008. Compensation costs were $445.1 million, an increase of 7% from prior year, primarily reflecting higher incentive compensation costs due to greater achievement against 2009 targeted results compared to achievement against targeted results in the prior year. Non-compensation expenses in 2009 were $87.3 million, an increase of approximately $11 million compared to the same period in 2008. The increase is due to higher professional service costs which include technology consulting costs associated with an investment in IT infrastructure. The increase in both compensation and non-compensation expenses were partially offset by favorable changes in FX translation rates.

SG&A expenses of $495.7 million were $54.4 million higher than prior year. The increase is primarily due to higher non-compensation costs, which reflect higher rent expense relating to the Canary Wharf lease in London, additional bad debt expense due to the deterioration of liquidity caused by general economic conditions, higher professional services costs which include consulting as well as higher costs associated with investment in technology infrastructure. Compensation costs of $250.1 million increased 7% over the same period in 2008 primarily reflecting higher incentive compensation costs due to greater achievement against 2009 targeted results compared to achievement against targeted results in the prior year.

Restructuring expenses of $17.5 million in 2009 reflect costs associated with headcount reductions, the divestiture of non-strategic assets and contract terminations in accordance with the 2009 Restructuring Plan, as well as adjustments to previous estimates for the 2007 Restructuring Plan. The restructuring benefit of $2.5 million in 2008 reflects adjustments to previous estimates for severance and contract termination costs associated with the 2007 Restructuring Plan.

Depreciation and amortization of $64.1 million decreased $11.0 million from 2008 primarily due to the following items in 2008: an approximate $11 million impairment of certain software and database intangible assets within the MA segment, a $4.5 million write-off of acquired in-process technology related to the acquisition of Fermat and approximately $4 million of accelerated depreciation related to the closure of the Company’s New Jersey office. The absence of these items in 2009 was partially offset by higher amortization of intangible assets in 2009 associated with business acquisitions made in the fourth quarter of 2008.

Operating income of $687.5 million decreased $60.7 million from prior year reflecting the 10% increase in operating expenses being partially offset by modest revenue increases. Excluding the impact of restructuring in both years, operating income of $705.0 million decreased $40.7 million. Changes in FX translation rates had a $3 million unfavorable impact on operating income in 2009.

Interest (expense) income, net for the year ended December 31, 2009 was ($33.4) million, a decrease of $18.8 million compared to the same period in 2008. The change is due primarily to an interest expense reduction of approximately $12 million for tax and tax-related liabilities recorded in the first quarter of 2009 coupled with a $6.5 million favorable resolution of a Legacy Tax Matter in the second quarter of 2009. Interest expense on borrowings decreased approximately $15 million compared to 2008 reflecting lower short-term debt balances coupled with lower interest rates on borrowings under the 2007 Facility and CP Program. During 2009, the Company has utilized its operating cash flow to reduce short-term borrowings by 38%. Additionally, interest income decreased approximately $16 million compared to the same period in 2008 reflecting lower interest rate yields on cash and cash equivalents balances.

Other non-operating income (expense), net in 2009 was $(7.9) million compared to $33.8 million in 2008. The change reflects FX losses of $9.5 million in 2009 compared to FX gains of $24.7 million in 2008 primarily reflecting the weakening of the euro to the British pound in 2009 as well as $11 million in favorable adjustments for Legacy Tax Matters in 2008.

 

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Moody’s effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2009 was 37.0%, or 30 bps higher than the prior year. Excluding Legacy Tax Matters in both years, the ETR in 2009 of 37.6% increased 50 bps from 2008.

Net Income in 2009 was $402.0 million, or $1.69 per diluted share, and decreased $55.6 million, or $0.18 per diluted share, compared to 2008. Excluding the impact of restructuring and Legacy Tax Matters in both years, Net Income in 2009 decreased $40.6 million to $404.7 million, or $1.70 per diluted share, from $1.82 in the same period of 2008.

Segment Results

Moody’s Investors Service

The table below provides a summary of revenue and operating results, followed by further analysis and commentary:

 

     Year Ended December 31,     % Change Favorable
(Unfavorable)
 
     2009      2008    
Revenue:        

Corporate finance (CFG)

   $ 408.2       $ 307.0        33 %

Structured finance (SFG)

     304.9         404.7        (25 )%

Financial institutions (FIG)

     258.5         263.0        (2 )%

Public, project and infrastructure finance (PPIF)

     246.1         230.0        7 %
                   

Total external revenue

     1,217.7         1,204.7        1 %

Intersegment royalty

     60.0         63.6        (6 )% 
                   

Total MIS Revenue

     1,277.7         1,268.3        1
                   
Expenses:        

Operating and SG&A

     680.1         636.0        (7 )%

Restructuring

     9.1         (1.6 )     NM   

Depreciation and amortization

     31.3         33.3        6 %
                   

Total

     720.5         667.7        (8 )%
                   
Operating income    $ 557.2       $ 600.6        (7 )%
                   

The following is a discussion of external MIS revenue as well as operating expenses:

Global MIS revenue in 2009 of $1,217.7 million increased $13.0 million, or $35.9 million excluding unfavorable changes in FX translation rates, compared to 2008. The increase from prior year reflects growth in rated issuance in the investment-grade and high-yield sectors of CFG coupled with increases in public and infrastructure ratings revenue within PPIF. These increases were partially offset by declines in new issuance in SFG and FIG. Transaction revenue for total MIS in 2009 was 50% compared to 49% in 2008.

In the U.S., revenue was $663.1 million, an increase of $18.1 million or 3% from prior year reflecting strong growth in ratings of investment and speculative-grade corporate debt partially offset by new issuance declines which were significant in SFG and modest in FIG. Non-U.S. revenue was $554.6 million and decreased 1% from the same period in 2008. The decrease primarily reflects declines in all international regions within SFG partially offset by growth in CFG and PPIF in EMEA due to higher issuance volumes.

Global CFG revenue of $408.2 million increased $101.2 million from the prior year which included approximately $6 million of unfavorable impact from changes in FX translation rates. The global increase is due primarily to higher rated issuance volume in the investment-grade and high-yield sectors. Transaction revenue represented 64% of total CFG revenue, an increase from 54% in the prior year. In the U.S., revenue was $251.2 million, an increase of $68.1 million compared to 2008, reflecting strong growth in both investment-grade and high-yield bond issuance. U.S. revenue accounted for 62% of global CFG compared to 60% in the prior year period. The growth in investment-grade rated issuance reflects an increase in the number of companies refinancing debt ahead of expected maturities to take advantage of favorable interest rates within the corporate finance markets and to improve liquidity. The activity in the U.S. high-yield markets increased revenue by approximately $45 million, with 68% of the growth occurring in the second half of 2009. The growth in speculative-grade rated issuance reflects increased investor confidence in the high-yield market and the continued narrowing of interest rate spreads compared to U.S. Treasuries which began in the second quarter of 2009. Internationally, revenue of $157.0 million in 2009 increased 27% compared to the same period in 2008, driven primarily by growth in investment-grade issuance within EMEA and high-yield issuance across all non-U.S. regions, reflecting early debt refinancing activities.

 

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Global SFG revenue of $304.9 million decreased $99.8 million reflecting the continued slowdown of new issuance in the securitization markets due to reduced investor appetite, continued high interest rate spreads and higher credit enhancements. The continued decline in new issuance resulted in transaction revenue in 2009 representing 41% of total SFG revenue, compared to 50% in 2008. In the U.S., revenue of $142.1 million decreased $42.1 million with the most prevalent declines in the Derivatives, ABS and CMBS sectors. Non-U.S. revenue was $162.8 million and declined $57.7 million from 2008, with 41% of the decrease occurring within EMEA Derivatives. Unfavorable changes in FX translation rates had a $7 million impact on international SFG revenue for the year ended December 31, 2009.

Global FIG revenue of $258.5 million declined $4.5 million from the prior year, with declines in the U.S. being partially offset by modest growth internationally. Transaction revenue declined to 31% of total FIG revenue, compared to 33% in the same period of 2008. In the U.S., 2009 revenue of $107.3 million decreased $10.5 million from 2008, primarily within specialty insurance which reflects continued contraction within the sector. Outside the U.S., revenue was $151.2 million, an increase of 4% from the prior year due primarily to growth in the banking sector in the Canada and Latin America regions. Unfavorable changes in FX translation rates negatively impacted international FIG revenue by approximately $6 million.

Global PPIF revenue was $246.1 million and increased $16.1 million compared to the same period in 2008 with increases in public finance and infrastructure finance being partially offset by declines in U.S. municipal structured products. Revenue generated from new transactions comprised 59% of global PPIF, unchanged from the same period of 2008. In the U.S., PPIF revenue increased $2.6 million compared to 2008 with growth in public finance reflecting higher issuance related to the Build America Bond Program which was implemented in the U.S. as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, coupled with higher project and infrastructure revenue. These increases were partially offset by declines in issuance for municipal structured products which reflects declines in bank capacity and a lower market penetration for insured transactions. Outside the U.S., PPIF revenue increased $13.5 million, or 19% over 2008, reflecting growth in infrastructure finance and public finance revenue in EMEA partially offset by declines in project finance in Asia. Excluding the $4 million unfavorable impact of changes in FX translation rates, international revenue grew $17.7 million compared to the same period in 2008.

Operating and SG&A expenses in 2009 increased $44.1 million, reflecting increases in compensation and non-compensation costs of approximately $26 million and $18 million, respectively. The increase in compensation costs compared to 2008 related to higher incentive compensation due to greater achievement against 2009 targeted results being partially offset by cost savings realized from the 2007 and 2009 Restructuring Plans, $6 million of senior executive severance costs included in 2008 and the impact of favorable changes in FX translation rates. The increase in non-compensation costs reflects higher rent and occupancy costs for the Canary Wharf Lease, higher professional services costs which include legal and IT consulting and a higher allowance for uncollectible accounts due to the deterioration of liquidity caused by general economic conditions. Additionally, there was a charge in 2009 for an international VAT matter.

Restructuring expenses reflect costs associated with the 2009 Restructuring Plan as well as adjustments made to previous estimates for the 2007 Restructuring Plan.

Depreciation and amortization of $31.3 million decreased $2.0 million from the prior year and was primarily due to the 2008 accelerated depreciation for the New Jersey office facility closure being partially offset by higher depreciation relating to costs capitalized for ongoing IT systems projects which were placed in service during 2009.

Operating income of $557.2 million was $43.4 million lower than 2008 primarily reflecting the 8% increase in total expenses. Changes in FX translation rates had an immaterial impact on operating income during in 2009.

 

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Moody’s Analytics

The table below provides a summary of revenue and operating results, followed by further insight and commentary:

 

     Year Ended December 31,     % Change Favorable
(Unfavorable)
 
     2009      2008    
Revenue:        

Research, data and analytics (RD&A)

   $ 413.6       $ 418.7        (1 )%

Risk management software (RMS)

     145.1         108.8        33 %

Professional services

     20.8         23.2        (10 )%
                   

Total

     579.5         550.7        5 %
                   
Expenses:        

Operating and SG&A (including intersegment royalty)

     408.0         362.2        (13 )%

Restructuring

     8.4         (0.9 )     NM   

Depreciation and amortization

     32.8         41.8        22 %
                   

Total

     449.2         403.1        (11 )%
                   
Operating income    $ 130.3       $ 147.6        (12 )%
                   

Global MA revenue increased $28.8 million, with all of the growth generated internationally, and included a negative $12 million impact from changes in FX translation. Recurring revenue comprised 89% of total revenue in 2009, slightly lower than the 91% in 2008 reflecting higher RMS license and service revenue which is primarily transaction-based.

In the U.S., revenue of $257.7 million decreased 3%, reflecting declines across all LOB’s. International revenue of $321.8 million was $36.2 million higher than in 2008, primarily reflecting strong growth in RMS resulting from the Fermat acquisition in the fourth quarter of 2008.

Global RD&A revenue, which comprises 71% of total MA in 2009, was down slightly compared to 2008 reflecting modestly higher attrition due to contraction among capital markets customers offset by demand for products that support analysis for investment and commercial credit applications. U.S. revenue was $212.5 million, a decrease of $3.7 million from 2008. Internationally, revenue totaled $201.1 million, a decrease of $1.4 million from the prior year.

Global RMS revenue increased $36.3 million compared to 2008, and was primarily due to the Fermat acquisition made in the fourth quarter of 2008. U.S. revenue of $42.1 million was down $1.7 million compared prior year, while international revenue of $103.0 million increased $38.0 million reflecting the aforementioned acquisition made in the fourth quarter of 2008.

Global professional services revenue decreased $2.4 million compared to the prior year primarily reflecting declines in training services in the U.S. and EMEA as companies reduced their spending on these services due to the poor capital markets and economic conditions during 2009.

Operating and SG&A expenses of $408.0 million increased $45.8 million from the prior year, reflecting higher compensation and non-compensation costs. Compensation costs of $229.1 million increased $18.2 million from the prior year and reflected additional headcount from acquisitions made in the fourth quarter of 2008 partially offset by lower incentive compensation resulting from lower achievement against 2009 targeted results compared to achievement against targeted results in the prior year. Non-compensation expenses were $118.9 million, an increase of $31.2 million compared to 2008, primarily due to higher rent and occupancy costs for the Canary Wharf Lease and higher expenses related to acquisitions made in the fourth quarter of 2008. The aforementioned increases for both compensation and non-compensation costs were partially offset by favorable changes in FX translation rates.

Restructuring expenses of $8.4 million reflect severance and contract termination costs associated with the divestiture of non-strategic assets as well as adjustments made to previous estimates for the 2009 and 2007 Restructuring Plans.

Depreciation and amortization expenses decreased $9.0 million from prior year, primarily due to adjustments recorded in 2008 relating to an approximate $11 million impairment of certain software and database intangible assets and a $4.5 million write-off of acquired in-process technology related to the acquisition of Fermat. The absence of these items in 2009 was partially offset by higher amortization of intangible assets during 2009 associated with business acquisitions made in the fourth quarter of 2008.

 

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Operating income of $130.3 million decreased $17.3 million compared to 2008, due to the 11% increase in expenses outpacing the 5% increase in revenue. Excluding restructuring in both years, operating income in 2009 was $138.7 million, a decrease of $8.0 million from the same period in 2008.

Non-GAAP Financial Measures:

In addition to its reported results, Moody’s has included in this MD&A certain adjusted results that the SEC defines as “non-GAAP financial measures.” Management believes that such non-GAAP financial measures, when read in conjunction with the Company’s reported results, can provide useful supplemental information for investors analyzing period to period comparisons of the Company’s performance. These non-GAAP financial measures relate to expenses and adjustments made to both the Company’s 2007 and 2009 Restructuring Plans and Legacy Tax Matters, further described in Note 10 and Note 17, respectively, to the Company’s consolidated financial statements. The table below shows Moody’s consolidated results for each of the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, adjusted to exclude the impact of the aforementioned items:

 

Amounts in millions, except per share
amounts
  Year Ended December 31,  
  2010     2009  
    As
Reported
    Restructuring (a)     Legacy
Tax (b)
    Non-GAAP
Financial
Measures
    As
Reported
    Restructuring (a)     Legacy
Tax (b)
    Non-GAAP
Financial
Measures
 
Total expenses   $ 1,259.2      $ (0.1   $      $ 1,259.1      $ 1,109.7      $ (17.5   $      $ 1,092.2   
Operating income   $ 772.8      $ 0.1      $      $ 772.9      $ 687.5      $ 17.5      $      $ 705.0   
Interest (expense) income, net   $ (52.5   $      $ (2.5   $ (55.0   $ (33.4   $      $ (6.5   $ (39.9
Provision for income taxes   $ 201.0      $      $ 2.1      $ 203.1      $ 239.1      $ 6.6      $ 1.7      $ 247.4   
Net income attributable to Moody's Corporation   $ 507.8      $ 0.1      $ (4.6   $ 503.3      $ 402.0      $ 10.9      $ (8.2   $ 404.7   
Earnings per share attributable to Moody's common shareholders   

Basic

  $ 2.16      $      $ (0.02   $ 2.14      $ 1.70      $ 0.05      $ (0.04   $ 1.71   

Diluted

  $ 2.15      $      $ (0.02   $ 2.13      $ 1.69      $ 0.05      $ (0.04   $ 1.70   
Amounts in millions, except per share
amounts
  Year Ended December 31,                          
  2008                          
    As
Reported
    Restructuring (a)     Legacy
Tax (b)
    Non-GAAP
Financial
Measures
                         
Total expenses   $ 1,007.2      $      $      $ 1,007.2           
Operating income   $ 748.2      $ (2.5   $      $ 745.7           
Interest (expense) income, net   $ (52.2   $      $ (2.3   $ (54.5        
Other non-operating income (expense), net   $ 33.8      $      $ (11.0   $ 22.8           
Provision for income taxes   $ 268.2      $ (0.9   $ (2.6   $ 264.7           
Net income attributable to Moody's Corporation   $ 457.6      $ (1.6   $ (10.7   $ 445.3           
Earnings per share attributable to Moody's common shareholders           

Basic

  $ 1.89      $ (0.01   $ (0.04   $ 1.84           

Diluted

  $ 1.87      $ (0.01   $ (0.04   $ 1.82           

 

(a) To exclude amounts related to the 2009 restructuring charge as well as minor adjustments related to both the 2009 and 2007 restructuring charges.

Additionally, includes the tax impacts of the aforementioned adjustments.

 

(b) To exclude benefits and related tax resulting from the resolution of certain legacy tax matters.

MARKET RISK

Foreign exchange risk:

Moody’s maintains operations in 25 countries outside the U.S. In 2010, approximately 45% and 46% of the Company’s revenue and expenses, respectively, were in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, principally in the GBP and the euro. As such, the Company is exposed to market risk from changes in FX rates. As of December 31, 2010, approximately 46% of Moody’s assets were located outside

 

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the United States. making the Company susceptible to fluctuations in FX rates. The effects of translating assets and liabilities of non-U.S. operations with non-U.S. functional currencies to the U.S. dollar are charged or credited to the cumulative translation adjustment account in the consolidated statements of shareholders’ equity (deficit).

The effects of revaluing assets and liabilities that are denominated in currencies other than an entity’s functional currency are charged to other income/expense in the Company’s consolidated statement of operations. Accordingly, the Company enters into foreign exchange forwards to mitigate the change in fair value on certain assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than an entity’s functional currency. If all foreign currencies in the Company’s foreign exchange forward portfolio were to devalue 10% compared to the U.S. dollar, there would be an approximate $10 million unfavorable impact to the fair value of the forward contracts. This unfavorable change in fair value of the foreign exchange forward contracts would be offset by favorable FX revaluation gains in future earnings on underlying assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than an entity’s functional currency. Additional information on the Company’s forward contracts can be found in Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements located in Item 8 of this Form 10K.

Credit and Interest rate risk:

The Company’s interest rate risk management objective is to reduce the funding cost and volatility to the Company and to alter the interest rate exposure to the desired risk profile. Moody’s uses interest rate swaps as deemed necessary to assist in accomplishing this objective.

The Company is exposed to interest rate risk as it relates to its floating rate $150 million 2008 Term Loan entered into on May 7, 2008. The Company entered into interest rate swaps with a total notional amount of $150 million to protect against fluctuations in the LIBOR-based variable interest rate. These swaps are adjusted to fair market value based on prevailing interest rates at the end of each reporting period and fluctuations related to unrealized gains and losses are recorded into AOCI, while net interest payments are recorded in interest expense (income), net in the consolidated statements of operations. A hypothetical change of 100bps in the LIBOR would result in an approximate $3 million change to the fair value of these interest rate swaps which would be recognized over the swaps remaining contractual term. Additional information on this interest rate swap is disclosed in Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements located in Item 8 of this Form 10K.

Additionally, the Company is exposed to interest rate risk on its various outstanding fixed rate debt for which the fair value of the outstanding fixed rate debt fluctuates based on changes in interest rates. The Company entered into interest rate swaps with a total notional amount of $300 million in the fourth quarter of 2010 to convert the fixed rate of interest on its $300 million Series 2005-1 Notes to a floating interest rate based on the 3 month LIBOR. These swaps are adjusted to fair market value based on prevailing interest rates at the end of each reporting period and fluctuations are recorded as a reduction or addition to the carrying value of the Series 2005-1 Notes, while net interest payments are recorded as interest expense/income in the Company’s consolidated statement of operations. A hypothetical change of 100bps in the LIBOR would result in an approximate $14 million change to the fair value of these interest rate swaps. Additional information on this interest rate swap is disclosed in Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements located in Item 8 of this Form 10K.

Moody’s aggregate cash and cash equivalents of $659.6 million at December 31, 2010 consisted of approximately $438 million located outside the U.S. Moody’s cash equivalents consist of investments in high-quality investment-grade securities within and outside the U.S. with maturities of three months or less when purchased. The Company manages its credit risk exposure by allocating its cash equivalents among various money market mutual funds and issuers of high-grade commercial paper and by limiting the amount it can invest with any single issuer. Short-term investments primarily consist of certificates of deposit and high quality investment-grade corporate bonds in Korea.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Cash Flow

The Company is currently financing its operations, capital expenditures and share repurchases through cash flow from operations and from financing activities. The Company had net repayments on short-term borrowings of $443.6 million during 2010 and issued $496.9 million in long-term debt as more fully discussed below.

The following is a summary of the changes in the Company’s cash flows followed by a brief discussion of these changes:

 

    Year Ended December 31,           Year Ended December 31,        
    2010     2009     $ Change
Favorable
(unfavorable)
    2009     2008     $ Change
Favorable
(unfavorable)
 
Net cash provided by operating activities   $ 653.3      $ 643.8      $ 9.5      $ 643.8      $ 539.7      $ 104.1   
Net cash used in investing activities   $ (228.8 )   $ (93.8 )   $ (135.0   $ (93.8 )   $ (319.3 )   $ 225.5   
Net cash used in financing activities   $ (241.3 )   $ (348.8 )   $ 107.5      $ (348.8 )   $ (349.8 )   $ 1.0   

 

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Net cash provided by operating activities

Year ended December 31, 2010 compared to the year ended December 31, 2009:

The $9.5 million increase in net cash flows provided by operating activities resulted from an increase in net income of $106.3 million, which was partially offset by the following:

 

 

A $27.1 million reduction in cash flow related to a non-cash benefit from deferred income taxes primarily related to basis differences on non-U.S. earnings that are permanently reinvested as well as accruals for legal and litigation-related costs;

 

 

A $39.5 million reduction in cash flow due to changes in year-to-date accounts receivable balances from December 31, 2008 to December 31, 2009 compared to the same periods in 2010. The higher accounts receivable balances in 2010 reflect stronger fundamental ratings issuance in the fourth quarter of 2010 as compared to the same period in 2009 as well as timing of billings for certain software maintenance fees within the MA segment;

 

 

An approximate $108 million reduction in cash flows reflecting higher prepaid tax balances in 2010, which are included in other current assets, resulting from higher than anticipated estimated tax payments in excess of required amounts;

 

 

A $51.8 million increase in cash flows from UTBs primarily related to a $51 million payment in 2009 for the settlement of a tax audit for the 2001-2007 tax years;

 

 

An approximate $29 million increase in cash flows reflecting higher incentive compensation accruals as compared to the prior year, which are included in accounts payable and accrued liabilities. This increase reflects greater achievement against targeted results in 2010 compared to achievement against targeted results in the prior year and an accrual for a profit sharing contribution based on the Company’s diluted EPS growth over 2009.

Year ended December 31, 2009 compared to the year ended December 31, 2008

The following changes in non-cash and other one-time items impacted cash provided by operating activities in 2009 compared to 2008, relative to net income:

 

 

An $11.0 million decrease in depreciation and amortization expense due primarily to the following items in 2008: an approximate $11 million impairment of certain software and database intangibles within the MA segment, a $4.5 million write-off of acquired in-process technology relating to the Fermat acquisition and approximately $4 million of accelerated depreciation resulting from the closure of the Company’s New Jersey office. These decreases were partially offset by higher amortization of intangible assets in 2009 associated with business acquisitions made in the fourth quarter of 2008.

 

 

A $7.8 million non-cash reduction related to the resolution of a Legacy Tax Matter in the second quarter of 2008;

 

 

A $33.8 million increase in deferred income tax expense primarily relating to the settlement of a tax audit for the 2001 – 2007 tax years.

In addition to the non-cash items discussed above and a decrease in net income of $54.5 million, the $104.1 million increase in net cash flows provided by operating activities was also impacted by the following changes in assets and liabilities:

 

 

A $168.8 million increase attributed to a reduction in 2009 payments of accounts payable and accrued liabilities primarily reflecting lower 2008 incentive compensation payouts made in the first quarter of 2009 due to weaker financial performance compared to targets in 2008 compared to 2007 as well as lower accrued taxes resulting primarily from the decrease in pre-tax income;

 

 

A $32.4 million increase relating to the $17.5 million restructuring charge taken in 2009, of which $5 million had not been paid at December 31, 2009, coupled with lower restructuring payments in 2009 compared to 2008 attributable to the 2007 Restructuring Plan;

 

 

A $78.4 million increase due to a reduction in other current assets primarily related to prepaid taxes which were used for 2009 estimated income tax payments;

 

 

An increase in the growth of deferred rent of approximately $15 million due primarily to a free rent period associated with the Canary Wharf lease;

 

 

A $45.4 million decrease from other liabilities primarily reflecting a $17 million payment for interest to settle a tax audit for the 2001-2007 tax years and a $12 million reduction to accrued interest for UTB’s;

 

 

A decrease of approximately $33 million due to a refund of a deposit from the IRS in March 2008 in connection with a Legacy Tax Matter;

 

 

A $51.8 million decrease in UTBs primarily related to a payment for the settlement of a tax audit for the 2001-2007 tax years;

 

 

A $41.1 million decrease relating to 5% higher accounts receivable from December 31, 2008 reflecting higher billings related to the gradual improvement in the credit markets during 2009 compared to a 5% decrease in the December 31, 2008 balance compared to the prior year reflecting lower billings in the later part of 2008 compared to 2009.

 

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Net cash used in investing activities

Year ended December 31, 2010 compared to the year ended December 31, 2009:

Net cash used in investing activities in 2010 increased $135.0 million compared to the prior year period and reflected payments made, net of cash acquired, for the acquisition of CSI in the fourth quarter of 2010 of $148.6 million. The $11.7 million reduction in capital expenditures compared to 2009 reflects less costs relating to the build-out the Canary Wharf leased facility in London, England in the current year as the project nears completion partially offset by higher cash outlays relating to the Company’s continued investment in IT infrastructure.

Year ended December 31, 2009 compared to the year ended December 31, 2008:

The $225.5 million decrease in net cash used in investing activities was primarily attributed to:

 

 

A $240.5 million decrease in net cash used resulting from the 2008 acquisitions of Fermat, BQuotes, Financial Projections Limited and Enb Consulting.

Net cash used in financing activities

Year ended December 31, 2010 compared to the year ended December 31, 2009:

The $107.5 million decrease in cash used in financing activities was primarily attributed to:

 

 

Proceeds received of $496.9 million relating to the issuance of the 2010 Senior Notes in August 2010;

Partially offset by:

 

 

A $223.6 million increase in treasury shares repurchased. There were no share repurchases in 2009 as the Company instead utilized its operating cash flow to repay outstanding borrowings;

 

 

A $169.6 million increase in net repayments in short-term borrowings under the Company’s CP program and revolving credit facility.

Year ended December 31, 2009 compared to the year ended December 31, 2008:

The $1.0 million decrease in net cash flows used in financing activities was primarily attributed to:

 

 

A $592.9 million decrease in treasury shares repurchased in 2009 compared to 2008. The Company did not repurchase any shares during 2009;

Partially offset by:

 

 

Net repayments of $274.0 million on short-term borrowings resulting from the Company utilizing operating cash flow to repay outstanding borrowings in 2009 compared to net borrowings of $166.3 million in 2008;

 

 

A $150.0 million decrease relating to proceeds received in May 2008 from the 2008 Term Loan.

Future Cash Requirements

The Company believes that it has the financial resources needed to meet its cash requirements and expects to have positive operating cash flow for the next twelve months. Cash requirements for periods beyond the next twelve months will depend, among other things, on the Company’s profitability and its ability to manage working capital requirements. The Company may also borrow from various sources.

The Company remains committed to using its strong cash flow to create value for shareholders by investing in growing areas of the business, reinvesting in ratings quality initiatives, making selective acquisitions in related businesses, repurchasing stock and paying a dividend, all in a manner consistent with maintaining sufficient liquidity. In December of 2010 the Board of Directors of the Company declared a quarterly dividend of $0.115 per share of Moody’s common stock, payable on March 10, 2011 to shareholders of record at the close of business on February 20, 2011. This is an increase from $0.105 per share of Moody’s common stock paid in each of the preceding four quarters. The continued payment of dividends at this rate, or at all, is subject to the discretion of the Board. Additionally, the Company intends to repurchase shares at modest levels in 2011 subject to available cash flow and other capital allocation decisions. As of December 31, 2010, Moody’s had $1.2 billion of share repurchase authority remaining under its current program, which does not have an established expiration.

During the third quarter of 2010, the Company issued $500 million of 2010 Senior Notes due in September 2020, the proceeds of which were or will be used for general corporate purposes, including the redemption and repayment of short-term or long-term borrowings; working capital needs; capital expenditures; acquisitions of or investments in businesses or assets; and purchases of the Company’s common stock under its authorized stock repurchase program. At December 31, 2010, Moody’s had $1.2 billion of outstanding debt with $1 billion of additional capacity available. Principal payments on the 2008 Term Loan commenced in September 2010 and will continue through its maturity in accordance with the schedule of payments outlined in the “Indebtedness” section of this MD&A below.

 

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On February 6, 2008, the Company entered into a 17.5 year operating lease agreement to occupy six floors of an office tower located in the Canary Wharf district of London, England. The total base rent of the Canary Wharf Lease over its 17.5-year term is approximately 134 million GBP, and the Company will begin making base rent payments in 2011. In addition to the base rent payments the Company will be obligated to pay certain customary amounts for its share of operating expenses and tax obligations.

On October 20, 2006, the Company entered into an operating lease agreement with 7 World Trade Center, LLC for 589,945 square-feet of an office building located at 7WTC at 250 Greenwich Street, New York, New York, which is serving as Moody’s headquarters. The 7WTC Lease has an initial term of approximately 21 years with a total of 20 years of renewal options. The total base rent of the 7WTC Lease over its initial 21-year term is approximately $536 million including rent credits from the World Trade Center Rent Reduction Program promulgated by the Empire State Development Corporation. On March 28, 2007, the 7WTC lease agreement was amended for the Company to lease an additional 78,568 square feet at 7WTC. The additional base rent is approximately $106 million over a 20-year term. The total remaining lease payments as of December 31, 2010, including the aforementioned rent credits, are approximately $558 million, of which approximately $27 million will be paid during the year ended December 31, 2011.

During the year ended December 31, 2011, the Company anticipates making contributions of $13.6 million to its funded pension plan, $8.9 million to its unfunded pension plan and $0.6 million to its other-post retirement plans.

Indebtedness

The following table summarizes total indebtedness:

 

     December 31,  
     2010     2009  
2007 Facility    $      $   
Commercial paper, net of unamortized discount of $0.1 million at 2009             443.7   
Notes payable:     

Series 2005-1 Notes due 2015, net of fair value of interest rate swap of $3.7 million in 2010

     296.3        300.0   

Series 2007-1 Notes due 2017

     300.0        300.0   

2010 Senior Notes, net of unamortized discount of $3.0 million at 2010, due 2020

     497.0          
2008 Term Loan, various payments through 2013      146.3        150.0   
                
Total Debt      1,239.6        1,193.7   
Current portion      (11.3 )     (447.5 )
                
Total long-term debt    $ 1,228.3      $ 746.2   
                

2007 Facility

On September 28, 2007, the Company entered into a $1.0 billion five-year senior, unsecured revolving credit facility, expiring in September 2012. The 2007 Facility will serve, in part, to support the Company’s CP Program described below. Interest on borrowings is payable at rates that are based on LIBOR plus a premium that can range from 16.0 to 40.0 basis points of the outstanding borrowing amount depending on the Debt/EBITDA ratio. The Company also pays quarterly facility fees, regardless of borrowing activity under the 2007 Facility. The quarterly fees for the 2007 Facility can range from 4.0 to 10.0 basis points per annum of the facility amount, depending on the Company’s Debt/EBITDA ratio. The Company also pays a utilization fee of 5.0 basis points on borrowings outstanding when the aggregate amount outstanding exceeds 50% of the total facility. The 2007 Facility contains certain covenants that, among other things, restrict the ability of the Company and certain of its subsidiaries, without the approval of the lenders, to engage in mergers, consolidations, asset sales, transactions with affiliates and sale-leaseback transactions or to incur liens, as defined in the related agreement. The 2007 Facility also contains financial covenants that, among other things, require the Company to maintain a Debt/EBITDA ratio of not more than 4.0 to 1.0 at the end of any fiscal quarter.

Commercial Paper

On October 3, 2007, the Company entered into a private placement commercial paper program under which the Company may issue CP notes up to a maximum amount of $1.0 billion. Amounts available under the CP Program may be re-borrowed. The CP Program is supported by the Company’s 2007 Facility. The maturities of the CP Notes will vary, but may not exceed 397 days from the date of

 

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issue. The CP Notes are sold at a discount from par or, alternatively, sold at par and bear interest at rates that will vary based upon market conditions at the time of issuance. The rates of interest will depend on whether the CP Notes will be a fixed or floating rate. The interest on a floating rate may be based on the following: (a) certificate of deposit rate; (b) commercial paper rate; (c) the federal funds rate; (d) the LIBOR; (e) prime rate; (f) Treasury rate; or (g) such other base rate as may be specified in a supplement to the private placement agreement. The weighted average interest rate on CP borrowings outstanding was 0.3% as of December 31, 2009. The CP Program contains certain events of default including, among other things: non-payment of principal, interest or fees; entrance into any form of moratorium; and bankruptcy and insolvency events, subject in certain instances to cure periods.

Notes Payable

On August 19, 2010, the Company issued $500 million aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes in a public offering. The 2010 Senior Notes bear interest at a fixed rate of 5.50% and mature on September 1, 2020. Interest on the 2010 Senior Notes will be due semi-annually on September 1 and March 1 of each year, commencing March 1, 2011. The Company may prepay the 2010 Senior Notes, in whole or in part, at any time at a price equal to 100% of the principal amount being prepaid, plus accrued and unpaid interest and a Make Whole Amount. Additionally, at the option of the holders of the notes, the Company may be required to purchase all or a portion of the notes upon occurrence of a “Change of Control Triggering Event,” as defined in the Indenture, at a price equal to 101% of the principal amount thereof, plus accrued and unpaid interest to the date of purchase. The Indenture contains covenants that limit the ability of the Company and certain of its subsidiaries to, among other things, incur or create liens and enter into sale and leaseback transactions. In addition, the Indenture contains a covenant that limits the ability of the Company to consolidate or merge with another entity or to sell all or substantially all of its assets to another entity. The Indenture contains customary default provisions. In addition, an event of default will occur if the Company or certain of its subsidiaries fail to pay the principal of any indebtedness (as defined in the Indenture) when due at maturity in an aggregate amount of $50 million or more, or a default occurs that results in the acceleration of the maturity of the Company’s or certain of its subsidiaries’ indebtedness in an aggregate amount of $50 million or more. Upon the occurrence and during the continuation of an event of default under the Indenture, the notes may become immediately due and payable either automatically or by the vote of the holders of more than 25% of the aggregate principal amount of all of the notes then outstanding.

On September 7, 2007, the Company issued and sold through a private placement transaction, $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of its 6.06% Series 2007-1 Senior Unsecured Notes due 2017 pursuant to the 2007 Agreement. The Series 2007-1 Notes have a ten-year term and bear interest at an annual rate of 6.06%, payable semi-annually on March 7 and September 7. Under the terms of the 2007 Agreement, the Company may, from time to time within five years, in its sole discretion, issue additional series of senior notes in an aggregate principal amount of up to $500.0 million pursuant to one or more supplements to the 2007 Agreement. The Company may prepay the Series 2007-1 Notes, in whole or in part, at any time at a price equal to 100% of the principal amount being prepaid, plus accrued and unpaid interest and a Make Whole Amount. The 2007 Agreement contains covenants that limit the ability of the Company, and certain of its subsidiaries to, among other things: enter into transactions with affiliates, dispose of assets, incur or create liens, enter into any sale-leaseback transactions, or merge with any other corporation or convey, transfer or lease substantially all of its assets. The Company must also not permit its Debt/EBITDA ratio to exceed 4.0 to 1.0 at the end of any fiscal quarter.

On September 30, 2005, the Company issued and sold through a private placement transaction, $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of its Series 2005-1 Senior Unsecured Notes due 2015 pursuant to the 2005 Agreement. The Series 2005-1 Notes have a ten-year term and bear interest at an annual rate of 4.98%, payable semi-annually on March 30 and September 30. Proceeds from the sale of the Series 2005-1 Notes were used to refinance $300.0 million aggregate principal amount of the Company’s outstanding 7.61% senior notes which matured on September 30, 2005. In the event that Moody’s pays all, or part, of the Series 2005-1 Notes in advance of their maturity, such prepayment will be subject to a Make Whole Amount. The Series 2005-1 Notes are subject to certain covenants that, among other things, restrict the ability of the Company and certain of its subsidiaries, without the approval of the lenders, to engage in mergers, consolidations, asset sales, transactions with affiliates and sale-leaseback transactions or to incur liens, as defined in the related agreements.

2008 Term Loan

On May 7, 2008, Moody’s entered into a five-year, $150.0 million senior unsecured term loan with several lenders. Proceeds from the loan were used to pay off a portion of the CP outstanding. Interest on borrowings under the 2008 Term Loan is payable quarterly at rates that are based on LIBOR plus a margin that can range from 125 basis points to 175 basis points depending on the Company’s Debt/EBITDA ratio. The outstanding borrowings shall amortize beginning in 2010 in accordance with the schedule of payments set forth in the 2008 Term Loan outlined in the table below.

The 2008 Term Loan contains restrictive covenants that, among other things, restrict the ability of the Company to engage or to permit its subsidiaries to engage in mergers, consolidations, asset sales, transactions with affiliates and sale-leaseback transactions or to incur, or permit its subsidiaries to incur, liens, in each case, subject to certain exceptions and limitations. The 2008 Term Loan also limits the amount of debt that subsidiaries of the Company may incur. In addition, the 2008 Term Loan contains a financial covenant that requires the Company to maintain a Debt/EBITDA ratio of not more than 4.0 to 1.0 at the end of any fiscal quarter.

 

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The principal payments due on the Company’s long-term borrowings for each of the next five years are presented in the table below:

 

     2008 Term Loan      Series 2005-1 Notes      Total  

Year Ending December 31,                

                    
2011    $ 11.3       $       $ 11.3   
2012      71.2                 71.2   
2013      63.8                 63.8   
2014                        
2015              300.0         300.0   
                          
Total    $ 146.3       $ 300.0       $ 446.3   
                          

In the fourth quarter of 2010, the Company entered into interest rate swaps with a total notional amount of $300 million which will convert the fixed rate of interest on the Series 2005-1 Notes to a floating LIBOR-based interest rate. Also, on May 7, 2008, the Company entered into interest rate swaps with a total notional amount of $150 million to protect against fluctuations in the LIBOR-based variable interest rate on the 2008 Term Loan. Both of these interest rate swaps are more fully discussed in Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements.

INTEREST (EXPENSE) INCOME, NET

The following table summarizes the components of interest as presented in the consolidated statements of operations:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  
Income    $ 3.1      $ 2.5      $ 18.1   
Expense on borrowings      (52.2 )     (45.5 )     (60.0 )
UTBs and other tax related interest      (7.7 )     1.6        (13.7 )
Legacy Tax (a)      2.5        6.5        2.3   
Interest capitalized      1.8        1.5        1.1   
                        
Total    $ (52.5 )   $ (33.4 )   $ (52.2 )
                        
Interest paid    $ 44.0      $ 46.1      $ 59.5   
                        

 

(a) Represents a reduction of accrued interest related to the favorable resolution of Legacy Tax Matters, further discussed in Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements.

Net interest expense of $33.4 million in 2009 reflects a reduction of approximately $12 million related to tax and tax-related liabilities.

At December 31, 2010, the Company was in compliance with all covenants contained within all of the debt agreements. In addition to the covenants described above, the 2007 Facility, the 2005 Agreement, the 2007 Agreement, the 2010 Senior Notes and the 2008 Term Loan contain cross default provisions whereby default under one of the aforementioned debt instruments could in turn permit lenders under other debt instruments to declare borrowings outstanding under those instruments to be immediately due and payable.

The Company’s long-term debt, including the current portion, is recorded at cost except for the Series 2005-1 Notes which are carried at cost net of the fair value of an interest rate swap used to hedge the fair value of the note. The fair value and carrying value of the Company’s long-term debt as of December 31, 2010 and 2009 is as follows:

 

     December 31, 2010      December 31, 2009  
     Carrying Amount      Estimated Fair Value      Carrying Amount      Estimated Fair Value  
Series 2005-1 Notes    $ 296.3       $ 310.6       $ 300.0       $ 291.1   
Series 2007-1 Notes      300.0         321.3         300.0         298.6   
2010 Senior Notes      497.0         492.1                   
2008 Term Loan      146.3         146.3         150.0         150.0   
                                   
Total    $ 1,239.6       $ 1,270.3       $ 750.0       $ 739.7   
                                   

The fair value of the Company’s 2010 Senior Notes is based on quoted market prices. The fair value of the remaining long-term debt, which is not publicly traded, is estimated using discounted cash flows based on prevailing interest rates available to the Company for borrowings with similar maturities.

 

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Management may consider pursuing additional long-term financing when it is appropriate in light of cash requirements for operations, share repurchases and other strategic opportunities, which would result in higher financing costs.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

At December 31, 2010, Moody’s did not have any relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as special purpose or variable interest entities where Moody’s is the primary beneficiary, which would have been established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. As such, Moody’s is not exposed to any financing, liquidity, market or credit risk that could arise if it had engaged in such relationships.

Contractual Obligations

The following table presents payments due under the Company’s contractual obligations as of December 31, 2010:

 

            Payments Due by Period  

(in millions)

   Total      Less Than 1
Year
     1-3 Years      3-5 Years      Over 5 Years  
Indebtedness (1)    $ 1,713.7       $ 73.8       $ 253.5       $ 412.5       $ 973.9   
Operating lease obligations      864.0         58.7         122.4         107.2         575.7   
Purchase obligations      100.3         50.8         44.5         5.0           
Acquisition costs (2)      2.5                                 2.5   
Pension obligations (3)      86.6         23.2         6.4         8.5         48.5   
                                            
Total(4)    $ 2,767.1       $ 206.5       $ 426.8       $ 533.2       $ 1,600.6   
                                            

 

(1) Reflects principal payments, related interest and applicable fees due on the 2008 Term Loan, the Series 2005-1 Notes, the Series 2007-1 Notes, the 2010 Senior Notes, borrowings under the CP Program and the 2007 Facility, as described in Note 14 to the consolidated financial statements.

 

(2) Reflects a $2.5 million contingent cash payment related to the November 18, 2010, acquisition of CSI Global Education, Inc. The cash payment is dependent upon the achievement of a certain contractual milestone by January 2016.

 

(3) Reflects projected benefit payments for the next ten years relating to the Company’s U.S. unfunded Post-Retirement Benefit Plans described in Note 11 to the consolidated financial statements

 

(4) The table above does not include the Company’s net long-term tax liabilities of $238.8 million relating to UTP and Legacy Tax Matters, since the expected cash outflow of such amounts by period cannot be reasonably estimated.

2011 OUTLOOK

Moody’s outlook for 2011 is based on assumptions about many macroeconomic and capital market factors, including interest rates, corporate profitability and business investment spending, merger and acquisition activity, consumer borrowing and securitization, and the eventual withdrawal of government-sponsored economic stabilization initiatives. There is an important degree of uncertainty surrounding these assumptions and, if actual conditions differ from these assumptions, Moody’s results for the year may differ materially from the current outlook. The Company’s guidance assumes foreign currency translation at end-of-year exchange rates.

For Moody’s overall, the Company expects full-year 2011 revenue to increase in the high-single-digit percent range. Full-year 2011 expenses are expected to increase in the mid- to high-single-digit percent range. Full-year 2011 operating margin is projected between 38% and 40% and the effective tax rate is expected to be approximately 36 percent. Share repurchase is expected to continue at modest levels in 2011 subject to available cash flow and other capital allocation decisions. The Company expects diluted earnings per share for full-year 2011 in the range of $2.12 to $2.22.

For the global MIS business, revenue for full-year 2011 is expected to increase in the mid- to high-single-digit percent range. Within the U.S., MIS revenue is expected to increase in the mid-single-digit percent range, while non-U.S. revenue is expected to increase in the low-double-digit percent range. Corporate finance revenue is projected to increase in the high-single- to low-double-digit percent range. Structured finance revenue is expected to remain about flat. Revenue from financial institutions is expected to grow in the mid-single-digit percent range, while public, project and infrastructure finance revenue is projected to increase in the low-double-digit percent range.

For Moody’s Analytics, full-year 2011 revenue is expected to increase in the high-single- to low-double-digit percent range. Revenue growth is expected in the mid-single-digit percent range for research, data and analytics and in the low- to mid-single-digit percent range for risk management software. Professional services revenue is projected to more than double, primarily reflecting additional revenue from the acquisition of CSI Global Education. MA revenue is expected to increase in the high-single-digit percent range in the U.S. and in the low-double-digit percent range outside the U.S.

 

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RECENTLY ISSUED ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

Adopted:

In June 2009, the FASB issued a new accounting standard related to the consolidation of variable interest entities. This new standard eliminates the quantitative approach previously required for determining the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity and requires ongoing qualitative reassessments of whether an enterprise is the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity. This new standard also requires enhanced disclosures regarding an enterprise’s involvement in variable interest entities. The Company has adopted this new accounting standard as of January 1, 2010 and the implementation did not impact its consolidated financial statements.

In October 2009, the FASB issued ASU No. 2009-13, “Multiple-Deliverable Revenue Arrangements” (“ASU 2009-13”). The new standard changes the requirements for establishing separate units of accounting in a multiple element arrangement and requires the allocation of arrangement consideration to each deliverable based on the relative selling price. The selling price for each deliverable is based on vendor-specific objective evidence of selling price (“VSOE”) if available, third-party evidence (“TPE”) if VSOE is not available, or estimated selling price (“ESP”) if neither VSOE nor TPE is available. The Company has elected to early adopt ASU 2009-13 on a prospective basis for applicable transactions originating or materially modified on or after January 1, 2010. The early adoption of this ASU did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. Further information on the early adoption of this standard is set forth in Note 2 to the condensed consolidated financial statements.

In January 2010, the FASB issued ASU No. 2010-06, “Improving Disclosures about Fair Value Measurements”. The new standard requires disclosure regarding transfers in and out of Level 1 and Level 2 classifications within the fair value hierarchy as well as requiring further detail of activity within the Level 3 category of the fair value hierarchy. The new standard also requires disclosures regarding the fair value for each class of assets and liabilities, which is a subset of assets or liabilities within a line item in a company’s balance sheet. Additionally, the standard will require further disclosures surrounding inputs and valuation techniques used in fair value measurements. The new disclosures and clarifications of existing disclosures set forth in this ASU are effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2009, except for the additional disclosures regarding Level 3 fair value measurements, for which the effective date is for fiscal years and interim periods within those years beginning after December 15, 2010. The Company has adopted the provisions of this ASU as of January 1, 2010 for all new disclosure requirements except for the aforementioned requirements regarding Level 3 fair-value measurements, for which the Company will adopt that portion of the ASU on January 1, 2011. The portion of this ASU that was adopted on January 1, 2010 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. The Company does not expect the implementation of the remaining portion of this ASU to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

Not yet adopted

In December 2010, the FASB issued ASU No. 2010-29, “Disclosure of Supplementary Pro Forma Information for Business Combinations”. The objective of this ASU is to address diversity in practice regarding proforma disclosures for revenue and earnings of the acquired entity. The amendments in this ASU specify that if a public entity presents comparative financial statements, the entity should disclose revenue and earnings of the combined entity as though the business combination(s) that occurred during the current year had occurred as of the beginning of the comparable prior annual reporting period only. The amendments in this ASU also expand the supplemental pro forma disclosures under ASC Topic 805 to include a description of the nature and amount of material, nonrecurring pro forma adjustments directly attributable to the business combination included in the reported pro forma revenue and earnings. The amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2010. The Company will conform to the disclosure requirements set forth in this ASU for any future material business combinations.

CONTINGENCIES

From time to time, Moody’s is involved in legal and tax proceedings, governmental investigations, claims and litigation that are incidental to the Company’s business, including claims based on ratings assigned by MIS. Moody’s is also subject to ongoing tax audits in the normal course of business. Management periodically assesses the Company’s liabilities and contingencies in connection with these matters based upon the latest information available. Moody’s discloses material pending legal proceedings pursuant to SEC rules and other pending matters as it may determine to be appropriate.

Following the events in the U.S. subprime residential mortgage sector and the credit markets more broadly over the last several years, MIS and other credit rating agencies are the subject of intense scrutiny, increased regulation, ongoing investigation, and civil litigation. Legislative, regulatory and enforcement entities around the world are considering additional legislation, regulation and enforcement actions, including with respect to MIS’s compliance with newly imposed regulatory standards. Moody’s has received subpoenas and inquiries from states attorneys general and other governmental authorities and is responding to such investigations and inquiries.

In addition, the Company is facing litigation from market participants relating to the performance of MIS rated securities. Although Moody’s in the normal course experiences such litigation, the volume and cost of defending such litigation has significantly increased in the current economic environment.

 

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On June 27, 2008, the Brockton Contributory Retirement System, a purported shareholder of the Company’s securities, filed a purported shareholder derivative complaint on behalf of the Company against its directors and certain senior officers, and the Company as nominal defendant, in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of New York. The plaintiff asserts various causes of action relating to the named defendants’ oversight of MIS’s ratings of RMBS and constant-proportion debt obligations, and their participation in the alleged public dissemination of false and misleading information about MIS’s ratings practices and/or a failure to implement internal procedures and controls to prevent the alleged wrongdoing. The plaintiff seeks compensatory damages, restitution, disgorgement of profits and other equitable relief. On July 2, 2008, Thomas R. Flynn, a purported shareholder of the Company’s securities, filed a similar purported shareholder derivative complaint on behalf of the Company against its directors and certain senior officers, and the Company as nominal defendant, in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of New York, asserting similar claims and seeking the same relief. The cases have been consolidated and plaintiffs filed an amended consolidated complaint in November 2008. The Company removed the consolidated action to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York in December 2008. In January 2009, the plaintiffs moved to remand the case to the Supreme Court of the State of New York, which the Company opposed. On February 23, 2010, the court issued an opinion remanding the case to the Supreme Court of New York. On October 30, 2008, the Louisiana Municipal Police Employees Retirement System, a purported shareholder of the Company’s securities, also filed a shareholder derivative complaint on behalf of the Company against its directors and certain officers, and the Company as a nominal defendant, in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. This complaint also asserts various causes of action relating to the Company’s ratings of RMBS, CDO and constant-proportion debt obligations, and named defendants’ participation in the alleged public dissemination of false and misleading information about MIS’s ratings practices and/or a failure to implement internal procedures and controls to prevent the alleged wrongdoing. On December 9, 2008, Rena Nadoff, a purported shareholder of the Company, filed a shareholder derivative complaint on behalf of the Company against its directors and its CEO, and the Company as a nominal defendant, in the Supreme Court of the State of New York. The complaint asserts a claim for breach of fiduciary duty in connection with alleged overrating of asset-backed securities and underrating of municipal securities. On October 20, 2009, the Company moved to dismiss or stay the action in favor of related federal litigation. On January 26, 2010, the court entered a stipulation and order, submitted jointly by the parties, staying the Nadoff litigation pending coordination and prosecution of similar claims in the above and below described federal derivative actions. On July 6, 2009, W. A. Sokolowski, a purported shareholder of the Company, filed a purported shareholder derivative complaint on behalf of the Company against its directors and current and former officers, and the Company as a nominal defendant, in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. The complaint asserts claims relating to alleged mismanagement of the Company’s processes for rating structured finance transactions, alleged insider trading and causing the Company to buy back its own stock at artificially inflated prices.

Two purported class action complaints have been filed by purported purchasers of the Company’s securities against the Company and certain of its senior officers, asserting claims under the federal securities laws. The first was filed by Raphael Nach in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois on July 19, 2007. The second was filed by Teamsters Local 282 Pension Trust Fund in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York on September 26, 2007. Both actions have been consolidated into a single proceeding entitled In re Moody’s Corporation Securities Litigation in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. On June 27, 2008, a consolidated amended complaint was filed, purportedly on behalf of all purchasers of the Company’s securities during the period February 3, 2006 through October 24, 2007. Plaintiffs allege that the defendants issued false and/or misleading statements concerning the Company’s business conduct, business prospects, business conditions and financial results relating primarily to MIS’s ratings of structured finance products including RMBS, CDO and constant-proportion debt obligations. The plaintiffs seek an unspecified amount of compensatory damages and their reasonable costs and expenses incurred in connection with the case. The Company moved for dismissal of the consolidated amended complaint in September 2008. On February 23, 2009, the court issued an opinion dismissing certain claims and sustaining others.

Moody’s Analytics is cooperating with an investigation by the SEC concerning services provided by that unit to certain financial institutions in connection with the valuations used by those institutions with respect to certain financial instruments held by such institutions.

For claims, litigation and proceedings not related to income taxes, where it is both probable that a liability is expected to be incurred and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated, the Company records liabilities in the consolidated financial statements and periodically adjusts these as appropriate. In other instances, because of uncertainties related to the probable outcome and/or the amount or range of loss, management does not record a liability but discloses the contingency if significant. As additional information becomes available, the Company adjusts its assessments and estimates of such matters accordingly. In view of the inherent difficulty of predicting the outcome of litigation, regulatory, enforcement and similar matters and contingencies, particularly where the claimants seek large or indeterminate damages or where the parties assert novel legal theories or the matters involve a large number of parties, the Company cannot predict what the eventual outcome of the pending matters will be or the timing of any resolution of such matters. The Company also cannot predict the impact (if any) that any such matters may have on how its business is conducted, on its competitive position or on its financial position, results of operations or cash flows. As the process to resolve the pending matters referred to above progresses, management will continue to review the latest information available and assess its ability to predict the outcome of such matters and the effects, if any, on its operations and financial condition. However, in light of the inherent

 

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uncertainties involved in these matters, the large or indeterminate damages sought in some of them and the novel theories of law asserted, an estimate of the range of possible losses cannot be made at this time. For income tax matters, the Company employs the prescribed methodology of Topic 740 of the ASC which requires a company to first determine whether it is more-likely-than-not (defined as a likelihood of more than fifty percent) that a tax position will be sustained based on its technical merits as of the reporting date, assuming that taxing authorities will examine the position and have full knowledge of all relevant information. A tax position that meets this more-likely-than-not threshold is then measured and recognized at the largest amount of benefit that is greater than fifty percent likely to be realized upon effective settlement with a taxing authority.

Legacy Tax Matters

Moody’s continues to have exposure to potential liabilities arising from Legacy Tax Matters. As of December 31, 2010, Moody’s has recorded liabilities for Legacy Tax Matters totaling $59.3 million. This includes liabilities and accrued interest due to New D&B arising from the 2000 Distribution Agreement. It is possible that the ultimate liability for Legacy Tax Matters could be greater than the liabilities recorded by the Company, which could result in additional charges that may be material to Moody’s future reported results, financial position and cash flows.

The following summary of the relationships among Moody’s, New D&B and their predecessor entities is important in understanding the Company’s exposure to the Legacy Tax Matters.

In November 1996, The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation separated into three separate public companies: The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation, ACNielsen Corporation and Cognizant Corporation. In June 1998, The Dun & Bradstreet Corporation separated into two separate public companies: Old D&B and R.H. Donnelley Corporation. During 1998, Cognizant separated into two separate public companies: IMS Health Incorporated and Nielsen Media Research, Inc. In September 2000, Old D&B separated into two separate public companies: New D&B and Moody’s.

Old D&B and its predecessors entered into global tax planning initiatives in the normal course of business. These initiatives are subject to normal review by tax authorities. Old D&B and its predecessors also entered into a series of agreements covering the sharing of any liabilities for payment of taxes, penalties and interest resulting from unfavorable IRS determinations on certain tax matters, and certain other potential tax liabilities, all as described in such agreements. Further, in connection with the 2000 Distribution and pursuant to the terms of the 2000 Distribution Agreement, New D&B and Moody’s have agreed on the financial responsibility for any potential liabilities related to these Legacy Tax Matters.

At the time of the 2000 Distribution, New D&B paid Moody’s $55.0 million for 50% of certain anticipated future tax benefits through 2012. In the event that these tax benefits are not claimed or otherwise not realized by New D&B, or there is an IRS audit of New D&B impacting these tax benefits, Moody’s would be required to repay to New D&B an amount equal to the discounted value of its share of the related future tax benefits as well as its share of any tax liability incurred by New D&B. As of December 31, 2010, Moody’s liability with respect to this matter totaled $57.3 million. In 2008, as part of this matter and due to a statue of limitations expiration, Moody’s recorded a reduction of accrued interest expense of $2.3 million ($1.4 million, net of tax) and an increase in other non-operating income of $6.4 million relating to amounts due to New D&B.

In 2005, settlement agreements were executed with the IRS with respect to certain Legacy Tax Matters related to the years 1989-1990 and 1993-1996. With respect to these settlements, Moody’s and New D&B believed that IMS Health and NMR did not pay their full share of the liability to the IRS under the terms of the applicable separation agreements between the parties. Moody’s and New D&B subsequently paid these amounts to the IRS and commenced arbitration proceedings against IMS Health and NMR to resolve this dispute. This resulted in settlement payments to Moody’s of $6.7 million in 2008 ($6.1 million as a reduction of interest expense and $0.6 million as a reduction of selling, general and administrative expense) and $10.8 million ($6.5 million as a reduction of interest expense and $4.3 million as a reduction of tax expense) in 2009. The aforementioned settlement payments resulted in net income benefits of $4 million and $8.2 million in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The Company continues to carry a $2 million liability for this matter.

In 2006, New D&B and Moody’s each deposited $39.8 million with the IRS in order to stop the accrual of statutory interest on potential tax deficiencies with respect to the 1997 through 2002 tax years. In 2007, New D&B and Moody’s requested a return of that deposit. The IRS applied a portion of our deposit in satisfaction of an assessed deficiency and returned the balance to the Company. Moody’s subsequently pursued a refund for a portion of the outstanding amount. In May 2010, the IRS refunded $5.2 million to us for the 1997 tax year, which included interest of approximately $2.5 million resulting in an after-tax benefit of $4.6 million.

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements contained in this annual report on Form 10-K are forward-looking statements and are based on future expectations, plans and prospects for the Company’s business and operations that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Such statements involve estimates, projections, goals, forecasts, assumptions and uncertainties that could cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those contemplated, expressed, projected, anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements. Those statements appear at various places throughout this annual report on Form 10-K, including in the sections entitled “2011 Outlook” and

 

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“Contingencies” under Item 7. “MD&A”, commencing on page 28 of this annual report on Form 10-K, under “Legal Proceedings” in Part I, Item 3, of this Form 10-K, and elsewhere in the context of statements containing the words “believe”, “expect”, “anticipate”, “intend”, “plan”, “will”, “predict”, “potential”, “continue”, “strategy”, “aspire”, “target”, “forecast”, “project”, “estimate”, “should”, “could”, “may” and similar expressions or words and variations thereof relating to the Company’s views on future events, trends and contingencies. Stockholders and investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward- looking statements. The forward-looking statements and other information are made as of the date of this annual report on Form 10-K, and the Company undertakes no obligation (nor does it intend) to publicly supplement, update or revise such statements on a going-forward basis, whether as a result of subsequent developments, changed expectations or otherwise. In connection with the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, the Company is identifying examples of factors, risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ, perhaps materially, from those indicated by these forward-looking statements. Those factors, risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, the current world-wide credit market disruptions and economic slowdown, which is affecting and could continue to affect the volume of debt and other securities issued in domestic and/or global capital markets; other matters that could affect the volume of debt and other securities issued in domestic and/or global capital markets, including credit quality concerns, changes in interest rates and other volatility in the financial markets; the uncertain effectiveness and possible collateral consequences of U.S. and foreign government initiatives to respond to the economic slowdown; concerns in the marketplace affecting our credibility or otherwise affecting market perceptions of the integrity or utility of independent agency ratings; the introduction of competing products or technologies by other companies; pricing pressure from competitors and/or customers; the impact of regulation as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization and the potential for new U.S., state and local legislation and regulations; the potential for increased competition and regulation in foreign jurisdictions; exposure to litigation related to our rating opinions, as well as any other litigation to which the Company may be subject from time to time; the possible loss of key employees; failures or malfunctions of our operations and infrastructure; the outcome of any review by controlling tax authorities of the Company’s global tax planning initiatives; the outcome of those Legacy Tax Matters and legal contingencies that relate to the Company, its predecessors and their affiliated companies for which Moody’s has assumed portions of the financial responsibility; the ability of the Company to successfully integrate acquired businesses; and a decline in the demand for credit risk management tools by financial institutions. These factors, risks and uncertainties as well as other risks and uncertainties that could cause Moody’s actual results to differ materially from those contemplated, expressed, projected, anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements are described in greater detail under “Risk Factors” in Part I, Item 1A of this annual report on Form 10-K, elsewhere in this Form 10-K and in other filings made by the Company from time to time with the SEC or in materials incorporated herein or therein. Stockholders and investors are cautioned that the occurrence of any of these factors, risks and uncertainties may cause the Company’s actual results to differ materially from those contemplated, expressed, projected, anticipated or implied in the forward-looking statements, which could have a material and adverse effect on the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition. New factors may emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for the Company to predict new factors, nor can the Company assess the potential effect of any new factors on it.

 

ITEM 7A.   QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Information in response to this Item is set forth under the caption “Market Risk” in Part II, Item 7 on page 46-47 of this annual report on Form 10-K.

 

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ITEM 8.   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Index to Financial Statements

 

     Page(s)  
Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting      59   
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm      60   
Consolidated Financial Statements:   

Consolidated Statements of Operations

     61   

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2010 and 2009

     62   

For the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008:

  

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

     63   

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity (Deficit)

     64-66   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     67-101   
        

Schedules are omitted as not required or inapplicable or because the required information is provided in the consolidated financial statements, including the notes thereto.

 

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MANAGEMENT’S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

Management of Moody’s Corporation is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting and for the assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. As defined by the SEC in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, internal control over financial reporting is a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the Company’s principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, and effected by the Company’s Board, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

Moody’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of assets of the Company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of Moody’s management and directors; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

Management of the Company has undertaken an assessment of the design and operational effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010 based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. The COSO framework is based upon five integrated components of control: risk assessment, control activities, control environment, information and communications and ongoing monitoring.

Based on the assessment performed, management has concluded that Moody’s maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010.

The effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010 has been audited by KPMG LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which appears herein.

/s/ RAYMOND W. MCDANIEL, JR.

Raymond W. McDaniel, Jr.

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

/s/ LINDA S. HUBER

Linda S. Huber

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

February 25, 2011

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of Moody’s Corporation:

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Moody’s Corporation (the Company) as of December 31, 2010 and 2009 and the related consolidated statements of operations, cash flows and shareholders’ deficit, for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2010. We also have audited Moody’s Corporation’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010, based on the criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Moody’s Corporation’s management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements and an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audits of the consolidated financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Moody’s Corporation as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2010, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also in our opinion, Moody’s Corporation maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

/s/ KPMG LLP

New York, New York

February 25, 2011

 

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MOODY’S CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(AMOUNTS IN MILLIONS, EXCEPT PER SHARE DATA)

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  
Revenue    $ 2,032.0      $ 1,797.2      $ 1,755.4   
                        
Expenses       

Operating

     604.8        532.4        493.3   

Selling, general and administrative

     588.0        495.7        441.3   

Restructuring

     0.1        17.5        (2.5 )

Depreciation and amortization

     66.3        64.1        75.1   
                        

Total expenses

     1,259.2        1,109.7        1,007.2   
                        
Operating income      772.8        687.5        748.2   
                        

Interest income (expense), net

     (52.5     (33.4 )     (52.2 )

Other non-operating income (expense), net

     (5.9     (7.9 )     33.8   
                        

Non-operating income (expense), net

     (58.4     (41.3 )     (18.4 )
                        
Income before provision for income taxes      714.4        646.2        729.8   

Provision for income taxes

     201.0        239.1        268.2   
                        
Net income      513.4        407.1        461.6   

Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests

     5.6        5.1        4.0   
                        
Net income attributable to Moody’s    $ 507.8      $ 402.0      $ 457.6   
                        
Earnings per share       

Basic

   $ 2.16      $ 1.70      $ 1.89   
                        

Diluted

   $ 2.15      $ 1.69      $ 1.87   
                        
Weighted average shares outstanding       

Basic

     235.0        236.1        242.4   
                        

Diluted

     236.6        237.8        245.3   
                        

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 

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MOODY’S CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(AMOUNTS IN MILLIONS, EXCEPT SHARE AND PER SHARE DATA)

 

     December 31,  
     2010     2009  
Assets     
Current assets:     

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 659.6      $ 473.9   

Short-term investments

     12.7        10.0   

Accounts receivable, net of allowances of $33.0 in 2010 and $24.6 in 2009

     497.5        444.9   

Deferred tax assets, net

     45.3        32.3   

Other current assets

     127.9        51.8   
                

Total current assets

     1,343.0        1,012.9   
Property and equipment, net      319.3        293.0   
Goodwill      465.5        349.2   
Intangible assets, net      168.8        104.9   
Deferred tax assets, net      187.9        192.6   
Other assets      55.8        50.7   
                

Total assets

   $ 2,540.3      $ 2,003.3   
                
Liabilities and shareholders’ deficit     
Current liabilities:     

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

   $ 414.4      $ 317.2   

Commercial paper

            443.7   

Current portion of long-term debt

     11.3        3.8   

Deferred revenue

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