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National Presto Industries 10-K 2007
National Presto Industries, Inc. Form 10-K/A for fiscal year ended December 31, 2005

Page 1

 
 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D. C. 20549

 


FORM 10-K/A

Amendment No. 1


 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2005
or
o TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from ____________________________ to __________________________

 

Commission File Number 811-21874

 


NATIONAL PRESTO INDUSTRIES, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 


Wisconsin

39-0494170

(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

(IRS Employer
Identification Number)

 

 

3925 North Hastings Way

Eau Claire, Wisconsin

54703-3703

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (715) 839-2121

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange
on which registered

$1.00 par value common stock

 

New York Stock Exchange

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

NONE

 


Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes o  

No x

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes o  

No x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes o  

No x*

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or any amendment to the Form 10-K.    x

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer o

Accelerated filer x

Non-accelerated filer o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).

Yes o  

No x

 

State the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates computed by reference to the price at which the common equity was last sold, or the average bid and asked price of such common equity, as of the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter: $426,199,130.

 

The number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of June 29, 2007 was 6,836,688.

 

* The following reports have not been filed: Three quarterly Form 10-Q reports for 2006, one annual Form 10-K report for 2006, and two quarterly Form 10-Q reports for 2007.


 
 



Page 2

 

EXPLANATORY NOTE – RESTATEMENT OF FINANCIAL INFORMATION. This filing does contain restatements of a previously issued Form 10-K filing which when filed in March 2006, contained the certification of Grant Thornton, LLP.* Grant Thornton subsequently withdrew its opinion and ultimately withdrew from its audit engagement with the Company. The withdrawal was not occasioned by the restatements found herein, but instead stemmed from a controversy with the Securities Exchange Commission over the need for an investment company footnote. A description of the circumstances surrounding those withdrawals can be found in Item 9, infra. An explanation of the restatements can be found in Note R of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, infra. Financial statements affected include the consolidated statement of earnings for the year ended December 31, 2005. The consolidated balance sheet , the consolidated statement of cash flows, and the consolidated statement of stockholders’ equity were affected for all three years – the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004, and 2003. This filing is not fully updated for events that occurred after 2005. Filings for subsequent periods should be referred to for this information.

 

* The following Items were changed with this filing of Form 10-K/A: 1, 1A, 2, 5, 6, 7, 7A, 8, 9, 9A, 10, 14, and 15.


PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

 

A.

DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

 

The business of National Presto Industries, Inc., and its consolidated subsidiaries (the “Company”) consists of three business segments. For a further discussion of the Company’s business and the segments in which it operates please refer to Footnote N in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. The Housewares/Small Appliance segment designs, markets and distributes housewares and small electrical appliances, including pressure cookers and canners, kitchen electrics, and comfort appliances. The Defense Products segment manufactures precision mechanical and electro-mechanical assemblies and performs Load, Assemble and Pack (LAP) operations on ordnance related products for the U.S. government and prime contractors. The Absorbent Products segment manufactures and sells primarily private label diapers, adult incontinent products and puppy pads.

 

1. Housewares/Small Appliance Segment

Housewares and electrical appliances sold by the Company include pressure cookers and canners; the Presto Control Master® heat control single thermostatic control line of fry pans in several sizes, griddles and multi-purpose cookers; deep fryers of various sizes; pizza ovens; slicer/shredders; curly cutters; electric heaters; corn poppers (hot air and microwave); microwave bacon cookers; coffeemakers; single serve coffee pod holders; electric grills; electric tea kettles; lemonade makers; electric knife sharpeners; and timers. Pressure cookers and canners are available in various sizes and are fabricated of aluminum and, in the case of cookers, of stainless steel, as well.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2005, approximately 36% of consolidated net sales were provided by cast products (fry pans, griddles, grills, deep fryers and multi-cookers), and approximately 20% by noncast/thermal appliances (stamped cookers and canners, stainless steel cookers, pizza ovens, corn poppers [hot air and microwave], coffeemakers, microwave bacon cookers, tea kettles, and heaters). For the year ended December 31, 2004, approximately 44% of consolidated net sales were provided by cast products, and approximately 21% by noncast/thermal appliances. For the year ended December 31, 2003, approximately 52% of consolidated net sales were provided by cast products, and approximately 29% by noncast/thermal appliances.

 

For the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004, and 2003, this segment had one customer which accounted for 10% or more of Company consolidated net sales. That customer was Wal-Mart Stores which accounted for 27% in 2005, 30% in 2004, and 33% in 2003 of consolidated net sales, and the loss of Wal-Mart Stores as a customer would have a material adverse effect on the segment.

 

Products are sold directly to retailers throughout the United States and also through independent distributors. Although the Company has long established relationships with many of its customers, it does not have long-term supply contracts with them. The loss of, or material reduction in, business from any of the Company’s major customers could adversely affect the Company’s business (see Footnote J in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements).

 




Page 3

 

The Company has a sales force of ten employees that sell to and service most customers. A few selected accounts are handled by manufacturers’ representatives who may also sell other product lines. Sales promotional activities are conducted through the use of television and newspaper advertising. The Company’s business is highly competitive and seasonal, with the normal peak sales period occurring in the fourth quarter of the year prior to the holiday season. Many companies compete for sales of housewares and small electrical appliances, some of which are larger than the Company and others which are smaller. Product competition extends to special product features, product pricing, marketing programs, warranty provisions, service policies and other factors. New product introductions are an important part of the Company’s sales to offset the morbidity rate of other products and/or the effect of lowered acceptance of seasonal products due to weather conditions. New products entail unusual risks. Engineering and tooling costs are increasingly expensive, as are finished goods that may not have a ready market or achieve widespread consumer acceptance. High-cost advertising commitments accompanying such new products or to maintain sales of existing products may not be fully absorbed by ultimate product sales. Initial production schedules, set in advance of introduction, carry the possibility of excess unsold inventories. New product introductions are further subject to delivery delays from supply sources, which can impact availability for the Company’s most active selling periods.

 

Research and development costs related to new product development for the years 2005, 2004 and 2003 were absorbed in operations of these years and were not a material element in the aggregate costs incurred by the Company.

 

Products are generally warranted to the original owner to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of one to twelve years from date of purchase. The Company allows a sixty-day over-the-counter initial return privilege through cooperating dealers. Products are serviced through a corporate service repair operation. The Company’s service and warranty programs are competitive with those offered by other manufacturers in the industry.

 

Prior to 2002, many of the Company’s products were manufactured in plants located in Jackson, Mississippi and Alamogordo, New Mexico. In 2005, the Company purchased almost all of its products from non-affiliated companies primarily located in the Orient. (See Footnote M to the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements).

 

The Company primarily warehouses and distributes its products from distribution centers located in Canton and Jackson, Mississippi. Selective use is made of leased tractors and trailers.

 

The Company invests funds not currently required for business activities (see Footnote A(3) in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements). Income from invested funds is included in Other Income in the accompanying financial statements.

 

Earnings from investments may vary significantly from year to year depending on interest yields on instruments meeting the Company’s investment criteria, and the extent to which funds may be needed for internal growth, acquisitions, newly identified business activities, and reacquisition of Company stock.

 

 

2. Defense Products Segment

AMTEC Corporation was acquired on February 24, 2001, and manufactures precision mechanical and electro-mechanical products for the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and DOD prime contractors. AMTEC’s 70,000 square-foot manufacturing facility, located in Janesville, Wisconsin, is focused on producing niche market ordnance products (such as training ammunition, fuzes, firing devices, and initiators). Spectra Technologies LLC, a subsidiary of AMTEC, was acquired on July 31, 2003, and is engaged in the manufacture, distribution, and delivery of munitions and ordnance-related products for the DOD and DOD prime contractors. Spectra maintains 117,000 square feet of space located in East Camden, Arkansas, dedicated primarily to the performance of Load, Assemble, and Pack (LAP) type work.

 

The Defense Products segment competes for its business primarily on the basis of technical competence, product quality, manufacturing experience, and price. This segment operates in a highly competitive environment with many other organizations, some of which are larger and others that are smaller.

 




Page 4

 

On April 29, 2005, AMTEC Corporation was awarded the high-volume, prime contract for the Army’s five year 40mm system program. The Army selected AMTEC as one of two prime contractors that will be responsible for supplying all requirements for 40mm practice and tactical ammunition rounds for a period of five years. The Army estimated the entire contract, if all of the options are exercised, to be $1.3 billion. AMTEC projects that its deliveries to the Army over the five year period will exceed $500,000,000. Deliveries under the systems program were $57,000,000 during 2006. Through August 24, 2007, the government base and supplemental awards under the 40mm program to AMTEC total $331.3 million.

 

During 2005, almost all of the work performed by this segment directly or indirectly for the DOD was performed on a fixed-price basis. Under fixed-price contracts, the price paid to the contractor is awarded based on competition at the outset of the contract and therefore is generally not subject to any adjustments reflecting the actual costs incurred by the contractor. The defense segment’s contracts and subcontracts contain the customary provision permitting termination at any time for the convenience of the government, with payment for any work completed, associated profit, and inventory/work in process at the time of termination.

 

 

3. Absorbent Products Segment

The first Absorbent Products segment business (Presto Absorbent Products, Inc.) was acquired on November 21, 2001. At that time, Presto Absorbent Products manufactured primarily private label diapers. On October 6, 2003, the Company purchased the assets of NCN Hygienic Products, Inc., a Marietta, Georgia company which manufactured adult incontinence products and pads for dogs, which were likewise primarily private label products. The business is capital intensive and substantial investment in new equipment was made during 2004 and 2005. New equipment is extremely complex. Not only is considerable time required to secure and install the equipment, but even more time is required to develop the requisite employee skill sets to utilize the equipment efficiently. Sales channels must be in place to sell the increased production that results from improved efficiency in operations.

 

Unlike the housewares/small appliance business, the absorbent product business is not seasonal. To the extent there are variations from month to month, that is primarily a function of customer promotional timing. As private label products tend to emulate branded product as much as possible, new product development is important, but is largely limited to providing features similar to those found in national branded product. Research and development costs are absorbed in operations.

 

The absorbent product business is very competitive. There are several competitors, most of which are larger than the Company. Product competition is largely based on product pricing, quality, and features.

 

Product cost is heavily influenced by commodity costs which include wood pulp, as well as many petroleum based products, and by equipment operating speed, efficiency, and utilization.

 

Advertising is typically the responsibility of the owner of the private label and is thus minimal. Most sales are currently handled through distributor/broker arrangements. Production for the most part is done to order.

 

For the years ended December 31, 2005 and 2004, this segment had one customer, Medline Industries Holdings LP, which accounted for 14% and 11% of consolidated net sales, and the loss of Medline Industries Holdings LP as a customer would have a material adverse effect on the segment.

 

 

B.

OTHER COMMENTS

 

1. Sources and Availability of Materials

See Footnote J in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

2. Trademarks, Licenses, Franchises and Concessions Held

Patents, particularly on new products, trademarks and know-how are considered significant. The Company’s current and future success depends upon judicial protection of its intellectual property rights (patents, trademarks and trade dress). Removal of that protection would expose the Company to competitors who seek to take advantage of the Company’s innovations and proprietary rights. The Company has dozens of U.S. and foreign patents pending and granted. Of those U.S. patents granted, the following is a non-exclusive list of those relevant to current products and their expiration dates, assuming continued payment of maintenance fees (the date is the latest expiration date of the corresponding patents): Quick Release Appliance Cord Assemblies (US 6,719,576 and 6,527,570, October 2021), Rotatable Cooking Apparatus (US 6,125,470 and 6,354,194, March 2019), Food Processor (4,884,755 and 5,680,997, October 2014), Microwave Corn Popper Device and Methods (5,357,879, March 2012), Heater (D456,500, April 2016), and Parabolic Heater (D456,067, April 2016). To date, the Company has vigorously protected its rights and enjoyed success in all its intellectual property suits.

 




Page 5

 

3. Effects of Compliance with Environmental and OSHA Regulations

In May 1986, the Company’s Eau Claire, Wisconsin, site was placed on the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) because of alleged hazardous waste deposited on the property. At year end 1998, all remediation projects at the Eau Claire, Wisconsin, site had been installed, were fully operational, and restoration activities had been completed.

 

Based on factors known as of December 31, 2005, it is believed that the Company’s existing environmental accrued liability reserve will be adequate to satisfy on-going remediation operations and monitoring activities; however, should environmental agencies require additional studies or remediation projects, it is possible the existing accrual could be inadequate.

 

Management believes that in the absence of any unforeseen future developments, known environmental matters will not have any material effect on the results of operations or financial condition of the Company.

 

4. Number of Employees of the Company

As of December 31, 2005, the Company had 552 employees compared to 551 employees at the end of December 2004.

 

5. Industry Practices Related to Working Capital Requirements

The major portion of the Company’s sales were made with terms of 90 days or shorter.

 

For the Housewares/Small Appliance segment, inventory levels increase in advance of the selling period for products that are seasonal, such as pressure canners, heaters, and major new product introductions. Inventory build-up also occurs to create stock levels required to support the higher sales that occur in the latter half of each year. Buying practices of the Company’s customers require “just-in-time” delivery, necessitating that the Company carry large finished goods inventories.

 

The multiple stock keeping units inherent in the private label absorbent product business, combined with the desire to minimize machine changeover to maximize efficiency, necessitates the carrying of a large finished goods inventory in the Absorbent Product segment as well.

 

The ability to meet U.S. Department of Defense demands also necessitates the carrying of large inventories in the defense segment.

 

6. Order Backlog

Shipment of most of the Company’s Housewares/Small Appliance Products occurs within a relatively short time after receipt of the order and, therefore, there is usually no substantial order backlog. New product introductions may result in order backlogs that vary from product to product and as to timing of introduction.

 

Contract backlog of the Defense segment was approximately $150,000,000 at December 31, 2005, $43,000,000 at December 31, 2004 and $30,000,000 at December 31, 2003. Backlog is defined as the value of funded orders from the customer less the amount of sales recognized against the funded order. It is anticipated that the backlog will be performed during a 14 to 18-month period, after December 31, 2005.

 

Shipment of Absorbent Products typically occurs within 15 to 60 days from receipt of an order and thus there is usually no substantial long term backlog of orders.

 

 

C.

PLANT CLOSINGS

 

See Footnote M in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

 

D.

ACQUISITIONS

 

See Footnote L in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 




Page 6

 

 

E.

AVAILABLE INFORMATION

 

The Company has a web site at www.gopresto.com. The contents of the Company’s web site are not part of, nor are they incorporated by reference into this annual report.

 

The Company does not make available on its web site its annual reports on Form 10-K or 10-K/A, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, or amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act because those reports are already readily available to the public on the SEC web site at www.sec.gov. The Company does provide paper copies of its annual report free of charge upon request.

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

The Company’s three operating business segments described above are all subject to a number of risk factors, the occurrence of any one or more of which could have a significant adverse impact on the business, financial condition, or results of operations. While some of the more significant, but not all, risks faced by each operating segment are identified below, it should be recognized that as noted elsewhere herein, there are other risks and circumstances that could also adversely impact the operating results of each segment and the Company as a whole.

 

 

Housewares/Small Appliances

This segment operates in a highly competitive and extremely price sensitive environment. Therefore, increased costs that cannot be fully absorbed into the price of products or passed along in the form of price increases to the retail customer can have a significant adverse impact on operating results. Loss of the Division’s largest customer, Wal-Mart, or a significant reduction in business with this customer, could have a serious adverse impact on overall performance. Similarly, the loss of, or material reduction in, business from any of this Division’s other major customers could prove detrimental to this segment’s operations. Housewares/Small Appliances is also dependent upon a handful of key suppliers based in the Orient for finished product. The inability of one or more of these manufacturers to provide quality product on a timely basis could be both costly and disruptive. The sales of this Division are also dependent upon the strength of the United States retail markets and consumer spending in general, particularly during the key Christmas selling season. Since all of this segment’s finished goods are produced in the Orient, primarily China, this Division could also be adversely affected by changes in trade relations with China, currency fluctuations, or interruptions in international shipments.

 

 

Defense

The opportunity for this segment to obtain business is largely dependent upon competitive bidding and U.S. government defense spending. If successful in obtaining a bid, the work awarded is usually subject to a firm fixed price contract that provides little, if any, economic relief for changed conditions or circumstances that are detrimental to the contractor. Thus, contracts that are obtained must be performed on time, with quality product that is produced within previously projected cost parameters. In addition, any contract with the United States Government, whether direct or indirect, is subject to termination for the convenience of the Government, a provision that is unique to government contracts. There is also the risk that contracts with the Government may not be funded or the risk that there will be a change in requirements resulting in significant reductions in overall quantities or a stretch out of previously planned delivery schedules.

 

 

Absorbent Products

In addition to being highly capital intensive, this business segment utilizes complex technology and equipment that can be time consuming to receive, install, and then become fully operable on a consistent and reliable basis. It is highly competitive with low margins, where volume is critical. Therefore, it becomes essential to develop and operate at a maximum capacity and to achieve high efficiency in order to provide bottom line results. Loss of its largest customer, or a significant reduction in volume from that customer, could adversely impact the Division. Product pricing and overall performance is extremely sensitive to material commodity costs, including such items as wood pulp and petroleum based products. Freight and energy costs can also have a significant impact on overall performance.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None

 




Page 7

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES (Owned Except Where Indicated)

 

The Company’s Eau Claire facility is approximately 470,000 square feet. Presto Absorbent Products, Inc. leases approximately 320,000 square feet of this area. Leases for 14,000 square feet of this area have been entered into with outside tenants. The Company’s corporate office occupies the balance of the space in Eau Claire.

 

The Company also has Defense manufacturing facilities located in Janesville, Wisconsin, and East Camden, Arkansas; and Absorbent Products manufacturing facilities located in Marietta, Georgia; and two warehousing facilities which are located in Jackson and Canton, Mississippi used in the Housewares/Small Appliance segment. Manufacturing ceased at the Jackson plant during the fourth quarter of 2002 since the Company is outsourcing all of its Housewares/Small Appliances. (See Note M in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.)

 

The Janesville facility is comprised of approximately 72,000 square feet. The Camden operation leases approximately 62,000 square feet. The Marietta, Georgia facility contains 104,000 square feet of leased space.

 

The Jackson facility contains 283,000 square feet. The Company leases a 191,900 square foot building in Canton, Mississippi which is used primarily for warehousing and distribution and some activities for product service functions. An additional 72,200 square feet has been leased in adjacent buildings for warehousing.

 

The facilities in use for each of the segments are believed to be adequate for their ongoing business needs.

 

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

See Footnote I in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

See Item 1.B.3. for information regarding certain environmental matters.

 

ITEM 4. SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

 

The Company held its Annual Meeting on October 18, 2005, at which the election of two Directors and an amendment of the Restated Articles of Incorporation were submitted for a vote. Both Directors were elected with the following vote totals: James F. Bartl with 6,012,013 “For”, 145,925 “Against”, 68,815 “Abstain”, and 172,159 “Broker Non-Votes”; and Joseph G. Stienessen with 6,154,787 “For”, 3,151 “Against”, 68,815 “Abstain”, and 172,159 “Broker Non-Votes”. The amendment related to Article 6(A) of the Restated Articles of Incorporation, reducing the number of directors from six to five. This amendment received the following vote totals: 6,118,506 “For”, 97,178 “Against”, 10,802 “Abstain”, and 172,426 “Broker Non-Votes”.

 

 







Page 8

 

PART II

 

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Record of Dividends Paid and Market Price of Common Stock

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

 

 

Applicable
Dividends Paid

 

Market Price

 

Applicable
Dividends Paid

 

Market Price

 

 

 

Per Share

 

High

 

Low

 

Per Share

 

High

 

Low

 

First Quarter

 

$

1.67

 

$

45.51

 

$

39.59

 

$

1.17

 

$

40.30

 

$

35.89

 

Second Quarter

 

 

 

 

45.47

 

 

38.85

 

 

 

 

42.22

 

 

37.62

 

Third Quarter

 

 

 

 

48.35

 

 

42.60

 

 

 

 

42.19

 

 

38.30

 

Fourth Quarter

 

 

 

 

47.35

 

 

42.65

 

 

 

 

46.70

 

 

39.15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Full Year

 

$

1.67

 

$

48.35

 

$

38.85

 

$

1.17

 

$

46.70

 

$

35.89

 

 

Common stock of National Presto Industries, Inc. is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “NPK”. As of August 15, 2007, there were 425 holders of record of the Company’s common stock. This number does not reflect shareholders who hold their shares in the name of broker dealers or other nominees. During the fourth quarter of 2005, the Company did not purchase any of its equity securities.

 

Code of Ethics

The Company has adopted a code of business conduct and ethics which is posted on its web site at www.gopresto.com.

 

SECTION 16 (A) BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP REPORTING COMPLIANCE

 

Based upon a review of Forms 3, 4 and 5 and any amendments thereto pursuant to Section 16 of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, the Company believes all such forms were filed on a timely basis by reporting persons during the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006.

 








Page 9

 

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

 

 

(in thousands except per share data)

 

For the years ended December 31,

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

2001

 

 

 

(As restated. See Note R of the
Consolidated Financial Statements.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

184,565

 

$

158,956

 

$

125,744

 

$

124,784

 

$

112,187

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings

 

 

16,417

*

 

15,441

*

 

15,477

*

 

8,690

*

 

6,286

*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings per share – Basic

 

 

2.41

*

 

2.26

*

 

2.27

*

 

1.27

*

 

.92

*

Net earnings per share – Diluted

 

 

2.40

*

 

2.26

*

 

2.27

*

 

1.27

*

 

.92

*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

 

307,415

 

 

302,006

 

 

298,565

 

 

289,994

 

 

284,076

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividends paid per common share applicable to current year

 

 

1.67

 

 

1.17

 

 

0.92

 

 

0.92

 

 

2.00

 

 

*

Net earnings for 2005 reflect the impairment of the Absorbent Segment goodwill of $2,550,000 ($.37 per basic share), after tax. For 2004 the net effect of the reversal of the LIFO reserve vis a vis 2003 resulted in a net comparative earnings decline of $2,695,000 or $.40 per share which was in part offset by the absence of the $1,137,000 ($.17 per share) plant closing charge taken in 2003. The impact of the pension termination resulted in a net comparative earnings decline of $1,371,000 or $.20 per share. 2003 net earnings reflect after tax charges of $1,137,000 ($.17 per share) related to plant closing expenses and $817,000 ($.12 per share) related to converting a defined benefit pension plan into a defined contribution plan, which were more than offset by the partial reversal of the LIFO reserve stemming from the shut down of domestic plants, net of tax, $3,122,000 ($.46 per share). 2002 includes $2,843,000 -- $.42 per share versus 2001’s $4,771,000 -- $.70 per share for after-tax expenses relating to plant closings. 2002 earnings also reflect $1,040,000 or $.15 per share after-tax charge primarily related to the early retirement of long term employees. The 2002 expenses were largely offset ($3,259,000 or $.48 per share after-tax) by the partial reversal of the LIFO reserve stemming from the shutdown of the domestic manufacturing plants.


 

 








Page 10

 

ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Forward-looking statements in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, elsewhere in this Form 10-K/A, in the Company’s 2005 Annual Report to Shareholders, in the Proxy Statement for the annual meeting held October 18, 2005, and in the Company’s press releases and oral statements made with the approval of an authorized executive officer are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. There are certain important factors that could cause results to differ materially from those anticipated by some of the statements made herein. Investors are cautioned that all forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainty. In addition to the factors discussed herein and in the notes to consolidated financial statements, among the other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially are the following: consumer spending and debt levels; interest rates; continuity of relationships with and purchases by major customers; product mix; the benefit and risk of business acquisitions; competitive pressure on sales and pricing; increases in material, freight/shipping, or production cost which cannot be recouped in product pricing; delays or interruptions in shipping; changes in government requirements and funding of government contracts, and the efficient start-up and utilization of capital equipment investments. Additional information concerning these and other factors is contained in the Company’s Securities and Exchange Commission filings, copies of which are available from the Company without charge.

 

As indicated in Note R of the Consolidated Financial Statements, certain figures have been restated from those reported in the Form 10-K filed in March 2006.

 

2005 COMPARED TO 2004

 

Readers are directed to Note N, “Business Segments” for data on the financial results of the Company’s three business segments for the years ended December 31, 2005 and 2004.

 

On a consolidated basis, sales were up by $25,609,000 (16%), gross profit down by $1,785,000 (5%), and selling and general expense down by $2,965,000 (17%). Other income, principally interest, increased by $760,000 (21%), as did earnings before provision for income taxes by $1,320,000 (6%), and net earnings by $976,000. Details concerning these changes can be found in the comments by segment found below.

 

Housewares/Small Appliances net sales increased $5,827,000 from $106,160,000 to $111,987,000, or 6%, primarily resulting from an increase in units shipped. Approximately 75% of the actual volume increase was attributable to new product introductions. Defense net sales increased by $12,419,000 from $24,535,000 to $36,954,000, or 51%, primarily reflecting a unit volume increase resulting from partial fulfillment of an augmented backlog. Absorbent Products net sales increased by $7,363,000 from $28,261,000 to $35,624,000, or 26%, primarily reflecting increased volume from the adult incontinence line of products.

 

Housewares/Small Appliance gross profit for 2005 increased $326,000 from $30,649,000 to $30,975,000, while gross profit as a percentage of sales decreased from 29% in 2004 to 28% in 2005. Defense gross profit dollars increased $1,697,000 from $7,867,000 to $9,564,000, while the gross profit percentage decreased from 32% to 26%. The increase in gross profit dollars is primarily attributable to the increased volume referenced above, while the decrease in percentage relates to a less favorable product sales mix. Absorbent products gross profit dropped from $1,550,000 in 2004 to a loss of $2,258,000 in 2005. The decline stemmed primarily from cost inefficiencies of a startup/learning curve nature related to the installation of new state-of-the-art machinery, and increased material costs.

 

Housewares/Small Appliance selling and general expenses decreased $4,104,000, with approximately 75% attributable to a decrease in television advertising during 2005. Defense selling and general expenses increased $610,000, reflecting increased compensation and staffing commensurate with the Defense segment’s increased sales and earnings levels. Absorbent Product selling and general expense increased $529,000 stemming mainly from increased administrative costs associated with the expansion of the segment.

 

In the third quarter of 2003 the Company announced its decision to terminate its defined benefit pension plan (see Note G). As a result, the Company recorded a pre-tax charge of $3,528,000 for 2004 upon settlement of the pension obligation. Note G also includes information regarding assumptions used to value the pension plan.

 




Page 11

 

During the fourth quarter of 2005, goodwill for the absorbent products segment was deemed impaired because of the losses experienced by the segment. Using a multiple of earnings to estimate fair value, it was determined that goodwill was fully impaired. This resulted in a charge to the current year’s earnings of $2,550,000, net of tax.

 

The above items were responsible for the change in operating profit.

 

Other income, principally interest, increased $760,000 reflecting the interest rate increases implemented by the Federal Reserve over the past several quarters, only partially offset by a decrease in average daily investment balance, stemming primarily from the use of funds for the expansion of the Absorbent Products and Defense segments.

 

Earnings before provision for income taxes increased $1,320,000 from $22,706,000 to $24,026,000. The provision for income taxes increased from $7,265,000 to $7,609,000, which resulted in an effective income tax rate of 32% for both years. Net earnings increased $976,000 from $15,441,000 to $16,417,000.

 

2004 COMPARED TO 2003

 

Readers are directed to Note N, “Business Segments” for data on the financial results of the Company’s three business segments for the years ended December 31, 2004 and 2003.

 

On a consolidated basis, sales were up by $33,212,000 (26%), gross profit by $2,605,000 (7%), and selling and general expense by $1,956,000 (13%). Other income, principally interest decreased by $649,000 (15%), as did earnings before provision for income taxes by $377,000 (2%), and net earnings by $36,000. Details concerning these changes can be found in the comments by segment found below.

 

Housewares/Small Appliance net sales increased $1,914,000 from $104,246,000 to $106,160,000, or 2%, primarily resulting from an increase in unit volume offset in large part by decreased pricing, which reflected the competitive nature of the housewares/small appliance business. Defense net sales increased by $14,539,000 from $9,996,000 to $24,535,000, or 145%, primarily reflecting a unit volume increase resulting from the satisfaction of a significant portion of the 2003 backlog. Absorbent Products net sales increased by $16,759,000 from $11,502,000 to $28,261,000, or 146%, primarily reflecting the addition of revenues stemming from the October 2003 acquisition of the assets of NCN Hygienic Products, Inc. which were in turn augmented by a competitor’s sudden decision to exit the adult incontinent business.

 

Housewares/Small Appliance gross profit for 2004 decreased $2,970,000 from $33,619,000 to $30,649,000, or 32% in 2003 versus 29% in 2004 as a percentage of sales. The gross profit decrease was primarily attributable to a comparatively smaller benefit received in 2004 from the partial reversal of Manufactured Product LIFO reserve (as discussed in Notes B & M), offset in part by two elements which were approximately equal – the margin increase stemming from the increased sales volume and a reduction in the warranty reserve (see Note A(14)). Defense gross profit increased $4,741,000 from $3,126,000 to $7,867,000, primarily due to increased volume referenced above. Gross margin was largely unchanged – 32% in 2004 versus 31% in 2003. Absorbent products gross profit increased $834,000 from $716,000 to $1,550,000, reflecting the increased volume stated above. Gross margin as a percentage of sales decreased from 6.2% to 5.5%, largely as a result of the effort to fill orders created by the above mentioned competitor’s exit from the business without having the requisite machine capacity in place to efficiently handle the added volume. As mentioned in the Liquidity section below, efforts were in process to expand that capacity.

 

Housewares/Small Appliance selling and general expenses were relatively unchanged. Defense selling and general expenses increased $1,626,000 reflecting increased compensation and staffing commensurate with the Defense segment’s increased sales and earnings levels, and a full year versus five months of activity at Spectra. Absorbent Product selling and general expenses increased $304,000 primarily reflecting the October 2003 acquisition of assets noted above.

 

Fiscal year 2003 included pre-tax plant closing charges of $1,834,000 relating to the closing of the Company’s Housewares/Small Appliance manufacturing operations in Jackson, Mississippi, and Alamogordo, New Mexico (See Note M). Also, in the third quarter of 2003, the Company announced its decision to terminate its defined benefit pension plan (See Note G). As a result, the Company recorded pre-tax charges of $3,528,000 and $1,317,000 for fiscal years 2004 and 2003, respectively. Note G also includes information regarding assumptions used to value the pension plan.

 




Page 12

 

The above items were responsible for the change in operating profit.

 

Other income, principally interest, decreased $649,000 from $4,234,000 to $3,585,000, primarily due to a decreased average daily investment balance, stemming from the use of funds for expansion in the Defense and Absorbent Products segments.

 

Earnings before provision for income taxes decreased $377,000 from $23,083,000 to $22,706,000. The provision for income taxes decreased from $7,606,000 to $7,265,000, which resulted in an effective income tax rate decrease from 33% to 32% as a result of decreased earnings subject to tax. Net earnings decreased $36,000 from $15,477,000 to $15,441,000.

 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

 

Cash provided by operating activities was $22,337,000 during 2005 compared to $5,779,000 during the comparable period in the prior year. The principal factors behind the increase can be found in the changes in the components of working capital and the pension charge element within the statement of cash flows.

 

Cash provided by investing activities was $33,574,000 during 2005 compared to $13,144,000 used during 2004. The change in cash flow is primarily attributable to two factors. First, more marketable securities were converted into cash and cash equivalents during 2005 than in 2004, either as a result of tendering of demand instruments with put options or through the maturity of securities. Second, payments for fixed asset additions were higher during 2004 than in 2005, reflecting the timing of payments for the equipment for the absorbent product expansion and the modification of the Jackson, Mississippi plant to a warehousing and shipping facility.

 

Based on the accounting profession’s latest interpretation of cash equivalents under FASB Statement No. 95, the company’s variable rate demand notes which had previously been included in cash and cash equivalents on the 2005 and 2004 consolidated financial statements, were reclassified as marketable securities. (See Note R of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, infra). This interpretation, which is contrary to the interpretation that the Company’s representative received directly from the FASB (which indicated it would not object to the Company’s classification of variable rate demand notes as cash equivalents), and subsequent reclassification has resulted in a presentation of the Company’s consolidated balance sheet that the Company believes understates the true liquidity of the Company’s portfolio. As of December 31, 2005, the portfolio included $39,444,000 of variable rate demand notes classified as marketable securities. These notes have structural features that allow the Company to tender them at par plus interest within any 7 day period for cash to the notes’ trustees or remarketers and thus provide the liquidity of cash equivalents.

 

Cash used in financing activities for 2005 and 2004 increased primarily as a result of the $.50 per share increase in the extra dividend paid during those years.

 

As a result of the foregoing factors, cash and cash equivalents increased in 2005 by $44,507,000 to $62,023,000.

 

Working capital decreased by $2,041,000 to $212,721,000 at December 31, 2005, reflecting an increase in the current income tax liability stemming from the increase in current year earnings. The Company’s current ratio was 6.3 to 1.0 at fiscal 2005 year-end, compared to 6.5 to 1.0 at the end of fiscal 2004.

 

The Company expects to continue to evaluate acquisition opportunities that align with its business segments and will make further acquisitions, as well as continue to make capital investments in these segments if the appropriate return on investment is projected.

 

The Company has substantial liquidity in the form of cash and cash equivalents and marketable securities to meet all of its anticipated capital requirements, to make dividend payments, and to fund future growth through acquisitions and other means. The Company intends to continue its investment strategy of safety and short-term liquidity throughout its investment holdings. The interest rate increases over the past several quarters, partially offset by the reduction in the Company’s investment holdings, currently has resulted in increased levels of interest income for the Company. There can be no assurance that interest rates will not decline. The interest rate environment is a function of national and international monetary policies as well as the growth and inflation rates of the U.S. and foreign economies, and is not controllable by the Company.

 




Page 13

 

DEFENSE SEGMENT BACKLOG

 

The Company’s Defense segment contract backlog was approximately $150,000,000 at December 31, 2005, and $43,000,000 at December 31, 2004. Backlog is defined as the value of funded orders from the customer less the amount of sales recognized against the funded order. It is anticipated that the backlog will be performed during a 14 to 18-month period.

 

CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS

 

The below table discloses a summary of the Company’s specified contractual obligations at December 31, 2005:

 

 

 

Payments Due By Period (In Thousands)

 

Contractual Obligations

 

Total

 

Under 1 Year

 

1-3 Years

 

3-5 Years

 

More Than
5 Years

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating lease obligations

 

$

2,366

 

$

592

 

$

410

 

$

201

 

$

1,163

 

Purchase obligations(1)

 

 

92,696

 

 

92,696

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earn-out and incentive payments(2)

 

 

16,592

 

 

375

 

 

16,217

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

$

111,654

 

$

93,663

 

$

16,627

 

$

201

 

$

1,163

 

 

(1) Purchase obligations include outstanding purchase orders at December 31, 2005. Included are purchase orders issued to the Company’s housewares manufacturers in the Orient, and to material suppliers in the Defense and Absorbent Products segment. The Company can cancel or change many of these purchase orders, but may incur costs if its supplier cannot use the material to manufacture the Company’s products in other applications or return the material to their supplier. As a result, the actual amount the Company is obligated to pay cannot be estimated.

(2) The Company has agreed to make certain payments dependent upon the future performance of the companies in the defense and absorbent products segments. The expected payments noted above were based upon the anticipated future levels of earnings of these companies.

 

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make certain estimates and assumptions that affect the amount of reported assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and revenues and expenses during the periods reported. Actual results may differ from those estimates. The Company reviewed the development and selection of the critical accounting policies and believes the following are the most critical accounting policies that could have an effect on the Company’s reported results. These critical accounting policies and estimates have been reviewed with the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors.

 

Inventories

New Housewares/Small Appliance product introductions are an important part of the Company’s sales to offset the morbidity rate of other Housewares/Small Appliance products and/or the effect of lowered acceptance of seasonal products due to weather conditions. New products entail unusual risks and have occasionally in the past resulted in losses related to obsolete or excess inventory as a result of low or diminishing demand for a product. There were no such obsolescence issues that had a material effect during the 2005, 2004 or 2003; accordingly, the Company did not record a reserve for obsolete product. In the future should product demand issues arise, the Company may incur losses related to the obsolescence of the related inventory.

 

Self-Insured Product Liability and Health Insurance

The Company is subject to product liability claims in the normal course of business and is self-insured for health care costs. The Company is partly insured for product liability claims, and therefore records an accrual for known claims and incurred but not reported claims, including an estimate for related legal fees in the Company’s consolidated financial statements. The Company utilizes historical trends and other analysis to assist in determining the appropriate accrual. An increase in the number or magnitude of claims could have a material impact on the Company’s financial condition and results of operations.

 

 




Page 14

 

NEW ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

 

Please refer to Note A(16) for information related to the future effect of adopting new accounting pronouncements on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

SEC LITIGATION

 

Please refer to Footnote I in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for discussion on this item.

 

ITEM 7A.

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

The Company’s interest income on cash equivalents and marketable securities is affected by changes in interest rates in the United States. Cash equivalents include money market funds. As a result of the restatement referenced in Note R of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, 7-day variable rate demand notes are now categorized as marketable securities. The demand notes are highly liquid instruments with interest rates set every 7 days that can be tendered to the trustee or remarketer upon 7 days notice for payment of principal and accrued interest amounts. The 7-day tender feature of these variable rate demand notes is further supported by an irrevocable letter of credit from highly rated U.S. banks. To the extent a bond is not remarketed at par plus accrued interest, the difference is drawn from the bank’s letter of credit. The balance of the Company’s investments are held primarily in fixed and variable rate municipal bonds with an average life of less than one year. Accordingly, changes in interest rates have not had a material effect on the Company, and the Company does not anticipate that future exposure to interest rate market risk will be material. The Company uses sensitivity analysis to determine its exposure to changes in interest rates.

 

The Company has no history of, and does not anticipate in the future, investing in derivative financial instruments. Most transactions with international customers are entered into in U.S. dollars, precluding the need for foreign currency cash flow hedges. The Company’s manufacturing contracts with its foreign suppliers contain provisions to share the impact of fluctuations in the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the Hong Kong dollar above and below a fixed range contained in the contracts. All transactions with the foreign suppliers were within the exchange rate range specified in the contracts during 2005, 2004 and 2003. There is no similar provision applicable to the Chinese Yuan which until 2005 had been tied to the U.S. Dollar. To the extent there are further revaluations of the Yuan vis-à-vis the U.S. Dollar, it is anticipated that any potential material impact from such revaluations will be to the cost of products secured via purchase orders issued subsequent to the revaluation.

 

ITEM 8.

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

 

A.

The consolidated financial statements of National Presto Industries, Inc. and its subsidiaries and the related Reports of its Independent Registered Public Accountants are contained on pages F-1 through F-21 of this report.

 

 

B.

Quarterly financial data is contained in Note P in Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

 

ITEM 9.

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

There have no disagreements with accountants on accounting and financial disclosure, but there has been a change in accountants. The change stemmed from the lawsuit that the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filed in July 2002 in the federal district court in Chicago, Illinois, against National Presto Industries, Inc. alleging the Company operated as an unregistered investment company from 1992 through 2002. The case did not involve fraud, deceptive practices, or questionable accounting methods. The federal district judge granted the SEC’s motion for summary judgment on October 31, 2005. On December 23, 2005, the judge ordered the Company to register under the Investment Company Act. As he barred the Company from operating in interstate commerce until the filing was completed, the Company immediately filed the requisite application, albeit under protest, indicating that it did not meet the filing criteria. The Company filed a notice of appeal from the decision to the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals in the 7th Circuit. On May 15, 2007, the appellate court reversed the lower court, ruling that the Company is not and has never been an investment company and that the Company was free to drop its registration under the Investment Company Act and operate under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 whether or not the SEC gave its formal approval to that step.

 




Page 15

 

Prior to the appellate court’s decision, there was considerable discussion between the Company’s outside counsel and the SEC staff on the manner in which financial information was to be presented during the period in which the appeal was pending. As a result of the controversy surrounding the SEC’s staff’s ultimate mandate that an investment company footnote be inserted into the Company’s financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2005, Grant Thornton withdrew its opinion for the years ending December 31, 2005, 2004, and 2003. Subsequently, the firm withdrew from the audit engagement as well. Despite the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals’ decision, Grant Thornton would not reinstate its opinions, necessitating the reaudit of all three years by the successor auditor, Virchow Krause & Co. LLP

 

ITEM 9A.

CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

The Company’s management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, have conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures pursuant to Rule 13a-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “1934 Act”) as of December 31, 2005.

 

Management has reviewed the restatements of the insurance reserve and goodwill and noted that they are part of a reaudit in which the parties have the luxury of hindsight. The actual verdict or settlement value of many of the product liability claims that were open at the time of the earlier audits were known by the time the reaudits occurred, as was the future year’s performance of the absorbent product business and the decision to close the Atlanta facility. The line between change in audit estimate or a misapplication of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) is a fine one. For purposes of this control review, Management has elected to deem the level of the product liability reserve and the failure to recognize the impairment of goodwill as a misapplication of GAAP and hence an error and a material weakness under Paragraph Number 140 of the PCAOB Auditing Standard No. 2. In the future, management will correct these weaknesses by a) Using the best point in the range or a low point rather than a judgmental mid-point in determining the portion of the insurance reserve applicable to product liability and b) Performing a more robust review as of the beginning of the fourth quarter to determine whether any goodwill impairment has occurred.

 

Accordingly, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that the Company had a material weakness in internal control over financial reporting solely relating its use of a judgmental mid-point in determining its reserve for insurance and its failure to perform a robust review of goodwill and that, solely for this reason, its internal control over financial reporting and its disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of that date.

 

There were no significant changes in internal controls over financial reporting during the quarter ended December 31, 2005 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

MANAGEMENT’S ASSESSMENT OF INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

 

The management of National Presto Industries, Inc. (NPI) is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. NPI’s internal control system was designed to provide reasonable assurance to the Company’s management and Board of Directors regarding the preparation and fair presentation of published financial statements.

 

All internal control systems, no matter how well designed, have inherent limitations. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation.

 

NPI management assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2005. In making this assessment, it used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control – Integrated Framework. Based on our assessment and those criteria, we believe that, as of December 31, 2005, the Company had a material weakness in internal control over financial reporting solely relating to its use of a judgmental mid-point in determining its reserve for product liability insurance and its failure to perform a robust review of goodwill and that, solely for these reasons, its internal control over financial reporting and its disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of that date.

 




Page 16

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

Stockholders and Board of Directors

National Presto Industries, Inc.

 

We were engaged to audit management’s assessment included in the accompanying Management’s Assessment of Internal Control over Financial Reporting that National Presto Industries, Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2005 based on control criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting.

 

The Company did not engage us until November 28, 2006. Accordingly, we were unable to perform sufficient auditing procedures necessary to form an opinion on either management’s assessment or on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. A material weakness has been identified and included in management’s assessment. Management’s disclosure of the material weakness is not fairly presented in all material respects. Information necessary to fairly describe the material weakness is as follows:

 

Controls over the application of generally accepted accounting principles to material account balances and controls over adequacy of analysis and documentation supporting key accounting judgments and estimates – The Company did not maintain effective internal controls relating to its processes for determining, monitoring, disseminating, implementing and updating accounting policies that complied with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The Company did not provide for adequate analysis supporting the development or evaluation of certain key estimates embodied in its financial statements using information available at the time the estimates were formed or subsequently evaluated, nor did it have effective internal controls to ensure that the estimates were properly recorded on its financial statements. Because of this weakness, the Company restated its previously issued 2005, 2004, and 2003 annual financial statements to correct for overstatements of the products liability reserve and restated its previously issued 2005 annual financial statements to account for the impairment of goodwill. Therefore, a reasonable possibility existed that a material misstatement of the Company’s annual or interim financial statements would not be prevented or detected on a timely basis by the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting and that the Company had not maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). This material weakness was considered in determining the nature, timing and extent of audit tests applied in our audit of the consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2005, of the Company and this report does not affect our report on such consolidated financial statements.

 

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 




Page 17

 

Because of the limitation on the scope of our audit described in the second paragraph of this report, the scope of our work was not sufficient to enable us to express, and we do not express, an opinion either on management’s assessment or on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of National Presto Industries, Inc. and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2005 and 2004, and the related consolidated statements of earnings, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2005, and our report dated August 23, 2007 expressed an unqualified opinion on those financial statements.

 

/s/ Virchow Krause & Company, LLP

Minneapolis, Minnesota

August 23, 2007

 


ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

 

 

None

 










Page 18

 

PART III

 

ITEM 10.

DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

 

 

IDENTIFICATION OF EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

 

The following information is provided with regard to the executive officers of the registrant:

(All terms for elected officers are one year or until their respective successors are elected.)

 

NAME

 

TITLE

AGE

 

 

 

 

Maryjo Cohen

 

Chair of the Board, President
and Chief Executive Officer

55

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

James F. Bartl

 

Senior Vice President
and Secretary

67

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neil L. Brown

 

Vice President, Purchasing

63

 

 

 

 

Donald E. Hoeschen

 

Vice President, Sales

60

 

 

 

 

Larry Tienor

 

Vice President, Engineering

59

 

 

 

 

Randy Lieble

 

Vice President, Treasurer
and Chief Financial Officer

54

 

Ms. Cohen became Chair of the Board on January 1, 2002. Prior to that date she had been elected Treasurer in September 1983, to the additional positions of Vice President in May 1986, President in May 1989 and Chief Executive Officer in May 1994. She has been associated with the registrant since 1976. Prior to becoming an officer, she was Associate Resident Counsel and Assistant to the Treasurer.

 

Mr. Bartl was elected Secretary in May 1978 and the additional position of Executive Vice President in November 1998. Effective January 1, 2005, pursuant to previous planning, he relinquished his responsibilities as Executive Vice President and began working a reduced work schedule. He has been associated with the registrant since 1969. Prior to becoming an officer, he was Resident Counsel and Director of Industrial Relations.

 

Mr. Brown was elected Vice President in November 1997. He has been associated with the registrant since 1966. Prior to becoming an officer, he was Director of Manufacturing.

 

Mr. Hoeschen was elected Vice President in May 1997. He has been associated with the registrant since 1971. Prior to becoming an officer, he was Director of Sales.

 

Mr. Tienor was elected Vice President in November 2003. He has been associated with the registrant since 1971. Prior to becoming an officer, he was Director of Engineering.

 

Mr. Lieble was elected Secretary in November 2006 and Vice President in October 2004. Prior to 2004, he had been elected Treasurer in November 1995 and the additional position of Chief Financial Officer in November 1999. He has been associated with the registrant since 1977. Prior to becoming an officer, he was Manager of Investments and Government Contracts.

 

Section 16(a) beneficial ownership reporting compliance information is incorporated by reference to the “VOTING SECURITIES AND PRINCIPAL HOLDERS THEREOF” section of the Company’s Proxy Statement for its 2006 Annual Meeting of Stockholders. The Company has adopted a code of ethics, entitled the “Corporate Code of Conduct,” which is set forth in the Corporate Governance section of the Company’s website located at www.gopresto.com.

 




Page 19

 

ITEM 11.

EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

Executive compensation information is incorporated by reference to the “EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION AND OTHER INFORMATION” of the Company’s Proxy Statement for its 2006 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.

 

ITEM 12.

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

Security ownership of certain beneficial owners and management and related stockholder matters information is incorporated by reference to the “VOTING SECURITIES AND PRINCIPAL HOLDERS THEREOF” section of the Company’s Proxy Statement for its 2006 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.

 

EQUITY COMPENSATION PLAN INFORMATION

 

The following table sets forth information with respect to the Company’s equity compensation plans as of December 31, 2005.

 

 

 

(a)

 

(b)

 

(c)

 

Plan category

 

Number of securities to be issued upon exercise of outstanding options, warrants and rights

 

Weighted-average exercise price of outstanding options, warrants and rights

 

Number of securities remaining available for future issuance under equity compensation plans (excluding securities reflected in column (a))

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders

 

1,000

 

$

38.63

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

1,000

 

$

38.63

 

 

 

 

ITEM 13.

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS

 

None

 

ITEM 14.

PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

Principal accountant fees and services information is herein incorporated by reference to the “INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS” section of the Company’s Proxy Statement for its 2006 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.

 

In connection with the fees paid to Grant Thornton, the information found in the Principal accountant fees and services information is herein incorporated by reference to the “INDEPENDENT PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS” section of the Company’s Proxy Statement for its 2006 Annual Meeting of Stockholders.

 

On November 27, 2006, the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors of the Company engaged Virchow, Krause & Company, LLP as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm. As part of its engagement, Virchow Krause was to audit the financial statements for the years ended December 31, 2005 and December 31, 2006. During the two most recent fiscal years, the Company did not consult Virchow Krause with respect to (i) the application of accounting principles to any transaction, either contemplated or proposed, (ii) the type of audit opinion that might be rendered on the Company’s financial statements, or any matter that was either the subject of a disagreement (as defined in Item 304(a)(1)(iv) of Regulation S-K) or a reportable event (as described in Item 304(a)(1)(v) of Regulation S-K).

 

Virchow Krause & Company, LLP did not provide any financial information, design or implementation services for the Company during fiscal years ended December 31, 2005 and 2006.




Page 20

 

 

The Company estimates the following fees have been incurred and will be billed:

 

 

 

Audit Fees(1)

 

Audit Related Fees

 

Tax Fees

 

All Other Fees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year ended December 31, 2005

 

$

190,000

 

$

——

 

$

——

 

$

 

 

 

(1) The Company estimates total billings from Virchow Krause & Co, LLC will be $413,000 related to the reaudits of fiscal years 2003 and 2004.

 










Page 21

 

PART IV

 

ITEM 15.

EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

(a)

Documents filed as part of this Form 10-K/A:

 

 

 

 

Form 10-K/A
Page Reference

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.

Consolidated Financial Statements:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a.

Consolidated Balance Sheets - December 31, 2005 and 2004 (Restated)

F-1 & F-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

b.

Consolidated Statements of Earnings -
Years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003 (Restated)

F-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

c.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows -
Years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003 (Restated)

F-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

d.

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity -
Years ended December 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003 (Restated)

F-5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

e.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Restated)

F-6 - F-23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

f.

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

F-24

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Consolidated Financial Statement Schedules:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Schedule II – Valuation and Qualifying Accounts

F-25

 

 

 

 

 

(b)

Exhibits:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit Number

 

Description

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 3

(i) –

 

Restated Articles of Incorporation, attached

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(ii) –

 

By-Laws - incorporated by reference from Exhibit 3 (ii) of the Company’s quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended October 3, 1999

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 9

 

Voting Trust Agreement - incorporated by reference from Exhibit 9 of the Company’s quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended July 6, 1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 10.1*

 

1988 Stock Option Plan - incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the fiscal Quarter ended July 6, 1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 10.2*

 

Form of Incentive Stock Option Agreement under the 1988 Stock Option Plan - Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the fiscal Quarter ended July 6, 1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 11

 

Statement Re Computation of Per Share Earnings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Compensatory Plans

 

 

 

 




Page 22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 21

 

Parent and Subsidiaries

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 23.1

 

Consent of Virchow Krause & Co. LLP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 31.1

 

Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 31.2

 

Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 32.1

 

Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 32.2

 

Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(c)

Schedules:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reference is made to Item 15(a)(2).

 

 

 








Page 23

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the Requirements of Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

NATIONAL PRESTO INDUSTRIES, INC.

(registrant)

 

 

 

By: 


/S/ Randy F. Lieble

 

 

 

Randy F. Lieble, Vice President
Treasurer, Secretary,
and Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Accounting Officer)

 

 

 


By:

/S/ Richard N. Cardozo

 

By: 


/S/ Joseph G. Stienessen

 

Richard N. Cardozo
Director

 

 

Joseph G. Stienessen
Director

 

 


By:

/S/ Patrick J. Quinn

 

By: 


/S/ Maryjo Cohen

 

Patrick J. Quinn
Director

 

 

Maryjo Cohen
Chair of the Board, President,
Chief Executive Officer and Director
(Principal Executive Officer)

 

 


By:

/S/ Melvin S. Cohen

 

 

 

Melvin S. Cohen
Director

 

 

 

 

 

Date:  August 24, 2007

 





F-1

NATIONAL PRESTO INDUSTRIES, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

December 31

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

ASSETS

 

(Restated, See Note R)

 

(Restated, See Note R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT ASSETS:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

 

 

 

$

62,023

 

 

 

 

$

17,516

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marketable securities

 

 

 

 

 

111,552

 

 

 

 

 

163,304

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

$

32,764

 

 

 

 

$

34,041

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Less allowance for doubtful accounts

 

 

480

 

 

32,284

 

 

480

 

 

33,561

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inventories:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finished goods

 

 

20,771

 

 

 

 

 

17,632

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work in process

 

 

8,431

 

 

 

 

 

8,798

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raw materials

 

 

8,477

 

 

37,679

 

 

7,697

 

 

34,127

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other current assets

 

 

 

 

 

9,687

 

 

 

 

 

5,169

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total current assets

 

 

 

 

 

253,225

 

 

 

 

 

253,677

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land and land improvements

 

 

1,855

 

 

 

 

 

1,836

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Buildings

 

 

10,878

 

 

 

 

 

10,804

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Machinery and equipment

 

 

55,369

 

 

 

 

 

42,112

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

68,102

 

 

 

 

 

54,752

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Less allowance for depreciation

 

 

17,618

 

 

50,484

 

 

13,527

 

 

41,225

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GOODWILL

 

 

 

 

 

3,556

 

 

 

 

 

6,954

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHER ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

150

 

 

 

 

 

150

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

307,415

 

 

 

 

$

302,006

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.



F-2

NATIONAL PRESTO INDUSTRIES, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

December 31

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

LIABILITIES

 

(Restated, See Note R)

 

(Restated, See Note R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CURRENT LIABILITIES:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

 

 

 

$

18,084

 

 

 

 

$

18,439

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Federal and state income taxes

 

 

 

 

 

8,282

 

 

 

 

 

5,804

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accrued liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

14,138

 

 

 

 

 

14,672

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

 

 

 

40,504

 

 

 

 

 

38,915

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DEFERRED INCOME TAXES

 

 

 

 

 

376

 

 

 

 

 

1,576

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $1 par value:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Authorized: 12,000,000 shares at December 31,
2005 and 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Issued: 7,440,518 shares at December 31,
2005 and 2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding: 6,828,700 and 6,823,251 shares at
December 31, 2005 and 2004, respectively

 

$

7,441

 

 

 

 

$

7,441

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paid-in capital

 

 

1,135

 

 

 

 

 

1,050

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Retained earnings

 

 

277,033

 

 

 

 

 

272,010

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)

 

 

(141

)

 

 

 

 

93

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

285,468

 

 

 

 

 

280,594

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treasury stock, at cost, 611,818 shares
in 2005 and 617,267 shares in 2004

 

 

18,933

 

 

 

 

 

19,079

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

 

 

 

 

 

266,535

 

 

 

 

 

261,515

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

307,415

 

 

 

 

$

302,006

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.



F-3

NATIONAL PRESTO INDUSTRIES, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS

(In thousands except per share data)

 

 

 

 

For the years ended December 31,

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

 

 

(Restated, See Note R)

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

184,565

 

$

158,956

 

$

125,744

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of sales

 

 

146,284

 

 

118,890

 

 

88,283

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gross profit

 

 

38,281

 

 

40,066

 

 

37,461

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selling and general expenses

 

 

14,452

 

 

17,417

 

 

15,461

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plant closing costs

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,834

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pension plan termination

 

 

 

 

3,528

 

 

1,317

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Goodwill Impairment

 

 

4,148

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating profit

 

 

19,681

 

 

19,121

 

 

18,849

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income, principally interest

 

 

4,345

 

 

3,585

 

 

4,234

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings before provision for income taxes

 

 

24,026

 

 

22,706

 

 

23,083

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision for income taxes

 

 

7,609

 

 

7,265

 

 

7,606

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings

 

$

16,417

 

$

15,441

 

$

15,477

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted average shares outstanding:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

 

6,826

 

 

6,821

 

 

6,820

 

Diluted

 

 

6,827

 

 

6,823

 

 

6,821

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic

 

$

2.41

 

$

2.26

 

$

2.27

 

Diluted

 

$

2.40

 

$

2.26

 

$

2.27

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.



F-4

NATIONAL PRESTO INDUSTRIES, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

 

 

 

 

(Restated, See Note R)

 

 

 

In Thousands

 

For the years ended December 31,

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings

 

$

16,417

 

$

15,441

 

$

15,477

 

Adjustments to reconcile net earnings to net cash
provided by (used in) operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Provision for depreciation

 

 

4,245

 

 

3,310

 

 

2,353

 

  Deferred income taxes

 

 

(1,485

)

 

126

 

 

2,252

 

  Pension charges

 

 

 

 

2,052

 

 

322

 

  Plant closing and asset impairment charges

 

 

 

 

 

 

(950

)

  Goodwill Impairment

 

 

4,148

 

 

 

 

 

  Other

 

 

555

 

 

1,160

 

 

694

 

  Changes in operating accounts, net of acquisitions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

 

1,277

 

 

(4,657

)

 

(572

)

Inventories

 

 

(3,552

)

 

(9,489

)

 

1,804

 

Other current assets

 

 

(1,607

)

 

(50

)

 

(308

)

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

 

 

(139

)

 

(2,256

)

 

(917

)

Federal and state income taxes

 

 

2,478

 

 

142

 

 

2,019

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

 

22,337

 

 

5,779

 

 

22,174

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marketable securities purchased

 

 

(89,088

)

 

(111,237

)

 

(75,096

)

Marketable securities - maturities and sales

 

 

140,482

 

 

127,895

 

 

72,018

 

Acquisition of property, plant and equipment

 

 

(13,832

)

 

(28,188

)

 

(2,903

)

Acquisition of businesses

 

 

(1,500

)

 

(2,373

)

 

(7,595

)

Deposit for acquisition of business

 

 

(2,500

)

 

 

 

 

Sale of property plant and equipment

 

 

12

 

 

759

 

 

1,434

 

Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

88

 

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

 

 

33,574

 

 

(13,144

)

 

(12,054

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividends paid

 

 

(11,394

)

 

(7,977

)

 

(6,284

)

Purchase of treasury stock

 

 

 

 

 

 

(425

)

Other

 

 

(10

)

 

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

 

 

(11,404

)

 

(7,977

)

 

(6,709

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

44,507

 

 

(15,342

)

 

3,411

 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

 

 

17,516

 

 

32,858

 

 

29,447

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year

 

$

62,023

 

$

17,516

 

$

32,858

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash paid during the year for:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Income taxes

 

$

6,617

 

$

6,996

 

$

3,336

 

 

Supplemental disclosure of non-cash investing and financing activities:

As of December 31, 2005, 2004, and 2003, the unrealized gain (loss) on available for sale securities, net of tax was ($141), $93, and $600.

 

During 2005 and 2004, $750,000 and $1,250,000, respectively, were accrued for goodwill related to the acquisition of NCN Hygienic Products, Inc. Included in accounts payable at December 31, 2003, is $2,623,000 related to the accrued purchase price of NCN Hygienic Products, Inc.

 

During 2003, an additional $1,095,000 was accrued for the Company’s minimum pension liability.

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.



F-5

NATIONAL PRESTO INDUSTRIES, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(In thousands except share and per share data)

 

 

 

 

For the years ended December 31, 2005, 2004, 2003

 

 

 

Common
Stock

 

Paid-in
Capital

 

Retained
Earnings

 

Accumulated
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)

 

Treasury
Stock

 

Total

 

 

 

Restated, See Note R

 

Balance December 31, 2002, as previously reported

 

$

7,441

 

$

998

 

$

249,313

 

$

(698

)

$

(18,797

)

$

238,257

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Product Liability Restatement Adjustment, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

6,040

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,040

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance December 31, 2002, as restated (See Note R)

 

$

7,441

 

$

998

 

$

255,353

 

$

(698

)

$

(18,797

)

$

244,297

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15,477

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15,477

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized gain on available for sale securities, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(67

)

 

 

 

 

(67

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minimum pension liability adjustment, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(674

)

 

 

 

 

(674

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14,736

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividends paid, $.92 per share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6,284

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6,284

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchase of treasury stock - 16,300 shares

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(425

)

 

(425

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other

 

 

 

 

 

(7

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(8

)

 

(15

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance December 31, 2003

 

 

7,441

 

 

991

 

 

264,546

 

 

(1,439

)

 

(19,230

)

 

252,309

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net earnings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15,441

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15,441

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized loss on available for sale securities, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(507

)

 

 

 

 

(507

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minimum pension liability adjustment, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,039

 

 

 

 

 

2,039

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16,973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dividends paid, $1.17 per share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(7,977

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(7,977

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other

 

 

 

 

 

59

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

151

 

 

210

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance December 31, 2004

 

 

7,441

 

 

1,050

 

 

272,010

 

 

93

 

 

(19,079

)

 

261,515