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Panera Bread Company 10-Q 2011

Documents found in this filing:

  1. 10-Q
  2. Ex-31.1
  3. Ex-31.2
  4. Ex-32
  5. Ex-32
Form 10-Q
Table of Contents

 
 
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington D.C. 20549
 
Form 10-Q
(Mark one)
     
þ   QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 29, 2011
or
     
o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                        to                      
Commission file number: 0-19253
Panera Bread Company
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)
     
Delaware   04-2723701
     
(State or Other Jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer
Incorporation or Organization)   Identification No.)
     
3630 South Geyer Road, Suite 100, St. Louis, MO   63127
     
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)
(314) 984-1000
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. þ Yes o No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). þ Yes o No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
             
Large accelerated filer þ   Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No þ
As of May 2, 2011, 29,024,054 shares of the registrant’s Class A Common Stock, par value $.0001 per share, and 1,389,087 shares of the registrant’s Class B Common Stock, par value $.0001 per share, were outstanding.
 
 

 

 


 

PANERA BREAD COMPANY
QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q
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 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-32
 EX-101 INSTANCE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 SCHEMA DOCUMENT
 EX-101 CALCULATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 LABELS LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 PRESENTATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
 EX-101 DEFINITION LINKBASE DOCUMENT

 

 


Table of Contents

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1.  
Financial Statements
PANERA BREAD COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in thousands, except share and per share information)
                 
    March 29, 2011     December 28, 2010  
    (unaudited)        
ASSETS
               
Current assets:
               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 250,660     $ 229,299  
Trade accounts receivable, net
    22,779       20,378  
Other accounts receivable
    21,605       17,962  
Inventories
    14,079       14,345  
Prepaid expenses and other
    21,336       23,905  
Deferred income taxes
    20,568       24,796  
 
           
Total current assets
    351,027       330,685  
Property and equipment, net
    445,178       444,094  
Other assets:
               
Goodwill
    94,510       94,442  
Other intangible assets, net
    47,383       48,402  
Deposits and other
    7,279       6,958  
 
           
Total other assets
    149,172       149,802  
 
           
Total assets
  $ 945,377     $ 924,581  
 
           
LIABILITIES
               
Current liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 8,968     $ 7,346  
Accrued expenses
    186,195       204,170  
 
           
Total current liabilities
    195,163       211,516  
Deferred rent
    49,247       47,974  
Deferred income taxes
    33,492       30,264  
Other long-term liabilities
    35,094       39,219  
 
           
Total liabilities
    312,996       328,973  
Commitments and contingencies (Note 9)
               
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
               
Common stock, $.0001 par value per share:
               
Class A, 75,000,000 shares authorized; 30,145,662 issued and 29,021,212 outstanding in 2011; and 30,125,936 issued and 29,006,844 outstanding in 2010
    3       3  
Class B, 10,000,000 shares authorized; 1,389,087 issued and outstanding in 2011 and 1,391,607 in 2010
           
Treasury stock, carried at cost; 1,124,450 shares in 2011 and 1,119,092 shares in 2010
    (79,641 )     (78,990 )
Additional paid-in capital
    134,652       130,005  
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    278       275  
Retained earnings
    577,089       544,315  
 
           
Total stockholders’ equity
    632,381       595,608  
 
           
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 945,377     $ 924,581  
 
           
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 

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PANERA BREAD COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(unaudited)
(in thousands, except per share information)
                 
    For the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010  
Revenues:
               
Bakery-cafe sales, net
  $ 365,579     $ 312,500  
Franchise royalties and fees
    22,582       20,863  
Fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees
    33,939       30,847  
 
           
Total revenues
    422,100       364,210  
Costs and expenses:
               
Bakery-cafe expenses:
               
Cost of food and paper products
    106,209       90,311  
Labor
    114,050       100,682  
Occupancy
    26,773       24,389  
Other operating expenses
    47,327       39,535  
 
           
Total bakery-cafe expenses
    294,359       254,917  
Fresh dough and other product cost of sales to franchisees
    28,024       24,835  
Depreciation and amortization
    19,094       17,009  
General and administrative expenses
    26,671       25,012  
Pre-opening expenses
    978       276  
 
           
Total costs and expenses
    369,126       322,049  
 
           
Operating profit
    52,974       42,161  
Interest expense
    225       168  
Other (income) expense, net
    (804 )     307  
 
           
Income before income taxes
    53,553       41,686  
Income taxes
    20,779       15,841  
 
           
Net income
  $ 32,774     $ 25,845  
 
           
 
               
Earnings per common share:
               
Basic
  $ 1.10     $ 0.83  
 
           
Diluted
  $ 1.09     $ 0.82  
 
           
 
               
Weighted average shares of common and common equivalent shares outstanding:
               
Basic
    29,845       31,170  
 
           
Diluted
    30,160       31,521  
 
           
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 

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PANERA BREAD COMPANY
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(unaudited)
(in thousands)
                 
    For the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010  
Cash flows from operations:
               
Net income
  $ 32,774     $ 25,845  
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
               
Depreciation and amortization
    19,094       17,009  
Stock-based compensation expense
    3,019       2,484  
Tax benefit from exercise of stock options
    (593 )     (2,755 )
Deferred income taxes
    7,456       (3,316 )
Other
    870       173  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, excluding the effect of acquisitions:
               
Trade and other accounts receivable, net
    (6,044 )     1,874  
Inventories
    266       644  
Prepaid expenses and other
    2,569       481  
Deposits and other
    (321 )     (875 )
Accounts payable
    1,622       (435 )
Accrued expenses
    (14,877 )     13,007  
Deferred rent
    1,273       798  
Other long-term liabilities
    (4,125 )     921  
 
           
Net cash provided by operating activities
    42,983       55,855  
 
           
Cash flows from investing activities:
               
Additions to property and equipment
    (22,714 )     (10,465 )
Proceeds from sale of bakery-cafes
    115        
 
           
Net cash used in investing activities
    (22,599 )     (10,465 )
 
           
Cash flows from financing activities:
               
Repurchase of common stock
    (651 )     (94 )
Exercise of employee stock options
    519       10,149  
Tax benefit from exercise of stock options
    593       2,755  
Proceeds from issuance of common stock under employee benefit plans
    516       459  
 
           
Net cash provided by financing activities
    977       13,269  
 
           
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
    21,361       58,659  
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    229,299       246,400  
 
           
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 250,660     $ 305,059  
 
           
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED)
Note 1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation
The unaudited consolidated financial statements of Panera Bread Company and its subsidiaries (the “Company”) have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (“GAAP”), under the rules and regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), and on a basis substantially consistent with the audited consolidated financial statements of the Company as of and for the fiscal year ended December 28, 2010. These unaudited consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with such audited consolidated financial statements, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 28, 2010 as filed with the SEC on February 22, 2011. The unaudited consolidated financial statements consist of the accounts of Panera Bread Company and its wholly owned direct and indirect subsidiaries. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The Consolidated Balance Sheet data as of December 28, 2010 was derived from audited financial statements, but does not include all disclosures required by GAAP.
The unaudited consolidated financial statements include all adjustments (consisting of normal recurring adjustments and accruals) that management considers necessary for a fair statement of its financial position and results of operations for the interim periods presented. Interim results are not necessarily indicative of the results for any other interim period or for the entire fiscal year.
Subsequent Events
The Company has evaluated all events or transactions occurring between the balance sheet date and the date of issuance of the consolidated financial statements. Refer to Note 12 for information related to subsequent events.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
On December 30, 2009, the Company adopted the updated guidance issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) related to fair value measurements and disclosures, which requires a reporting entity to separately disclose the amounts of significant transfers in and out of Level 1 and Level 2 fair value measurements and to describe the reasons for the transfers. The updated guidance also requires that an entity provide fair value measurement disclosures for each class of assets and liabilities and disclosures about the valuation techniques and inputs used to measure fair value for both recurring and non-recurring Level 2 and Level 3 fair value measurements. This guidance was effective for interim or annual financial reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2009. The adoption of this updated guidance did not have an impact on the Company’s consolidated financial position or results of operations. In addition, the updated guidance requires that in the reconciliation for fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs, or Level 3, a reporting entity separately disclose information about purchases, sales, issuances, and settlements on a gross basis rather than as one net number. This guidance was effective for interim or annual financial reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2010. The adoption of this updated guidance did not have an impact on the Company’s consolidated financial position or results of operations.
Note 2. Business Combinations and Divestitures
Texas Divestiture
On February 9, 2011, the Company sold substantially all of the assets of two Paradise Bakery & Café bakery-cafes to an existing Texas franchisee for a sales price of approximately $0.1 million, resulting in a nominal gain, which is classified in other (income) expense, net in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
New Jersey Franchisee Acquisition
On September 29, 2010 the Company purchased substantially all of the assets and certain liabilities of 37 bakery-cafes and the area development rights from a New Jersey franchisee for a purchase price of approximately $55.0 million. Approximately $52.2 million of the purchase price, as well as related transaction costs, were paid on September 29, 2010, with $2.8 million retained by the Company for certain holdbacks. The holdbacks are primarily for certain indemnifications and expire on the first anniversary of the transaction closing date, September 29, 2011, with any remaining holdback amounts reverting to the prior franchisee. As a result of the acquisition, the Company gained control of the 37 bakery-cafes and expanded Company-owned operations into New Jersey. The Consolidated Statements of Operations include the results of operations from the operating bakery-cafes from the date of the acquisition.

 

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The following supplemental pro forma information has been prepared for comparative purposes and does not purport to be indicative of what would have occurred had the acquisition been made on December 30, 2009, nor are they indicative of any future results (in thousands):
         
    Pro Forma for  
    the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 30, 2010  
Bakery-cafe sales, net
  $ 333,085  
Net income
  $ 26,574  
The pro forma amounts included in the table above reflect the application of the Company’s accounting policies and adjustment of the results of the New Jersey bakery-cafes to reflect the additional depreciation and amortization that would have been charged assuming the fair value adjustments to property and equipment and intangible assets had been applied from December 30, 2009, together with the consequential tax impacts.
The Company allocated the purchase price to the tangible and intangible assets acquired in the acquisition at their estimated fair values with the remainder allocated to tax deductible goodwill as follows: $0.5 million to inventories, $19.9 million to property and equipment, $31.2 million to intangible assets, which represents the fair value of re-acquired territory rights and favorable lease agreements, $1.2 million to liabilities, and $4.6 million to goodwill. The fair value measurement of tangible and intangible assets and liabilities as of the acquisition date is based on significant inputs not observed in the market and thus represents a Level 3 measurement.
Goodwill recorded in connection with this acquisition is attributable to the workforce of the acquired bakery-cafes and synergies expected to arise from cost savings opportunities. All of the recorded goodwill is anticipated to be tax deductible and is included in the Company Bakery-Cafe Operations segment.
Note 3. Stockholders’ Equity
The following tables illustrate the changes in stockholders’ equity for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 and March 30, 2010, respectively (in thousands):
                                                                 
                                                            Accumulated  
                                                            Other  
            Compre-                             Additional             Compre-  
            hensive     Common Stock     Treasury     Paid-in     Retained     hensive  
    Total     Income     Class A     Class B     Stock     Capital     Earnings     Income  
Balance, December 29, 2009
  $ 597,036             $ 3     $     $ (3,928 )   $ 168,288     $ 432,449     $ 224  
 
                                               
Comprehensive income:
                                                               
Net income
    25,845     $ 25,845                               25,845        
Other comprehensive income:
                                                               
Foreign currency translation adjustment
    38       38                                     38  
 
                                                           
Total other comprehensive income
    38       38                                                  
 
                                                           
Comprehensive income
    25,883     $ 25,883                                                  
 
                                                           
Issuance of common stock
    459                                 459              
Exercise of employee stock options
    10,149                                 10,149              
Stock-based compensation expense
    2,484                                 2,484              
Repurchase of common stock
    (94 )                         (94 )                  
Tax benefit from exercise of stock options
    2,755                                 2,755              
 
                                               
Balance, March 30, 2010
  $ 638,672             $ 3     $     $ (4,022 )   $ 184,135     $ 458,294     $ 262  
 
                                               
 
                                                               
Balance, December 28, 2010
  $ 595,608             $ 3     $     $ (78,990 )   $ 130,005     $ 544,315     $ 275  
 
                                               
Comprehensive income:
                                                               
Net income
    32,774     $ 32,774                               32,774        
Other comprehensive income:
                                                               
Foreign currency translation adjustment
    3       3                                     3  
 
                                                           
Total other comprehensive income
    3       3                                                  
 
                                                           
Comprehensive income
    32,777     $ 32,777                                                  
 
                                                           
Issuance of common stock
    516                                 516              
Exercise of employee stock options
    519                                 519              
Stock-based compensation expense
    3,019                                 3,019              
Repurchase of common stock
    (651 )                         (651 )                  
Tax benefit from exercise of stock options
    593                                 593              
 
                                               
Balance, March 29, 2011
  $ 632,381             $ 3     $     $ (79,641 )   $ 134,652     $ 577,089     $ 278  
 
                                               
Note 4. Fair Value Measurements
The Company’s $51.0 million and $44.5 million in cash equivalents at March 29, 2011 and December 28, 2010, respectively, were carried at fair value in the Consolidated Balance Sheets based on quoted market prices for identical securities (Level 1 inputs).

 

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Note 5. Inventories
Inventories consisted of the following (in thousands):
                 
    March 29, 2011     December 28, 2010  
Food:
               
Fresh dough facilities:
               
Raw materials
  $ 2,028     $ 2,338  
Finished goods
    254       261  
Bakery-cafes:
               
Raw materials
    8,951       8,780  
Paper goods
    2,846       2,966  
 
           
 
  $ 14,079     $ 14,345  
 
           
Note 6. Goodwill
The following is a reconciliation of the beginning and ending balances of the Company’s goodwill by reportable segment at March 29, 2011 (in thousands):
                                 
    Company Bakery-     Franchise     Fresh Dough        
    Cafe Operations     Operations     Operations     Total  
Balance as of December 28, 2010
  $ 90,813     $ 1,934     $ 1,695     $ 94,442  
Currency translation
    68                   68  
 
                       
Balance as of March 29, 2011
  $ 90,881     $ 1,934     $ 1,695     $ 94,510  
 
                       
Note 7. Accrued Expenses
Accrued expenses consisted of the following (in thousands):
                 
    March 29, 2011     December 28, 2010  
Compensation and related employment taxes
  $ 41,436     $ 43,788  
Unredeemed gift cards
    37,650       47,716  
Insurance
    19,918       20,212  
Taxes, other than income tax
    16,327       16,281  
Advertising
    10,753       9,866  
Capital expenditures
    10,551       13,057  
Litigation settlement (Note 9)
    7,125       7,125  
Rent
    6,468       7,084  
Fresh dough and other product operations
    5,350       5,071  
Deferred purchase price
    5,051       5,040  
Loyalty program
    4,962       4,280  
Utilities
    3,331       3,547  
Deferred revenue
    1,892       1,962  
Other
    15,381       19,141  
 
           
 
  $ 186,195     $ 204,170  
 
           
Note 8. Credit Facility
The Company and certain of its direct and indirect subsidiaries, as guarantors, are parties to an amended and restated credit agreement (the “Amended and Restated Credit Agreement”) with Bank of America, N.A. and other lenders party thereto, which provides for a secured revolving credit facility of $250.0 million to be used for general corporate purposes, including working capital, capital expenditures, permitted acquisitions, and share repurchases. The Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, which is collateralized by the capital stock of the Company’s present and future material subsidiaries, will become due on March 7, 2013, subject to acceleration upon certain specified events of default.
As of March 29, 2011 and December 28, 2010, the Company had no balance outstanding under the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement. The Company incurred $0.1 million of commitment fees for each of the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 and March 30, 2010, and accrued interest related to the commitment fees was $0.1 million at both March 29, 2011 and December 28, 2010. As of March 29, 2011, the Company was in compliance with all covenants included in the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement.

 

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Note 9. Commitments and Contingencies
Lease Obligations
As of March 29, 2011, the Company guaranteed operating leases of 27 franchisee or affiliate locations, which the Company accounted for in accordance with the accounting standard for guarantees. These leases have terms expiring on various dates from April 30, 2011 to December 31, 2023 and a potential amount of future rental payments of approximately $24.9 million as of March 29, 2011. The obligations under these leases will generally decrease over time as these operating leases expire. The Company has not recorded a liability for certain of these guarantees as they arose prior to the implementation of the accounting standard for guarantees and, unless modified, are exempt from its requirements. The Company has not recorded a liability for those guarantees issued after the effective date of this accounting standard because the fair value of each such lease guarantee was determined by the Company to be insignificant based on analysis of the facts and circumstances of each such lease and each such franchisee’s performance, and the Company did not believe it was probable it would be required to perform under any guarantees at the time the guarantees were issued. The Company has not had to make any payments related to any of these guaranteed leases. The applicable franchisees or affiliates continue to have primary liability for these operating leases.
Legal Proceedings
On January 25, 2008 and February 26, 2008, purported class action lawsuits were filed against the Company and three of the Company’s current or former executive officers by the Western Washington Laborers-Employers Pension Trust and Sue Trachet, respectively, on behalf of investors who purchased the Company’s common stock during the period between November 1, 2005 and July 26, 2006. Both lawsuits were filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri, St. Louis Division. Each complaint alleges that the Company and the other defendants violated Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and Rule 10b-5 under the Exchange Act in connection with the Company’s disclosure of system-wide sales and earnings guidance during the period from November 1, 2005 through July 26, 2006. Each complaint seeks, among other relief, class certification of the lawsuit, unspecified damages, costs and expenses, including attorneys’ and experts’ fees, and such other relief as the Court might find just and proper. On June 23, 2008, the lawsuits were consolidated and the Western Washington Laborers-Employers Pension Trust was appointed lead plaintiff. On August 7, 2008, the plaintiff filed an amended complaint, which extended the class period to November 1, 2005 through July 26, 2007. Following the filing of motions by both parties and hearings before the Court, on February 11, 2011, the parties filed with the Court a Stipulation of Settlement regarding the class action lawsuit. Under the terms of the Stipulation of Settlement, the Company’s primary directors and officers liability insurer will deposit $5.7 million into a settlement fund for payment to class members, plaintiff’s attorneys’ fees and costs of administering the settlement. The settlement must be approved by the Court before becoming effective. The Stipulation of Settlement contains no admission of wrongdoing. The Company and the other defendants have maintained and continue to deny liability and wrongdoing of any kind with respect to the claims made in the class action lawsuit. However, given the potential cost and burden of continued litigation, the Company believes the settlement is in its best interests and the best interests of its stockholders. On February 22, 2011, the Court preliminarily approved the settlement and scheduled a settlement hearing on June 22, 2011. If the Court grants final approval of the Stipulation of Settlement, the Court will dismiss the class action lawsuit with prejudice and the plaintiff will be deemed to have released all claims against the Company relating to the allegations in the class action. The Company can provide no assurance that the Court will approve the Stipulation of Settlement. If the Court does not approve the Stipulation of Settlement, the Company will continue to defend against these claims, which could have a material adverse effect on its financial condition and business. If these matters were concluded in a manner adverse to the Company, it could be required to pay substantially more in damages than the amount provided for in the Stipulation of Settlement. In addition, the costs to the Company of defending any litigation or other proceeding, even if resolved in its favor, could be substantial. Such litigation could also substantially divert the attention of its management and resources in general. The amount deposited by the Company’s primary directors and officers liability insurer into the settlement fund of $5.7 million is included in other accounts receivable and accrued expenses in the Company’s Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 29, 2011.
On February 22, 2008, a shareholder derivative lawsuit was filed against the Company as nominal defendant and against certain of its current or former officers and certain current directors. The lawsuit was filed by Paul Pashcetto in the Circuit Court of St. Louis, Missouri. The complaint alleges, among other things, breach of fiduciary duty, abuse of control, waste of corporate assets and unjust enrichment between November 5, 2006 and February 22, 2008. The complaint sought, among other relief, unspecified damages, costs and expenses, including attorneys’ fees, an order requiring the Company to implement certain corporate governance reforms, restitution from the defendants and such other relief as the Court might find just and proper. Following the filing of motions by both parties and hearings before the Court, on February 22, 2011, the parties filed with the Court a Stipulation of Settlement regarding the shareholder derivative lawsuit. Under the terms of the Stipulation of Settlement, the Company agreed, among other things, to implement and maintain certain corporate governance additions, modifications and/or formalizations, and its insurer will pay plaintiff’s attorneys’ fees and expenses of $1.4 million. The Stipulation of Settlement contains no admission of wrongdoing and would result in the dismissal of the shareholder derivative lawsuit with prejudice, and under such settlement, the plaintiff would be deemed to have released all claims against the defendants relating to the allegations in the derivative action. The Company and the other defendants have maintained and continue to deny liability and wrongdoing of any kind with respect to the claims made in the shareholder derivative action. On April 8, 2011, the Court granted final approval of the settlement, subject to a 30 day appeal period. The amount deposited by the Company’s primary directors and officers liability insurer into the settlement fund of $1.4 million is included in other accounts receivable and accrued expenses in the Company’s Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 29, 2011.

 

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On December 9, 2009, a purported class action lawsuit was filed against the Company and one of its subsidiaries by Nick Sotoudeh, a former employee of the Company. The lawsuit was filed in the California Superior Court, County of Contra Costa. The complaint alleges, among other things, violations of the California Labor Code, failure to pay overtime, failure to provide meal and rest periods and termination compensation and violations of California’s Unfair Competition Law. The complaint seeks, among other relief, collective and class certification of the lawsuit, unspecified damages, costs and expenses, including attorneys’ fees, and such other relief as the Court might find just and proper. The Company believes it and the other defendant have meritorious defenses to each of the claims in this lawsuit and the Company is prepared to vigorously defend the lawsuit. There can be no assurance, however, that the Company will be successful, and an adverse resolution of the lawsuit could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position and results of operations in the period in which the lawsuit is resolved. The Company is not presently able to reasonably estimate potential losses, if any, related to the lawsuit and as such, has not recorded a liability in its Consolidated Balance Sheets.
On December 16, 2010, a purported class action lawsuit was filed against the Company by Denarius Lewis and Corey Weiner, former employees of one of the Company’s subsidiaries, and Caroll Ruiz, an employee of one of the Company’s franchisees. The lawsuit was filed in the United States District Court for Middle District of Florida. The complaint alleges, among other things, violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The complaint seeks, among other relief, collective, and class certification of the lawsuit, unspecified damages, costs and expenses, including attorneys’ fees and such other relief as the Court might find just and proper. The Company believes it and the other defendant have meritorious defenses to each of the claims in this lawsuit and the Company is prepared to vigorously defend the lawsuit. There can be no assurance, however, that the Company will be successful, and an adverse resolution of the lawsuit could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position and results of operations in the period in which the lawsuit is resolved. The Company is not presently able to reasonably estimate potential losses, if any, related to the lawsuit and as such, has not recorded a liability in its Consolidated Balance Sheets.
On December 20, 2010, a purported class action lawsuit was filed against the Company by Jamie Ortiz, a former employee of one of the Company’s subsidiaries. The lawsuit was filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Virginia. The complaint alleges, among other things, violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Mr. Ortiz also has alleged several individual claims for Title VII retaliation, defamation and intentional infliction of emotional distress. The complaint seeks, among other relief, collective, and class certification of the lawsuit, unspecified damages, costs and expenses, including attorneys’ fees and such other relief as the Court might find just and proper. The Company believes it has meritorious defenses to each of the claims in this lawsuit and the Company is prepared to vigorously defend the lawsuit. There can be no assurance, however, that the Company will be successful, and an adverse resolution of the lawsuit could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position and results of operations in the period in which the lawsuit is resolved. The Company is not presently able to reasonably estimate potential losses, if any, related to the lawsuit and as such, has not recorded a liability in its Consolidated Balance Sheets.
In addition, the Company is subject to other routine legal proceedings, claims, and litigation in the ordinary course of its business. Defending lawsuits requires significant management attention and financial resources and the outcome of any litigation, including the matters described above, is inherently uncertain. The Company does not, however, currently expect that the costs to resolve these routine matters will have a material adverse effect on its consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.
Other
The Company is subject to on-going federal and state income tax audits and sales tax audits and any unfavorable rulings could materially and adversely affect its consolidated financial condition or results of operations. The Company believes reserves for these matters are adequately provided for in its consolidated financial statements.
Note 10. Business Segment Information
The Company operates three business segments. The Company Bakery-Cafe Operations segment is comprised of the operating activities of the bakery-cafes owned directly and indirectly by the Company. The Company-owned bakery-cafes conduct business under the Panera Bread®, Saint Louis Bread Co.® or Paradise Bakery & Café® names. These bakery-cafes offer some or all of the following: fresh baked goods, made-to-order sandwiches on freshly baked breads, soups, salads, custom roasted coffees, and other complementary products through on-premise sales, as well as catering.
The Franchise Operations segment is comprised of the operating activities of the franchise business unit which licenses qualified operators to conduct business under the Panera Bread® or Paradise Bakery & Café® names and also monitors the operations of these bakery-cafes. Under the terms of most of the agreements, the licensed operators pay royalties and fees to the Company in return for the use of the Panera Bread® or Paradise Bakery & Café® names and other services.

 

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The Fresh Dough and Other Product Operations segment supplies fresh dough, produce, tuna, cream cheese, and indirectly supplies proprietary sweet goods items through a contract manufacturing arrangement, to Company-owned and franchise-operated bakery-cafes. The fresh dough is sold to a number of Company-owned and franchise-operated bakery-cafes at a delivered cost generally not to exceed 27 percent of the retail value of the end product. The sales and related costs to the franchise-operated bakery-cafes are separately stated line items in the Consolidated Statements of Operations. The operating profit related to the sales to Company-owned bakery-cafes is classified as a reduction of the costs in the cost of food and paper products in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
Information related to the Company’s three business segments follows (in thousands):
                 
    For the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010  
Revenues:
               
Company bakery-cafe operations
  $ 365,579     $ 312,500  
Franchise operations
    22,582       20,863  
Fresh dough and other product operations
    66,025       53,742  
Intercompany sales eliminations
    (32,086 )     (22,895 )
 
           
Total revenues
  $ 422,100     $ 364,210  
 
           
Segment profit:
               
Company bakery-cafe operations
  $ 71,220     $ 57,583  
Franchise operations
    21,007       19,520  
Fresh dough and other product operations
    5,915       6,012  
 
           
Total segment profit
  $ 98,142     $ 83,115  
 
           
 
               
Depreciation and amortization
  $ 19,094     $ 17,009  
Unallocated general and administrative expenses
    25,096       23,669  
Pre-opening expenses
    978       276  
Interest expense
    225       168  
Other (income) expense, net
    (804 )     307  
 
           
Income before income taxes
  $ 53,553     $ 41,686  
 
           
Depreciation and amortization:
               
Company bakery-cafe operations
  $ 16,244     $ 14,115  
Fresh dough and other product operations
    1,744       1,910  
Corporate administration
    1,106       984  
 
           
Total depreciation and amortization
  $ 19,094     $ 17,009  
 
           
Capital expenditures:
               
Company bakery-cafe operations
  $ 21,890     $ 9,194  
Fresh dough and other product operations
    217       525  
Corporate administration
    607       746  
 
           
Total capital expenditures
  $ 22,714     $ 10,465  
 
           
                 
    March 29, 2011     December 28, 2010  
Segment assets:
               
Company bakery-cafe operations
  $ 584,312     $ 581,193  
Franchise operations
    6,629       6,679  
Fresh dough and other product operations
    47,446       48,393  
 
           
Total segment assets
  $ 638,387     $ 636,265  
 
           
Unallocated trade and other accounts receivable
    3,012       9,409  
Unallocated property and equipment
    19,532       19,798  
Unallocated deposits and other
    4,446       4,549  
Other unallocated assets
    280,000       254,560  
 
           
Total assets
  $ 945,377     $ 924,581  
 
           
“Unallocated trade and other accounts receivable” relates primarily to rebates and interest receivable, “unallocated property and equipment” relates primarily to corporate fixed assets, “unallocated deposits and other” relates primarily to insurance deposits, and “other unallocated assets” relates primarily to cash and cash equivalents and deferred income taxes.

 

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Note 11. Earnings Per Share
The following table sets forth the computation of basic and diluted earnings per share (in thousands, except for per share data):
                 
    For the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010  
Amounts used for basic and diluted per share calculations:
               
Net income
  $ 32,774     $ 25,845  
 
           
 
               
Weighted average number of shares outstanding — basic
    29,845       31,170  
Effect of dilutive stock-based employee compensation awards
    315       351  
 
           
Weighted average number of shares outstanding — diluted
    30,160       31,521  
 
           
 
               
Earnings per common share:
               
Basic
  $ 1.10     $ 0.83  
 
           
Diluted
  $ 1.09     $ 0.82  
 
           
For the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011, and March 30, 2010, weighted-average outstanding stock options, restricted stock, and stock-settled appreciation rights of less than 0.1 million shares, were excluded in calculating diluted earnings per share as the exercise price exceeded fair market value and the inclusion of such shares would have been antidilutive.
Note 12. Subsequent Event
On April 19, 2011 the Company purchased substantially all the assets and certain liabilities of 25 bakery-cafes and the area development rights from a Milwaukee franchisee for a purchase price of approximately $42 million, which the Company paid with cash on hand at the time of closing. The Company’s results for the reported periods were not impacted by this acquisition as it was completed subsequent to March 29, 2011.
Item 2.  
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Forward-Looking Statements
Matters discussed in this report and in our public disclosures, whether written or oral, relating to future events or our future performance, including any discussion expressed or implied, of our anticipated growth, operating results, future earnings per share, plans, and objectives contain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or Exchange Act. These statements are often identified by the words “believe”, “positioned”, “estimate”, “project”, “plan”, “goal”, “target”, “continue”, “intend”, “expect”, “future”, “anticipate”, and similar expressions, whether in the negative or the affirmative, that are not statements of historical fact. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve certain risks, uncertainties, and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Our actual results and timing of certain events could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of certain factors, including, but not limited to, those set forth under “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this report and those discussed from time to time in our Securities and Exchange Commission reports, or SEC, including our Form 10-K for the year ended December 28, 2010 and our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q. All forward-looking statements and the internal projections and beliefs upon which we base our expectations included in this report or other periodic reports represent our estimates as of the date made and should not be relied upon as representing our estimates as of any subsequent date. While we may elect to update forward-looking statements at some point in the future, we specifically disclaim any obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances that arise after the date such statement was made.
General
Panera Bread Company and its subsidiaries may be referred to as the “Company,” “Panera Bread,” or in the first person notation of “we,” “us,” and “our” in the following discussion.
Our revenues are derived from Company-owned net bakery-cafe sales, fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees, and franchise royalties and fees. Fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees are primarily the sales of fresh dough, produce, tuna, and cream cheese to certain of our franchisees. Franchise royalties and fees include royalty income and franchise fees. The cost of food and paper products, labor, occupancy, and other operating expenses relate primarily to Company-owned net bakery-cafe sales. The cost of fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees relates primarily to the sale of fresh dough, produce, tuna, and cream cheese to certain of our franchisees. General and administrative, depreciation and amortization, and pre-opening expenses relate to all areas of revenue generation.

 

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Use of Non-GAAP Measurements
We include in this report information on Company-owned, franchise-operated, and system-wide comparable net bakery-cafe sales percentages. Company-owned comparable net bakery-cafe sales percentages are based on sales from Company-owned bakery-cafes included in our base store bakery-cafes. Franchise-operated comparable net bakery-cafe sales percentages are based on sales from franchised bakery-cafes, as reported by franchisees, that are included in our base store bakery-cafes. System-wide comparable net bakery-cafe sales percentages are based on sales at Company-owned and franchise-operated bakery-cafes that are included in our base store bakery-cafes. Acquired Company-owned and franchise-operated bakery-cafes and other restaurant or bakery-cafe concepts are included in our comparable net bakery-cafe sales percentages after we have acquired a 100 percent ownership interest and such acquisition occurred prior to the first day of our prior fiscal year. Comparable net bakery-cafe sales exclude closed locations.
Comparable net bakery-cafe sales percentages are non-GAAP financial measures, which should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for other measures of performance prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, (or GAAP), and may not be equivalent to comparable net bakery-cafe sales as defined or used by other companies. We do not record franchise-operated net bakery-cafe sales as revenues. However, royalty revenues are calculated based on a percentage of franchise-operated net bakery-cafe sales, as reported by franchisees. We use franchise-operated and system-wide sales information internally in connection with store development decisions, planning, and budgeting analyses. We believe franchise-operated and system-wide sales information is useful in assessing consumer acceptance of our brand, facilitates an understanding of our financial performance and the overall direction and trends of sales and operating income, helps us appreciate the effectiveness of our advertising and marketing initiatives, to which our franchisees also contribute based on a percentage of their sales, and provides information that is relevant for comparison within the industry.
We also include in this report information on Company-owned, franchise-operated, and system-wide average weekly net sales. Average weekly net sales are calculated by dividing total net sales in the period by operating weeks in the period. Accordingly, year-over-year results reflect sales for all locations, whereas comparable net bakery-cafe sales exclude closed locations and are based on sales from bakery-cafes included in our base store bakery-cafes. New stores typically experience an opening “honeymoon” period during which they generate higher average weekly net sales in the first 12 to 16 weeks they are open as customers “settle-in” to normal usage patterns from initial trial of the location. On average, the “settle-in” experienced is 5 percent to 10 percent less than the average weekly net sales during the “honeymoon” period. As a result, year-over-year results of average weekly net sales are generally lower than the results in comparable net bakery-cafe sales. This results from the relationship of the number of bakery-cafes in the “honeymoon” phase, the number of bakery-cafes in the “settle-in” phase, and the number of bakery-cafes in the comparable bakery-cafe base.
Executive Summary of Results
For the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011, we earned $1.09 per diluted share with the following performance on key metrics: system-wide comparable net bakery-cafe sales grew 3.3 percent compared to the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010 (growth of 3.3 percent for Company-owned bakery-cafes and growth of 3.4 percent for franchise-operated bakery-cafes); system-wide average weekly net sales increased 2.7 percent to $43,096 ($42,532 for Company-owned bakery-cafes and $43,568 for franchise-operated bakery-cafes); and 19 new bakery-cafes opened system-wide (eight Company-owned bakery-cafes and 11 franchise-operated bakery-cafes).
For the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010, we earned $0.82 per diluted share with the following performance on key metrics: system-wide comparable net bakery-cafe sales grew 9.5 percent (10.0 percent for Company-owned bakery-cafes and 9.2 percent for franchise-operated bakery-cafes); system-wide average weekly net sales increased 9.2 percent to $41,948 ($41,040 for Company-owned bakery-cafes and $42,620 for franchise-operated bakery-cafes); and eight new bakery-cafes opened system-wide (three Company-owned bakery-cafes and five franchise-operated bakery-cafes).

 

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The following table sets forth the percentage relationship to total revenues, except where otherwise indicated, of certain items included in the Consolidated Statements of Operations for the periods indicated. Percentages may not add due to rounding:
                 
    For the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010  
Revenues:
               
Bakery-cafe sales, net
    86.6 %     85.8 %
Franchise royalties and fees
    5.3       5.7  
Fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees
    8.0       8.5  
 
           
Total revenues
    100.0 %     100.0 %
Costs and expenses:
               
Bakery-cafe expenses (1):
               
Cost of food and paper products
    29.1 %     28.9 %
Labor
    31.2       32.2  
Occupancy
    7.3       7.8  
Other operating expenses
    12.9       12.7  
 
           
Total bakery-cafe expenses
    80.5       81.6  
Fresh dough and other product cost of sales to franchisees (2)
    82.6       80.5  
Depreciation and amortization
    4.5       4.7  
General and administrative expenses
    6.3       6.9  
Pre-opening expenses
    0.2       0.1  
 
           
Total costs and expenses
    87.4       88.4  
 
           
Operating profit
    12.6       11.6  
Interest expense
    0.1        
Other (income) expense, net
    (0.2 )     0.1  
 
           
Income before income taxes
    12.7       11.4  
Income taxes
    4.9       4.3  
 
           
Net income
    7.8 %     7.1 %
 
           
     
(1)  
As a percentage of Company net bakery-cafe sales.
 
(2)  
As a percentage of fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees.
The following table sets forth certain information and other data relating to Company-owned and franchise-operated bakery-cafes for the periods indicated:
                 
    For the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010  
Number of bakery-cafes:
               
Company-owned:
               
Beginning of period
    662       585  
Bakery-cafes opened
    8       3  
Bakery-cafes closed
    (3 )        
Bakery-cafes sold to a franchisee
    (2 )      
 
           
End of period
    665       588  
 
           
Franchise-operated:
               
Beginning of period
    791       795  
Bakery-cafes opened
    11       5  
Bakery-cafes closed
    (2 )        
Bakery-cafes purchased from Company
    2        
 
           
End of period
    802       800  
 
           
System-wide:
               
Beginning of period
    1,453       1,380  
Bakery-cafes opened
    19       8  
Bakery-cafes closed
    (5 )      
 
           
End of period
    1,467       1,388  
 
           
Comparable Bakery-Cafe Sales, net
Fiscal comparable net bakery-cafe sales growth for the periods indicated were as follows:
                 
    For the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010  
Company-owned
    3.3 %     10.0 %
Franchise-operated
    3.4 %     9.2 %
System-wide
    3.3 %     9.5 %

 

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Results of Operations
Revenues
Total revenues for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 increased 15.9 percent to $422.1 million compared to $364.2 million for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. The growth in total revenues for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010 was primarily due to the opening of 87 new bakery-cafes system-wide since March 30, 2010 and to the 3.3 percent increase in system-wide comparable net bakery-cafe sales for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011. The system-wide average weekly net sales per bakery-cafe for the periods indicated were as follows:
                         
    For the 13 Weeks Ended     Percentage  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010     Change  
System-wide average weekly net sales
  $ 43,096     $ 41,948       2.7 %
Net bakery-cafe sales for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 increased 17.0 percent to $365.6 million compared to $312.5 million for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. The increase in net bakery-cafe sales for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010 was primarily due to the opening of 47 new Company-owned bakery-cafes, the acquisition of 40 franchise-operated bakery-cafes since March 30, 2010 and the 3.3 percent increase in Company-owned comparable net bakery-cafe sales for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011, partially offset by the closure of five Company-owned bakery-cafes and the sale of five Company-owned bakery-cafes since March 30, 2010. This 3.3 percent growth in comparable net bakery-cafe sales was driven by approximately 1.7 percent of transaction growth and approximately 1.6 percent average check growth. Average check growth, in turn, was comprised of retail price increases of approximately 2.0 percent and negative mix impact of approximately 0.4 percent in comparison to the same period in the prior year. In total, Company-owned net bakery-cafe sales as a percentage of total revenues increased to 86.6 percent for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 as compared to 85.8 percent for the same period in 2010. The increase in average weekly net sales for Company-owned bakery-cafes for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010 was primarily due to an increase in transactions and average check growth. The average weekly net sales per Company-owned bakery-cafe and the number of operating weeks for the periods indicated were as follows:
                         
    For the 13 Weeks Ended     Percentage  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010     Change  
Company-owned average weekly net sales
  $ 42,532     $ 41,040       3.6 %
Company-owned number of operating weeks
    8,596       7,619       12.8 %
Franchise royalties and fees for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 increased 8.2 percent to $22.6 million compared to $20.9 million for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. The components of franchise royalties and fees for the periods indicated were as follows (in thousands):
                 
    For the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010  
Franchise royalties
  $ 22,152     $ 20,675  
Franchise fees
    430       188  
 
           
Total
  $ 22,582     $ 20,863  
 
           
The increase in franchise royalty and fee revenues for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010 was primarily due to the opening of 40 franchise-operated bakery-cafes since March 30, 2010 and the 3.4 percent increase in comparable franchise-operated net bakery-cafe sales for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011, partially offset by the closure of three franchise-operated bakery-cafes and the Company’s purchase of 40 franchise-operated bakery-cafes since March 30, 2011. The average weekly net sales per franchise-operated bakery-cafe and the related number of operating weeks for the periods indicated were as follows:
                         
    For the 13 Weeks Ended     Percentage  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010     Change  
Franchise-operated average weekly net sales
  $ 43,568     $ 42,620       2.2 %
Franchise-operated number of operating weeks
    10,303       10,306       0.0 %
As of March 29, 2011, we had 802 franchise-operated bakery-cafes open throughout the United States and we have received commitments to open 180 additional franchise-operated bakery-cafes. The timetables for opening these bakery-cafes are established in the respective Area Development Agreements, referred to as ADAs, with franchisees, which provide for the majority to open in the next four to five years. An ADA requires a franchisee to develop a specified number of bakery-cafes on or before specific dates. If a franchisee fails to develop bakery-cafes on the schedule set forth in the ADA, we have the right to terminate the ADA and develop Company-owned locations or develop locations through new franchisees in that market. We may exercise one or more alternative remedies to address defaults by franchisees, including not only development defaults, but also defaults in complying with our operating and brand standards and other covenants included in the ADAs and franchise agreements. We may waive compliance with certain requirements included in our ADAs and franchise agreements if we determine such action is warranted under the particular circumstances.

 

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Fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 increased 10.0 percent to $33.9 million compared to $30.8 million for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. The increase in fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 was primarily driven by the previously described increased number of franchise-operated bakery-cafes opened since March 30, 2010, the 3.4 percent increase in franchise-operated comparable net bakery-cafe sales, and increased produce distribution program sales, partially offset by the closure of three franchise-operated bakery-cafes and the Company’s purchase of 40 franchise-operated bakery-cafes since March 30, 2010.
Costs and Expenses
The cost of food and paper products includes the costs associated with our fresh dough and other product operations that sell fresh dough and other products to Company-owned bakery-cafes, as well as the cost of food and paper products supplied by third-party vendors and distributors. The costs associated with our fresh dough and other product operations that sell fresh dough and other products to the franchise-operated bakery-cafes are excluded from the cost of food and paper products and are shown separately as fresh dough and other product cost of sales to franchisees in the Consolidated Statements of Operations.
The cost of food and paper products was $106.2 million, or 29.1 percent of net bakery-cafe sales, for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to $90.3 million, or 28.9 percent of net bakery-cafe sales, for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. This increase in the cost of food and paper products as a percentage of net bakery-cafe sales for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to the same periods in 2010 was primarily due to modest food cost inflation, partially offset by improved leverage of our fresh dough manufacturing costs due to additional bakery-cafe openings and improved leverage from higher comparable net bakery-cafe sales. For the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011, there was an average of 67.9 bakery-cafes per fresh dough facility compared to an average of 64.3 as of March 30, 2010.
Labor expense was $114.1 million, or 31.2 percent of net bakery-cafe sales, for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to $100.7 million, or 32.2 percent of net bakery-cafe sales, for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. The decrease in labor expense as a percentage of net bakery-cafe sales for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010 was primarily a result of improved leverage from higher comparable net bakery-cafe sales, lower costs due to lower than expected self-insurance claims, and lower average wage in our bakery-cafes.
Occupancy cost was $26.8 million, or 7.3 percent of net bakery-cafe sales, for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to $24.4 million, or 7.8 percent of net bakery-cafe sales, for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. The decrease in occupancy cost as a percentage of net bakery-cafe sales for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to the same periods in 2010 was primarily a result of common area maintenance credits, as landlords spent less on common area maintenance in prior years than anticipated, improved leverage from higher comparable net bakery-cafe sales, and lower occupancy costs in new bakery-cafes.
Other operating expenses were $47.3 million, or 12.9 percent of net bakery-cafe sales, for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to $39.5 million, or 12.7 percent of net bakery-cafe sales, for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. The increase in other operating expenses as a percentage of net bakery-cafe sales for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010 was primarily a result of increased marketing expense, partially offset by leverage from higher comparable net bakery-cafe sales.
Fresh dough and other product cost of sales to franchisees were $28.0 million, or 82.6 percent of fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees, for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011, compared to $24.8 million, or 80.5 percent of fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees, for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. The increase in fresh dough and other product costs of sales to franchisees as a percentage of fresh dough and other product sales to franchisees for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010 was primarily the result of the year-over-year increase in ingredient costs, partially offset by improved leverage from new bakery-cafes and higher comparable net bakery-cafe sales.
General and administrative expenses were $26.7 million, or 6.3 percent of total revenues, for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to $25.0 million, or 6.9 percent of total revenues, for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. The decrease in general and administrative expenses as a percent of total revenues for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to the same period in 2010 was primarily due to improved leverage from new bakery-cafes and higher comparable net bakery-cafe sales.
Interest Expense
Interest expense was $0.2 million, or 0.1 percent of total revenues and less than 0.1 percent of total revenues, for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 and March 30, 2010. The modest increase in interest expense as a percentage of total revenues for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 as compared to the same period in 2010 was primarily a result of a modest increase in interest expense, partially offset by higher comparable net bakery-cafe sales.

 

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Other (Income) and Expense, net
Other (income) and expense, net was $0.8 million of income, or 0.2 percent of total revenues, for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to $0.3 million of expense, or 0.1 percent of total revenues, for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. Other (income) and expense, net for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 and March 30, 2010 was comprised of immaterial items.
Income Taxes
The provision for income taxes increased to $20.8 million for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 compared to $15.8 million for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010. The tax provision for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 and March 30, 2010 reflects a combined federal, state, and local effective tax rate of 38.8 percent and 38.0 percent, respectively. The increase in the thirteen week period rate was primarily driven by a decrease in permanent benefits recognized in the current period relating to differences between financial and tax reporting requirements.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Cash and cash equivalents were $250.7 million at March 29, 2011 compared with $229.3 million at December 28, 2010. This increase was primarily a result of $43.0 million of cash generated from operations partially offset by $22.7 million used on capital expenditures during the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011. Our primary source of liquidity is cash provided by operations, although we have the ability to borrow under a credit facility, as described below. Historically, our principal requirements for cash have primarily resulted from the cost of food and paper products, employee labor, and our capital expenditures for the development of new Company-owned bakery-cafes, for maintaining or remodeling existing Company-owned bakery-cafes, for purchasing existing franchise-operated bakery-cafes or ownership interests in other restaurant or bakery-cafe concepts, for developing, maintaining, or remodeling fresh dough facilities, and for other capital needs such as enhancements to information systems and other infrastructure.
We had working capital of $155.9 million at March 29, 2011 compared to $119.2 million at December 28, 2010. The increase in working capital from December 28, 2010 to March 29, 2011 resulted primarily from the previously described increase in cash and cash equivalents of $21.4 million and a decrease in accrued expenses of $18.0 million. We believe that cash provided by our operations and available borrowings under our existing credit facility will be sufficient to fund our cash requirements for the foreseeable future.
A summary of our cash flows, for the periods indicated, were as follows (in thousands):
                 
    For the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010  
Cash provided by (used in):
               
Operating activities
  $ 42,983     $ 55,855  
Investing activities
    (22,599 )     (10,465 )
Financing activities
    977       13,269  
 
           
Total
  $ 21,361     $ 58,659  
 
           
Operating Activities
Cash flows provided by operating activities for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 resulted primarily from net income, adjusted for non-cash items such as depreciation and amortization, deferred income taxes, stock-based compensation expense, and an increase in prepaid expenses and other, partially offset by a decrease in accrued expenses and trade and other accounts receivable, net. Cash flows provided by operating activities for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010 primarily resulted from net income, adjusted for non-cash items such as depreciation and amortization, stock-based compensation expense, deferred income taxes and the tax benefit from the exercise of stock options, an increase in accrued expenses and a decrease in trade and other accounts receivable, net.
Investing Activities
Capital Expenditures
Capital expenditures are the largest ongoing component of our investing activities and include expenditures for new bakery-cafes and fresh dough facilities, improvements to existing bakery-cafes and fresh dough facilities, and other capital needs. A summary of capital expenditures for the periods indicated consisted of the following (in thousands):
                 
    For the 13 Weeks Ended  
    March 29, 2011     March 30, 2010  
New bakery-cafe and fresh dough facilities
  $ 13,336     $ 5,154  
Bakery-cafe and fresh dough facility improvements
    6,397       4,096  
Other capital needs
    2,981       1,215  
 
           
Total
  $ 22,714     $ 10,465  
 
           

 

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Our capital requirements, including development costs related to the opening or acquisition of additional bakery-cafes and fresh dough facilities and maintenance and remodel expenditures, have been and will continue to be significant. Our future capital requirements and the adequacy of available funds will depend on many factors, including the pace of expansion, real estate markets, site locations, and the nature of the arrangements negotiated with landlords. We believe that cash provided by our operations and available borrowings under our existing credit facility will be sufficient to fund our capital requirements in both our short-term and long-term future. We currently anticipate 95 to 105 system-wide bakery-cafe openings in the fiscal year ending December 27, 2011.
Investing activities for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 included additions to property and equipment of $22.7 million offset by $0.1 million received from the sale of two bakery-cafes. Investing activities for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2011 consisted solely of additions to property and equipment.
Business Combinations
In the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 and March 30, 2010 there were no acquisitions.
Financing Activities
Financing activities for the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 included $0.6 million received from the tax benefit from exercise of stock options, $0.5 million received from the exercise of employee stock options under employee benefit plans, and $0.5 million received from the issuance of common stock, offset by $0.7 million used to repurchase shares of our Class A common stock. Financing activities for the thirteen weeks ended March 30, 2010 included $10.1 million received from the exercise of employee stock options, $2.8 million received from the tax benefit from the exercise of stock options, $0.5 million received from the issuance of common stock under employee benefit plans, and $0.1 million used to repurchase shares of our Class A common stock.
Share Repurchases
On November 17, 2009, our Board of Directors approved a three year share repurchase authorization of up to $600.0 million of our Class A common stock, pursuant to which share repurchases may be effected from time to time on the open market or in privately negotiated transactions and which may be made under a Rule 10b5-1 plan. Repurchased shares may be retired immediately and will resume the status of authorized but unissued shares or they may be held by us as treasury stock. The repurchase authorization may be modified, suspended, or discontinued by our Board of Directors at any time. During the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011 and March 30, 2010, we did not repurchase any shares under the share repurchase authorization. As of the date of this report, under the share repurchase authorization, we repurchased a total of 1,932,969 shares of our Class A common stock at a weighted-average price of $78.50 per share for an aggregate purchase price of approximately $152.0 million. We have approximately $448.0 million available under the existing $600.0 million repurchase authorization.
We have historically repurchased shares of our Class A common stock through a share repurchase authorization approved by our Board of Directors from participants of the Panera Bread 1992 Stock Incentive Plan and the Panera Bread 2006 Stock Incentive Plan, or collectively, the Plans. Repurchased shares are netted and surrendered as payment for applicable tax withholding on the vesting of participants’ restricted stock. During the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011, we repurchased 5,358 shares of Class A common stock surrendered by participants of the Plans at a weighted-average price of $121.51 per share for an aggregate purchase price of $0.7 million pursuant to the terms of the Plans and the applicable award agreements. These share repurchases were not made pursuant to publicly announced share repurchase authorizations.
Credit Facility
On March 7, 2008, we, and certain of our direct and indirect subsidiaries, as guarantors, entered into an amended and restated credit agreement, referred to as the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, with Bank of America, N.A., and other lenders party thereto to amend and restate in its entirety our Credit Agreement, dated as of November 27, 2007, by and among us, Bank of America, N.A., and the lenders party thereto, referred to as the Original Credit Agreement. Pursuant to our request under the terms of the Original Credit Agreement, the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement increased the size of our secured revolving credit facility from $75.0 million to $250.0 million. We may select interest rates equal to (a) the Base Rate (which is defined as the higher of Bank of America prime rate and the Federal Funds Rate plus 0.50 percent), or (b) LIBOR plus an Applicable Rate, ranging from 0.75 percent to 1.50 percent, based on our Consolidated Leverage Ratio, as each term is defined in the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement. The Amended and Restated Credit Agreement allows us from time to time to request that the credit facility be further increased by an amount not to exceed, in the aggregate, $150.0 million, subject to receipt of lender commitments and other conditions precedent. The Amended and Restated Credit Agreement contains financial covenants that, among other things, require the maintenance of certain leverage and fixed charges coverage ratios. The credit facility, which is secured by the capital stock of our present and future material subsidiaries, will become due on March 7, 2013, subject to acceleration upon certain specified events of defaults, including breaches of representations or covenants, failure to pay other material indebtedness or a change of control of our Company, as defined in the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement. The proceeds from the credit facility will be used for general corporate purposes, including working capital, capital expenditures, and permitted acquisitions and share repurchases. As of March 29, 2011 and December 28, 2010, we had no balance outstanding under the Amended and Restated Credit Agreement.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based upon the consolidated financial statements and notes to the consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of the consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates, judgments and assumptions, which we believe to be reasonable, based on the information available. These estimates and assumptions affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities. Variances in the estimates or assumptions used could yield materially different accounting results. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate the continued appropriateness of our accounting policies and resulting estimates to make adjustments we consider appropriate under the facts and circumstances.
We have chosen accounting policies we believe are appropriate to report accurately and fairly our operating results and financial position, and we apply those accounting policies in a consistent manner. As described in Item 7., “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 28, 2010, we consider our policies on accounting for revenue recognition, valuation of goodwill, self-insurance, income taxes, lease obligations, and stock-based compensation to be the most critical in the preparation of the consolidated financial statements because they involve the most difficult, subjective, or complex judgments about the effect of matters that are inherently uncertain. There have been no material changes to our application of critical accounting policies and significant judgments and estimates since December 28, 2010.
Contractual Obligations and Other Commitments
We currently anticipate 95 to 105 system-wide bakery-cafe openings in fiscal 2011. We expect to fund our capital expenditures principally through internally generated cash flow and available borrowings under our existing credit facility, if needed.
In addition to our planned capital expenditure requirements, we have certain other contractual and committed cash obligations. Our contractual cash obligations consist of noncancelable operating leases for our bakery-cafes, fresh dough facilities and trucks, and support centers; purchase obligations primarily for certain commodities; and uncertain tax positions. Lease terms for our trucks are generally for six to eight years. Lease terms for our bakery-cafes, fresh dough facilities, and support centers are generally for ten years with renewal options at most locations and generally require us to pay a proportionate share of real estate taxes, insurance, common area maintenance, and other operating costs. Many bakery-cafe leases provide for contingent rental (i.e. percentage rent) payments based on sales in excess of specified amounts or changes in external indices. Certain of our lease agreements provide for scheduled rent increases during the lease terms or for rental payments commencing at a date other than the date of initial occupancy.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
As of March 29, 2011, we guaranteed operating leases of 27 franchisee or affiliate locations, which we account for in accordance with the accounting standard for guarantees. These leases have terms expiring on various dates from April 30, 2011 to December 31, 2023 and a potential amount of future rental payments of approximately $24.9 million as of March 29, 2011. Our obligation under these leases will generally decrease over time as these operating leases expire. We have not recorded a liability for certain of these guarantees as they arose prior to the implementation of the accounting standard for guarantees and, unless modified, are exempt from its requirements. We have not recorded a liability for those guarantees issued after the effective date of the accounting requirements because the fair value of each such lease guarantee was determined by us to be insignificant based on analysis of the facts and circumstances of each such lease and each such franchisee’s performance, and we did not believe it was probable we would be required to perform under any guarantees at the time the guarantees were issued. We have not had to make any payments related to any of these guaranteed leases. The applicable franchisees or affiliates continue to have primary liability for these operating leases.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
On December 30, 2009, we adopted the updated guidance issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) related to fair value measurements and disclosures, which requires a reporting entity to separately disclose the amounts of significant transfers in and out of Level 1 and Level 2 fair value measurements and to describe the reasons for the transfers. The updated guidance also requires that an entity provide fair value measurement disclosures for each class of assets and liabilities and disclosures about the valuation techniques and inputs used to measure fair value for both recurring and non-recurring Level 2 and Level 3 fair value measurements. This guidance was effective for interim or annual financial reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2009. The adoption of this updated guidance did not have an impact on our consolidated results of operations or financial condition. In addition, the updated guidance requires that in the reconciliation for fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs, or Level 3, a reporting entity separately disclose information about purchases, sales, issuances and settlements on a gross basis rather than as one net number. This guidance was effective for interim or annual financial reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2010. The adoption of this new guidance did not have a material effect on our financial position or results of operations.

 

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Item 3.  
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
There were no material changes in the quantitative and qualitative information about market risk since the end of our most recent fiscal year. For further information, see Item 7A. of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 28, 2010.
Item 4.  
Controls and Procedures
Our management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of March 29, 2011. The term “disclosure controls and procedures”, as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act, means controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act are recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act are accumulated and communicated to the company’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our disclosure controls and procedures were designed to provide reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and management necessarily applies its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. Based on the evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of March 29, 2011, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of such date, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level.
No change in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) occurred during the first fiscal quarter ended March 29, 2011 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION
Item 1.  
Legal Proceedings
On January 25, 2008 and February 26, 2008, purported class action lawsuits were filed against us and three of our current or former executive officers by the Western Washington Laborers-Employers Pension Trust and Sue Trachet, respectively, on behalf of investors who purchased our common stock during the period between November 1, 2005 and July 26, 2006. Both lawsuits were filed in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri, St. Louis Division. Each complaint alleges that we and the other defendants violated Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and Rule 10b-5 under the Exchange Act in connection with our disclosure of system-wide sales and earnings guidance during the period from November 1, 2005 through July 26, 2006. Each complaint seeks, among other relief, class certification of the lawsuit, unspecified damages, costs and expenses, including attorneys’ and experts’ fees, and such other relief as the Court might find just and proper. On June 23, 2008, the lawsuits were consolidated and the Western Washington Laborers-Employers Pension Trust was appointed lead plaintiff. On August 7, 2008, the plaintiff filed an amended complaint, which extended the class period to November 1, 2005 through July 26, 2007. Following the filing of motions by both parties and hearings before the Court, on February 11, 2011, the parties filed with the Court a Stipulation of Settlement regarding the class action lawsuit. Under the terms of the Stipulation of Settlement, our primary directors and officers liability insurer will deposit $5.7 million into a settlement fund for payment to class members, plaintiff’s attorneys’ fees and costs of administering the settlement. The settlement must be approved by the Court before becoming effective. The Stipulation of Settlement contains no admission of wrongdoing. We and the other defendants have maintained and continue to deny liability and wrongdoing of any kind with respect to the claims made in the class action lawsuit. However, given the potential cost and burden of continued litigation, we believe the settlement is in our best interests and the best interests of our stockholders. On February 22, 2011, the Court preliminarily approved the settlement and scheduled a settlement hearing on June 22, 2011. If the Court grants final approval of the Stipulation of Settlement, the Court will dismiss the class action lawsuit with prejudice and the plaintiff will be deemed to have released all claims against us relating to the allegations in the class action. We can provide no assurance that the Court will approve the Stipulation of Settlement. If the Court does not approve the Stipulation of Settlement, we will continue to defend against these claims, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and business. If these matters were concluded in a manner adverse to us, we could be required to pay substantially more in damages than the amount provided for in the Stipulation of Settlement. In addition, the costs to us of defending any litigation or other proceeding, even if resolved in our favor, could be substantial. Such litigation could also substantially divert the attention of our management and our resources in general. The amount deposited by our primary directors and officers liability insurer into the settlement fund of $5.7 million is included in other accounts receivable and accrued expenses in our Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 29, 2011.

 

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On February 22, 2008, a shareholder derivative lawsuit was filed against us as nominal defendant and against certain of our current or former officers and certain current directors. The lawsuit was filed by Paul Pashcetto in the Circuit Court of St. Louis, Missouri. The complaint alleges, among other things, breach of fiduciary duty, abuse of control, waste of corporate assets and unjust enrichment between November 5, 2006 and February 22, 2008. The complaint seeks, among other relief, unspecified damages, costs and expenses, including attorneys’ fees, an order requiring us to implement certain corporate governance reforms, restitution from the defendants and such other relief as the Court might find just and proper. Following the filing of motions by both parties and hearings before the Court, on February 22, 2011, the parties filed with the Court a Stipulation of Settlement regarding the shareholder derivative lawsuit. Under the terms of the Stipulation of Settlement, we agreed, among other things, to implement and maintain certain corporate governance additions, modifications and/or formalizations, and our insurer will pay plaintiff’s attorneys’ fees and expenses of $1.4 million. The Stipulation of Settlement contains no admission of wrongdoing and would result in the dismissal of the shareholder derivative suit with prejudice, and under such settlement, the plaintiff would be deemed to have released all claims against the defendants relating to the allegations in the derivative action. We and the other defendants have maintained and continue to deny liability and wrongdoing of any kind with respect to the claims made in the shareholder derivative action. On April 8, 2011, the Court granted final approval of the settlement, subject to a 30 day appeal period. The amount deposited by our primary directors and officers liability insurer into the settlement fund of $1.4 million is included in other accounts receivable and accrued expenses in our Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 29, 2011.
On December 9, 2009, a purported class action lawsuit was filed against us and one of our subsidiaries by Nick Sotoudeh, a former employee of ours. The lawsuit was filed in the California Superior Court, County of Contra Costa. The complaint alleges, among other things, violations of the California Labor Code, failure to pay overtime, failure to provide meal and rest periods and termination compensation and violations of California’s Unfair Competition Law. The complaint seeks, among other relief, collective and class certification of the lawsuit, unspecified damages, costs and expenses, including attorneys’ fees, and such other relief as the Court might find just and proper. We believe we and the other defendant have meritorious defenses to each of the claims in this lawsuit and we are prepared to vigorously defend the lawsuit. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be successful, and an adverse resolution of the lawsuit could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position and results of operations in the period in which the lawsuit is resolved. We are not presently able to reasonably estimate potential losses, if any, related to the lawsuit and as such, have not recorded a liability in our Consolidated Balance Sheets.
On December 16, 2010, a purported class action lawsuit was filed against us by Denarius Lewis and Corey Weiner, former employees of one of our subsidiaries, and Caroll Ruiz, an employee of one of our franchisees. The lawsuit was filed in the United States District Court for Middle District of Florida. The complaint alleges, among other things, violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act. The complaint seeks, among other relief, collective and class certification of the lawsuit, unspecified damages, costs and expenses, including attorneys’ fees, and such other relief as the Court might find just and proper. We believe we and the other defendant have meritorious defenses to each of the claims in this lawsuit and we are prepared to vigorously defend the lawsuit. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be successful, and an adverse resolution of the lawsuit could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position and results of operations in the period in which the lawsuit is resolved. We are not presently able to reasonably estimate potential losses, if any, related to the lawsuit and as such, have not recorded a liability in our Consolidated Balance Sheets.
On December 20, 2010, a purported class action lawsuit was filed against us by Jamie Ortiz, a former employee of one of our subsidiaries. The lawsuit was filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Virginia. The complaint alleges, among other things, violations of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Mr. Ortiz also has alleged several individual claims for Title VII retaliation, defamation and intentional infliction of emotional distress. The complaint seeks, among other relief, collective, and class certification of the lawsuit, unspecified damages, costs and expenses, including attorneys’ fees and such other relief as the Court might find just and proper. We believe we have meritorious defenses to each of the claims in this lawsuit and we are prepared to vigorously defend the lawsuit. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be successful, and an adverse resolution of the lawsuit could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position and results of operations in the period in which the lawsuit is resolved. We are not presently able to reasonably estimate potential losses, if any, related to the lawsuit and as such, have not recorded a liability in our Consolidated Balance Sheets.
In addition, we are subject to other routine legal proceedings, claims and litigation in the ordinary course of business. Defending lawsuits requires significant management attention and financial resources and the outcome of any litigation, including the matters described above, is inherently uncertain. We do not, however, currently expect that the costs to resolve these routine matters will have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows.

 

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Item 1A.  
Risk Factors
Our business is subject to a number of risks, some of which are beyond our control. In addition to the other information set forth in this report, you should carefully consider the factors discussed in Item 1A. — “Risk Factors” of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 28, 2010, as filed with the SEC on February 22, 2011, that could have a material effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and/or liquidity and that could cause our operating results to vary significantly from period to period. As of March 29, 2011, there have been no material changes to the risk factors disclosed in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K, although we may disclose changes to such factors or disclose additional factors from time to time in our future filings with the SEC. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial also may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, or operating results.
Item 2.  
Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
During the thirteen weeks ended March 29, 2011, we repurchased Class A common stock as follows:
                                 
                            Approximate Dollar  
                    Total Number of     Value of Shares That  
                    Shares Purchased as     May Yet Be Purchased  
    Total Number of     Average Price     Part of Publicly     Under the Announced  
Period   Shares Purchased     Paid per Share     Announced Program     Program  
December 29, 2010 – January 25, 2011
        $           $ 448,238,968  
January 26, 2011 – March 1, 2011
    227 (1)     115.83             448,238,968  
March 2, 2011 – March 29, 2011
    5,131 (1)     121.76             448,238,968  
 
                       
Total
    5,358     $ 121.51           $ 448,238,968  
 
                       
     
(1)  
Represents Class A common stock surrendered by participants under the Panera Bread 1992 Stock Incentive Plan and the Panera Bread 2006 Stock Incentive Plan, as amended, as payment of applicable tax withholding on the vesting of restricted stock. Shares so surrendered by the participants are repurchased by us pursuant to the terms of those plans and the applicable award agreements and not pursuant to publicly announced share repurchase authorizations.

 

22


Table of Contents

Item 6.  
Exhibits
         
Exhibit    
Number   Description
       
 
  31.1    
Certification by Chief Executive Officer
       
 
  31.2    
Certification by Chief Financial Officer
       
 
  32    
Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, by Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer
       
 
  101.INS *  
XBRL Instance Document
       
 
  101.SCH *  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
       
 
  101.CAL *  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
       
 
  101.LAB *  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
       
 
  101.PRE *  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
       
 
  101.DEF *  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
     
*  
In accordance with Regulation S-T, the XBRL-related information in Exhibit 101 to this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q shall be deemed to be “furnished” and not “filed”.

 

23


Table of Contents

SIGNATURES
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.
         
  Panera Bread Company  
  (Registrant)
 
 
Dated: May 4, 2011  By:   /s/ William W. Moreton    
    William W. Moreton   
    President, Chief Executive Officer
(on behalf of registrant and as principal executive officer)
 
 
     
Dated: May 4, 2011  By:   /s/ Jeffrey W. Kip    
    Jeffrey W. Kip   
    Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer
(principal financial officer)
 
 
     
Dated: May 4, 2011  By:   /s/ Amy L. Kuzdowicz    
    Amy L. Kuzdowicz   
    Vice President, Controller   
     
Dated: May 4, 2011  By:   /s/ Mark D. Wooldridge    
    Mark D. Wooldridge   
    Assistant Controller, Chief Accounting Officer   

 

24


Table of Contents

         
EXHIBIT INDEX
         
Exhibit    
Number   Description
       
 
  31.1    
Certification by Chief Executive Officer
       
 
  31.2    
Certification by Chief Financial Officer
       
 
  32    
Certification Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, by Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer
       
 
  101.INS *  
XBRL Instance Document
       
 
  101.SCH *  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
       
 
  101.CAL *  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
       
 
  101.LAB *  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
       
 
  101.PRE *  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
       
 
  101.DEF *  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
     
*  
In accordance with Regulation S-T, the XBRL-related information in Exhibit 101 to this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q shall be deemed to be “furnished” and not “filed”.

 

 

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