PEP » Topics » Commodity Prices

These excerpts taken from the PEP 10-K filed Feb 22, 2010.

Commodity Prices

We expect to be able to reduce the impact of volatility in our raw material and energy costs through our hedging strategies and ongoing sourcing initiatives.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $151 million as of December 26, 2009 and $303 million as of December 27, 2008. These contracts resulted in net unrealized losses of $29 million as of December 26, 2009 and $117 million as of December 27, 2008. At the end of 2009, the potential change in fair value of commodity derivative instruments, assuming a 10% decrease in the underlying commodity price, would have increased our net unrealized losses in 2009 by $13 million.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $231 million as of December 26, 2009 and $626 million as of December 27, 2008. These contracts resulted in net losses of $57 million in 2009 and $343 million in 2008. At the end of 2009, the potential change in fair value of commodity derivative instruments, assuming a 10% decrease in the underlying commodity price, would have increased our net losses in 2009 by $17 million.

 

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Commodity Prices

We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than three years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas and diesel fuel. For those derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting, any ineffectiveness is recorded immediately. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify net losses of $124 million related to these hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income. Derivatives used to hedge commodity price risk that do not qualify for hedge accounting are marked to market each period and reflected in our income statement.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $151 million as of December 26, 2009 and $303 million as of December 27, 2008. These contracts resulted in net unrealized losses of $29 million as of December 26, 2009 and $117 million as of December 27, 2008.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $231 million as of December 26, 2009 and $626 million as of December 27, 2008. These contracts resulted in net losses of $57 million in 2009 and $343 million in 2008.

This excerpt taken from the PEP 8-K filed Aug 27, 2009.

Commodity Prices

We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than three years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas and diesel fuel. For those derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting, any ineffectiveness is recorded immediately. However, such commodity cash flow hedges have not had any significant ineffectiveness for all periods presented. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify net losses of $64 million related to cash flow hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income. Derivatives used to hedge commodity price risks that do not qualify for hedge accounting are marked to market each period and reflected in our income statement.

In 2007, we expanded our commodity hedging program to include derivative contracts used to mitigate our exposure to price changes associated with our purchases of fruit. In addition, in 2008, we entered into additional contracts to further reduce our exposure to price fluctuations in our raw material and energy costs. The majority of these contracts do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment and are marked to market with the resulting gains and losses recognized in corporate unallocated expenses. These gains and losses are then subsequently reflected in divisional results.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $303 million at December 27, 2008 and $5 million at December 29, 2007. These contracts resulted in net unrealized losses of $117 million at December 27, 2008 and net unrealized gains of less than $1 million at December 29, 2007.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $626 million at December 27, 2008 and $105 million at December 29, 2007. These contracts resulted in net losses of $343 million in 2008 and net gains of $3 million in 2007.

 

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This excerpt taken from the PEP 10-Q filed Apr 22, 2009.

Commodity Prices

We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than three years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas and diesel fuel. For those derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting, any ineffectiveness is recorded immediately. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify net losses of $56 million related to cash flow hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income. Derivatives used to hedge commodity price risk that do not qualify for hedge accounting are marked to market each period and reflected in our income statement.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $259 million as of March 21, 2009 and $20 million as of March 22, 2008. Our open commodity derivative contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $512 million as of March 21, 2009 and $52 million as of March 22, 2008.

 

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This excerpt taken from the PEP 8-K filed Mar 25, 2009.

Commodity Prices

We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than three years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas and diesel fuel. For those derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting, any ineffectiveness is recorded immediately. However, such commodity cash flow hedges have not had any significant ineffectiveness for all periods presented. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify net losses of $64 million related to cash flow hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income. Derivatives used to hedge commodity price risks that do not qualify for hedge accounting are marked to market each period and reflected in our income statement.

In 2007, we expanded our commodity hedging program to include derivative contracts used to mitigate our exposure to price changes associated with our purchases of fruit. In addition, in 2008, we entered into additional contracts to further reduce our exposure to price fluctuations in our raw material and energy costs. The majority of these contracts do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment and are marked to market with the resulting gains and losses recognized in corporate unallocated expenses. These gains and losses are then subsequently reflected in divisional results.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $303 million at December 27, 2008 and $5 million at December 29, 2007. These contracts resulted in net unrealized losses of $117 million at December 27, 2008 and net unrealized gains of less than $1 million at December 29, 2007.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $626 million at December 27, 2008 and $105 million at December 29, 2007. These contracts resulted in net losses of $343 million in 2008 and net gains of $3 million in 2007.

These excerpts taken from the PEP 10-K filed Feb 19, 2009.

Commodity Prices

We expect to be able to reduce the impact of volatility in our raw material and energy costs through our hedging strategies and ongoing sourcing initiatives.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $303 million at December 27, 2008 and $5 million at December 29, 2007. These contracts resulted in net unrealized losses of $117 million at December 27, 2008 and net unrealized gains of less than $1 million at December 29, 2007. At the end of 2008, the potential change in fair value of commodity derivative instruments, assuming a 10% decrease in the underlying commodity price, would have increased our net unrealized losses in 2008 by $19 million.

 

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Our open commodity derivative contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $626 million at December 27, 2008 and $105 million at December 29, 2007. These contracts resulted in net losses of $343 million in 2008 and net gains of $3 million in 2007. At the end of 2008, the potential change in fair value of commodity derivative instruments, assuming a 10% decrease in the underlying commodity price, would have increased our net losses in 2008 by $34 million.

Commodity Prices

We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than three years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas and diesel fuel. For those derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting, any ineffectiveness is recorded immediately. However, such commodity cash flow hedges have not had any significant ineffectiveness for all periods presented. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify net losses of $64 million related to cash flow hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income. Derivatives used to hedge commodity price risks that do not qualify for hedge accounting are marked to market each period and reflected in our income statement.

In 2007, we expanded our commodity hedging program to include derivative contracts used to mitigate our exposure to price changes associated with our purchases of fruit. In addition, in 2008, we entered into additional contracts to further reduce our exposure to price fluctuations in our raw material and energy costs. The majority of these contracts do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment and are marked to market with the resulting gains and losses recognized in corporate unallocated expenses. These gains and losses are then subsequently reflected in divisional results.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $303 million at December 27, 2008 and $5 million at December 29, 2007. These contracts resulted in net unrealized losses of $117 million at December 27, 2008 and net unrealized gains of less than $1 million at December 29, 2007.

Our open commodity derivative contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $626 million at December 27, 2008 and $105 million at December 29, 2007. These contracts resulted in net losses of $343 million in 2008 and net gains of $3 million in 2007.

Commodity Prices

ALIGN="justify">We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is
managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than three years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our
anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas and diesel fuel. For those derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting, any ineffectiveness is recorded immediately. However, such commodity cash flow hedges have not had any significant
ineffectiveness for all periods presented. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify net losses of $64 million related to
cash flow hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income. Derivatives used to hedge commodity price risks that do not qualify for hedge accounting are marked to market each period and reflected in our income statement.


In 2007, we expanded our commodity hedging program to include derivative contracts used to mitigate our exposure to price changes associated with our
purchases of fruit. In addition, in 2008, we entered into additional contracts to further reduce our exposure to price fluctuations in our raw material and energy costs. The majority of these contracts do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment
and are marked to market with the resulting gains and losses recognized in corporate unallocated expenses. These gains and losses are then subsequently reflected in divisional results.

ALIGN="justify">Our open commodity derivative contracts that qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $303 million at December 27, 2008 and $5 million at December 29, 2007. These contracts
resulted in net unrealized losses of $117 million at December 27, 2008 and net unrealized gains of less than $1 million at December 29, 2007.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="3">Our open commodity derivative contracts that do not qualify for hedge accounting had a face value of $626 million at December 27, 2008 and $105 million at December 29, 2007. These contracts resulted in net
losses of $343 million in 2008 and net gains of $3 million in 2007.

This excerpt taken from the PEP 8-K filed Apr 7, 2008.

Commodity Prices

We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than two years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas, diesel fuel and fruit. For those derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting, any ineffectiveness is recorded

 

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immediately. However, such commodity cash flow hedges have not had any significant ineffectiveness for all periods presented. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify net gains of $1 million related to cash flow hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income. Derivatives used to hedge commodity price risks that do not qualify for hedge accounting are marked to market each period and reflected in our income statement.

These excerpts taken from the PEP 10-K filed Feb 15, 2008.

Commodity Prices

We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than two years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas, diesel fuel and fruit. For those derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting, any ineffectiveness is recorded

 

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immediately. However, such commodity cash flow hedges have not had any significant ineffectiveness for all periods presented. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify net gains of $1 million related to cash flow hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income. Derivatives used to hedge commodity price risks that do not qualify for hedge accounting are marked to market each period and reflected in our income statement.

Commodity Prices

ALIGN="justify">We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is
managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than two years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our
anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas, diesel fuel and fruit. For those derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting, any ineffectiveness is recorded

 


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immediately. However, such commodity cash flow hedges have not had any significant ineffectiveness for all periods presented. We classify both the earnings
and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify net gains of $1 million related to cash flow hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income.
Derivatives used to hedge commodity price risks that do not qualify for hedge accounting are marked to market each period and reflected in our income statement.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="3">Foreign Exchange

Our operations outside of the U.S. generate 44% of our net revenue, with
Mexico, the United Kingdom and Canada comprising 19% of our net revenue. As a result, we are exposed to foreign currency risks. On occasion, we enter into hedges, primarily forward contracts with terms of no more than two years, to reduce the effect
of foreign exchange rates. Ineffectiveness of these hedges has not been material.

This excerpt taken from the PEP 10-K filed Feb 20, 2007.

Commodity Prices

We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than two years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas and diesel fuel. For those derivatives that qualify for hedge accounting, any ineffectiveness is recorded immediately. However, such commodity cash flow hedges have not had any significant ineffectiveness for all periods presented. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the

 

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next 12 months, we expect to reclassify net gains of $1 million related to cash flow hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income. Derivatives used to hedge commodity price risks that do not qualify for hedge accounting are marked to market each period and reflected in our income statement.

This excerpt taken from the PEP 10-K filed Feb 27, 2006.

Commodity Prices

 

We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and derivatives. We use derivatives, with terms of no more than two years, to economically hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for natural gas and diesel fuel. For those derivatives that are designated as cash flow hedges, any ineffectiveness is recorded immediately. However, our commodity cash flow hedges have not had any significant ineffectiveness for all periods presented. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these derivatives consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify gains of $24 million related to cash flow hedges from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income.

 

This excerpt taken from the PEP 10-K filed Feb 28, 2005.

Commodity Prices

 

We are subject to commodity price risk because our ability to recover increased costs through higher pricing may be limited in the competitive environment in which we operate. This risk is managed through the use of fixed-price purchase orders, pricing agreements, geographic diversity and cash flow hedges. We use cash flow hedges, with terms of no more than two years, to hedge price fluctuations related to a portion of our anticipated commodity purchases, primarily for corn, heating oil and natural gas. Any ineffectiveness is recorded immediately. However, our commodity hedges have not had any significant ineffectiveness. We classify both the earnings and cash flow impact from these hedges consistent with the underlying hedged item. During the next 12 months, we expect to reclassify gains of less than $1 million from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income.

 

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