RMKR » Topics » Use of Estimates

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed May 14, 2009.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets, fixed assets and commitments and contingencies.

These excerpts taken from the RMKR 10-K filed Mar 31, 2009.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of the financial statements and related disclosures, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S., requires us to establish accounting policies that contain estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. We evaluate our estimates

 

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on an on-going basis. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. The policies that contain estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes include:

 

   

revenue recognition;

 

   

the allowance for doubtful accounts;

 

   

impairment of long-lived assets, including goodwill, intangible assets and property and equipment;

 

   

measurement of our deferred tax assets and corresponding valuation allowance;

 

   

allocation of purchase price in business combinations;

 

   

fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options.

We have other equally important accounting policies and practices. However, once adopted, these policies either generally do not require us to make significant estimates or assumptions or otherwise only require implementation of the adopted policy, not a judgment as to the application of policy itself. Despite our intention to establish accurate estimates and assumptions, actual results could differ materially from those estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets, private company investments, fixed assets and commitments and contingencies.

Use of
Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management
to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting
period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates. Accounting policies that include
particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business
combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets, private company investments, fixed assets and commitments and contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed Nov 7, 2008.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets, fixed assets and commitments and contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed Aug 7, 2008.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets, fixed assets and commitments and contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed May 8, 2008.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets, fixed assets and commitments and contingencies.

These excerpts taken from the RMKR 10-K filed Mar 11, 2008.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets, fixed assets and commitments and contingencies.

Use of Estimates

The
preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and
liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and
circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax
asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill,
intangible assets, fixed assets and commitments and contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed Nov 13, 2007.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets ,fixed assets and commitments and contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed Aug 7, 2007.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets and fixed assets.

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed May 14, 2007.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets and fixed assets.

 

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This excerpt taken from the RMKR 8-K filed Mar 26, 2007.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of the financial statements and related disclosures, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S., requires us to establish accounting policies that contain estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. We evaluate our estimates on an on-going basis, including those related to revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets and fixed assets. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. The policies that contain estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes include:

 

   

revenue recognition;

 

   

the allowance for doubtful accounts;

 

   

impairment of long-lived assets, including goodwill, intangible assets and property and equipment;

 

14


   

measurement of our deferred tax assets and corresponding valuation allowance;

 

   

allocation of purchase price in business combinations; and

 

   

fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options.

We have other equally important accounting policies and practices. However, once adopted, these policies either generally do not require us to make significant estimates or assumptions or otherwise only require implementation of the adopted policy, not a judgment as to the application of policy itself. Despite our intention to establish accurate estimates and assumptions, actual results could differ from those estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-K filed Feb 26, 2007.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, measurement of our deferred tax asset and the corresponding valuation allowance, allocation of purchase price in business combinations, fair value estimates for the expense of employee stock options and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets and fixed assets.

These excerpts taken from the RMKR 8-K filed Nov 29, 2006.

Use of Estimates:

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.

Actual results may differ from those estimates.

Notes to Unaudited Financial Statements

 

- 8 -


3. Property and Equipment

Property and equipment consist of the following:

 

    

June 30,

2006

  

December 31,

2005

Computer hardware and office equipment

   $ 593,066    $ 605,450

Leasehold improvements

     16,794      16,794
             
     609,860      622,244

Less: accumulated depreciation and amortization

     583,481      564,774
             
   $ 26,379    $ 57,470
             

Property and equipment include assets acquired under a capital lease, principally computer equipment and software, of $28,228 at December 31, 2005 and June 30, 2006. Accumulated amortization of those assets was $8,625 and $13,329 at December 31, 2005 and June 30, 2006, respectively.

 

4. Financing Arrangements

Use of Estimates:

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.

Actual results may differ from those estimates.

See Independent Auditors’ Report

 

- 9 -


ViewCentral, Inc.

Notes to Financial Statements

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed Nov 13, 2006.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, allocation of purchase price in business combinations and assessing the recoverability and measuring any impairment of goodwill, intangible assets and fixed assets.

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed Aug 10, 2006.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, and assessing the recoverability and measuring any impairment of goodwill, intangible assets and fixed assets.

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed May 11, 2006.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets and fixed assets.

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-K filed Mar 10, 2006.

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that include particularly significant estimates are revenue recognition and

 

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RAINMAKER SYSTEMS, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of goodwill, intangible assets and fixed assets.

 

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed Nov 10, 2005.

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires us to establish accounting policies that contain estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. On an on-going basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to bad debts, investments, commissions and contingencies and litigation. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. These policies that contain estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes include:

 

    revenue recognition;

 

    the allowance for doubtful accounts;

 

    impairment of long-lived assets, including goodwill, intangible assets and property and equipment; and

 

    allocation of purchase price in business combinations.

 

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Table of Contents

We have other equally important accounting policies and practices; however, once adopted, these other policies either generally do not require us to make significant estimates or assumptions or otherwise only require implementation of the adopted policy, not a judgment as to the application of policy itself. Despite our intention to establish accurate estimates and assumptions, actual results could differ from those estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed Aug 10, 2005.

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires us to establish accounting policies that contain estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. On an on-going basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to bad debts, investments, commissions and contingencies and litigation. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. These policies that contain estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes include:

 

    revenue recognition;

 

    the allowance for doubtful accounts;

 

    impairment of long-lived assets, including goodwill, intangible assets and property and equipment; and

 

    allocation of purchase price in business combinations.

 

17


Table of Contents

We have other equally important accounting policies and practices; however, once adopted, these other policies either generally do not require us to make significant estimates or assumptions or otherwise only require implementation of the adopted policy, not a judgment as to the application of policy itself. Despite our intention to establish accurate estimates and assumptions, actual results could differ from those estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-Q filed May 13, 2005.

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires us to establish accounting policies that contain estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. On an on-going basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to bad debts, investments, commissions and contingencies and litigation. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. These policies that contain estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes include:

 

    revenue recognition;

 

    the allowance for doubtful accounts;

 

    impairment of long-lived assets, including goodwill, intangible assets and property and equipment; and

 

    allocation of purchase price in business combinations.

 

We have other equally important accounting policies and practices; however, once adopted, these other policies either generally do not require us to make significant estimates or assumptions or otherwise only require

 

16


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implementation of the adopted policy, not a judgment as to the application of policy itself. Despite our intention to establish accurate estimates and assumptions, actual results could differ from those estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-K filed Mar 22, 2005.

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that are particularly significant include revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of fixed assets.

 

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RAINMAKER SYSTEMS, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

This excerpt taken from the RMKR 10-K filed Mar 18, 2005.

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Our estimates are based on historical experience, input from sources outside of the company, and other relevant facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Accounting policies that are particularly significant include revenue recognition and presentation policies, valuation of accounts receivable, and the assessment of recoverability and measuring impairment of fixed assets.

 

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Table of Contents

RAINMAKER SYSTEMS, INC.

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

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