COL » Topics » Goodwill and Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets

This excerpt taken from the COL 10-K filed Nov 13, 2006.

Goodwill and Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets

As of September 30, 2006, we had $517 million of goodwill resulting from various acquisitions and $2 million of indefinite-lived intangible assets consisting of trademarks and tradenames (herein referred to as “trademarks”). We perform impairment tests on both goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets on an annual basis during the second quarter of each fiscal year, or on an interim basis if events or circumstances indicate that it is more likely than not that impairment has occurred.

Goodwill is potentially impaired if the carrying value of the “reporting unit” that contains the goodwill exceeds its estimated fair value. The fair values of our reporting units are determined with the assistance of third-party valuation experts using a combination of an “income approach”, which estimates fair value based upon future discounted cash flows, and a “market approach”, which estimates fair value using market multiples, ratios, and valuations of a set of comparable public companies within our industry. An indefinite-lived intangible asset is impaired if its carrying value exceeds its fair value. The fair values of our trademarks are determined with the assistance of third-party valuation experts using a “royalty savings” method, which is based upon a hypothetical royalty rate that would be charged by a licensor of the trademarks against discounted projected revenues attributable to products using those trademarks.

The valuation methodology and underlying financial information that is used to estimate the fair value of our reporting units and trademarks requires significant judgments to be made by management. These judgments include, but are not limited to, the long-term projections of future financial performance, the selection of appropriate discount rates used to present value future cash flows, and the determination of appropriate royalty rates. Our five-year strategic operating plan serves as the basis for these valuations and represents our best estimate of future business conditions in our industry as well as our ability to compete. Discount rates are determined based upon the weighted average cost of capital for a set of comparable companies adjusted for risks associated with our different operations. Royalty rates used for the trademark valuations are determined by considering market competition, customer base, the age of the trademark, quality, absolute and relative profitability, and market share. Our goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible asset impairment tests that were performed in the second quarter of 2006 yielded no impairments. If there was a significant downturn in our business, or if our plans with respect to utilization of acquired trademarks changed significantly, we could incur an impairment of one or more of these intangible assets.

This excerpt taken from the COL 10-K filed Nov 21, 2005.

Goodwill and Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets

 

As of September 30, 2005, we had $458 million of goodwill resulting from various acquisitions and $2 million of indefinite-lived intangible assets consisting of trademarks and tradenames (herein referred to as “trademarks”). We perform impairment tests on both goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets on an annual basis during the second quarter of each fiscal year, or on an interim basis if events or circumstances indicate that it is more likely than not that impairment has occurred.

 

Goodwill is potentially impaired if the carrying value of the “reporting unit” that contains the goodwill exceeds its estimated fair value. The fair values of our reporting units are determined with the assistance of third-party valuation experts using a combination of an “income approach”, which estimates fair value based upon future discounted cash flows, and a “market approach”, which estimates fair value using market multiples, ratios, and valuations of a set of comparable public companies within our industry. An indefinite-lived intangible asset is impaired if its carrying value exceeds its fair value. The fair values of our trademarks are determined with the assistance of third-party valuation experts using a “royalty savings” method, which is based upon a hypothetical royalty rate that would be charged by a licensor of the trademarks against discounted projected revenues attributable to products using those trademarks.

 

The valuation methodology and underlying financial information that is used to estimate the fair value of our reporting units and trademarks requires significant judgments to be made by management. These judgments include, but are not limited to, the long-term projections of future financial performance, the selection of appropriate discount rates used to present value future cash flows, and the determination of appropriate royalty rates. Our five-year strategic operating plan serves as the basis for these valuations and represents our best estimate of future business conditions in our industry as well as our ability to compete. Discount rates are determined based upon the weighted average cost of capital for a set of comparable companies adjusted for risks associated with our different operations. Royalty rates used for the trademark valuations are determined by considering market competition, customer base, the age of the trademark, quality, absolute and relative profitability, and market share. Our goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible asset impairment tests that were performed in the second quarter of 2005 yielded no impairments. If there was a significant downturn in our business, or if our plans with respect to utilization of acquired trademarks changed significantly, we could incur an impairment of one or more of these intangible assets.

 

In the fourth quarter of 2005, we completed a company-wide branding initiative and announced to our customers that we will no longer use certain indefinite lived tradenames related to Kaiser Aerospace and Electronics Corporation (acquired in December 2000). As a result, Kaiser Electronics has been renamed Rockwell Collins Display Systems, Kaiser Electroprecision has been renamed Rockwell Collins ElectroMechanical Systems, Inc., and Kaiser Electro-Optics, Inc. has been renamed Rockwell Collins Optronics, Inc. These changes resulted in a $15 million pre-tax write-off in the fourth quarter of 2005, as we will no longer be using these tradenames.

 

EXCERPTS ON THIS PAGE:

10-K
Nov 13, 2006
10-K
Nov 21, 2005
Wikinvest © 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012. Use of this site is subject to express Terms of Service, Privacy Policy, and Disclaimer. By continuing past this page, you agree to abide by these terms. Any information provided by Wikinvest, including but not limited to company data, competitors, business analysis, market share, sales revenues and other operating metrics, earnings call analysis, conference call transcripts, industry information, or price targets should not be construed as research, trading tips or recommendations, or investment advice and is provided with no warrants as to its accuracy. Stock market data, including US and International equity symbols, stock quotes, share prices, earnings ratios, and other fundamental data is provided by data partners. Stock market quotes delayed at least 15 minutes for NASDAQ, 20 mins for NYSE and AMEX. Market data by Xignite. See data providers for more details. Company names, products, services and branding cited herein may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. The use of trademarks or service marks of another is not a representation that the other is affiliated with, sponsors, is sponsored by, endorses, or is endorsed by Wikinvest.
Powered by MediaWiki