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SEMPRA ENERGY 10-Q 2007

Documents found in this filing:

  1. 10-Q
  2. Ex-12
  3. Ex-31
  4. Ex-31
  5. Ex-32
  6. Ex-32
  7. 10-Q
  8. Ex-12
  9. Ex-12
Sempra Energy 2nd qtr 2007 Form 10-Q


 

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C.  20549

FORM 10-Q

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15 (d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended

June 30, 2007

 

Commission file number

1-14201


SEMPRA ENERGY

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

California

 

33-0732627

 

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)


101 Ash Street, San Diego, California 92101

(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)


(619) 696-2034

(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

No Change

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year,
if changed since last report)


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.


 

Yes

X

 

No

 


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of "accelerated filer and large accelerated filer" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer

[ X ]

Accelerated filer

[     ]

Non-accelerated filer

[     ]

 


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

 

Yes

 

 

No

X


Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer's classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock outstanding on July 31, 2007:

264,024,122

 

 

 

 




INFORMATION REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS


This Quarterly Report contains statements that are not historical fact and constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The words "estimates," "believes," "expects," "anticipates," "plans," "intends," "may," "could," "would" and "should" or similar expressions, or discussions of strategy or of plans are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of performance. They involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Future results may differ materially from those expressed in these forward-looking statements.


Forward-looking statements are necessarily based upon various assumptions involving judgments with respect to the future and other risks, including, among others, local, regional, national and international economic, competitive, political, legislative and regulatory conditions and developments; actions by the California Public Utilities Commission, the California State Legislature, the California Department of Water Resources, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the Federal Reserve Board, the U.K. Financial Services Authority and other environmental and regulatory bodies in the United States and other countries; capital markets conditions, inflation rates, interest rates and exchange rates; energy and trading markets, including the timing and extent of changes in commodity prices; the availability of natural gas and liquefied natural gas; weather conditions and conservation efforts; war and terrorist attacks; business, regulatory, environmental and legal decisions and requirements; the status of deregulation of retail natural gas and electricity delivery; the timing and success of business development efforts; the resolution of litigation; and other uncertainties, all of which are difficult to predict and many of which are beyond the control of the company. Readers are cautioned not to rely unduly on any forward-looking statements and are urged to review and consider carefully the risks, uncertainties and other factors which affect the company's business described in this report and other reports filed by the company from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission.





2



PART I.  FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1.  CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


SEMPRA ENERGY
STATEMENTS OF CONSOLIDATED INCOME

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

June 30,

 

 

June 30,

(Dollars in millions, except per share amounts)

 

 

2007

 

 

 

2006

 

 

2007

 

 

 

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

OPERATING REVENUES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Utilities

 

$

1,620

 

 

$

1,568

 

$

3,679

 

 

$

3,696

 

Sempra Global and parent

 

 

 

 

 

1,041

 

 

 

918

 

 

1,986

 

 

 

2,126

 

 

 

Total operating revenues

 

 

2,661

 

 

 

2,486

 

 

5,665

 

 

 

5,822

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPERATING EXPENSES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Utilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of natural gas

 

 

603

 

 

 

535

 

 

1,653

 

 

 

1,665

 

 

Cost of electric fuel and purchased power

 

 

163

 

 

 

153

 

 

312

 

 

 

363

 

Sempra Global and parent:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of natural gas, electric fuel and purchased power

 

 

278

 

 

 

233

 

 

614

 

 

 

531

 

 

Other cost of sales

 

 

221

 

 

 

313

 

 

540

 

 

 

689

 

Other operating expenses

 

 

743

 

 

 

680

 

 

1,376

 

 

 

1,356

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

171

 

 

 

171

 

 

340

 

 

 

328

 

Franchise fees and other taxes

 

 

68

 

 

 

64

 

 

149

 

 

 

141

 

 

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

2,247

 

 

 

2,149

 

 

4,984

 

 

 

5,073

 

Operating income

 

 

414

 

 

 

337

 

 

681

 

 

 

749

 

Other income (expense), net

 

 

45

 

 

 

(5

)

 

56

 

 

 

(1

)

Interest income

 

 

24

 

 

 

25

 

 

50

 

 

 

39

 

Interest expense

 

 

(66

)

 

 

(87

)

 

(136

)

 

 

(183

)

Preferred dividends of subsidiaries

 

 

(3

)

 

 

(3

)

 

(5

)

 

 

(5

)

Income from continuing operations before income taxes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and equity in earnings of certain unconsolidated subsidiaries

 

414

 

 

 

267

 

 

646

 

 

 

599

 

Income tax expense

 

 

143

 

 

 

96

 

 

206

 

 

 

204

 

Equity in earnings of certain unconsolidated subsidiaries

 

9

 

 

 

14

 

 

67

 

 

 

24

 

Income from continuing operations

 

 

280

 

 

 

185

 

 

507

 

 

 

419

 

Discontinued operations, net of income tax

 

(3

)

 

 

188

 

 

(2

)

 

 

209

 

Net income

 

$

277

 

 

$

373

 

$

505

 

 

$

628

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic earnings per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations

 

$

1.08

 

 

$

0.73

 

$

1.95

 

 

$

1.64

 

 

Discontinued operations, net of income tax

 

 

(0.01

)

 

 

0.73

 

 

(0.01

)

 

 

0.82

 

 

Net income

 

$

1.07

 

 

$

1.46

 

$

1.94

 

 

$

2.46

 

 

Weighted-average number of shares outstanding (thousands)

 

260,198

 

 

 

255,728

 

 

259,830

 

 

 

254,996

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations

 

$

1.06

 

 

$

0.71

 

$

1.92

 

 

$

1.61

 

 

Discontinued operations, net of income tax

 

 

(0.01

)

 

 

0.72

 

 

(0.01

)

 

 

0.81

 

 

Net income

 

$

1.05

 

 

$

1.43

 

$

1.91

 

 

$

2.42

 

 

Weighted-average number of shares outstanding (thousands)

 

264,963

 

 

 

260,320

 

 

264,518

 

 

 

259,804

 

Dividends declared per share of common stock

$

0.31

 

 

$

0.30

 

$

0.62

 

 

$

0.60

 


See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.



3




SEMPRA ENERGY
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS


 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

 

December 31,

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

1,352

 

 

$

920

 

 

Restricted cash

 

 

1

 

 

 

4

 

 

Trade accounts receivable, net

 

 

682

 

 

 

938

 

 

Other accounts and notes receivable, net

 

 

90

 

 

 

97

 

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

349

 

 

 

270

 

 

Interest receivable

 

 

5

 

 

 

40

 

 

Trading-related receivables and deposits, net

 

 

2,346

 

 

 

3,047

 

 

Derivative trading instruments

 

 

3,197

 

 

 

4,068

 

 

Commodities owned

 

 

1,763

 

 

 

1,845

 

 

Inventories

 

 

167

 

 

 

215

 

 

Regulatory assets

 

 

136

 

 

 

193

 

 

Other

 

 

442

 

 

 

317

 

 

Current assets of continuing operations

 

 

10,530

 

 

 

11,954

 

 

Current assets of discontinued operations

 

 

58

 

 

 

62

 

 

 

Total current assets

 

 

10,588

 

 

 

12,016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investments and other assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regulatory assets arising from fixed-price contracts

      and other derivatives

 

 

331

 

 

 

353

 

 

Regulatory assets arising from pension and other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      postretirement benefit obligations

 

 

373

 

 

 

356

 

 

Other regulatory assets

 

 

445

 

 

 

472

 

 

Nuclear decommissioning trusts

 

 

728

 

 

 

702

 

 

Investments

 

 

1,122

 

 

 

1,086

 

 

Sundry

 

 

840

 

 

 

789

 

 

 

Total investments and other assets

 

 

3,839

 

 

 

3,758

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property, plant and equipment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property, plant and equipment

 

 

19,980

 

 

 

18,916

 

 

Less accumulated depreciation and amortization

 

 

(5,930

)

 

 

(5,741

)

 

 

Property, plant and equipment, net

 

 

14,050

 

 

 

13,175

 

Total assets

 

$

28,477

 

 

$

28,949

 


See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.



4



SEMPRA ENERGY
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

 

December 31,

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Short-term debt

 

 

$

627

 

 

$

252

 

 

Accounts payable - trade

 

 

 

1,190

 

 

 

1,432

 

 

Accounts payable - other

 

 

 

128

 

 

 

155

 

 

Due to unconsolidated affiliate

 

 

 

60

 

 

 

--

 

 

Income taxes payable

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

9

 

 

Trading-related payables

 

 

 

2,531

 

 

 

3,211

 

 

Derivative trading instruments

 

 

 

2,243

 

 

 

2,304

 

 

Commodities sold with agreement to repurchase

 

 

 

407

 

 

 

537

 

 

Dividends and interest payable

 

 

 

143

 

 

 

145

 

 

Regulatory balancing accounts, net

 

 

 

555

 

 

 

332

 

 

Fixed-price contracts and other derivatives

 

 

 

53

 

 

 

87

 

 

Current portion of long-term debt

 

 

 

340

 

 

 

681

 

 

Other

 

 

 

1,157

 

 

 

1,197

 

 

Current liabilities of continuing operations

 

 

 

9,462

 

 

 

10,342

 

 

Current liabilities of discontinued operations

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

 

9,467

 

 

 

10,349

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Long-term debt

 

 

 

4,219

 

 

 

4,525

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deferred credits and other liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due to unconsolidated affiliate

 

 

 

102

 

 

 

162

 

 

Customer advances for construction

 

 

 

127

 

 

 

126

 

 

Pension and other postretirement benefit obligations,

     net of plan assets

 

 

 

620

 

 

 


609

 

 

Deferred income taxes

 

 

 

437

 

 

 

412

 

 

Deferred investment tax credits

 

 

 

64

 

 

 

67

 

 

Regulatory liabilities arising from removal obligations

 

 

 

2,382

 

 

 

2,330

 

 

Asset retirement obligations

 

 

 

1,204

 

 

 

1,128

 

 

Other regulatory liabilities

 

 

 

228

 

 

 

221

 

 

Fixed-price contracts and other derivatives

 

 

 

343

 

 

 

358

 

 

Deferred credits and other

 

 

 

940

 

 

 

961

 

 

 

Total deferred credits and other liabilities

 

 

 

6,447

 

 

 

6,374

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock of subsidiaries

 

 

 

179

 

 

 

179

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minority interests

 

 

 

176

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 10)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders' equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock (50 million shares authorized; none issued)

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

Common stock (750 million shares authorized;

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

264 million and 262 million shares outstanding at

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively; no par value)

 

 

3,325

 

 

 

3,245

 

 

Retained earnings

 

 

 

5,032

 

 

 

4,681

 

 

Deferred compensation

 

 

 

(23

)

 

 

(25

)

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)

 

 

 

(345

)

 

 

(390

)

 

 

Total shareholders' equity

 

 

 

7,989

 

 

 

7,511

 

Total liabilities and shareholders' equity

 

 

$

28,477

 

 

$

28,949

 


See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.



5



SEMPRA ENERGY

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOWS


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

 

$

505

 

 

$

628

 

 

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discontinued operations

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

(209

)

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

 

340

 

 

 

328

 

 

 

 

Deferred income taxes and investment tax credits

 

 

 

(39

)

 

 

(216

)

 

 

 

Equity in income of unconsolidated subsidiaries

 

 

 

(55

)

 

 

(6

)

 

 

 

Other

 

 

 

(16

)

 

 

82

 

 

Net changes in other working capital components

 

 

 

918

 

 

 

79

 

 

Changes in other assets

 

 

 

33

 

 

 

(2

)

 

Changes in other liabilities

 

 

 

(10

)

 

 

32

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by continuing operations

 

 

 

1,678

 

 

 

716

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by (used in) discontinued operations

 

 

 

(3

)

 

 

76

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

 

 

1,675

 

 

 

792

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expenditures for property, plant and equipment

 

 

 

(889

)

 

 

(893

)

 

Proceeds from sale of assets from continuing operations

 

 

 

61

 

 

 

24

 

 

Expenditures for investments  

 

 

 

(5

)

 

 

(120

)

 

Distributions from investments

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

104

 

 

Purchases of nuclear decommissioning and other trust assets

 

 

 

(341

)

 

 

(398

)

 

Proceeds from sales by nuclear decommissioning and other trusts

 

 

 

300

 

 

 

371

 

 

Dividends received from unconsolidated affiliates

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

3

 

 

Other

 

 

 

(9

)

 

 

(5

)

 

 

Net cash used in continuing operations

 

 

 

(879

)

 

 

(914

)

 

 

Net cash provided by discontinued operations

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

560

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

 

 

 

(879

)

 

 

(354

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common dividends paid

 

 

 

(152

)

 

 

(134

)

 

Issuances of common stock

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

46

 

 

Repurchases of common stock

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(12

)

 

Increase (decrease) in short-term debt, net

 

 

 

374

 

 

 

(668

)

 

Payments on long-term debt

 

 

 

(654

)

 

 

(64

)

 

Issuance of long-term debt

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

253

 

 

Financing transaction related to Sempra Financial

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

83

 

 

Other

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

Net cash used in continuing operations

 

 

 

(393

)

 

 

(488

)

 

 

Net cash provided by discontinued operations

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

 

 

 

(393

)

 

 

(486

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

 

403

 

 

 

(48

)

Cash and cash equivalents, January 1

 

 

 

920

 

 

 

769

 

Cash assumed in connection with FIN 46(R) consolidation

 

 

 

29

 

 

 

--

 

Cash and cash equivalents, June 30

 

 

$

1,352

 

 

$

721

 

 

See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.



6



SEMPRA ENERGY

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF CONSOLIDATED CASH FLOWS


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

 

 

 

(unaudited)

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH FLOW INFORMATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest payments, net of amounts capitalized

 

 

$

135

 

 

$

176

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income tax payments, net of refunds

 

 

$

191

 

 

$

406

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NON-CASH INVESTING

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     ACTIVITY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Increase (decrease) in accounts payable from investments in property, plant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   and equipment

 

 

$

60

 

 

$

(70

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fair value of stock received for services rendered

 

 

$

32

 

 

$

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fair value of stock received for sale of investments

 

 

$

26

 

 

$

--

 


See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.



7



NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


NOTE 1. GENERAL


Principles of Consolidation


This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q is that of Sempra Energy (the company), a California-based Fortune 500 holding company, its consolidated subsidiaries and a variable interest entity of which it is the primary beneficiary. Sempra Energy’s principal subsidiaries are San Diego Gas & Electric Company (SDG&E) and Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) (collectively referred to as the Sempra Utilities) and Sempra Global, which is the holding company for Sempra Commodities, Sempra Generation, Sempra Pipelines & Storage, Sempra LNG and other, smaller businesses. The accompanying financial statements are the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements of Sempra Energy and its consolidated subsidiaries and variable interest entity.


Basis of Presentation


The Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP) and in accordance with the interim-period-reporting requirements of Form 10-Q. Results of operations for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of results for the entire year. In the opinion of management, the accompanying statements reflect all adjustments necessary for a fair presentation. These adjustments are only of a normal, recurring nature. The presentation of the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for 2006, which reconciled Income from Continuing Operations to Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities, was revised to conform to the current year presentation.


Information in this Quarterly Report should be read in conjunction with the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006 (the Annual Report) and the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2007.


The company’s significant accounting policies are described in Note 1 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the Annual Report. The same accounting policies are followed for interim reporting purposes, except for the adoption of new accounting standards as discussed in Note 2.


Other cost of sales includes primarily the cost of sales of Sempra Commodities, consisting primarily of transportation and storage costs.


Other operating expenses include operating and maintenance costs, and general and administrative costs, consisting primarily of personnel costs, purchased materials and services, and outside services.


The Sempra Utilities account for the economic effects of regulation on utility operations in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) 71, Accounting for the Effects of Certain Types of Regulation.


NOTE 2. NEW ACCOUNTING STANDARDS


Pronouncements that have recently become effective that are relevant to the company and/or have had or may have a significant effect on the company's financial statements are described below.


SFAS 157, "Fair Value Measurements" (SFAS 157): SFAS 157 defines fair value, establishes criteria to be considered when measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value measurements.



8



SFAS 157 does not expand the application of fair value accounting to any new circumstances. The company applies recurring fair value measurements to certain assets and liabilities, primarily trading derivatives and certain trading inventories, nuclear decommissioning and other trusts, and other miscellaneous derivatives.


SFAS 157 nullified a portion of Emerging Issues Task Force (EITF) Issue No. 02-3, Issues Involved in Accounting for Derivative Contracts Held for Trading Purposes and Contracts Involved in Energy Trading and Risk Management Activities (EITF 02-3). Under EITF 02-3, the transaction price presumption prohibited recognition of a trading profit at inception of a derivative unless the positive fair value of that derivative was substantially based on quoted prices or a valuation process incorporating observable inputs. For transactions that did not meet this criterion at inception, trading profits that had been deferred were recognized in the period that inputs to value the derivative became observable or when the contract performed. SFAS 157 nullified this portion of EITF 02-3. SFAS 157 also: (1) establishes that fair value is based on a hierarchy of inputs into the valuation process (as described in Note 8), (2) clarifies that an issuer's credit standing should be considered when measuring liabilities at fair value, (3) precludes the use of a liquidity or block discount when measuring instruments traded in an actively quoted market at fair value, and (4) requires costs relating to acquiring instruments carried at fair value to be recognized as expense when incurred. SFAS 157 requires that a fair value measurement reflect the assumptions market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability based on the best available information. These assumptions include the risk inherent in a particular valuation technique (such as a pricing model) and the risks inherent in the inputs to the model.


The provisions of SFAS 157 are to be applied prospectively, except for the initial impact on three specific items: (1) changes in fair value measurements of existing derivative financial instruments measured initially using the transaction price under EITF 02-3, (2) existing hybrid financial instruments measured initially at fair value using the transaction price, and (3) blockage factor discounts. Adjustments to these items required under SFAS 157 are to be recorded as a transition adjustment to beginning retained earnings in the year of adoption.


Although this statement is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2007, early adoption may be elected if the reporting entity has not yet issued financial statements for the fiscal year, including interim period financial statements. The company elected to early-adopt SFAS 157 in the first quarter of 2007. As a result of the company's adoption of SFAS 157, the transition adjustment to beginning retained earnings was a gain of $12 million, net of income tax. SFAS 157 also requires new disclosures regarding the level of pricing observability associated with financial instruments carried at fair value. This additional disclosure is provided in Note 8.


SFAS 159, "The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities – Including an amendment of FASB Statement No. 115" (SFAS 159): SFAS 159 allows measurement at fair value of eligible financial assets and liabilities that are not otherwise measured at fair value. If the fair value option for an eligible item is elected, unrealized gains and losses for that item are reported in current earnings at each subsequent reporting date. SFAS 159 also establishes presentation and disclosure requirements designed to draw comparison between the different measurement attributes the company elects for similar types of assets and liabilities. This statement is effective for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2007. The company is in the process of evaluating the application of the fair value option and the effect on its financial position and results of operations.


Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Interpretation No. (FIN) 48, "Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes, an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109" (FIN 48): FIN 48 clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise's financial statements in accordance with SFAS 109, Accounting for Income Taxes. FIN 48 addresses how an entity should



9



recognize, measure, classify and disclose in its financial statements uncertain tax positions that it has taken or expects to take in an income tax return. FIN 48 also provides guidance on derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition. Additionally, the FASB issued FASB Staff Position (FSP) FIN 48-1, Definition of Settlement in FASB Interpretation No. 48 which amends FIN 48 to provide guidance on how an enterprise should determine whether a tax position is effectively settled for the purpose of recognizing previously unrecognized tax benefits. The company's implementation of FIN 48 as of January 1, 2007 was consistent with the guidance in this FSP.


The company adopted the provisions of FIN 48 on January 1, 2007. As a result, the company recognized a $2 million decrease in retained earnings. Including this adjustment, the company had unrecognized tax benefits of $110 million as of January 1, 2007. Of this amount, $99 million related to tax positions that, if recognized, would decrease the effective tax rate; however, $47 million related to tax positions that would increase the effective tax rate in subsequent years. There were no material changes to the company’s unrecognized tax benefit amounts as of June 30, 2007.


It is reasonably possible that the company’s unrecognized tax benefits could decrease by up to $18 million within the next 12 months due to the expiration of statutes of limitations on tax assessments and by up to $7 million due to the potential resolution of federal income tax refund claims with the Internal Revenue Service.


Effective January 1, 2007, the company’s policy is to recognize accrued interest and penalties on accrued tax balances as components of tax expense. Prior to the adoption of FIN 48, the company accrued interest expense and penalties as components of tax expense and interest income as a component of interest income.


As of January 1, 2007, the company had accrued a total of $11 million of interest expense and $2 million of penalties. There was no material change to these amounts as of June 30, 2007. Amounts accrued for interest expense and penalties associated with income taxes are included in income tax expense on the Statements of Consolidated Income and in various income tax balances on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.


The company is subject to U.S. federal income tax as well as income tax of multiple state and foreign jurisdictions. The company is no longer subject to examination by U.S. federal and major state tax jurisdictions for years before 2002. Federal, major state and most major foreign income tax returns from 2002 through the present are currently open to examination. Certain major foreign income tax returns from 1995 through the present are open to examination.


In addition, the company has filed federal and state refund claims for tax years back to 1989. The pre-2002 tax years are closed to new issues; therefore, no additional tax may be assessed by the taxing authorities for these years.


EITF Issue No. 06-11, "Accounting for Income Tax Benefits of Dividends on Share-Based Payment Awards" (EITF 06-11): EITF 06-11 requires that the tax benefit related to dividends paid on employee share-based payment awards classified as equity be recorded as an increase to additional paid-in capital. EITF 06-11 is to be applied prospectively for tax benefits on dividends declared in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2007. The company does not expect the effect of adopting EITF 06-11 to have a material impact on its financial position or results of operations.




10



NOTE 3. OTAY MESA ENERGY CENTER LLC


FIN 46 (revised December 2003), Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities, an interpretation of Accounting Research Bulletin (ARB) No. 51 (FIN 46(R)), requires an enterprise to consolidate a variable interest entity (VIE), as defined in FIN 46(R), if the company is the primary beneficiary of a VIE’s activities.


SDG&E has entered into a 10-year power purchase agreement with Otay Mesa Energy Center LLC (OMEC LLC) for power generated at the Otay Mesa Energy Center (OMEC), a 573-megawatt (MW) generating facility under construction in San Diego by OMEC LLC, which is expected to commence commercial operations in mid-2009. Under the terms of the agreement, SDG&E will purchase all of the power produced from the plant to serve its energy customers, and will supply natural gas to fuel the power plant. The agreement also provides SDG&E the option to purchase the plant at the end of the contract term in 2019, or upon earlier termination of the purchase power agreement, at a predetermined price subject to adjustments based on performance of the facility. If SDG&E does not exercise its option, OMEC LLC has the right, under certain circumstances, to require SDG&E to purchase the plant at a predetermined price. As defined in FIN 46(R), OMEC LLC is a VIE, of which SDG&E is the primary beneficiary. In accordance with FIN 46(R), the company consolidated OMEC LLC beginning in the second quarter of 2007. The impact of the consolidation is negligible to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements of the company. OMEC LLC’s equity of $164 million is included in Minority Interests on the Consolidated Balance Sheet at June 30, 2007.


OMEC LLC has a project finance credit facility with third party lenders that provides for up to $377 million for the construction of the OMEC. The credit facility is structured as a construction loan, converting to a term loan upon commercial operation of the plant, and is secured by the assets of OMEC LLC. The loan matures in April 2019. Borrowings under the facility bear interest at rates varying with market rates. OMEC LLC had no outstanding borrowings under this facility at June 30, 2007. In addition, OMEC LLC has entered into interest-rate swap agreements to moderate its exposure to interest-rate changes on this facility.


NOTE 4. RECENT INVESTMENT ACTIVITY


Sempra Pipelines & Storage


Sempra Pipelines & Storage is currently expanding its existing pipelines in Baja California, Mexico, and adding a spur line to connect Sempra LNG’s Energía Costa Azul terminal to an existing Sempra Energy natural gas pipeline in Mexico with interconnection to the U.S. border. The estimated cost of this project is $200 million, of which $161 million has been expended through June 30, 2007. The expansion is expected to be completed in early 2008.


Liberty Gas Storage (Liberty), as currently permitted, is a 17 billion cubic feet (Bcf) salt cavern natural gas storage facility located in Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana.  The facility has been under construction by the company and its 25-percent partner Proliance Transportation and Storage, LLC.  The estimated project cost is approximately $200 million, of which $157 million has been expended through June 30, 2007.  Pipeline and compressor systems are currently in operation and can provide transportation services.


In 2006, the company acquired additional property with 11 Bcf of existing salt dome caverns and the capability to add significant additional capacity by mining new caverns. The newly purchased caverns would allow Liberty to be expended to over 28 Bcf of capacity.




11



The company has experienced construction problems with the smaller initial cavern which will delay storage injections. The company has begun constructing a second, larger cavern which is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2008 with firm service starting during the spring injection season of April 2008. Given the capacity to develop new caverns, the company does not expect the completion issues related to the first cavern to affect its ability to ultimately provide more than 17 Bcf of storage to its customers.


Sempra LNG


Sempra LNG’s Energía Costa Azul LNG receipt terminal is currently under construction in Baja California, Mexico, and is expected to begin operations in early 2008. It is expected to cost approximately $900 million and will be capable of processing 1 Bcf of natural gas per day. Through June 30, 2007, Sempra LNG has made expenditures of $811 million related to the terminal and the proposed expansion project. The ultimate scope and timing of the expansion project will depend on the outcome of negotiations for supply and/or terminal service agreements. As discussed above, Sempra Pipelines & Storage is expanding its Baja California pipelines to connect Energía Costa Azul to existing natural gas pipelines.


Sempra LNG’s Cameron LNG receipt terminal is currently under construction in Hackberry, Louisiana. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $750 million, and construction is expected to be completed in late 2008. In January 2007, Sempra LNG received approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for a possible expansion of the terminal’s production capacity to 2.65 Bcf per day of natural gas from 1.5 Bcf per day. Through June 30, 2007, Sempra LNG has made expenditures of $538 million related to the terminal and the proposed expansion project. The ultimate scope and timing of the expansion project will depend on the outcome of negotiations for supply and/or terminal service agreements.


In March 2006, Sempra LNG executed a terminal services agreement with Merrill Lynch Commodities Inc. (MLC) to bring natural gas to the U.S. Gulf Coast, conditioned on MLC’s obtaining a contract for the supply of LNG. The 20-year, full-service capacity agreement provides MLC the capability to process 500,000 million British thermal units (MMBtu) per day through the Cameron LNG receipt terminal. The agreement, as amended in March 2007, is subject to MLC obtaining a supply of LNG by June 30, 2008 and signing a transportation agreement on the connecting pipeline. MLC is subject to a termination fee if these conditions precedent are not satisfied.




12



NOTE 5. DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS


The company’s discontinued operations are discussed in Note 4 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the Annual Report. Information concerning discontinued operations for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively, is summarized below:



(Dollars in millions)

 

Twin Oaks

 

Energy Services and Facilities Management

 

Bangor Gas and Frontier Energy

 

SEPCO

 AEG

Consolidated state tax adjustment

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three months ended June 30, 2007:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating revenues

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

2

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

$

--

 

$

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from operations, before

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

income taxes

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

1

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

$

--

 

$

1

 

Income tax expense

 

 

--

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

4

 

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

(3

)

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

$

--

 

$

(3

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three months ended June 30, 2006:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating revenues

 

$

3

 

 

$

7

 

 

$

3

 

 

$

9

 

 

$

--

 

$

--

 

$

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from operations, before

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

income taxes

 

$

1

 

 

$

2

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

3

 

 

$

2

 

$

--

 

$

8

 

Impairment loss

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(59

)

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

(59

)

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

 

1

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(24

)

 

 

1

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

(22

)

Consolidated state tax adjustment

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

(2

)

 

(2

)

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

(35

)

 

 

2

 

 

 

2

 

 

(2

)

 

(31

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gain on disposal, before income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

taxes

 

 

349

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

349

 

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

 

122

 

 

 

(4

)

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

118

 

Consolidated state tax adjustment

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

(12

)

 

(12

)

 

 

 

227

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

(12

)

 

219

 

 

 

 

$

227

 

 

$

6

 

 

$

(35

)

 

$

2

 

 

$

2

 

$

(14

)

$

188

 





13




(Dollars in millions)

 

Twin Oaks

 

Energy Services and Facilities Management

 

Bangor Gas and Frontier Energy

 

SEPCO

 AEG

Consolidated state tax adjustment

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2007:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating revenues

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

7

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

$

--

 

$

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from operations, before

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

income taxes

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

2

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

$

--

 

$

2

 

Income tax expense

 

 

--

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

4

 

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

(3

)

 

$

1

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

$

--

 

$

(2

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2006:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating revenues

 

$

22

 

 

$

35

 

 

$

7

 

 

$

17

 

 

$

--

 

$

--

 

$

81

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income from operations, before

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

income taxes

 

$

2

 

 

$

6

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

6

 

 

$

2

 

$

--

 

$

16

 

Impairment loss

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(59

)

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

(59

)

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

 

1

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

(24

)

 

 

2

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

(19

)

Consolidated state tax adjustment

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

(2

)

 

(2

)

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

(35

)

 

 

4

 

 

 

2

 

 

(2

)

 

(26

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gain on disposal, before income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

taxes

 

 

349

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

349

 

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

 

122

 

 

 

(20

)

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

102

 

Consolidated state tax adjustment

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

(12

)

 

(12

)

 

 

 

227

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

(12

)

 

235

 

 

 

 

$

228

 

 

$

24

 

 

$

(35

)

 

$

4

 

 

$

2

 

$

(14

)

$

209

 


Current assets and liabilities of discontinued operations at June 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006 consist primarily of income tax balances related to Bangor Gas and Frontier Energy.


NOTE 6. OTHER FINANCIAL DATA


Investments in Unconsolidated Subsidiaries


In February 2007, Sempra Commodities sold its interests in an equity-method investment, along with a related cost-basis investment, receiving cash and a 12.7-percent interest in a newly formed entity. The after-tax gain on this transaction, recorded as Equity in Earnings of Certain Unconsolidated Subsidiaries on the Statements of Consolidated Income, was $30 million.


Available-for-Sale Securities


Sempra Commodities had $106 million and $55 million of available-for-sale securities included in Investments at June 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively. At June 30, 2007, the balance in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) related to these securities was $36 million net of income tax, comprised entirely of unrealized gains. At December 31, 2006, the balance in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) related to these securities was $18 million net of income tax, comprised of $19 million of unrealized gains and $1 million of unrealized losses.



14




Sempra Commodities recorded a negligible amount and $5 million in purchases of available-for-sale securities for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007, respectively. Sempra Commodities sold available-for-sale securities with a cost basis of $8 million and $11 million, yielding proceeds of $17 million and $25 million for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007, respectively. The cost basis of the sales was determined by the specific identification method and pretax gains of $9 million and $14 million were realized as a result of the sales for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007, respectively.


Sempra Commodities recorded $9 million and $15 million in purchases of available-for-sale securities for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2006, respectively. There was a negligible amount of available-for-sale securities sales activity for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2006.


There were no securities in an unrealized loss position at June 30, 2007.


Trading Securities


Sempra Commodities had securities of $15 million and $13 million classified as trading securities at June 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively.


In the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007, Sempra Commodities recorded $9 million of pretax gains related to trading securities, including a pretax gain of $6 million resulting from sales, an unrealized pretax gain of $7 million from the transfer of available-for-sale securities to trading securities, and an unrealized pretax loss of $4 million related to trading securities held at June 30, 2007.


In the three months ended June 30, 2006, Sempra Commodities recorded $5 million of pretax gains related to trading securities, including a pretax gain of $7 million resulting from sales and an unrealized pretax loss of $2 million related to trading securities held at June 30, 2006.


In the six months ended June 30, 2006, Sempra Commodities recorded $16 million of pretax gains related to trading securities, including a pretax gain of $16 million resulting from sales, an unrealized pretax gain of $1 million from the transfer of available-for-sale securities to trading securities, and an unrealized pretax loss of $1 million related to trading securities held at June 30, 2006.


Goodwill


The carrying amount of goodwill included in Sundry Assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheets was $170 million as of June 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006.


Asset Retirement Obligations


The company’s asset retirement obligations, as defined in SFAS 143, Accounting for Asset Retirement Obligations and FIN 47, Accounting for Conditional Asset Retirement Obligations, an interpretation of SFAS 143, are discussed in Note 1 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the Annual Report. Following are the changes in asset retirement obligations for the six months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006:



15





(Dollars in millions)

 

 2007

 2006

Balance as of January 1*

 

$

 1,163

 

$

977

 

Accretion expense

 

 

39

 

 

32

 

Payments

 

 

 (11

)

 

(6

)

Liabilities incurred

 

 

1

 

 

--

 

Revision to estimated cash flows**

 

 

44

 

 

--

 

Balance as of June 30*

 

$

1,236

 

$

1,003

 


* The current portion of the obligation is included in Other Current Liabilities on the Consolidated Balance Sheets.

**  The revision is due to an increase in the present value of estimated liabilities for the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) decommissioning costs.


Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits


The following tables provide the components of benefit costs for the three months and six months ended June 30:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pension Benefits

 

Other Postretirement Benefits

 

 

Three months ended June 30,

 

Three months ended June 30,

 

(Dollars in millions)

 

2007

 

 

2006

 

 

2007

 

 

2006

 

Service cost

$

17

 

$

18

 

$

7

 

$

7

 

Interest cost

 

41

 

 

39

 

 

14

 

 

13

 

Expected return on assets

 

(39

)

 

(38

)

 

(11

)

 

(10

)

Amortization of:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prior service cost

 

--

 

 

3

 

 

(1

)

 

(1

)

 

Actuarial loss

 

3

 

 

3

 

 

2

 

 

1

 

Curtailment *

 

5

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

Special termination *

 

1

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

Regulatory adjustment

 

(7

)

 

(12

)

 

1

 

 

1

 

Total net periodic benefit cost

$

21

 

$

13

 

$

12

 

$

11

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pension Benefits

 

Other Postretirement Benefits

 

 

Six months ended June 30,

 

Six months ended June 30,

 

(Dollars in millions)

 

2007

 

 

2006

 

 

2007

 

 

2006

 

Service cost

$

39

 

$

36

 

$

14

 

$

13

 

Interest cost

 

82

 

 

78

 

 

28

 

 

25

 

Expected return on assets

 

(79

)

 

(75

)

 

(22

)

 

(20

)

Amortization of:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prior service cost

 

2

 

 

5

 

 

(2

)

 

(2

)

 

Actuarial loss

 

5

 

 

6

 

 

4

 

 

3

 

Curtailment *

 

5

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

Special termination *

 

1

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

 

--

 

Regulatory adjustment

 

(23

)

 

(28

)

 

3

 

 

2

 

Total net periodic benefit cost

$

32

 

$

22

 

$

25

 

$

21

 


* These charges reflect the expected accelerated vesting and exit from the company's pension plans related to Sempra Commodities employees as a result of the transaction discussed in Note 11.


The company expects to contribute $61 million to its pension plans and $49 million to its other postretirement benefit plans in 2007. For the six months ended June 30, 2007, the company made contributions of $15 million and $24 million to the pension plans and other postretirement benefit



16



plans, respectively, including $8 million and $12 million, respectively, for the three months ended June 30, 2007.


Earnings per Share (EPS)


Diluted EPS for the three months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006 reflects the inclusion of 4,765,000 and 4,592,000 additional shares, respectively, in the weighted average shares outstanding for the dilutive effect of stock options and restricted stock awards. Diluted EPS for the six months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006 reflects the inclusion of 4,688,000 and 4,808,000 additional shares, respectively, in the weighted average shares outstanding for the dilutive effect of stock options and restricted stock awards.


The dilution from common stock options is based on the treasury stock method, whereby the proceeds from the exercise price and unearned compensation as defined by SFAS 123 (revised 2004), Share-Based Payment (SFAS 123(R)), are assumed to be used to repurchase shares on the open market at the average market price for the period. The calculation excludes options for which the exercise price was greater than the average market price for common stock during the period. The company had 734,105 and 826,426 stock options that were outstanding during the three months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively, and 711,847 and 804,386 stock options that were outstanding during the six months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively, but were not included in the computation of diluted EPS for these periods because the effect of including these awards would be antidilutive, due to the inclusion of unearned compensation in the assumed proceeds.


The dilution from unvested restricted stock awards is based on the treasury stock method, whereby assumed proceeds equivalent to the unearned compensation as defined by SFAS 123(R) related to the awards are assumed to be used to repurchase shares on the open market at the average market price for the period. The company had 302 and 151 restricted shares that were outstanding during the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007, respectively, but were not included in the computation of diluted EPS for these periods because the effect of including these shares would be antidilutive. There were no antidilutive restricted shares for the three months and the six months ended June 30, 2006.


Share-Based Compensation


Total share-based compensation expense, net of income tax, was $14 million and $19 million in the six months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively. Pursuant to the company's share-based compensation plans, 760,700 non-qualified stock options, 803,706 shares of restricted stock and 5,400 restricted stock units were granted during the six months ended June 30, 2007.


Capitalized Interest


The company recorded $25 million and $46 million of capitalized interest for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007, respectively, including the debt-related portion of allowance for funds used during construction. The company recorded $9 million and $23 million of capitalized interest for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2006, respectively, including the debt-related portion of allowance for funds used during construction.




17



Other Income (Expense), Net


Other Income (Expense), Net consists of the following:


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

 

 June 30,

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

Equity in losses of unconsolidated subsidiaries

 

$

(6

)

 

$

(14

)

 

$

(12

)

 

$

(18

)

Allowance for equity funds used during construction

 

4

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

7

 

Regulatory interest, net

 

 

 

(7

)

 

 

6

 

 

 

(12

)

 

 

3

 

Sundry, net*

 

 

 

54

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

70

 

 

 

7

 

 

Total

 

 

$

45

 

 

$

(5

)

 

$

56

 

 

$

(1

)


* Includes gain related to interest rate swap as discussed in Note 7.


Comprehensive Income


The following is a reconciliation of net income to comprehensive income.


 

 

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

Six months ended

 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

 

June 30,

(Dollars in millions)

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

Net income

$

277

 

$

373

 

 

$

505

 

$

628

 

Foreign currency adjustments

 

13

 

 

(13

)

 

 

7

 

 

(25

)

Financial instruments*

 

8

 

 

(2

)

 

 

7

 

 

19

 

Available-for-sale securities**

 

13

 

 

(1

)

 

 

18

 

 

--

 

Net actuarial gain ***

 

15

 

 

--

 

 

 

15

 

 

--

 

Prior service cost ****

 

2

 

 

--

 

 

 

2

 

 

--

 

Comprehensive income

$

328

 

$

357

 

 

$

554

 

$

622

 


* Net of income tax expense (benefit) of $8 million and $(4) million for the three months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively, and $7 million for both the six months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006.

  ** Net of income tax expense (benefit) of $7 million and $(1) million for the three months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively, and $11 million for the six months ended June 30, 2007.

*** Net of income tax expense of $10 million for both the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007.

  **** Net of income tax expense of $2 million for both the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007.


NOTE 7. DEBT AND CREDIT FACILITIES

 

Committed Lines of Credit


At June 30, 2007, the company had available $5.8 billion in unused, committed lines of credit to provide liquidity and support commercial paper (the major components of which are detailed below). As of June 30, 2007, $5 million of the lines supported variable-rate debt.


Sempra Global has a $2.5 billion five-year syndicated revolving credit facility expiring in 2010 and a $750 million three-year syndicated revolving credit facility expiring in 2008. The five-year and three-year credit facilities include provisions for the issuance of up to $400 million and $500 million, respectively, of letters of credit on behalf of Sempra Global. At June 30, 2007, Sempra Global had letters of credit of $43 million outstanding under the five-year facility and no outstanding borrowings under either facility. The facilities provide support for $496 million of commercial paper outstanding at June 30, 2007.




18



Sempra Commodities has a five-year syndicated revolving credit facility expiring in 2010 that provides for up to $1.72 billion of extensions of credit (consisting of borrowings, letters of credit and other credit support accommodations) to Sempra Commodities and certain of its affiliates. Letters of credit of $542 million were outstanding under the facility at June 30, 2007. At June 30, 2007, Sempra Commodities had no outstanding borrowings under this facility.


Sempra Commodities also has a $500 million three-year credit facility expiring in 2009 that provides for extensions of credit (consisting of borrowings and the issuance of letters of credit and bank guarantees) to Sempra Commodities. Letters of credit of $343 million were outstanding under this facility at June 30, 2007. At June 30, 2007, Sempra Commodities had no outstanding borrowings under this facility.

 

Sempra LNG has a $1.25 billion five-year syndicated revolving credit facility expiring in 2009. The facility includes provisions for the issuance of letters of credit on behalf of Sempra LNG up to $200 million outstanding at any one time. Sempra LNG had $85 million of outstanding letters of credit under this facility at June 30, 2007. At June 30, 2007, Sempra LNG had no outstanding borrowings under this facility.


The Sempra Utilities have a combined $600 million five-year syndicated revolving credit facility expiring in 2010, under which each utility individually may borrow up to $500 million, subject to a combined borrowing limit for both utilities of $600 million. At June 30, 2007, the Sempra Utilities had no outstanding borrowings under this facility. The facility provides support for $30 million of commercial paper outstanding at SDG&E at June 30, 2007.


Sempra Energy, ConocoPhillips (Conoco) and Kinder Morgan Energy Partners, L.P. (KMP) currently hold 25-percent, 24-percent and 51-percent ownership interests, respectively, in Rockies Express Pipeline LLC (Rockies Express) which is constructing a natural gas pipeline to link natural gas producing areas in the Rocky Mountain region to the upper Midwest and the eastern United States. Rockies Express has entered into a $2 billion five-year credit facility expiring in 2011 that provides for revolving extensions of credit that are guaranteed severally by Sempra Energy, Conoco and KMP in proportion to their respective ownership percentages. Rockies Express had no outstanding borrowings under this facility at June 30, 2007. This facility supports the Rockies Express commercial paper program, of which 25 percent is also guaranteed by Sempra Energy. The commercial paper program had $1.35 billion of outstanding borrowings at June 30, 2007, of which $338 million is guaranteed by Sempra Energy. The fair value of these guarantees is negligible.


Additional information concerning these credit facilities is provided in the Annual Report.


Uncommitted Lines of Credit


Under uncommitted facilities, lenders provide credit on a discretionary basis. Terms are generally consistent with existing committed credit facilities. At June 30, 2007, Sempra Commodities had $1.49 billion in various uncommitted lines of credit. Of the $1.49 billion at June 30, 2007, $945 million of the lines are fully guaranteed by Sempra Energy, and bear interest at rates varying with market rates. The remaining $550 million line is secured by certain assets at Sempra Commodities and guaranteed by Sempra Energy up to 20 percent, subject to additional amounts based on the recoverability of Sempra Commodities' collateral. At June 30, 2007, Sempra Commodities had $202 million of letters of credit outstanding supported by these lines. In addition, it had $75 million of short-term borrowings outstanding against these lines at June 30, 2007.




19



Other Short-term Debt


In addition to the lines of credit and commercial paper, Sempra Commodities had $26 million of other short-term debt outstanding at June 30, 2007.


Weighted Average Interest Rate


The company's weighted average interest rate on the total short-term debt outstanding was 5.60 percent at June 30, 2007.


Current Portion of Long-term Debt


The company expects to call its $300 million variable rate notes due May 21, 2008 for redemption on August 21, 2007.


Interest-Rate Swaps


The company periodically enters into interest-rate swap agreements to moderate its exposure to interest-rate changes and to lower its overall cost of borrowing.


Fair value hedges


During 2004, to balance its mix of fixed and floating-rate debt, Sempra Energy entered into interest-rate swaps that effectively exchanged the fixed rate on $300 million of its $500 million 7.95 percent notes maturing in 2010 for a floating rate. The swaps expire in 2010. During 2003, SoCalGas entered into an interest-rate swap that effectively exchanged the fixed rate on $150 million of its $250 million 4.375 percent first mortgage bonds maturing in 2011 for a floating rate. The swap expires in 2011. At June 30, 2007 and 2006, market value adjustments since inception of the hedge of $9 million and $13 million, respectively, were recorded as an increase primarily in Fixed-price Contracts and Other Derivatives (in noncurrent liabilities) and an offsetting decrease in Long-term Debt without affecting net income or other comprehensive income. There has been no hedge ineffectiveness on these swaps.


Cash flow hedges


In the third quarter of 2005, the company entered into derivative transactions to hedge future interest payments associated with forecasted borrowings of $450 million for facilities related to Sempra LNG's Energía Costa Azul project. The swaps expire in 2027. The fair value of these swaps at June 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006 was $30 million and $12 million, respectively. As of June 30, 2007, the company revised its borrowing plans in anticipation of net cash proceeds to be received later in 2007 in connection with the transaction discussed in Note 11. Accordingly, as of June 30, 2007, the company reclassified the cash flow hedge gain of $30 million pretax from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) into Other Income (Expense), Net in the Statements of Consolidated Income. In September 2004, SDG&E entered into interest-rate swaps to exchange the floating rates on its $251 million Chula Vista Series 2004 bonds maturing from 2034 through 2039 for fixed rates. The swaps expire in 2009. The fair value of these swaps at both June 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006 was $3 million. For the six months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, pretax income arising from the ineffective portion of interest-rate cash flow hedges was a negligible amount and $2 million, respectively, and was recorded in Other Income (Expense), Net on the Statements of Consolidated Income. The net effects of interest-rate cash flow hedges on other comprehensive income for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007 were losses of $10 million and $9 million, respectively, including the reclassification discussed above. The net effects of interest-rate cash flow hedges on other comprehensive income for the three months and six months ended



20



June 30, 2006 were gains of $7 million and $17 million, respectively. The balances in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) at June 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006 related to interest-rate cash flow hedges were a negligible amount and a gain of $9 million, respectively.


NOTE 8. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS


Fair Value Hedges


Interest-Rate Swaps


The company periodically enters into interest-rate swap agreements to moderate its exposure to interest-rate changes and to lower its overall cost of borrowing. The company's fair value interest-rate swaps are discussed in Note 7.


Commodity Fair Value Hedges


For commodity derivative instruments designated as fair value hedges, the company recognized net pretax unrealized gains (losses) of $79 million and $(61) million for the six months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively, which represent portions of gains or losses on hedging instruments determined to be ineffective. These amounts include gains (losses) of $33 million and $(110) million for the six months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively, which represent time value of money which is excluded for hedge assessment purposes. For commodity derivative instruments designated as fair value hedges, the company recognized net pretax unrealized gains of $52 million and a negligible amount for the three months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively, which represent portions of gains or losses on hedging instruments determined to be ineffective. These amounts include gains (losses) of $35 million and $(19) million for the three months ended June 30, 2007 and 2006, respectively, which represent time value of money which is excluded for hedge assessment purposes. The ineffectiveness gains and losses relate to hedges of commodity inventory and are included in Operating Revenues from Sempra Global and Parent on the Statements of Consolidated Income.


Cash Flow Hedges


Interest-Rate Swaps


The company's interest-rate swaps to hedge cash flows are discussed in Note 7.


Other Cash Flow Hedges


For other derivative instruments designated as cash flow hedges, the company recognized net unrealized pretax gains of $1 million for both the three months and six months ended June 30, 2007, which represent portions of gains on hedging instruments determined to be ineffective. For other derivative instruments designated as cash flow hedges, the company recognized net unrealized pretax gains of $24 million and $14 million for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2006, respectively, which represent portions of gains on hedging instruments determined to be ineffective. The ineffectiveness amounts relate to the potential phase-out of synthetic fuels income tax credits, as well as hedges of natural gas purchases and sales related to transportation and storage capacity arrangements.


The balances in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) at June 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006 related to all cash flow hedges were losses of $43 million and $50 million, respectively, net of income tax. The company expects that $39 million, which is net of income tax benefit, that is currently recorded in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss) related to these cash flow hedges will be



21



reclassified into earnings during the next twelve months as the hedged items affect earnings. However, in connection with the consummation of the transaction discussed in Note 11, a portion of the remaining cash flow hedge balance may be recognized at that time.


Sempra Commodities


The carrying values of trading assets and trading liabilities, primarily at Sempra Commodities,

are as follows:


 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

 

December 31,

 

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

TRADING ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading-related receivables and deposits, net:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Due from trading counterparties

 

$

2,048

 

$

2,610

 

 

Due from commodity clearing organizations and clearing brokers

 

 

298

 

 

437

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,346

 

 

3,047

 

Derivative trading instruments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized gains on swaps and forwards

 

 

1,804

 

 

2,389

 

 

OTC (over-the-counter) commodity options purchased

 

 

1,393

 

 

1,679

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,197

 

 

4,068

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commodities owned

 

 

1,763

 

 

1,845

 

Total trading assets

 

$

7,306

 

$

8,960

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRADING LIABILITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading-related payables

 

$

2,531

 

$

3,211

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Derivative trading instruments sold, not yet purchased:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized losses on swaps and forwards

 

 

1,747

 

 

1,670

 

 

OTC commodity options written

 

 

496

 

 

634

 

 

 

 

2,243

 

 

2,304

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commodities sold with agreement to repurchase

 

 

407

 

 

537

 

Total trading liabilities

 

$

5,181

 

$

6,052

 


The average fair values during the three months ended June 30, 2007 for trading assets and liabilities were approximately $7.2 billion and $5.3 billion, respectively. For the three months ended June 30, 2006, the amounts were $8.9 billion and $6.5 billion, respectively. The average fair values during the six months ended June 30, 2007 for trading assets and liabilities were approximately $8.1 billion and $5.6 billion, respectively. For the six months ended June 30, 2006, the amounts were $9.5 billion and $7.0 billion, respectively.


Sempra Commodities' credit risk from physical and financial instruments as of June 30, 2007 is represented by their positive fair value after consideration of collateral. Options written do not expose Sempra Commodities to credit risk. Exchange traded futures and options are not deemed to have significant credit exposure since the exchanges guarantee that every contract will be properly settled on a daily basis. Credit risk is also associated with its retail customers.




22



The following table summarizes the counterparty credit quality and exposure for Sempra Commodities, expressed in terms of net replacement value. These exposures are net of collateral in the form of customer margin and/or letters of credit of $1.4 billion and $1.9 billion at June 30, 2007 and December 31, 2006, respectively.


 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

 

December 31,

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

2007

 

2006

Counterparty credit quality*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commodity exchanges

 

$

298

 

$

437

 

AAA

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

19

 

AA

 

 

 

 

315

 

 

262

 

A

 

 

 

 

486

 

 

654

 

BBB

 

 

 

 

676

 

 

1,032

 

Below investment grade or not rated

 

 

855

 

 

1,011

 

 

Total

 

 

$

2,637

 

$

3,415


* As determined by rating agencies or by internal models intended to approximate rating agency determinations.


Sempra Utilities


At the Sempra Utilities, the use of derivative instruments is subject to certain limitations imposed by company policy and regulatory requirements. These instruments allow the company to estimate with greater certainty the effective prices to be received by the company and the prices to be charged to its customers. The Sempra Utilities record transactions for natural gas and electric energy contracts in Cost of Natural Gas and Cost of Electric Fuel and Purchased Power, respectively, on the Statements of Consolidated Income. On the Consolidated Balance Sheets, the Sempra Utilities record corresponding regulatory assets and liabilities relating to unrealized gains and losses from these derivative instruments to the extent derivative gains and losses associated with these derivative instruments will be payable or recoverable in future rates.


Adoption of SFAS 157


Effective January 1, 2007, the company early-adopted SFAS 157 as discussed in Note 2, which, among other things, requires enhanced disclosures about assets and liabilities carried at fair value.


As defined in SFAS 157, fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date (exit price). However, as permitted under SFAS 157, the company utilizes a mid-market pricing convention (the mid-point price between bid and ask prices) as a practical expedient for valuing the majority of its assets and liabilities measured and reported at fair value. The company utilizes market data or assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, including assumptions about risk and the risks inherent in the inputs to the valuation technique. These inputs can be readily observable, market corroborated, or generally unobservable. The company primarily applies the market approach for recurring fair value measurements and endeavors to utilize the best available information. Accordingly, the company utilizes valuation techniques that maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. The company is able to classify fair value balances based on the observability of those inputs. SFAS 157 establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurement) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurement). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy defined by SFAS 157 are as follows:




23



Level 1 – Quoted prices are available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date. Active markets are those in which transactions for the asset or liability occur in sufficient frequency and volume to provide pricing information on an ongoing basis. Level 1 primarily consists of financial instruments such as exchange-traded derivatives and listed equities.


Level 2 – Pricing inputs are other than quoted prices in active markets included in level 1, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reported date. Level 2 includes those financial instruments that are valued using models or other valuation methodologies. These models are primarily industry-standard models that consider various assumptions, including quoted forward prices for commodities, time value, volatility factors, and current market and contractual prices for the underlying instruments, as well as other relevant economic measures. Substantially all of these assumptions are observable in the marketplace throughout the full term of the instrument, can be derived from observable data or are supported by observable levels at which transactions are executed in the marketplace. Instruments in this category include non-exchange-traded derivatives such as OTC forwards, options and repurchase agreements.


Level 3 – Pricing inputs include significant inputs that are generally less observable from objective sources. These inputs may be used with internally developed methodologies that result in management’s best estimate of fair value. Level 3 instruments include those that may be more structured or otherwise tailored to customers’ needs. At each balance sheet date, the company performs an analysis of all instruments subject to SFAS 157 and includes in level 3 all of those whose fair value is based on significant unobservable inputs.


The following table sets forth by level within the fair value hierarchy the company's financial assets and liabilities that were accounted for at fair value on a recurring basis as of June 30, 2007. As required by SFAS 157, financial assets and liabilities are classified in their entirety based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. The company's assessment of the significance of a particular input to the fair value measurement requires judgment, and may affect the valuation of fair value assets and liabilities and their placement within the fair value hierarchy levels.

 

Recurring Fair Value Measures

 

At fair value as of June 30, 2007

 

(Dollars in millions)

 

Level 1

 

 

 

Level 2

 

 

 

Level 3

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading derivatives

 

$

562

 

 

$

2,698

 

 

$

499

 

 

$

3,759

 

 

Commodity trading inventories

 

 

--

 

 

 

1,645

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

1,645

 

 

Other derivatives

 

 

29

 

 

 

52

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

81

 

 

Nuclear decommissioning trusts

 

 

575

 

 

 

145

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

720

 

 

Other

 

 

439

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

439

 

 

Total

 

$

1,605

 

 

$

4,540

 

 

$

499

 

 

$

6,644

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trading derivatives

 

$

--

 

 

$

2,349

 

 

$

28

 

 

$

2,377

 

 

Other derivatives

 

 

1

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

21

 

 

Total

 

$

1

 

 

$

2,369

 

 

$

28

 

 

$

2,398

 


Trading derivatives in the Recurring Fair Value Measures table above include OTC unrealized values related to swaps, forwards and options, as well as open listed exchange transactions. However, exchange transactions, which are cash settled during the life of the transaction, are classified as part of Trading-related Receivables and Deposits, Net on the Consolidated Balance Sheets. The following table provides a reconciliation of these balances as of June 30, 2007.




24






 

 

As of June 30, 2007

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

Assets

 

 

Liabilities

Derivative trading instruments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Per Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

$

3,197

 

 

$

2,243

 

Unrealized revenues for exchange contracts

 

 

562

 

 

 

134

 

Per Recurring Fair Value Measures Table

 

$

3,759

 

 

$

2,377

 


The Recurring Fair Value Measures table above does not include certain commodity trading inventories which are carried on a lower-of-cost-or-market basis. The table does include a portion of commodity trading inventories for which fair value hedge accounting is applied.


(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

As of June 30, 2007

Commodities owned:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Per Consolidated Balance Sheets

 

 

 

$

1,763

 

Less: Commodities owned, recorded at lower-of-cost-or-market

 

 

 

 

(118

)

Per Recurring Fair Value Measures Table

 

 

 

$

1,645

 


The determination of the fair values above incorporates various factors required under SFAS 157. These factors include not only the credit standing of the counterparties involved and the impact of credit enhancements (such as cash deposits, letters of credit and priority interests), but also the impact of the company’s nonperformance risk on its liabilities.


Trading derivatives and commodity trading inventories reflect positions held by Sempra Commodities. Trading derivatives include exchange-traded derivative contracts and OTC derivative contracts. Exchange-traded derivative contracts, which include futures and exchange-traded options, are generally based on unadjusted quoted prices in active markets and are classified within level 1. In addition, certain OTC-cleared options and swap contracts are included in level 1, as the fair values of these items are based on unadjusted quoted prices in active markets. Some exchange-traded derivatives are valued using broker or dealer quotations, or market transactions in either the listed or OTC markets. In such cases, these exchange-traded derivatives are classified within level 2. OTC derivative trading instruments include swaps, forwards, options and complex structures that are valued at fair value and may be offset with similar positions in exchange-traded markets. In certain instances, these instruments may utilize models to measure fair value. Generally, the company uses a similar model to value similar instruments. Valuation models utilize various inputs which include quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active, other observable inputs for the asset or liability, and market-corroborated inputs, i.e. inputs derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data by correlation or other means. Where observable inputs are available for substantially the full term of the asset or liability, the instrument is categorized in level 2. Certain OTC derivatives trade in less active markets with a lower availability of pricing information. In addition, complex or structured transactions can introduce the need for internally-developed model inputs which might not be observable in or corroborated by the market. When such inputs have a significant impact on the measurement of fair value, the instrument is categorized in level 3.


Nuclear decommissioning trusts reflect the assets of SDG&E's nuclear decommissioning trusts, excluding cash balances, as discussed in Note 6 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the Annual Report. Other derivatives include commodity derivative positions entered into primarily by the Sempra Utilities to manage customer price exposures, as well as interest-rate management instruments. Other assets represent dedicated assets in support of the company’s Supplemental Executive Retirement Plan, included in Sundry assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheets, and marketable securities.




25



The following table sets forth a reconciliation of changes in the fair value of net trading derivatives classified as level 3 in the fair value hierarchy.


(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30, 2007

Balance as of January 1, 2007

 

 

 

 

 

$

519

 

 

Realized and unrealized gains (losses)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(156

)

 

Purchases, issuances and settlements

 

 

 

 

 

 

108

 

 

Transfers in and/or out of level 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

--

 

Balance as of June 30, 2007

 

 

 

 

 

$

471

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Change in unrealized gains (losses) relating to

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

instruments still held as of June 30, 2007

 

 

 

 

 

$

77

 


Gains and losses (realized and unrealized) for level 3 recurring items are included in Operating Revenues for Sempra Global and Parent on the Statements of Consolidated Income. The company believes an analysis of instruments classified as level 3 should be undertaken with the understanding that these items are generally economically hedged as a portfolio with instruments that may be classified in levels 1 and 2. Accordingly, gains or losses associated with level 3 balances may not necessarily reflect trends occurring in the underlying business. Further, unrealized gains and losses for the period from level 3 items are often offset by unrealized gains and losses on positions classified in level 1 or 2, as well as positions that have been realized during the quarter.


Transfers in and/or out represent existing assets or liabilities that were either previously categorized as a higher level for which the inputs to the model became unobservable or assets and liabilities that were previously classified as level 3 for which the lowest significant input became observable during the period. There were no transfers in or out of level 3 during the period.


The following table sets forth by level within the fair value hierarchy the company's financial assets and liabilities that were accounted for at fair value on a nonrecurring basis as of June 30, 2007. The fair value measures classified as level 3 are calculated based on discounted expected future cash flows.


Nonrecurring Fair Value Measures

 

At fair value as of June 30, 2007

 

(Dollars in millions)

 

Level 1

 

 

 

Level 2

 

 

 

Level 3

 

 

 

Total

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OMEC*

 

$

--

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

155

 

 

$

163

 

 

Equity method investment**

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

32

 

 

 

32

 

 

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

187

 

 

$

195

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OMEC*

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

28

 

 

$

28

 

 

Asset retirement obligations***

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

45

 

 

 

45

 

 

Total

 

$

--

 

 

$

--

 

 

$

73

 

 

$

73

 


 * Consolidation of OMEC LLC as discussed in Note 3.

  ** Stock received from equity method investment in exchange for services rendered.

*** Update to SONGS decommissioning and other costs as discussed in Note 6.




26



NOTE 9. SEMPRA UTILITIES' REGULATORY MATTERS


Power Procurement and Resource Planning


Otay Mesa Energy Center


In October 2006, SDG&E, Calpine Corporation (Calpine), OMEC LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Calpine, and other Calpine affiliates, entered into an agreement, approved in September 2006 by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), for SDG&E to purchase all of the power produced from OMEC, a 573-MW generating facility to be constructed by OMEC LLC in the Otay Mesa area of SDG&E's service territory, with SDG&E supplying all of the natural gas to fuel the power plant. The agreement provides SDG&E the option to purchase the plant at the end of the contract term in 2019, or upon earlier termination of the purchase power agreement, at a predetermined price subject to adjustments based on performance of the facility. If SDG&E does not exercise its option, OMEC LLC has the right, under certain circumstances, to require SDG&E to purchase the plant at a predetermined price. The CPUC also approved an additional financial return to SDG&E to compensate it for the effect on its financial ratios from the requirement to consolidate OMEC LLC in accordance with FIN 46(R), as discussed in Note 3. Remaining conditions precedent in the agreement were favorably resolved in the second quarter of 2007. OMEC is expected to be in commercial operation by mid-2009, and annual capacity payments by SDG&E are estimated to be $70 million.


Sunrise Powerlink


In December 2005, SDG&E filed an application with the CPUC, amended in August 2006, proposing the construction of the Sunrise Powerlink, a 500-kV transmission line between the San Diego region and the Imperial Valley that is estimated to cost $1.3 billion and be able to deliver 1,000 MW by mid-2010. SDG&E and the Imperial Irrigation District (IID) have entered into a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to build the project, subject to the negotiation of a definitive agreement. If the IID participates in the project in accordance with the MOA, SDG&E's share of the project is estimated to be $1 billion.


During 2006, SDG&E reached several milestones, including the California Independent System Operator's (ISO) Board of Governors finding the project necessary to meet the demand for electricity in the region, the CPUC's Energy Division deeming the application complete and the company sponsoring public participation hearings on the project. The company submitted supplemental filings on July 20 and 25, 2007, with updated information. The ALJ is expected to rule shortly on a schedule for completion of the Phase I hearings.


Phase II of the hearings is expected to address environmental issues associated with the project, including alternative route proposals. Prior to Phase II, the CPUC is expected to issue a draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and Environmental Impact Study (EIS) for public comment and hold additional public participation hearings. This report, originally scheduled to be issued in August 2007, is now expected in January 2008. A final EIR/EIS is now scheduled to be issued by June 2008.


Given this revised timeline, the Sunrise Powerlink transmission line, if approved by the CPUC, will not be operational by the mid-2010 target date estimated in the company's original filing.


Renewable Energy


California Senate Bill 107 (SB 107), enacted in September 2006, requires California's investor-owned utilities (IOUs), including SDG&E, to achieve a 20-percent renewable energy portfolio by 2010.




27



SDG&E presently has executed renewable energy contracts to supply approximately 13 percent of its projected retail demand by the end of 2010, however, the deliverability of a substantial portion of these supplies is dependent upon SDG&E's proposed Sunrise Powerlink transmission line being approved and operational.


As a result of the revised Sunrise Powerlink EIR/EIS timeline, as discussed above, the Sunrise Powerlink transmission line, if approved, will not be in operation by mid-2010. In addition to the availability of adequate transmission infrastructure, SDG&E's ability to meet the requirements of SB 107 are highly dependent upon many other factors, including timely governmental approvals of contracted renewable energy projects, the renewable project developers' ability to obtain project financing, and successful development and implementation of the renewable energy technologies.


Consequently, SDG&E believes it is unlikely that it will be able to deliver 20 percent of its projected retail demand from renewable energy sources by the end of 2010. Subject to flexible compliance measures to be implemented by the CPUC as required by SB 107, SDG&E's failure to attain the 20-percent goal in 2010, or in any subsequent year, could subject it to a CPUC-imposed penalty of 5 cents per kilowatt hour of renewable energy under-delivery up to a maximum penalty of $25 million per year. SDG&E cannot determine if it will be subject to a penalty and believes the conditions under which any penalty would be applied would be subject to the flexible compliance measures and the CPUC's review of the circumstances for under-delivery.


Greenhouse Gas Regulation


Additional legislation was enacted in 2006, including Assembly Bill 32 and Senate Bill 1368 (SB 1368), mandating cuts in greenhouse gas emissions, which could affect costs and growth at the Sempra Utilities and at Sempra Generation's power plants. Any cost impact at the Sempra Utilities is expected to be recoverable through rates. The CPUC's adoption of an interim Greenhouse Gas Emissions Performance Standard in January 2007 implements SB 1368 by prohibiting IOUs from entering into new, or renewing existing, long-term (five years or longer) contracts for electricity from base-loaded sources that emit more carbon dioxide than a modern natural gas plant (1,100 pounds of carbon dioxide per MW-hour).


Long-term Procurement Plan


SDG&E filed its long-term procurement plan (LTPP) with the CPUC in December 2006, including a ten-year energy resource plan that details its expected portfolio of energy resources over the planning horizon of 2007 - 2016. The LTPP incorporates the renewable energy and greenhouse gas emissions performance standards established by the CPUC and by SB 107 and SB 1368. SDG&E's LTPP identifies, among other details, the need for additional generation resources beginning in 2010, including a baseload plant in 2012. The LTPP also indicates that SDG&E has an option to acquire in 2011, at net book value on the date of acquisition, the El Dorado power plant, a 480-MW generating facility owned by Sempra Generation. A CPUC decision on the LTPP is expected to be issued by the end of 2007.


Electric Transmission Formula Rate


On May 18, 2007, the FERC authorized an increase of 9.5 percent for SDG&E's annual electric transmission revenues effective July 1, 2007. This equates to an estimated annualized revenue increase in 2008 of $18 million in excess of the prior authorized amount. SDG&E will recover its annual transmission cost of service at a return on equity (ROE) of 11.35 percent, an increase from the current authorized ROE of 11.25 percent, and renew SDG&E's annual transmission formula rate, with only slight modifications from the current formula, for six years from July 1, 2007 through August 31, 2013.




28



General Rate Case


In April 2007, SoCalGas and SDG&E each filed an amendment to their original 2008 General Rate Case applications (2008 GRC) as filed in December 2006 with the CPUC. The 2008 GRC applications, as amended, establish the authorized margin requirements and the ratemaking mechanisms by which those margin requirements would change annually effective in 2008 through 2013 (2008 GRC rate period). The amended 2008 GRC requests represent increases in SoCalGas’ and SDG&E’s annual authorized margin of $133 million and $230 million, respectively, as compared to 2007 authorized margins. As part of the General Rate Case process, applications are subject to review and testimony by various groups representing the interests of ratepayers and other constituents. In early July 2007, the CPUC’s Division of Ratepayer Advocates (DRA) submitted testimony to the CPUC proposing, among other things, reductions to SoCalGas’ and SDG&E’s requested margin requirements by $201 million and $145 million, respectively. In addition, the DRA proposed a 5-year term as the applicable 2008 GRC rate period as compared to the 6-year term proposed by the Sempra Utilities. Testimony submitted to the CPUC by certain other advocacy groups proposes, among other things, additional reductions in the requested margin requirements beyond those proposed by the DRA.


On July 20, 2007, both SoCalGas and SDG&E submitted rebuttal testimony to the CPUC responding to the DRA's and other advocacy groups’ testimonies. Public hearings on the 2008 GRCs are now scheduled to be held in early August 2007 and are expected to last up to three weeks. A final decision is expected early in 2008, with an effective date retroactive to January 1, 2008.


Cost of Capital Proceeding


SDG&E filed an application with the CPUC in May 2007 seeking to update its cost of capital, authorized ROE and debt/equity ratios. SDG&E is requesting, among other things, an 11.60 percent ROE (compared to its current ROE of 10.70 percent), to be effective in 2008. SDG&E also seeks to maintain its current capital structure of 49 percent common equity, 5.75 percent preferred stock and 45.25 percent debt. Evidentiary hearings are scheduled to begin in August 2007, with a final CPUC decision expected by the end of 2007.


Utility Ratemaking Incentive Awards

 

Performance-Based Regulation (PBR), demand-side management and Gas Cost Incentive Mechanism (GCIM) awards are not included in the company's earnings until CPUC approval of each award is received.


In May 2007, the CPUC approved SDG&E's Gas PBR Year 13 activities and the resulting $2 million shareholder award, recognized in earnings in the second quarter of 2007. In July 2007, SDG&E received approval of its 2006 Operational PBR shareholder award of $9 million, which will be included in the company's earnings in the third quarter of 2007.


In 2006, the DRA recommended approval of SoCalGas' GCIM Year 12 application requesting a shareholder award of $10 million. A final CPUC decision is expected in the third quarter of 2007. SoCalGas filed its GCIM Year 13 application on June 15, 2007, seeking a $9 million shareholder reward. A final CPUC decision is expected in the latter part of 2008. In July 2007, SoCalGas received approval of its 2006 Operational PBR shareholder award of $1 million, which will be included in the company's earnings in the third quarter of 2007.




29



NOTE 10. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES


Legal Proceedings


At June 30, 2007, the company's reserves for litigation matters were $623 million, of which $523 million related to settlements reached in January 2006 to resolve certain litigation arising out of the 2000 - 2001 California energy crisis. The uncertainties inherent in complex legal proceedings make it difficult to estimate with any degree of certainty the costs and effects of resolving legal matters. Accordingly, costs ultimately incurred may differ materially from estimated costs and could materially adversely affect the company's business, cash flows, results of operations and financial condition.


Continental Forge Settlement


The litigation that is the subject of the January 2006 settlements is frequently referred to as the Continental Forge litigation, although the settlements also include other cases. The Continental Forge class-action and individual antitrust and unfair competition lawsuits in California and Nevada alleged that Sempra Energy and the Sempra Utilities unlawfully sought to control natural gas and electricity markets and claimed damages in excess of $23 billion after applicable trebling.


The San Diego County Superior Court entered a final order approving the settlement of the Continental Forge class-action litigation as fair and reasonable in July 2006. The California Attorney General, the Department of Water Resources (DWR), the Utility Consumers Action Network and one class member have filed notices of appeal of the final order. The Nevada Clark County District Court entered an order approving the Nevada class-action settlement in September 2006. Both the California and Nevada settlements must be approved for either settlement to take effect, but the company is permitted to waive this condition. The settlements are not conditioned upon approval by the CPUC, the DWR, or any other governmental or regulatory agency to be effective.


To settle the California and Nevada litigation, the company agreed to make cash payments in installments aggregating $377 million, of which $347 million relates to the Continental Forge and California class action price reporting litigation and $30 million relates to the Nevada antitrust litigation. The Los Angeles City Council had not previously voted to approve the City of Los Angeles' participation in the January 2006 California settlement. On March 26, 2007, Sempra Energy and the Sempra Utilities entered into a separate settlement agreement with the City of Los Angeles resolving all of its claims in the Continental Forge litigation in return for the payment of $8.5 million on April 25, 2007. This payment was made in lieu of the $12 million payable in eight annual installments that the City of Los Angeles was to receive as part of the January 2006 California settlement.


Additional consideration for the January 2006 California settlement includes an agreement that Sempra LNG would sell to the Sempra Utilities, subject to CPUC approval, regasified LNG from its LNG terminal being constructed in Baja California, Mexico, for a period of 18 years at the California border index price minus $0.02 per MMBtu. The Sempra Utilities agreed to seek approval from the CPUC to integrate their natural gas transmission facilities and to develop both firm, tradable natural gas receipt point rights for access to their combined intrastate transmission system and SoCalGas' underground natural gas storage system and filed for approval at the CPUC in July 2006. In addition, Sempra Generation voluntarily would reduce the price that it charges for power and limit the places at which it would deliver power under its contract with the DWR. Based on the expected contractual volumes of power to be delivered, this discount would have potential value aggregating $300 million over the contract's then remaining six-year term. As a result of recording the price discount of the DWR contract in 2005, subsequent earnings reported on the DWR contract reflect original rather than discounted power prices. The price reductions would be offset by any amounts in excess of a $150 million threshold up to



30



the full amount of the price reduction that Sempra Generation is ordered to pay or incurs as a monetary award, any reduction in future revenues or profits, or any increase in future costs in connection with arbitration proceedings involving the DWR contract.


Under the terms of the January 2006 California settlement, $83 million was paid in August 2006 and an additional $83 million will be paid in August 2007. Of the remaining amounts, $25.8 million is to be paid on the closing date of the January 2006 settlements, which will take place after the resolution of all appeals, and $24.8 million will be paid on each successive anniversary of the closing date through the seventh anniversary of the closing date, as adjusted for the City of Los Angeles settlement. Under the terms of the City of Los Angeles settlement, $8.5 million was paid on April 25, 2007. The reserves recorded for the California and Nevada settlements in 2005 fully provide for the present value of both the cash amounts to be paid in the settlements and the price discount to be provided on electricity to be delivered under the DWR contract. A portion of the reserves was discounted at 7 percent, the rate specified for prepayments in the settlement agreement. For payments not addressed in the agreement and for periods from the settlement date through the estimated date of the first payment, 5 percent was used to approximate the company’s average cost of financing.


DWR Contract


The DWR commenced an arbitration proceeding in February 2004 against Sempra Generation with respect to the contract under which Sempra Generation sells electricity to the DWR. The DWR disputed a portion of Sempra Generation's billings and its manner of delivering electricity, and sought rescission of the contract, which expires by its terms in 2011.


The arbitration panel issued its decision in April 2006. It declined to rescind the contract and ruled against the DWR on its most significant claims, but did rule in favor of the DWR on certain contractual issues. Sempra Generation recorded an additional $25 million pretax charge in the first quarter of 2006 in addition to its existing reserve of $48 million. The arbitration panel's ruling is final and binding upon both the DWR and Sempra Generation with respect to the issues that were the subject of the arbitration. The $73 million was paid in the second quarter of 2006.


In February 2006, the DWR commenced additional arbitration against Sempra Generation relating to the manner in which Sempra Generation schedules its Mexicali plant. The DWR seeks $100 million in damages and an order terminating the contract. On July 17, 2007, the arbitration panel issued an order finding that the claims asserted by the DWR in the arbitration were subject to the FERC's exclusive jurisdiction, and staying the matter until any proceedings filed by the DWR at the FERC are final.


In 2002, Sempra Generation and the DWR commenced litigation in a state civil action in which the DWR sought to void its contract with Sempra Generation, seeking damages, injunctive and declaratory relief and $100 million in punitive damages, alleging that the company misrepresented its intention and ability to construct a temporary phase of one power project and, alternatively, breached its contract by failure to construct and deliver power from that phase. Although Sempra Generation was initially awarded summary judgment on all claims, in June 2005, the California Court of Appeal reversed the summary judgment decision, concluding that the contract language was ambiguous and presented triable issues of material fact that must be addressed by further evidence and proceedings. The case was remanded to the trial court. In January 2007, the DWR added additional claims for fraud and breach of contract. The company believes that the DWR's claims must be arbitrated, and has appealed the trial court's denial of its motion to compel arbitration to the California Court of Appeal.


The California Energy Oversight Board, the CPUC and others filed petitions appealing 2003 FERC orders upholding the DWR's contracts with Sempra Generation and other power suppliers under the Mobile-



31



Sierra doctrine's "public interest" standard of review. In December 2006, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals) granted the appeals and remanded the cases back to the FERC for additional proceedings consistent with the court's rulings. In particular, the court instructed the FERC to reconsider the appropriate standard to apply in its review of the contracts, and consider applying a more rigorous review upon remand. In May 2007, Sempra Generation and other power suppliers petitioned the United States Supreme Court to review the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals' decision.


Other Natural Gas Cases


In April 2003, Sierra Pacific Resources and its utility subsidiary Nevada Power filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court in Nevada against major natural gas suppliers, including Sempra Energy, the Sempra Utilities and Sempra Commodities, seeking recovery of damages alleged to aggregate in excess of $150 million (before trebling). The lawsuit alleged a conspiracy to eliminate competition, prevent the construction of natural gas pipelines to serve Nevada and other Western states, and to manipulate natural gas pipeline capacity and supply and the data provided to price indices, as well as breach of contract. The U.S. District Court dismissed the case in November 2004, determining that the FERC had exclusive jurisdiction to resolve the claims. After oral argument in February 2007, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals took plaintiffs' appeal under submission.


Apart from the claims settled in connection with the Continental Forge settlement, there remain pending 13 state antitrust actions that have been coordinated in San Diego Superior Court against Sempra Energy, the Sempra Utilities and Sempra Commodities and other, unrelated energy companies, alleging that energy prices were unlawfully manipulated by the reporting of artificially inflated natural gas prices to trade publications and by entering into wash trades and churning transactions. On July 11, 2007, the Superior Court stayed both the entire proceeding against all defendants on federal preemption and filed rate grounds pending the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals' decision in the Sierra Pacific case described above and the portion of the proceeding involving all but four of the 13 individual plaintiffs who brought actions against the company because they are class members in the Continental Forge settlement class described above.


Pending in federal court are five cases against Sempra Energy, Sempra Commodities, the Sempra Utilities and various other companies, which make similar allegations to those in the state proceedings, four of which also include conspiracy allegations similar to those made in the Continental Forge litigation. The Federal District Court dismissed four of these actions as preempted under federal law. The remaining case, which includes conspiracy allegations, has been stayed. In February 2007, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals heard oral argument and took plaintiffs' appeals under submission.


Electricity Cases


Various antitrust lawsuits, which seek class-action certification, allege that numerous entities, including Sempra Energy and certain subsidiaries (SDG&E, Sempra Commodities and Sempra Generation, depending on the lawsuit), that participated in the wholesale electricity markets unlawfully manipulated those markets. Collectively, these lawsuits allege damages against all defendants (including Sempra Energy and its named subsidiaries) in an aggregate amount in excess of $16 billion (before trebling). In January 2003, the federal court dismissed one of these lawsuits, filed by the Snohomish County, Washington Public Utility District, on the grounds that the claims were subject to the filed rate doctrine and preempted by the Federal Power Act. In September 2004, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the district court's ruling and in June 2005, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to review the decision. The company believes that this decision serves as a precedent for the dismissal of all other lawsuits against the Sempra Energy companies claiming manipulation of the electricity markets.




32



In May and June 2004, two similar lawsuits were filed in Washington and Oregon U.S. District Courts. These cases were transferred to the San Diego U.S. District Court and dismissed in February 2005. After oral argument on April 10, 2007, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals took plaintiffs' appeals under submission.

 

In November 2006, the San Diego U.S. District Court dismissed a lawsuit filed by the California Attorney General in November 2005 against Sempra Commodities alleging illegal market-gaming activities during the California energy crisis and claiming unspecified civil penalties and damages. The court ruled that only the FERC has the authority to regulate wholesale energy markets. The court also declined to remand the case to state court. The FERC has previously investigated and entered into settlements with numerous energy trading companies, including Sempra Commodities, regarding similar allegations. The California Attorney General has appealed the dismissal.


FERC Refund Proceedings


The FERC is investigating prices charged to buyers in the California Power Exchange (PX) and ISO markets by various electric suppliers. In December 2002, a FERC Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) issued preliminary findings indicating that the PX and ISO owe power suppliers $1.2 billion for the October 2, 2000 through June 20, 2001 period (the $3.0 billion that the California PX and ISO still owe energy companies less $1.8 billion that the energy companies charged California customers in excess of the preliminarily determined competitive market clearing prices). In March 2003, the FERC adopted its ALJ's findings, but changed the calculation of the refund by basing it on a different estimate of natural gas prices, which would increase the refund obligations from $1.8 billion to more than $3 billion for the same time period.


Various parties appealed the FERC's order to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. In August 2006, the Court of Appeals held that the FERC had properly established October 2, 2000 through June 20, 2001 as the refund period and had properly excluded certain bilateral transactions between sellers and the DWR from the refund proceedings. However, the court also held that the FERC erred in excluding certain multi-day transactions from the refund proceedings. Finally, while the court upheld the FERC's decision not to extend the refund proceedings to the summer period (prior to October 2, 2000), it found that the FERC had erred in not considering other remedies, such as disgorgement of profits, for tariff violations that are alleged to have occurred prior to October 2, 2000. The Court of Appeals remanded the matter to the FERC for further proceedings.


Sempra Commodities previously established reserves for its estimated refund liability that were adjusted during 2004 and 2005 to reflect, among other things, the estimated effect of the FERC's revision of the benchmark prices it will use to calculate refunds, and Sempra Generation recorded its share of the 2004 and 2005 amounts related to its transactions with Sempra Commodities.


SDG&E has been awarded $159 million through June 30, 2007, in settlement of certain claims against electricity suppliers related to the 2000 - 2001 California energy crisis. The net proceeds of these settlements are for the benefit of ratepayers and for the payment of third party fees associated with the recovery of these claims. Of that amount, all monies have been received by SDG&E except for $12 million related to settlements which have been approved by the FERC and are pending disbursement of funds in the third quarter of 2007.


In a separate complaint filed with the FERC in 2002, the California Attorney General challenged the FERC's authority to establish a market-based rate regime, and further contended that, even if such a regime were valid, electricity sellers had failed to comply with the FERC's quarterly reporting requirements. The Attorney General requested that the FERC order refunds from suppliers. The FERC



33



dismissed the complaint and instead ordered sellers to restate their reports. After an appeal by the California Attorney General, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the FERC's authority to establish a market-based rate regime, but ordered remand of the case to the FERC for further proceedings, stating that failure to file transaction-specific quarterly reports gave the FERC authority to order refunds with respect to jurisdictional sellers. In December 2006, a group of sellers petitioned the United States Supreme Court to review the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals' decision. In June 2007, the Supreme Court declined further review of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals' order. On remand, it is possible that the FERC could order refunds or disgorgement of profits for periods in addition to those covered by its prior refund orders and substantially increase the refunds that ultimately may be required to be paid by Sempra Commodities and other power suppliers.


At June 30, 2007, Sempra Commodities is owed approximately $100 million from energy sales made in 2000 and 2001 through the ISO and the PX markets. The collection of these receivables depends on several factors, including the FERC refund case. The company believes adequate reserves have been recorded.


FERC Manipulation Investigation


The FERC is separately investigating whether there was manipulation of short-term energy markets in the western United States that would constitute violations of applicable tariffs and warrant disgorgement of associated profits. In this proceeding, the FERC's authority is not confined to the periods relevant to the refund proceeding. In May 2002, the FERC ordered all energy companies engaged in electric energy trading activities to state whether they had engaged in various specific trading activities in violation of the PX and ISO tariffs.


In June 2003, the FERC issued several orders requiring various entities to show cause why they should not be found to have violated California ISO and PX tariffs. The FERC directed a number of entities, including Sempra Commodities, to show cause why they should not disgorge profits from certain transactions between January 1, 2000 and June 20, 2001 that are asserted to have constituted gaming and/or anomalous market behavior under the California ISO and/or PX tariffs. In October 2003, Sempra Commodities agreed to pay $7.2 million in full resolution of these investigations. That liability was recorded as of December 31, 2003. The Sempra Commodities settlement was approved by the FERC in August 2004. Certain California parties have sought rehearing on this order and the FERC has not yet responded.


Other Litigation


The company and several subsidiaries, along with three oil and natural gas companies, the City of Beverly Hills and the Beverly Hills Unified School District, are defendants in a toxic tort lawsuit filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court by approximately 1,000 plaintiffs claiming that various emissions resulted in cancer or fear of cancer. The company has submitted the case to its insurers, who have reserved their rights with respect to coverage. In November 2006, the court granted the defendants' summary judgment motions based on lack of medical causation for the 12 initial plaintiffs scheduled to go to trial first. The court also granted the company's separate summary judgment motion on punitive damages. Plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal on March 29, 2007. The court has stayed the case as to the remaining plaintiffs pending the appeal.


In 1998, Sempra Energy and the Sempra Utilities converted their traditional pension plans (other than the SoCalGas union employee plan) to cash balance plans. In July 2005, a lawsuit was filed against SoCalGas in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California alleging that the conversion unlawfully discriminated against older employees and failed to provide required disclosure of a reduction in benefits.



34



In October 2005, the court dismissed three of the four causes of action and, in March 2006, dismissed the remaining cause of action. The plaintiffs have appealed the court's ruling. The matter has been fully briefed at the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, but oral argument has not been scheduled.


Argentine Investments


On July 19, 2007, the tribunal officially closed arbitration proceedings under the 1994 Bilateral Investment Treaty between the United States and Argentina for recovery of the diminution of the value of Sempra Pipelines & Storage's investments that has resulted from Argentine governmental actions. A ruling is due within 120 days, subject to a 60-day extension. Additional information regarding this investment is provided in Note 3 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the Annual Report.


Environmental Matters


SoCalGas increased its environmental-related liabilities in the first quarter of 2007 by $18 million, $16 million of which is expected to be recoverable through rates, to reflect a change in estimate of expected cleanup costs at a former manufactured-gas plant site. Expected cleanup costs have risen due to increasingly stringent regulations by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control and due to technical challenges involved in excavating and removing contaminated soil while keeping existing businesses open.


Nuclear Insurance


SDG&E and the other owners of SONGS have insurance to respond to nuclear liability claims related to SONGS. The insurance provides coverage of $300 million, the maximum amount available. In addition, the Price-Anderson Act provides for up to $10.5 billion of secondary financial protection. Should any of the licensed/commercial reactors in the United States experience a nuclear liability loss which exceeds the $300 million insurance limit, all utilities owning nuclear reactors could be assessed to provide the secondary financial protection. SDG&E's total share would be up to $40 million, subject to an annual maximum assessment of $6 million, unless a default were to occur by any other SONGS owner. In the event the secondary financial protection limit were insufficient to cover the liability loss, SDG&E could be subject to an additional assessment.


SDG&E and the other owners of SONGS have $2.75 billion of nuclear property, decontamination and debris removal insurance and up to $490 million for outage expenses and replacement power costs incurred because of accidental property damage. This coverage is limited to $3.5 million per week for the first 52 weeks and $2.8 million per week for up to 110 additional weeks, after a waiting period of 12 weeks. The insurance is provided through a mutual insurance company, through which insured members are subject to retrospective premium assessments (up to $8.6 million in SDG&E's case).


The nuclear liability and property insurance programs subscribed to by members of the nuclear power generating industry include industry aggregate limits for non-certified acts (as defined by the Terrorism Risk Insurance Act) of terrorism-related SONGS losses, including replacement power costs. There are industry aggregate limits of $300 million for liability claims and $3.24 billion for property claims, including replacement power costs, for non-certified acts of terrorism. These limits are the maximum amount to be paid to members who sustain losses or damages from these non-certified terrorist acts. For certified acts of terrorism, the individual policy limits stated above apply.




35



NOTE 11. SUBSEQUENT EVENT


On July 9, 2007, the company and The Royal Bank of Scotland plc (RBS) entered into an agreement to form a partnership, RBS Sempra Commodities LLP (RBS Sempra Commodities), to purchase and operate Sempra Energy’s commodity-marketing businesses, which generally comprise the Sempra Commodities segment.


RBS Sempra Commodities will be formed as a United Kingdom limited liability partnership in which Sempra Energy and RBS will make initial equity investments of $1.3 billion and $1.355 billion, respectively. The partnership concurrently will purchase Sempra Energy’s commodity-marketing subsidiaries at a price (after deducting certain expenses to be paid by Sempra Energy in terminating pre-existing contractual arrangements) equal to their book value computed on the basis of international financial reporting standards (IFRS). RBS will provide any additional funding required for the ongoing operating expenses of the partnership’s businesses. RBS will also provide all growth capital, credit and liquidity for the partnership, replacing the trading guarantees and credit support currently maintained for these businesses by the company.


Sempra Energy and RBS intend that RBS Sempra Commodities will distribute all of its net income on an annual basis, although the distributions are within the discretion of the board of directors of the partnership. Subject to certain limited exceptions, partnership pretax income, calculated in accordance with IFRS, will be allocated as follows:


·

Sempra Energy will receive a preferred 15-percent return on its adjusted equity capital (initially, $1.3 billion);

·

RBS will receive a preferred 15-percent return on any capital in excess of capital attributable to Sempra Energy that is required by the U.K. Financial Services Authority (the FSA) to be maintained by RBS in respect of the operations of the partnership;

·

Sempra Energy will receive 70 percent of the next $500 million in pretax income, with RBS receiving the remaining 30 percent; and

·

Sempra Energy will receive 30 percent, and RBS 70 percent, of any remaining pretax income.


Any losses of the partnership would be shared equally between Sempra Energy and RBS.


RBS Sempra Commodities will initially be governed by a board of seven directors, three appointed by Sempra Energy and four by RBS. The consent of Sempra Energy will be required before the partnership may take certain significant actions, including materially changing the scope of the partnership’s businesses, issuing credit support outside the ordinary course, incurring certain types of indebtedness and entering into agreements of significant size or duration.


The closing is expected to occur prior to the end of 2007, and either RBS or Sempra Energy may unilaterally terminate the agreement if the closing does not occur by June 30, 2008. The closing is subject to customary closing conditions and the approval of regulatory authorities including the FSA, the U.S. Federal Reserve Board and the FERC. Sempra Energy will indemnify the partnership for liabilities in respect of certain litigation and taxes relating to the businesses to be purchased by the partnership.


After closing the transaction, the company will account for its investment in the partnership under the equity method, and the company's share of partnership earnings will be reported in the Sempra Commodities segment. The company's initial investment in the partnership will be $1.3 billion. The company will not be required to invest additional capital in the partnership beyond its initial capital investment of $1.3 billion although, in limited cases, earnings allocable to the company may be retained



36



by the partnership to replenish capital depleted through losses. However, the company will be permitted to provide additional capital of up to $200 million to the partnership, and RBS will have the right to contribute additional capital on an equal basis, to the extent that capital required by the FSA to be maintained by RBS in respect of the partnership exceeds $2.45 billion.


Financial information for the Sempra Commodities segment, which generally comprises the company's commodity-marketing businesses, is as follows at June 30, 2007 and for the six months then ended (in millions):


Operating revenues

$1,222

Net income

226

Assets

8,962

Liabilities

6,572



NOTE 12. SEGMENT INFORMATION


The company is a holding company, whose subsidiaries are primarily engaged in the energy business. It has five separately managed reportable segments (SoCalGas, SDG&E, Sempra Commodities, Sempra Generation and Sempra Pipelines & Storage), which are described in the Annual Report. The “all other” amounts consist primarily of parent organizations and Sempra LNG.


The accounting policies of the segments are described in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the Annual Report. Segment performance is evaluated by management based on reported net income. Sempra Utility transactions are based on rates set by the CPUC and the FERC.


The operations that were discontinued in the first half of 2006, as discussed in Note 5, were in the Sempra Generation segment, with the exception of Bangor Gas and Frontier Energy, which were in the Sempra Pipelines & Storage segment. The following tables exclude amounts from discontinued operations, unless otherwise noted.



37




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three months ended June 30,

 

Six months ended June 30,

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

OPERATING REVENUES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SoCalGas

 

 

$

981

 

 

37

%

 

$

908

 

 

36

%

 

$

2,349

 

 

41

%

 

$

2,333

 

 

40

%

 

SDG&E

 

 

 

659

 

 

25

 

 

 

664

 

 

27

 

 

 

1,368

 

 

24

 

 

 

1,386

 

 

24

 

 

Sempra Commodities

 

 

 

710

 

 

27

 

 

 

614

 

 

25

 

 

 

1,222

 

 

22

 

 

 

1,394

 

 

24

 

 

Sempra Generation

 

 

 

277

 

 

10

 

 

 

257

 

 

10

 

 

 

674

 

 

12

 

 

 

653

 

 

11

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

 

84

 

 

3

 

 

 

72

 

 

3

 

 

 

161

 

 

3

 

 

 

148

 

 

3

 

 

Adjustments and eliminations

(31

)

 

(1

)

 

 

(25

)

 

(1

)

 

 

(73

)

 

(1

)

 

 

(50

)

 

(1

)

 

Intersegment revenues

 

 

 

(19

)

 

(1

)

 

 

(4

)

 

--

 

 

 

(36

)

 

(1

)

 

 

(42

)

 

(1

)

 

Total

 

 

$

2,661

 

 

100

%

 

$

2,486

 

 

100

%

 

$

5,665

 

 

100

%

 

$

5,822

 

 

100

%

INTEREST EXPENSE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SoCalGas

 

 

$

17

 

 

 

 

 

$

16

 

 

 

 

 

$

35

 

 

 

 

 

$

34

 

 

 

 

 

SDG&E

 

 

 

23

 

 

 

 

 

 

24

 

 

 

 

 

 

47

 

 

 

 

 

 

46

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Commodities

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

 

 

 

 

 

 

33

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Generation

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1

)

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

All other

 

 

 

53

 

 

 

 

 

 

93

 

 

 

 

 

 

109

 

 

 

 

 

 

147

 

 

 

 

 

Intercompany eliminations

 

 

 

(43

)

 

 

 

 

 

(66

)

 

 

 

 

 

(87

)

 

 

 

 

 

(93

)

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

$

66

 

 

 

 

 

$

87

 

 

 

 

 

$

136

 

 

 

 

 

$

183

 

 

 

 

INTEREST INCOME

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SoCalGas

 

 

$

8

 

 

 

 

 

$

13

 

 

 

 

 

$

14

 

 

 

 

 

$

16

 

 

 

 

 

SDG&E

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

(8

)

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

(4

)

 

 

 

 

Sempra Commodities

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Generation

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

All other

 

 

 

39

 

 

 

 

 

 

79

 

 

 

 

 

 

82

 

 

 

 

 

 

106

 

 

 

 

 

Intercompany eliminations

 

 

 

(43

)

 

 

 

 

 

(66

)

 

 

 

 

 

(87

)

 

 

 

 

 

(93

)

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

24

 

 

 

 

 

$

25

 

 

 

 

 

$

50

 

 

 

 

 

$

39

 

 

 

 

DEPRECIATION AND AMORTIZATION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SoCalGas

 

 

$

70

 

 

41

%

 

$

67

 

 

39

%

 

$

139

 

 

41

%

 

$

133

 

 

40

%

 

SDG&E

 

 

 

75

 

 

44

 

 

 

80

 

 

47

 

 

 

150

 

 

44

 

 

 

147

 

 

45

 

 

Sempra Commodities

 

 

 

6

 

 

3

 

 

 

6

 

 

4

 

 

 

13

 

 

4

 

 

 

13

 

 

4

 

 

Sempra Generation

 

 

 

13

 

 

8

 

 

 

11

 

 

6

 

 

 

25

 

 

7

 

 

 

22

 

 

7

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

 

3

 

 

2

 

 

 

3

 

 

2

 

 

 

6

 

 

2

 

 

 

6

 

 

2

 

 

All other

 

 

 

4

 

 

2

 

 

 

4

 

 

2

 

 

 

7

 

 

2

 

 

 

7

 

 

2

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

171

 

 

100

%

 

$

171

 

 

100

%

 

$

340

 

 

100

%

 

$

328

 

 

100

%

INCOME TAX EXPENSE (BENEFIT)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SoCalGas

 

 

$

39

 

 

 

 

 

$

43

 

 

 

 

 

$

78

 

 

 

 

 

$

80

 

 

 

 

 

SDG&E

 

 

 

35

 

 

 

 

 

 

38

 

 

 

 

 

 

73

 

 

 

 

 

 

73

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Commodities

 

 

 

86

 

 

 

 

 

 

46

 

 

 

 

 

 

90

 

 

 

 

 

 

108

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Generation

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

 

 

 

44

 

 

 

 

 

 

34

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

 

(2

)

 

 

 

 

 

(12

)

 

 

 

 

 

(3

)

 

 

 

 

 

(9

)

 

 

 

 

All other

 

 

 

(20

)

 

 

 

 

 

(28

)

 

 

 

 

 

(76

)

 

 

 

 

 

(82

)

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

143

 

 

 

 

 

$

96

 

 

 

 

 

$

206

 

 

 

 

 

$

204

 

 

 

 

EQUITY IN EARNINGS (LOSSES) OF

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNCONSOLIDATED SUBSIDIARIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Earnings (losses) recorded before tax:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Generation

 

 

$

--

 

 

 

 

 

$

(11

)

 

 

 

 

$

(1

)

 

 

 

 

$

(10

)

 

 

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

 

(3

)

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

(3

)

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

All other

 

 

 

(3

)

 

 

 

 

 

(4

)

 

 

 

 

 

(8

)

 

 

 

 

 

(9

)

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

(6

)

 

 

 

 

$

(14

)

 

 

 

 

$

(12

)

 

 

 

 

$

(18

)

 

 

 

 

Earnings (losses) recorded net of tax:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

$

15

 

 

 

 

 

$

14

 

 

 

 

 

$

27

 

 

 

 

 

$

24

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Commodities

 

 

 

(6

)

 

 

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

9

 

 

 

 

 

$

14

 

 

 

 

 

$

67

 

 

 

 

 

$

24

 

 

 

 



38




 

 

 

Three months ended June 30,

 

Six months ended June 30,

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

2007

 

2006

 

2007

 

2006

NET INCOME (LOSS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SoCalGas *

 

 

$

54

 

 

19

%

 

$

58

 

 

16

%

 

$

109

 

 

22

%

 

$

107

 

 

17

%

 

SDG&E *

 

 

 

51

 

 

18

 

 

 

65

 

 

17

 

 

 

113

 

 

22

 

 

 

112

 

 

18

 

 

Sempra Commodities

 

 

 

155

 

 

56

 

 

 

69

 

 

18

 

 

 

226

 

 

45

 

 

 

185

 

 

29

 

 

Sempra Generation

 

 

 

10

 

 

4

 

 

 

16

 

 

4

 

 

 

64

 

 

13

 

 

 

57

 

 

9

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

 

17

 

 

6

 

 

 

28

 

 

8

 

 

 

33

 

 

6

 

 

 

39

 

 

6

 

 

Discontinued operations

 

 

 

(3

)

 

(1

)

 

 

188

 

 

50

 

 

 

(2

)

 

--

 

 

 

209

 

 

33

 

 

All other

 

 

 

(7

)

 

(2

)

 

 

(51

)

 

(13

)

 

 

(38

)

 

(8

)

 

 

(81

)

 

(12

)

 

 

Total

 

 

$

277

 

 

100

%

 

$

373

 

 

100

%

 

$

505

 

 

100

%

 

$

628

 

 

100

%


* after preferred dividends



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six months ended June 30,

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

2007

2006

CAPITAL EXPENDITURES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SoCalGas

 

 

$

191

 

 

 

22

%

 

$

193

 

 

 

22

%

 

SDG&E

 

 

 

305

 

 

 

34

 

 

 

723

 

 

 

81

 

 

Sempra Commodities

 

 

 

20

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

1

 

 

Sempra Generation

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

35

 

 

 

4

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

 

137

 

 

 

15

 

 

 

42

 

 

 

5

 

 

All other

 

 

 

232

 

 

 

26

 

 

 

353

 

 

 

39

 

 

Intercompany eliminations

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

(467

)

 

 

(52

)

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

$

889

 

 

 

100

%

 

$

893

 

 

 

100

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 30,

December 31,

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

2007

2006

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SoCalGas

 

 

$

6,516

 

 

 

23

%

 

$

6,359

 

 

 

22

%

 

SDG&E

 

 

 

8,042

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

7,795

 

 

 

27

 

 

Sempra Commodities

 

 

 

8,962

 

 

 

31

 

 

 

9,881

 

 

 

34

 

 

Sempra Generation

 

 

 

1,944

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

2,416

 

 

 

8

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

 

1,974

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

2,215

 

 

 

8

 

 

Discontinued operations

 

 

 

58

 

 

 

--

 

 

 

62

 

 

 

--

 

 

All other

 

 

 

2,786

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

1,922

 

 

 

7

 

 

Intercompany receivables

 

 

 

(1,805

)

 

 

(6

)

 

 

(1,701

)

 

 

(6

)

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

$

28,477

 

 

 

100

%

 

$

28,949

 

 

 

100

%

INVESTMENTS IN EQUITY-METHOD INVESTEES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Commodities

 

 

$

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

--

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Generation

 

 

 

207

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

212

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sempra Pipelines & Storage

 

 

 

569

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

604

 

 

 

 

 

 

All other

 

 

 

61

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

78

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total