SIFI » Topics » Critical Accounting Policies

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed May 13, 2009.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses, other-than-temporary impairment of securities, deferred income taxes and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies. Additional information about the Company’s accounting policies is included in the notes to the Company’s consolidated financial statements contained in Part I, Item 1 of this document and in the Company’s 2008 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-K filed Mar 27, 2009.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses, other-than-temporary impairment of securities, deferred income taxes and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on our historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated quarterly to ensure their relevance in the current economic environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. Additionally, a portion of the allowance is established based on the level of specific nonperforming loans, classified assets or charged-off loans.

Although management believes that it uses the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, which is based on estimates that are susceptible to change, future additions to the allowance may be necessary as a result of changes in economic conditions and other factors. Additionally, the Bank’s regulators, as a part of their examination process, periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require us to increase our allowance for loan losses by recognizing additional provisions for loan losses charged to expense, or to decrease our allowance for loan losses by recognizing loan charge-offs. See Notes 1 and 4 in the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Other-Than-Temporary Impairment of Securities. One of the significant estimates related to available for sale securities is the evaluation of investments for other-than-temporary impairment. If a decline in the fair value of an available for sale security is judged to be other-than-temporary, a charge is recorded equal to the difference between the fair value and cost or amortized cost basis of the security. Following such write-down in value, the fair value of the other-than-temporarily impaired investment becomes its new cost basis.

The evaluation of securities for impairment is a quantitative and qualitative process, which is subject to risks and uncertainties and is intended to determine whether declines in the fair value of investments should be recognized in current period earnings. The risks and uncertainties include changes in general economic conditions, the issuer’s financial condition or future prospects, the effects of changes in interest rates or credit spreads and the expected recovery period. Management evaluates securities for other-than-temporary impairment at least on a quarterly basis and more frequently when economic or market conditions warrant such evaluation. Based on this evaluation, during 2008, the Company incurred a $7.1 million impairment charge related to unrealized holding losses on securities it concluded were other-than-temporarily impaired. See Notes 1 and 3 in the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

 

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Deferred Income Taxes. The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes as prescribed in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. If current available information raises doubt as to the realization of the deferred tax assets, a valuation allowance is established. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The Company exercises significant judgment in evaluating the amount and timing of recognition of the resulting tax assets and liabilities. These judgments require us to make projections of future taxable income. These judgments and estimates, which are inherently subjective, are reviewed periodically as regulatory and business factors change. A reduction in estimated future taxable income may require the Company to record a valuation allowance against its deferred tax assets. A valuation allowance would result in additional income tax expense in the period, which would negatively affect earnings. See Notes 1 and 9 in the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles, goodwill and certain liabilities that it acquired at fair value, which may involve making estimates based on third-party valuations, such as appraisals or internal valuations based on discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by us, are presumed to have a useful life. The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment at least annually or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expenses. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment. See Notes 1, 5 and 6 in the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

 

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This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed Nov 14, 2008.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses, other-than-temporary impairment of securities, deferred income taxes and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies. Additional information about the Company’s accounting policies is included in the notes to the Company’s consolidated financial statements contained in Part I, Item 1 of this document and in the Company’s 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed Aug 13, 2008.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses, deferred income taxes and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies. Additional information about the Company’s accounting policies is included in the notes to the Company’s consolidated financial statements contained in Part I, Item 1 of this document and in the Company’s 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed May 14, 2008.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses and deferred income taxes to be its critical accounting policies. Additional information about the Company’s accounting policies is included in the notes to the Company’s consolidated financial statements contained in Part I, Item 1 of this document and in the Company’s 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on our historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. Additionally, a portion of the allowance is established based on the level of specific nonperforming loans, classified assets or charged-off loans.

 

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Although the Bank believes that it uses the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based on estimates that are susceptible to change as a result of changes in economic conditions and other factors. Refer to Note 4 of the consolidated financial statements in this report for additional information.

Deferred Income Taxes. The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes as prescribed in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. If current available information raises doubt as to the realization of the deferred tax assets, a valuation allowance is established. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The Company exercises significant judgment in evaluating the amount and timing of recognition of the resulting tax assets and liabilities. These judgments require us to make projections of future taxable income. The judgments and estimates, which are inherently subjective, are reviewed periodically as regulatory and business factors change. A reduction in estimated future taxable income may require the Company to record a valuation allowance against its deferred tax assets. A valuation allowance would result in additional income tax expense in the period, which would negatively affect earnings. Management believes, based upon current facts, that it is more likely than not that there will be sufficient taxable income in future years to realize the deferred tax assets.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-K filed Mar 27, 2008.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses, deferred income taxes and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on our historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. Additionally, a portion of the allowance is established based on the level of specific nonperforming loans, classified assets or charged-off loans.

Although the Bank believes that it uses the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based on estimates that are susceptible to change as a result of changes in economic conditions and other factors. See Notes 1 and 4 in the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Deferred Income Taxes. The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes as prescribed in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. If current available information raises doubt as to the realization of the deferred tax assets, a valuation allowance is established. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The Company exercises significant judgment in evaluating the amount and timing of recognition of the resulting tax assets and liabilities. These judgments require us to make projections of future taxable income. These judgments and estimates, which are inherently subjective, are reviewed periodically as regulatory and business factors change. A reduction in estimated future taxable income may require the Company to record a valuation allowance against its deferred tax assets. A valuation allowance would result in additional income tax expense in the period, which would negatively affect earnings. Management believes, based upon current facts, that it is more likely than not that there will be sufficient taxable income in future years to realize the deferred tax assets. See Note 10 in the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles, goodwill and certain liabilities that it assumed at fair value, which may involve making estimates based on third-party valuations, such as appraisals, or internal valuations based on discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by us, are presumed to have a useful life. The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment annually at a minimum or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expenses. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment. See Notes 1, 4, 6 and 7 in the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

 

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This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed Nov 13, 2007.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies. Additional information about the Company’s accounting policies is included in Notes 1 and 4 of the consolidated financial statements in Part I, Item 1 of this document and Items 1, 7 and 8 in the Company’s 2006 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions, and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on historical loan adjusted for qualitative factors. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated at least annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. To a lesser extent, the purchase of indirect automobile loans during 2006 increased the allowance for loan losses due to the higher risk of loss associated with this type of consumer lending. The indirect automobile loan portfolio was sold in June 2007, which resulted in a decrease in the allowance for loan losses. An unallocated component is maintained in the allowance to cover uncertainties that could affect management’s estimate of probable losses. Reference Note 4 for a more detailed discussion of the Allowance for Loan Losses.

Deferred Income Taxes. The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes as prescribed in Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes.” Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. If current available information raises doubt as to the realization of the deferred tax assets, a valuation allowance is established. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The Company exercises significant judgment in evaluating the amount and timing of recognition of the resulting tax liabilities and assets. These judgments require us to make projections of future taxable income. The judgments and estimates we make in determining our deferred tax assets, which are inherently subjective, are reviewed on a continual basis as regulatory and business factors change. Any reduction in estimated future taxable income may require us to record a valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets. A valuation allowance would result in additional income tax expense in the period, which would negatively affect earnings.

 

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Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles, goodwill and certain liabilities that it assumed at fair value, which may involve making estimates based on third party valuations, such as appraisals, or internal valuations based on discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by the Company, are presumed to have a useful life. The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment annually at a minimum or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expenses. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed Aug 14, 2007.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies. Additional information about the Company’s accounting policies is included in Notes 1 and 4 of the consolidated financial statements in Part I, Item 1 of this document and Items 1, 7 and 8 in the Company’s 2006 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions, and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated at least annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. To a lesser extent, the purchase of indirect automobile loans during 2006 increased the allowance for loan losses due to the higher risk of loss associated with this type of consumer lending. The indirect automobile loan portfolio was subsequently sold in June 2007, which resulted in a decrease in the allowance for loan losses. An unallocated component is maintained in the allowance to cover uncertainties that could affect management’s estimate of probable losses. Reference Note 4 for a more detailed discussion of the Allowance for Loan Losses.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles, goodwill and certain liabilities that it assumed at

 

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fair value, which may involve making estimates based on third party valuations, such as appraisals, or internal valuations based on discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by the Company, are presumed to have a useful life. The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment annually at a minimum or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expenses. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed May 9, 2007.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies. Additional information about the Company’s accounting policies is included in Notes 1 and 4 of the consolidated financial statements in Part I, Item 1 of this document and Items 1, 7 and 8 in the Company’s 2006 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions, and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated at least annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. To a lesser extent, the purchase of indirect automobile loans during 2006 increased the allowance for loan losses due to the higher risk of loss associated with this type of consumer lending. An unallocated component is maintained in the allowance to cover uncertainties that could affect management’s estimate of probable losses. Reference Note 4 for a more detailed discussion of the Allowance for Loan Losses.

 

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Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles, goodwill and certain liabilities that it assumed at fair value, which may involve making estimates based on third party valuations, such as appraisals, or internal valuations based on discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by the Company, are presumed to have a useful life. The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment annually at a minimum or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expenses. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed Nov 13, 2006.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies. Additional information about the Company’s accounting policies is included in Notes 1 and 4 of the consolidated financial statements in Part I, Item 1 of this document and Items 1 and 8 in the Company’s 2005 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions, and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated at least annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. To a lesser extent, the purchase of indirect automobile loans during 2006 increased the allowance for loan losses due to the higher risk of loss associated with this type of consumer lending. An unallocated component is maintained in the allowance to cover uncertainties that could affect management’s estimate of probable losses.

 

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Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles, goodwill and certain liabilities that it assumed at fair value, which may involve making estimates based on third party valuations, such as appraisals, or internal valuations based on discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by the Company, are presumed to have a useful life. The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment annually at a minimum or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expenses. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed Aug 11, 2006.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies. Additional information about the Company’s accounting policies is included in Notes 1 and 4 of the consolidated financial statements in Part I, Item 1 of this document and Items 1 and 8 in the Company’s 2005 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions, and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. To a lesser extent, the purchase of indirect automobile loans during 2006 increased the allowance for loan losses due to the higher risk of loss associated with this type of consumer lending. Additionally, a portion of the allowance is established based on the level of specific nonperforming loans, classified assets or charged-off loans. An unallocated component is maintained in the allowance to cover uncertainties that could affect management’s estimate of probable losses.

 

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Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles, goodwill and certain liabilities that it assumed at fair value, which may involve making estimates based on third party valuations, such as appraisals, or internal valuations based on discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by the Company, are presumed to have a useful life. The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment annually at a minimum or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expenses. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed May 12, 2006.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies. Additional information about the Company’s accounting policies is included in Notes 1 and 4 of the consolidated financial statements in Part I, Item 1 of this document and Items 1 and 8 in the Company’s 2005 Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions, and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. Additionally, a portion of the allowance is established based on the level of specific nonperforming loans, classified assets or charged-off loans. An unallocated component is maintained in the allowance to cover uncertainties that could affect management’s estimate of probable losses.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles, goodwill and certain liabilities that it assumed at fair value, which may involve making estimates based on third party valuations, such as appraisals, or internal

 

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valuations based on discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by the Company, are presumed to have a useful life. The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment annually at a minimum or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expense. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-K filed Mar 30, 2006.

Critical Accounting Policies

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies.

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions, and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on our historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. Additionally, a portion of the allowance is established based on the level of specific nonperforming loans, classified assets or charged-off loans.

Although the Bank believes that it uses the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based on estimates that are susceptible to change as a result of changes in economic conditions and other factors. In addition, the OTS, as an integral part of its examination process, periodically reviews the allowance for loan losses. Such agency may require the Bank to recognize adjustments to the allowance based on its judgments about information available to it at the time of its examination. See Part I. Item 1. Business. “Lending Activities – Allowance for Loan Losses” and Notes 1 and 4 in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles, goodwill and certain liabilities that it assumed at fair value, which may involve making estimates based on third party valuations, such as appraisals, or internal valuations based on discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation

 

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techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by us, are presumed to have a useful life. The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment annually at a minimum or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expense. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment. See Notes 1, 4, 6 and 7 in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed Nov 10, 2005.

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses and the impairment of long-lived assets to be its critical accounting policies.

 

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the allowance for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs, economic conditions and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on the Company’s historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increase the allowance. Additionally, a portion of the allowance is established based on the level of specific nonperforming loans, classified assets or charged-off loans.

 

Although the Company believes that it uses the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based on estimates that are susceptible to change as a result of changes in economic conditions and other factors. In addition, the OTS, as an integral part of its examination process, periodically reviews the Company’s allowance for loan losses. Such agency may require the Company to recognize adjustments to the allowance based on its judgments about information available to it at the time of its examination.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles and certain liabilities that it has assumed, at fair value. This may involve making estimates based on third party valuations, appraisals, internal valuations, discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by the Company, are presumed to have a useful life.

 

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The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expenses. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment.

 

This excerpt taken from the SIFI 10-Q filed May 13, 2005.

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The Company considers accounting policies involving significant judgments and assumptions by management that have, or could have, a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets or on income to be critical accounting policies. The Company considers the allowance for loan losses and the impairment of long-lived assets to be our critical accounting policies.

 

Allowance for Loan Losses. Determining the amount of allowance for loan losses necessarily involves a high degree of judgment. Management reviews the level of the allowance on a monthly basis and establishes the provision for loan losses based on the size and the composition of the loan portfolio, delinquency levels, loss experience, economic conditions and other factors related to the collectibility of the loan portfolio. The level of the allowance for loan losses fluctuates primarily due to changes in the size and composition of the loan portfolio and in the level of nonperforming loans, classified assets and charge-offs. A portion of the allowance is established by segregating the loans by loan category and assigning allocation percentages based on the Company’s historical loss experience and delinquency trends. The applied loss factors are re-evaluated annually to ensure their relevance in the current real estate environment. Accordingly, increases in the size of the loan portfolio and the increased emphasis on commercial real estate and commercial business loans, which carry a higher degree of risk of default and, thus, a higher allocation percentage, increases the allowance. Additionally, a portion of the allowance is established based on the level of specific nonperforming loans, classified assets or charged-off loans.

 

Although the Company believes that it uses the best information available to establish the allowance for loan losses, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based on estimates that are susceptible to change as a result of changes in economic conditions and other factors. In addition, the OTS, as an integral part of its examination process, periodically reviews the Company’s allowance for loan losses. Such agency may require the Company to recognize adjustments to the allowance based on its judgments about information available to it at the time of its examination.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets. The Company is required to record certain assets it has acquired, including identifiable intangible assets such as core deposit intangibles and certain liabilities that it has assumed, at fair value. This may involve making estimates based on third party valuations, such as appraisals or internal valuations, based on discounted cash flow analyses or other valuation techniques. Further, long-lived assets, including intangible assets and premises and equipment, that are held and used by the Company, are presumed to have a useful life. The determination of the useful lives of intangible assets is subjective, as is the appropriate

 

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amortization period for such intangible and long-lived assets. Additionally, long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of the asset may not be recoverable. If impairment is indicated by that review, the asset is written down to its estimated fair value through a charge to noninterest expenses. Testing for impairment is a subjective process, the application of which could result in different evaluations of impairment.

 

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