STM » Topics » Competition

This excerpt taken from the STM 20-F filed May 13, 2009.
Competition
 
Markets for our products are intensely competitive. While only a few companies compete with us in all of our product lines, we face significant competition in each of our product lines. We compete with major international semiconductor companies, some of which may have substantially greater financial and other more focused resources than we do with which to pursue engineering, manufacturing, marketing and distribution of their products. Smaller niche companies are also increasing their participation in the semiconductor market, and semiconductor foundry companies have expanded significantly, particularly in Asia. Competitors include manufacturers of standard semiconductors, ASICs and fully customized ICs, including both chip and board-level products, as well as customers who develop their own IC products and foundry operations. Some of our competitors are also our customers.
 
The primary international semiconductor companies that compete with us include Analog Devices, Broadcom, Infineon Technologies (“Infineon”), Intel, International Rectifier, Fairchild Semiconductor, Freescale Semiconductor, Linear Technology, LSI Logic, Marvell Technology Group, Maxim Integrated Products, Microchip Technology, National Semiconductor, NEC Electronics, NXP Semiconductors, ON Semiconductor, Qualcomm, Renesas, ROHM Semiconductor, Samsung, Texas Instruments and Toshiba.
 
We compete in different product lines to various degrees on the basis of price, technical performance, product features, product system compatibility, customized design, availability, quality and sales and technical support. In particular, standard products may involve greater risk of competitive pricing, inventory imbalances and severe market fluctuations than differentiated products. Our ability to compete successfully depends on elements both within and outside of our control, including successful and timely development of new products and manufacturing processes, product performance and quality, manufacturing yields and product availability, customer service, pricing, industry trends and general economic trends.


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This excerpt taken from the STM 20-F filed Mar 3, 2008.
Competition
 
Markets for our products are intensely competitive. While only a few companies compete with us in all of our product lines, we face significant competition in each of our product lines. We compete with major international semiconductor companies, some of which may have substantially greater financial and other more focused resources than we do with which to pursue engineering, manufacturing, marketing and distribution of their products. Smaller niche companies are also increasing their participation in the semiconductor market, and semiconductor foundry companies have expanded significantly, particularly in Asia. Competitors include manufacturers of standard semiconductors, ASICs and fully customized ICs, including both chip and board-level products, as well as customers who develop their own IC products and foundry operations. Some of our competitors are also our customers.
 
The primary international semiconductor companies that compete with us include Analog Devices, Broadcom, Hynix, IBM, Infineon Technologies, Intel, International Rectifier, Fairchild Semiconductor, Freescale Semiconductor, Linear Technology, LSI Logic, Marvell Technology Group, Maxim Integrated Products, Microchip Technology, National Semiconductor, Nippon Electric Company, NXP Semiconductors, ON Semiconductor, NXP Semiconductors, Qualcomm, Renesas, Samsung, Spansion, Texas Instruments and Toshiba.
 
We compete in different product lines to various degrees on the basis of price, technical performance, product features, product system compatibility, customized design, availability, quality and sales and technical support. In particular, standard products may involve greater risk of competitive pricing, inventory imbalances and severe market fluctuations than differentiated products. Our ability to compete successfully depends on elements both within and outside of our control, including successful and timely development of new products and manufacturing processes, product performance and quality, manufacturing yields and product availability, customer service, pricing, industry trends and general economic trends.
 

EXCERPTS ON THIS PAGE:

20-F
May 13, 2009
20-F
Mar 3, 2008

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