Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida (SBCF)

 
Annual Reports

  • 10-K (Mar 17, 2014)
  • 10-K (Mar 13, 2013)
  • 10-K (Apr 10, 2012)
  • 10-K (Mar 26, 2012)
  • 10-K (Mar 31, 2011)
  • 10-K (Mar 15, 2011)

 
Quarterly Reports

 
8-K

 
Other

SEACOAST BANKING CORP OF FLORIDA 10-K 2011
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UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20549
 
 
Form 10-K
 
     
þ
  ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010
o
  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the transition period from          to          
 
Commission File No. 0-13660
 
     
Florida
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  59-2260678
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
     
815 Colorado Avenue, Stuart, FL
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
  34994
(Zip Code)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (772) 287-4000
 
 
     
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
Common Stock, Par Value $0.10
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  YES o     NO þ
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  YES o     NO þ
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  YES þ     NO o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  YES o     NO o
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
             
Large accelerated filer o
  Accelerated filer þ   Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined by Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  YES o     NO þ
 
The aggregate market value of Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida common stock, par value $0.10 per share, held by non-affiliates, computed by reference to the price at which the stock was last sold on June 30, 2010, as reported on the Nasdaq Global Select Market, was $96,164,715.
 
The number of shares outstanding of Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida common stock, par value $0.10 per share, as of March 11, 2011, was 93,504,788.
 


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1. Certain portions of the registrant’s 2011 Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held May 26, 2011 (the “2011 Proxy Statement”) are incorporated by reference into Part III, Items 10 through 14 of this report. Other than those portions of the 2011 Proxy Statement specifically incorporated by reference herein pursuant to Items 10 through 14, no other portions of the 2011 Proxy Statement shall be deemed so incorporated.
 
2. Certain portions of the registrant’s 2010 Annual Report to Shareholders for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010 (the “2010 Annual Report”) are incorporated by reference into Part II, Items 6 through 8 of this report. Other than those portions of the 2010 Annual Report specifically incorporated by reference herein pursuant to Items 6 through 8, no other portions of the 2010 Annual Report shall be deemed so incorporated.


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        Page
 
  PART I              
  Item 1.     Business     6  
  Item 1A.     Risk Factors     23  
  Item 1B.     Unresolved Staff Comments     37  
  Item 2.     Properties     37  
  Item 3.     Legal Proceedings     42  
  Item 4.     [Reserved]     42  
             
  PART II              
  Item 5.     Market For Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities     43  
  Item 6.     Selected Financial Data     45  
  Item 7.     Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations     45  
  Item 7A.     Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk     45  
  Item 8.     Financial Statements and Supplementary Data     45  
  Item 9.     Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure     45  
  Item 9A.     Controls and Procedures     45  
  Item 9B.     Other Information     46  
             
  PART III              
  Item 10.     Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance     46  
  Item 11.     Executive Compensation     46  
  Item 12.     Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters     47  
  Item 13.     Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence     47  
  Item 14.     Principal Accountant Fees and Services     47  
             
  PART IV              
  Item 15.     Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules     48  
 EX-10.1
 EX-13
 EX-21
 EX-23.1
 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-32.1
 EX-32.2
 EX-99.1
 EX-99.2
 
Certain statistical data required by the Securities and Exchange Commission are included on pages 15-50 of Exhibit 13.


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SPECIAL CAUTIONARY NOTICE
REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
 
Various of the statements made herein under the captions “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”, “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk”, “Risk Factors” and elsewhere, are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning and protections of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) and are intended to be covered by the safe harbor provided by the same.
 
Forward-looking statements include statements with respect to our beliefs, plans, objectives, goals, expectations, anticipations, assumptions, estimates, intentions and future performance, and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, which may be beyond our control, and which may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of Seacoast to be materially different from those set forth in the forward-looking statements.
 
All statements other than statements of historical fact are statements that could be forward-looking statements. You can identify these forward-looking statements through our use of words such as “may,” “will,” “anticipate,” “assume,” “should,” “indicate,” “would,” “believe,” “contemplate,” “expect,” “estimate,” “continue,” “further,” “plan,” “point to,” “project,” “could,” “intend,” “target” and other similar words and expressions of the future. These forward-looking statements may not be realized due to a variety of factors, including, without limitation:
 
  •  the effects of future economic, business and market conditions and changes, domestic and foreign, including seasonality;
 
  •  changes in governmental monetary and fiscal policies, including interest rate policies of the Federal Reserve Board (the “FRB”);
 
  •  legislative and regulatory changes, including changes in banking, securities and tax laws and regulations and their application by our regulators, including those associated with the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) and changes in the scope and cost of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) insurance and other coverage;
 
  •  changes in accounting policies, rules and practices and applications or determinations made thereunder;
 
  •  the risks of changes in interest rates on the levels, composition and costs of deposits, loan demand, and the values and liquidity of loan collateral, securities, and interest sensitive assets and liabilities;
 
  •  changes in borrower credit risks and payment behaviors;
 
  •  changes in the availability and cost of credit and capital in the financial markets;
 
  •  changes in the prices, values and sales volumes of residential and commercial real estate in the United States and in the communities we serve, which could impact write-downs of assets, our ability to liquidate non-performing assets, realized losses on the disposition of non-performing assets and increased credit losses;
 
  •  our ability to comply with any requirements imposed on us or on Seacoast National Bank (“Seacoast National”) by regulators and the potential negative consequences that may result;
 
  •  our concentration in commercial real estate loans;
 
  •  the failure of assumptions and estimates, as well as differences in, and changes to, economic, market and credit conditions, including changes in borrowers’ credit risks and payment behaviors from those used in our loan portfolio stress test;
 
  •  the effects of competition from a wide variety of local, regional, national and other providers of financial, investment and insurance services;


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  •  the failure of assumptions and estimates underlying the establishment of reserves for possible loan losses and other estimates;
 
  •  the impact on the valuation of our investments due to market volatility or counterparty payment risk;
 
  •  statutory and regulatory restrictions on our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders, including those imposed by our participation in the U.S. Department of the Treasury (the “Treasury”) Capital Purchase Program (“CPP”);
 
  •  any applicable regulatory limits on Seacoast National’s ability to pay dividends to us;
 
  •  increases in regulatory capital requirements for banking organizations generally, which may adversely affect our ability to expand our business or could cause us to shrink our business;
 
  •  the risks of mergers, acquisitions and divestitures, including, without limitation, the related time and costs of implementing such transactions, integrating operations as part of these transactions and possible failures to achieve expected gains, revenue growth and/or expense savings from such transactions;
 
  •  changes in technology or products that may be more difficult, costly, or less effective than anticipated;
 
  •  the effects of war or other conflicts, acts of terrorism or other catastrophic events that may affect general economic conditions;
 
  •  the risks that our deferred tax assets could be reduced if estimates of future taxable income from our operations and tax planning strategies are less than currently estimated, and sales of our capital stock could trigger a reduction in the amount of net operating loss carryforwards that we may be able to utilize for income tax purposes; and
 
  •  other factors and risks described under “Risk Factors” herein and in any of our subsequent reports that we make with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission” or “SEC”) under the Exchange Act.
 
All written or oral forward-looking statements that are made by us or are attributable to us are expressly qualified in their entirety by this cautionary notice. We have no obligation and do not undertake to update, revise or correct any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this report, or after the respective dates on which such statements otherwise are made, except as required by law.


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Item 1.   Business
 
General
 
We are a bank holding company, incorporated in Florida in [date of incorporation], and registered under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (the “BHC Act”). Our principal subsidiary is Seacoast National Bank (“Seacoast National”). Seacoast National commenced its operations in 1933, and operated prior to 2006 as “First National Bank & Trust Company of the Treasure Coast”.
 
As a bank holding company, we are a legal entity separate and distinct from our subsidiaries, including Seacoast National. We coordinate the financial resources of the consolidated enterprise and maintain financial, operational and administrative systems that allow centralized evaluation of subsidiary operations and coordination of selected policies and activities. Our operating revenues and net income are derived primarily from Seacoast National through dividends and fees for services performed.
 
As of December 31, 2010, we had total consolidated assets of approximately $2,016.4 million, total deposits of approximately $1,637.2 million, total consolidated liabilities, including deposits, of approximately $1,850.1 million and consolidated shareholders’ equity of approximately $166.3 million. Our operations are discussed in more detail under “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Consolidated Financial Condition and Results of Operations” incorporated by reference from our 2010 Annual Report.
 
We and our subsidiaries offer a full array of deposit accounts and retail banking services, engage in consumer and commercial lending and provide a wide variety of trust and asset management services, as well as securities and annuity products to our customers. Seacoast National had 39 banking offices in 13 counties in Florida at year-end 2010. We have 23 branches in the “Treasure Coast,” including the counties of Martin, St. Lucie and Indian River on Florida’s southeastern coast.
 
Most of our banking offices have one or more automated teller machines (“ATMs”) providing customers with 24-hour access to their deposit accounts. We are a member of the “Star System,” the largest electronic funds transfer organization in the United States, which permits banking customers access to their accounts at 2.3 million participating ATMs and retail locations throughout the United States.
 
Seacoast National’s “MoneyPhone” system allows customers to access information on their loan or deposit account balances, transfer funds between linked accounts, make loan payments, and verify deposits or checks that may have cleared. This service is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
 
In addition, customers may access information via Seacoast National’s Customer Service Center (“CSC”). From 7 A.M. to 7 P.M., EST Monday through Friday, and on Saturdays from 9 A.M. to 4 P.M., our CSC staff is available to open accounts, take applications for certain types of loans, resolve account issues and offer information on other bank products and services to existing and potential customers.
 
We also offer Internet banking. Our Internet service allows customers to access transactional information on their deposit accounts, review loan and deposit balances, transfer funds between linked accounts and make loan payments from a deposit account, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
 
We have seven indirect, wholly-owned subsidiaries:
 
  •  FNB Brokerage Services, Inc. (“FNB Brokerage”), which provides brokerage and annuity services;
 
  •  FNB Insurance Services, Inc. (“FNB Insurance”), an inactive subsidiary, which was formed to provide insurance agency services;
 
  •  South Branch Building, Inc., which is a general partner in a partnership that constructed a branch facility of Seacoast National; and
 
  •  TCoast Holdings, LLC, BR West, LLC, TC Stuart, LLC and TC Property Ventures, LLC, each of which was formed to own and operate certain properties acquired through foreclosure.


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We directly own all the common equity in five statutory trusts relating to our trust preferred securities:
 
  •  SBCF Capital Trust I, formed on March 31, 2005 for the purpose of issuing $20 million in trust preferred securities;
 
  •  SBCF Statutory Trust II, formed on December 16, 2005, also for the purpose of issuing $20 million in trust preferred securities;
 
  •  SBCF Statutory Trust III, formed on June 29, 2007, for the purpose of issuing $12 million in trust preferred securities; and
 
  •  SBCF Statutory Trusts IV and V, formed on May 16, 2008, for the purpose of issuing additional preferred securities in the future. These trusts have been inactive since their formation.
 
The operations of each of these direct and indirect subsidiaries represented less than 10% of our consolidated assets and contributed less than 10% of our consolidated assets and revenues.
 
We have operated an office of Seacoast Marine Finance Division, a division of Seacoast National, in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida since February 2000. Seacoast Marine is staffed with experienced marine lending professionals with a marketing emphasis on marine loans of $200,000 and greater, with the majority of loan production sold to correspondent banks on a non-recourse basis. In November 2002, the Seacoast Marine Finance Division added offices and personnel in California to serve the western markets.
 
Our principal offices are located at 815 Colorado Avenue, Stuart, Florida 34994, and the telephone number at that address is (772) 287-4000. We and our subsidiary Seacoast National maintain Internet websites at www.seacoastbanking.com and www.seacoastnational.com, respectively. We are not incorporating the information on our or Seacoast National’s website into this report, and none of these websites nor the information appearing on these websites is included or incorporated in, or is a part of, this report.
 
We make available, free of charge on our corporate website, our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with or furnish it to the SEC.
 
Employees
 
As of December 31, 2010, we and our subsidiaries employed 398 full-time equivalent employees. We consider our employee relations to be good, and we have no collective bargaining agreements with any employees.
 
Expansion of Business
 
We have expanded our products and services to meet the changing needs of the various segments of our market, and we presently expect to continue this strategy. We have expanded geographically primarily through the addition of de novo branches. We also from time to time have acquired banks, bank branches and deposits, and have opened new branches and loan production offices.
 
In 2002, we entered Palm Beach County by establishing a new branch office. On April 30, 2005, we acquired Century National Bank, a commercial bank headquartered in Orlando, Florida. Century National Bank operated as our wholly owned subsidiary until August 2006 when it was merged with Seacoast National.
 
In April 2006, we acquired Big Lake National Bank (“Big Lake”), a commercial bank headquartered in Okeechobee, Florida, inland from our Treasure Coast markets, with nine offices in seven counties. Big Lake was merged with Seacoast National in June 2006.
 
Florida law permits statewide branching, and Seacoast National has expanded, and anticipates future expansion, by opening additional bank offices and facilities, as well as by acquisition of other financial institutions and branches. Since 2002, we have opened and acquired 17 new offices in 14 counties of Florida. The Seacoast Marine Finance Division operates loan production offices, or “LPOs”, in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida,


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and Newport Beach and Alameda, California. For more information on our branches and offices see “Item 2. Properties”.
 
We regularly evaluate possible mergers, acquisitions and other expansion opportunities.
 
Seasonality; Cycles
 
We believe our commercial banking operations are somewhat seasonal in nature. Investment management fees and deposits often peak in the first and second quarters, and often are lowest in the third quarter. Transactional fees from merchants, and ATM and debit card use also typically peak in the first and second quarters. Public deposits tend to increase with tax collections in the first and fourth quarters and decline as a result of spending thereafter.
 
Deposits tend to increase due to hurricanes as insurers disburse insurance proceeds more quickly than hurricane-related damage is repaired. No major hurricanes occurred between 2006 and 2010; as a result, deposits were more typical than during 2004 and 2005, when major hurricanes hit our coastal market areas, leading to an increase in deposits.
 
Commercial and residential real estate activity, demand, prices and sales volumes vary based upon various factors, including economic conditions, interest rates and credit availability.
 
Competition
 
We and our subsidiaries operate in the highly competitive markets of Martin, St. Lucie, Indian River, Brevard, Palm Beach and Broward Counties, in southeastern Florida and in the Orlando metropolitan statistical area. We also operate in six competitive counties in central Florida near Lake Okeechobee. Seacoast National not only competes with other banks of comparable or larger size in its markets, but also competes with various other nonbank financial institutions, including savings and loan associations, credit unions, mortgage companies, personal and commercial financial companies, investment brokerage and financial advisory firms and mutual fund companies. We compete for deposits, commercial, fiduciary and investment services and various types of loans and other financial services. Seacoast National also competes for interest-bearing funds with a number of other financial intermediaries and investment alternatives, including mutual funds, brokerage and insurance firms, governmental and corporate bonds, and other securities. Continued consolidation within the financial services industry will most likely change the nature and intensity of competition that we face, but can also create opportunities for us to demonstrate and exploit competitive advantages.
 
Our competitors include not only financial institutions based in the State of Florida, but also a number of large out-of-state and foreign banks, bank holding companies and other financial institutions that have an established market presence in the State of Florida, or that offer products by mail, telephone or over the Internet. Many of our competitors are engaged in local, regional, national and international operations and have greater assets, personnel and other resources. Some of these competitors are subject to less regulation and/or more favorable tax treatment than us. Many of these institutions have greater resources, broader geographic markets and higher lending limits than us and may offer services that we do not offer. In addition, these institutions may be able to better afford and make broader use of media advertising, support services, and electronic and other technology than us. To offset these potential competitive disadvantages, we depend on our reputation as an independent, “super” community bank headquartered locally, our personal service, our greater community involvement and our ability to make credit and other business decisions quickly and locally.
 
Supervision and Regulation
 
Bank holding companies and banks are extensively regulated under federal and state law. This discussion is qualified in its entirety by reference to the particular statutory and regulatory provisions referred to below and is not intended to be an exhaustive description of the statutes or regulations applicable to us and Seacoast National’s business. Supervision, regulation, and examination of us, Seacoast National and our respective subsidiaries by the bank regulatory agencies are intended primarily for the protection of bank depositors and


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the Deposit Insurance Fund (“DIF”) of the FDIC rather than holders of our capital stock. The following summarizes certain of the more important statutory and regulatory provisions. Substantial changes to the regulatory framework applicable to us and our subsidiaries were recently passed by the U.S. Congress, and the majority of the recent legislative changes will be implemented over time by various regulatory agencies. For a discussion of such changes, see “Recent Regulatory Developments” below. The full effect of the changes in the applicable laws and regulations, as implemented by the regulatory agencies, cannot be fully predicted and could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
 
We are required to comply with various corporate governance and financial reporting requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as rules and regulations adopted by the SEC, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, Nasdaq, and, more recently, the Treasury, since we are a participant in the Treasury’s Troubled Assets Relief Program (“TARP”) CPP. In particular, we are required to include management and independent registered public accounting firm reports on internal controls as part of our annual report on Form 10-K in order to comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We have evaluated our controls, including compliance with the SEC rules on internal controls, and have and expect to continue to spend significant amounts of time and money on compliance with these rules. Our failure to comply with these internal control rules may materially adversely affect our reputation, ability to obtain the necessary certifications to financial statements, and the values of our securities. The assessments of our financial reporting controls as of December 31, 2010 are included elsewhere in this report with no material weaknesses reported.
 
Recent Regulatory Developments
 
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010
 
On July 21, 2010, President Obama signed into law the Dodd-Frank Act. The Dodd-Frank Act will have a broad impact on the financial services industry, imposing significant regulatory and compliance changes, the imposition of increased capital, leverage and liquidity requirements, and numerous other provisions designed to improve supervision and oversight of, and strengthen safety and soundness within, the financial services sector. Additionally, the Dodd-Frank Act establishes a new framework of authority to conduct systemic risk oversight within the financial system to be distributed among new and existing federal regulatory agencies, including the Financial Stability Oversight Council, (the “Oversight Council”), the FRB, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “OCC”) and the FDIC.
 
The following items provide a brief description of the relevant provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act and their potential impact on our operations and activities, both currently and prospectively.
 
Creation of New Governmental Agencies.  The Dodd-Frank Act creates various new governmental agencies such as the Oversight Council and the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (the “CFPB”), an independent agency housed within the FRB. The CFPB will have a broad mandate to issue regulations, examine compliance and take enforcement action under the federal financial consumer laws. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act permits states to adopt consumer protection laws and regulations that are stricter than those regulations promulgated by the CFPB, and state attorneys general are permitted to enforce consumer protection rules adopted by the CFPB against certain institutions.
 
Limitation on Federal Preemption.  The Dodd-Frank Act significantly reduces the ability of national banks to rely upon federal preemption of state consumer financial laws. Although the OCC will have the ability to make preemption determinations where certain conditions are met, the broad rollback of federal preemption has the potential to create a patchwork of federal and state compliance obligations. This could, in turn, result in significant new regulatory requirements applicable to us, with attendant potential significant changes in our operations and increases in our compliance costs. It could also result in uncertainty concerning compliance, with attendant regulatory and litigation risks.
 
Mortgage Loan Origination and Risk Retention.  The Dodd-Frank Act contains additional regulatory requirements that may affect our mortgage origination and servicing operations, result in increased compliance costs and may impact revenue. For example, in addition to numerous new disclosure requirements, the Dodd-Frank Act imposes new standards for mortgage loan originations on all lenders, including banks, in an effort


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to strongly encourage lenders to verify a borrower’s ability to repay. Most significantly, the new standards limit the total points and fees that we and/or a broker may charge on conforming and jumbo loans to 3% of the total loan amount. Also, the Dodd-Frank Act, in conjunction with the FRB’s final rule on loan originator compensation issued August 16, 2010 and effective April 1, 2011, prohibits certain compensation payments to loan originators and steering consumers to loans not in their interest because it will result in greater compensation for a loan originator. These standards will result in a myriad of new system, pricing and compensation controls in order to ensure compliance and to decrease repurchase requests and foreclosure defenses. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act generally requires lenders or securitizers to retain an economic interest in the credit risk relating to loans the lender sells and other asset-backed securities that the securitizer issues if the loans have not complied with the ability to repay standards. The risk retention requirement generally will be 5%, but could be increased or decreased by regulation.
 
Corporate Governance.  The Dodd-Frank Act addresses many investor protection, corporate governance and executive compensation matters that will affect most U.S. publicly traded companies. The Dodd-Frank Act (1) grants shareholders of U.S. publicly traded companies an advisory vote on executive compensation; (2) enhances independence requirements for Compensation Committee members; and (3) requires companies listed on national securities exchanges to adopt incentive-based compensation clawback policies for executive officers.
 
Deposit Insurance.  The Dodd-Frank Act makes permanent the $250,000 deposit insurance limit for insured deposits. Amendments to the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (the “FDIA”) also revise the assessment base against which an insured depository institution’s deposit insurance premiums paid to the DIF will be calculated. Under the amendments, the assessment base will no longer be the institution’s deposit base, but rather its average consolidated total assets less its average tangible equity. This may shift the burden of deposit insurance premiums toward those depository institutions that rely on funding sources other than U.S. deposits. Additionally, the Dodd-Frank Act makes changes to the minimum designated reserve ratio of the DIF, increasing the minimum from 1.15% to 1.35% of the estimated amount of total insured deposits, and eliminating the requirement that the FDIC pay dividends to depository institutions when the reserve ratio exceeds certain thresholds. Several of these provisions could increase our FDIC deposit insurance premiums. The Dodd-Frank Act also provides that, effective one year after the date of enactment, depository institutions may pay interest on demand deposits.
 
Capital Standards.  Regulatory capital standards are expected to change as a result of the Dodd-Frank Act, and in particular as a result of the Collins Amendment. The Collins Amendment requires that the appropriate federal banking agencies establish minimum leverage and risk-based capital requirements on a consolidated basis for insured depository institutions and their holding companies. As a result, we and Seacoast National will be subject to the same capital requirements, and must include the same components in regulatory capital. One impact of the Collins Amendment is to prohibit bank and bank holding companies from including in their Tier 1 regulatory capital certain hybrid debt and equity securities issued on or after May 19, 2010. Among the hybrid debt and equity securities included in this prohibition are trust preferred securities, which we have used in the past as a tool for raising additional Tier 1 capital and otherwise improving our regulatory capital ratios.
 
Shareholder Say-On-Pay Votes.  The Dodd-Frank Act requires public companies to take shareholders’ votes on proposals addressing compensation (known as say-on-pay), the frequency of a say-on-pay vote, and the golden parachutes available to executives in connection with change-in-control transactions. Public companies must give shareholders the opportunity to vote on the compensation at least every three years and the opportunity to vote on frequency at least every six years, indicating whether the say-on-pay vote should be held annually, biennially, or triennially. The first say-on-pay and say-on-frequency votes must occur at our 2011 shareholders annual meeting. Both the say-on-pay and the say-on-parachute votes are explicitly nonbinding and cannot override a decision of our board of directors. It is currently unclear whether the say-on-frequency vote is binding.
 
Many of the requirements called for in the Dodd-Frank Act will be implemented over time and most will be subject to implementing regulations over the course of several years. Given the uncertainty associated with


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the manner in which the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act will be implemented by the various regulatory agencies and through regulations, the full extent of the impact such requirements will have on our operations is unclear. The changes resulting from the Dodd-Frank Act may impact the profitability of our business activities, require changes to certain of our business practices, impose upon us more stringent capital, liquidity and leverage requirements or otherwise adversely affect our business. These changes may also require us to invest significant management attention and resources to evaluate and make any changes necessary to comply with new statutory and regulatory requirements. Failure to comply with the new requirements may negatively impact our results of operations and financial condition. While we cannot predict what effect any presently contemplated or future changes in the laws or regulations or their interpretations would have on us, these changes could be materially adverse to our investors.
 
FDIC Insurance Assessment
 
On November 12, 2009, the FDIC adopted a final rule that requires nearly all FDIC-insured depositor-institutions prepay the DIF assessments for the fourth quarter of 2009 and for the next three years. In addition, the FDIC voted to adopt a uniform three-basis point increase in assessment rates effective on January 1, 2011, which increase would be reflected in our prepaid assessments. As discussed above, the Dodd-Frank Act requires the FDIC to substantially revise its regulations for determining the amount of an institution’s deposit insurance premiums.
 
Basel III
 
As a result of the Dodd-Frank Act’s Collins Amendment, we and Seacoast National will formally be subject to the same regulatory capital requirements. The current risk-based capital guidelines that apply to us are based upon the 1988 capital accord of the international Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, a committee of central banks and bank supervisors, as implemented by the U.S. federal banking agencies on an interagency basis. In 2008, the banking agencies collaboratively began to phase-in capital standards based on a second capital accord (“Basel II”) for large or “core” international banks (generally defined for U.S. purposes as having total assets of $250 billion or more or consolidated foreign exposures of $10 billion or more). Basel II emphasizes internal assessment of credit, market and operational risk, as well as supervisory assessment and market discipline in determining minimum capital requirements.
 
On September 12, 2010, the Group of Governors and Heads of Supervision, the oversight body of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, announced agreement to a strengthened set of capital requirements for internationally active banking organizations in the United States and around the world (“Basel III”). The agreement is supported by the U.S. federal banking agencies and the final text of the Basel III rules was released by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision on December 16, 2010. While the timing and scope of any U.S. implementation of Basel III remains uncertain, the following items provide a brief description of the relevant provisions of Basel III and their potential impact on our capital levels if applied to us.
 
New Minimum Capital Requirements.  Subject to implementation by the U.S. federal banking agencies, Basel III would be expected to have the following effects on the minimum capital levels of banking institutions to which it applies when fully phased in on January 1, 2019:
 
  •  Minimum Common Equity.  The minimum requirement for common equity, the highest form of loss absorbing capital, will be raised from the current 2.0% level, before the application of regulatory adjustments, to 4.5% after the application of stricter adjustments. This requirement will be phased in by January 1, 2015. As noted below, total common equity required will rise to 7.0% by January 1, 2019 (4.5% attributable to the minimum required common equity plus 2.5% attributable to the “capital conservation buffer”).
 
  •  Minimum Tier 1 Capital.  The minimum Tier 1 capital requirement, which includes common equity and other qualifying financial instruments based on stricter criteria, will increase from 4.0% to 6.0% also by January 1, 2015. Total Tier 1 capital will rise to 8.5% by January 1, 2019 (6.0% attributable to the minimum required Tier 1 capital ratio plus 2.5% attributable to the capital conservation buffer, as discussed below).


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  •  Minimum Total Capital.  The minimum Total Capital (Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital) requirement will increase to 8.0% (10.5% by January 1, 2019, including the capital conservation buffer).
 
Capital Conservation Buffer.  An initial capital conservation buffer of 0.625% above the regulatory minimum common equity requirement will begin in January 2016 and will gradually be increased to 2.5% by January 1, 2019. The buffer will be added to common equity, after the application of deductions. The purpose of the conservation buffer is to ensure that banks maintain a buffer of capital that can be used to absorb losses during periods of financial and economic stress. It is expected that, while banks would be allowed to draw on the buffer during such periods of stress, the closer their regulatory capital ratios approach the minimum requirement, the greater the constraints that would be applied to earnings distributions.
 
Countercyclical Buffer.  Basel III expects regulators to require, as appropriate to national circumstances, a “countercyclical buffer” within a range of 0% to 2.5% of common equity or other fully loss absorbing capital. The purpose of the countercyclical buffer is to achieve the broader goal of protecting the banking sector from periods of excess aggregate credit growth. For any given country, it is expected that this buffer would only be applied when there is excess credit growth that is resulting in a perceived system-wide build up of risk. The countercyclical buffer, when in effect, would be introduced as an extension of the conservation buffer range.
 
Regulatory Deductions from Common Equity.  The regulatory adjustments (i.e., deductions and prudential filters), including minority interests in financial institutions, and deferred tax assets from timing differences, would be deducted in increasing percentages beginning January 1, 2014, and would be fully deducted from common equity by January 1, 2018. Certain instruments that no longer qualify as Tier 1 capital, such as trust preferred securities, also would be subject to phase-out over a 10-year period beginning January 1, 2013.
 
Non-Risk Based Leverage Ratios.  These capital requirements are supplemented by a non-risk-based leverage ratio that will serve as a backstop to the risk-based measures described above. In July 2010, the Governors and Heads of Supervision agreed to test a minimum Tier 1 leverage ratio of 3.0% during the parallel run period. Based on the results of the parallel run period, any final adjustments would be carried out in the first half of 2017 with a view to adopting the 3.0% leverage ratio on January 1, 2018, based on appropriate review and calibration.
 
Adoption.  Basel III was endorsed at the meeting of the G-20 nations in November 2010 and the final text of the Basel III rules was subsequently agreed to by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision on December 16, 2010. The agreement calls for national jurisdictions to implement the new requirements beginning January 1, 2013. At that time, the U.S. federal banking agencies, including the OCC, will be expected to have implemented appropriate changes to incorporate the Basel III concepts into U.S. capital adequacy standards. While the Basel III changes as implemented in the United States will likely result in generally higher regulatory capital standards, it is difficult at this time to predict how any new standards will ultimately be applied to Seacoast National and us.
 
Bank Holding Company Regulation
 
As a bank holding company, we are subject to supervision and regulation by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve”) under the BHC Act. Bank holding companies generally are limited to the business of banking, managing or controlling banks, and other activities that the Federal Reserve determines to be closely related to banking, or managing or controlling banks and a proper incident thereto. We are required to file with the Federal Reserve periodic reports and such other information as the Federal Reserve may request. Ongoing supervision is provided through regular examinations by the Federal Reserve and other means that allow the regulators to gauge management’s ability to identify, assess and control risk in all areas of operations in a safe and sound manner and to ensure compliance with laws and regulations. The Federal Reserve may also examine our non-bank subsidiaries.
 
Expansion and Activity Limitations.  The BHC Act requires prior Federal Reserve approval for, among other things, the acquisition by a bank holding company of direct or indirect ownership or control of more than 5% of the voting shares or substantially all the assets of any bank, or for a merger or consolidation of a


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bank holding company with another bank holding company. With certain exceptions, the BHC Act prohibits a bank holding company from acquiring direct or indirect ownership or control of voting shares of any company which is not a bank or bank holding company, and from engaging directly or indirectly in any activity other than banking or managing or controlling banks or performing services for its authorized subsidiaries. A holding company, may, however, engage in or acquire an interest in a company that engages in activities which the Federal Reserve has determined by regulation or order to be so closely related to banking or managing or controlling banks as to be a proper incident thereto.
 
The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act of 1999 (the “GLB”) substantially revised the statutory restrictions separating banking activities from certain other financial activities. Under the GLB, bank holding companies that are “well-capitalized” and “well-managed”, as defined in Federal Reserve Regulation Y, which have and maintain “satisfactory” Community Reinvestment Act of 1977, as amended (the “CRA”) ratings, and meet certain other conditions, can elect to become “financial holding companies”. Financial holding companies and their subsidiaries are permitted to acquire or engage in activities such as insurance underwriting, securities underwriting, travel agency activities, a broad range of insurance agency activities, merchant banking, and other activities that the Federal Reserve determines to be financial in nature or complementary thereto. In addition, under the merchant banking authority added by the GLB and Federal Reserve regulation, financial holding companies are authorized to invest in companies that engage in activities that are not financial in nature, as long as the financial holding company makes its investment with the intention of limiting the term of its investment and does not manage the company on a day-to-day basis, and the invested company does not cross-market with any of the financial holding company’s controlled depository institutions. Financial holding companies continue to be subject to supervision and regulation of the Federal Reserve, but the GLB applies the concept of functional regulation to the activities conducted by subsidiaries. For example, insurance activities would be subject to supervision and regulation by state insurance authorities. While we have not become a financial holding company, we may elect to do so in the future in order to exercise the broader activity powers provided by the GLB. Banks may also engage in similar “financial activities” through subsidiaries. The GLB also includes consumer privacy provisions, and the federal bank regulatory agencies have adopted extensive privacy rules implementing these statutory provisions.
 
The BHC Act permits acquisitions of banks by bank holding companies, such that we and any other bank holding company, whether located in Florida or elsewhere, may acquire a bank located in any other state, subject to certain deposit-percentage, age of bank charter requirements, and other restrictions. Federal law also permits national and state-chartered banks to branch interstate through acquisitions of banks in other states. Florida’s Interstate Branching Act (the “Florida Branching Act”) permits interstate branching. Under the Florida Branching Act, with the prior approval of the Florida Department of Banking and Finance, a Florida bank may establish, maintain and operate one or more branches in a state other than the State of Florida pursuant to a merger transaction in which the Florida bank is the resulting bank. In addition, the Florida Branching Act provides that one or more Florida banks may enter into a merger transaction with one or more out-of-state banks, and an out-of-state bank resulting from such transaction may maintain and operate the branches of the Florida bank that participated in such merger. An out-of-state bank, however, is not permitted to acquire a Florida bank in a merger transaction, unless the Florida bank has been in existence and continuously operated for more than three years.
 
Support of Subsidiary Banks by Holding Companies.  Federal Reserve policy requires a bank holding company to act as a source of financial and managerial strength and to preserve and protect its bank subsidiaries in situations where additional investments in a troubled bank may not otherwise be warranted. In addition, under the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989 (“FIRREA”), where a bank holding company has more than one bank or thrift subsidiary, each of the bank holding company’s subsidiary depository institutions are responsible for any losses to the FDIC resulting from an affiliated depository institution’s failure. Accordingly, a bank holding company may be required to loan money to its bank subsidiaries in the form of capital notes or other instruments that qualify as capital under bank regulatory rules. However, any loans from the holding company to such subsidiary banks likely will be unsecured and subordinated to such bank’s depositors and perhaps to other creditors of the bank.


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Capital Requirements
 
The Federal Reserve and the OCC have risk-based capital guidelines for bank holding companies and national banks, respectively. These guidelines require a minimum ratio of capital to risk-weighted assets (including certain off-balance-sheet activities, such as standby letters of credit) of 8%. At least half of the total capital must consist of common equity, retained earnings and a limited amount of qualifying preferred stock, less goodwill and certain core deposit intangibles (“Tier 1 capital”). The remainder may consist of non-qualifying preferred stock, qualifying subordinated, perpetual, and/or mandatory convertible debt, term subordinated debt and intermediate term preferred stock and up to 45% of pretax unrealized holding gains on available for sale equity securities with readily determinable market values that are prudently valued, and a limited amount of any loan loss allowance (“Tier 2 capital” and, together with Tier 1 capital, “Total Capital”). The Federal Reserve has stated that Tier 1 voting common equity should be the predominant form of capital.
 
In addition, the Federal Reserve and the OCC have established minimum leverage ratio guidelines for bank holding companies and national banks, which provide for a minimum leverage ratio of Tier 1 capital to adjusted average quarterly assets (“leverage ratio”) equal to 3%, plus an additional cushion of 1.0% to 2.0%, if the institution has less than the highest regulatory rating. The guidelines also provide that institutions experiencing internal growth or making acquisitions will be expected to maintain strong capital positions substantially above the minimum supervisory levels without significant reliance on intangible assets. All bank holding companies and banks are expected to hold capital commensurate with the level and nature of their risks, including the volume and severity of their problem loans, and higher capital may be required as a result of an institution’s risk profile. Lastly, the Federal Reserve’s guidelines indicate that the Federal Reserve will continue to consider a “tangible Tier 1 leverage ratio” (deducting all intangibles) in evaluating proposals for expansion or new activities.
 
Letter Agreement with the OCC
 
The OCC and Seacoast National agreed by letter agreement that Seacoast National shall maintain specific minimum capital ratios by March 31, 2009 and subsequent periods, including a total risk based capital ratio of 12.00 percent and a Tier 1 leverage ratio of 7.50 percent. The agreed upon minimum capital ratios with the OCC were revised under the letter agreement to 12.00 percent for the total risk based capital ratio and 8.50 percent for the Tier l leverage ratio at January 31, 2010 and for subsequent periods. The federal bank regulatory agencies have begun seeking higher capital levels than the minimums due to market conditions and the OCC had indicated that Seacoast National, in light of risks in its loan portfolio and local economic conditions, especially in the real estate markets, should hold capital commensurate with such risks.
 
FDICIA and Prompt Corrective Action
 
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 (“FDICIA”), among other things, requires the federal bank regulatory agencies to take “prompt corrective action” regarding depository institutions that do not meet minimum capital requirements. FDICIA establishes five regulatory capital tiers: “well capitalized”, “adequately capitalized”, “undercapitalized”, “significantly undercapitalized”, and “critically undercapitalized”. A depository institution’s capital tier will depend upon how its capital levels compare to various relevant capital measures and certain other factors, as established by regulation. The FDICIA imposes progressively more restrictive restraints on operations, management and capital distributions, depending on the category in which an institution is classified.
 
All of the federal bank regulatory agencies have adopted regulations establishing relevant capital measures and relevant capital levels for federally insured depository institutions. The relevant minimum capital measures are the total risk-based capital ratio, Tier 1 capital ratio, and the leverage ratio. Under the regulations, a national bank will be (i) “well capitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of 10% or greater, a Tier 1 capital ratio of 6% or greater, and a leverage ratio of at least 5%, and is not subject to any written agreement, order, capital directive, or prompt corrective action directive by a federal bank regulatory agency to meet and maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure, (ii) “adequately capitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of 8% or greater, a Tier 1 capital ratio of 4% or greater, and a leverage ratio of 4% or


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greater (3% in certain circumstances), (iii) “undercapitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of less than 8%, a Tier 1 capital ratio of less than 4% (3% in certain circumstances), (iv) “significantly undercapitalized” if it has a total risk-based capital ratio of less than 6% or a Tier I capital ratio of less than 3%, or a leverage ratio of less than 3%, or (v) “critically undercapitalized” if its tangible equity is equal to or less than 2% of average quarterly tangible assets. In order to qualify as well-capitalized or adequately capitalized, an insured depository institution must meet all three minimum requirements. At each successively lower capital tier, increasingly stringent corrective actions are or may be required. The federal bank regulatory agencies have authority to require additional capital.
 
As of December 31, 2010, the consolidated capital ratios of the Seacoast and Seacoast National were as follows:
 
                         
    Regulatory
    Seacoast
    Seacoast
 
    Minimum     (Consolidated)     National  
 
Tier 1 capital ratio
    4.0 %     16.56 %     15.03 %
Total risk-based capital ratio
    8.0 %     17.84 %     16.30 %
Leverage ratio
    3.0-5.0 %     10.25 %     9.29 %
 
As discussed above, we have agreed with the OCC to maintain a Tier 1 leverage capital ratio of at least 8.50 percent and a total risk-based capital ratio of at least 12.00 percent.
 
As previously noted, the regulatory capital framework will change in important respects as a result of the Dodd-Frank Act and Basel III. It is widely anticipated that the capital requirements for most insured depository institutions will increase, although the nature and amounts of the increase have not yet been specified.
 
FDICIA directs that each federal bank regulatory agency prescribe standards for depository institutions and depository institution holding companies relating to internal controls, information systems, internal audit systems, loan documentation, credit underwriting, interest rate exposure, asset growth compensation, a maximum ratio of classified assets to capital, minimum earnings sufficient to absorb losses, a minimum ratio of market value to book value for publicly traded shares, and such other standards as the federal bank regulatory agencies deem appropriate.
 
FDICIA generally prohibits a depository institution from making any capital distribution (including payment of a dividend) or paying any management fee to its holding company if the depository institution would thereafter be undercapitalized. Undercapitalized depository institutions are subject to growth limitations and are required to submit a capital restoration plan for approval within 90 days of becoming undercapitalized. For a capital restoration plan to be acceptable, the depository institution’s parent holding company must guarantee that the institution will comply with such capital restoration plan. The aggregate liability of the parent holding company is limited to the lesser of 5% of the depository institution’s total assets at the time it became undercapitalized and the amount necessary to bring the institution into compliance with applicable capital standards. If a depository institution fails to submit an acceptable plan, it is treated as if it is significantly undercapitalized. If the controlling holding company fails to fulfill its obligations under FDICIA and files (or has filed against it) a petition under the federal Bankruptcy Code, the claim for such liability would be entitled to a priority in such bankruptcy proceeding over third party creditors of the bank holding company. In addition, an undercapitalized institution is subject to increased monitoring and asset growth restrictions and is required to obtain prior regulator approval for acquisitions, new lines of business, and branching. Such an institution also is barred from soliciting, taking or rolling over brokered deposits.
 
Significantly undercapitalized depository institutions may be subject to a number of requirements and restrictions, including orders to sell sufficient voting stock to become adequately capitalized, requirements to reduce total assets, and cessation of receipt of deposits from correspondent banks. Critically undercapitalized institutions are subject to the appointment of a receiver or conservator within 90 days of becoming significantly undercapitalized, except under limited circumstances. Because our company and Seacoast National exceed applicable capital requirements, the respective managements of our company and Seacoast


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National do not believe that the provisions of FDICIA have had any material effect on our company and Seacoast National or our respective operations.
 
FDICIA also contains a variety of other provisions that may affect the operations of our company and Seacoast National, including reporting requirements, regulatory standards for real estate lending, “truth in savings” provisions, the requirement that a depository institution give 90 days’ prior notice to customers and regulatory authorities before closing any branch, and a prohibition on the acceptance or renewal of brokered deposits by depository institutions that are not well capitalized, or are adequately capitalized and have not received a waiver from the FDIC. Seacoast National was well capitalized at December 31, 2010, and brokered deposits are not restricted.
 
Payment of Dividends
 
We are a legal entity separate and distinct from Seacoast National and other subsidiaries. Our primary source of cash, other than securities offerings, is dividends from Seacoast National. The prior approval of the OCC is required if the total of all dividends declared by a national bank (such as Seacoast National) in any calendar year will exceed the sum of such bank’s net profits for that year and its retained net profits for the preceding two calendar years, less any required transfers to surplus. Federal law also prohibits any national bank from paying dividends that would be greater than such bank’s undivided profits after deducting statutory bad debts in excess of such bank’s allowance for possible loan losses.
 
In addition, our Company and Seacoast National are subject to various general regulatory policies and requirements relating to the payment of dividends, including requirements to maintain adequate capital above regulatory minimums. The appropriate federal bank regulatory authority may prohibit the payment of dividends where it has determined that the payment of dividends would be an unsafe or unsound practice and to prohibit payment thereof. The OCC and the Federal Reserve have indicated that paying dividends that deplete a national or state member bank’s capital base to an inadequate level would be an unsound and unsafe banking practice. The OCC and the Federal Reserve have each indicated that depository institutions and their holding companies should generally pay dividends only out of current operating earnings.
 
Under a Federal Reserve policy adopted in 2009, the board of directors of a bank holding company must consider different factors to ensure that its dividend level is prudent relative to maintaining a strong financial position, and is not based on overly optimistic earnings scenarios, such as potential events that could affect its ability to pay, while still maintaining a strong financial position. As a general matter, the Federal Reserve has indicated that the board of directors of a bank holding company should consult with the Federal Reserve and eliminate, defer or significantly reduce the bank holding company’s dividends if:
 
  •  its net income available to shareholders for the past four quarters, net of dividends previously paid during that period, is not sufficient to fully fund the dividends;
 
  •  its prospective rate of earnings retention is not consistent with its capital needs and overall current and prospective financial condition; or
 
  •  it will not meet, or is in danger of not meeting, its minimum regulatory capital adequacy ratios.
 
In 2009 and 2010, Seacoast National recorded a net loss and did not pay any dividends. In 2008, Seacoast National recorded a net loss and paid $6.8 million in dividends to us.
 
Prior approval by the OCC is required if the total of all dividends declared by a national bank in any calendar year exceeds the bank’s “profits”, as defined, for that year combined with its retained net profits for the preceding two calendar years. Under this restriction, Seacoast National cannot distribute any dividends to us, without prior OCC approval, as of December 31, 2010.
 
In addition to these regulatory requirements and restrictions, our ability to pay dividends is also limited by our participation in the Treasury’s CPP, as described below. Prior to December 19, 2011, unless we have redeemed the preferred stock issued to the Treasury in the CPP or the Treasury has transferred the preferred stock to a third party, we cannot increase our quarterly dividend above $0.01 per share of common stock. Furthermore, if we are not current in the payment of quarterly dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock, we


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cannot pay dividends on our common stock. Due to recent operating losses, we are currently restricted by the Federal Reserve from paying dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock. As a result, we have deferred the payment of seven dividends to the Treasury and are unable to pay dividends on our common stock.
 
Enforcement Policies and Actions; Formal Agreement with OCC
 
The Federal Reserve and the OCC monitor compliance with laws and regulations. Violations of laws and regulations, or other unsafe and unsound practices, may result in these agencies imposing fines or penalties, cease and desist orders, or taking other enforcement actions. Under certain circumstances, these agencies may enforce these remedies directly against officers, directors, employees and other parties participating in the affairs of a bank or bank holding company.
 
Seacoast National entered into a formal agreement with the OCC on December 16, 2008 to improve Seacoast National’s asset quality. Under the formal agreement, Seacoast National’s board of directors appointed a compliance committee to monitor and coordinate Seacoast National’s performance under the formal agreement. The formal agreement provided for the development and implementation of written programs to reduce Seacoast National’s credit risk, monitor and reduce the level of criticized assets, and manage commercial real estate (“CRE”) loan concentrations in light of current adverse CRE market conditions. Seacoast National believes it has complied with all of the terms of this agreement.
 
Bank and Bank Subsidiary Regulation
 
Seacoast National is a national bank subject to supervision, regulation and examination by the OCC, which monitors all areas of operations, including reserves, loans, mortgages, the issuance of securities, payment of dividends, establishing branches, capital adequacy, and compliance with laws. Seacoast National is a member of the FDIC and, as such, its deposits are insured by the FDIC to the maximum extent provided by law. See “FDIC Insurance Assessments”.
 
Under Florida law, Seacoast National may establish and operate branches throughout the State of Florida, subject to the maintenance of adequate capital and the receipt of OCC approval.
 
The OCC has adopted the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council’s (“FFIEC”) rating system and assigns each financial institution a confidential composite rating based on an evaluation and rating of six essential components of an institution’s financial condition and operations including Capital Adequacy, Asset Quality, Management, Earnings, Liquidity and Sensitivity to Market Risk, as well as the quality of risk management practices. For most institutions, the FFIEC has indicated that market risk primarily reflects exposures to changes in interest rates. When regulators evaluate this component, consideration is expected to be given to: management’s ability to identify, measure, monitor, and control market risk; the institution’s size; the nature and complexity of its activities and its risk profile, and the adequacy of its capital and earnings in relation to its level of market risk exposure. Market risk is rated based upon, but not limited to, an assessment of the sensitivity of the financial institution’s earnings or the economic value of its capital to adverse changes in interest rates, foreign exchange rates, commodity prices, or equity prices; management’s ability to identify, measure, monitor, and control exposure to market risk; and the nature and complexity of interest rate risk exposure arising from nontrading positions.
 
FNB Brokerage, a Seacoast National subsidiary, is registered as a securities broker-dealer under the Exchange Act and is regulated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission” or SEC). It also is subject to examination and supervision of its operations, personnel and accounts by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”). FNB Brokerage is a separate and distinct entity from Seacoast National, and must maintain adequate capital under the SEC’s net capital rule. The net capital rule limits FNB Brokerage’s ability to reduce capital by payment of dividends or other distributions to Seacoast National. FNB Brokerage is also authorized by the State of Florida to act as a securities dealer and an investment advisor.
 
FNB Insurance, a Seacoast National subsidiary, is authorized by the State of Florida to market insurance products as an agent. FNB Insurance is a separate and distinct entity from Seacoast National and is subject to supervision and regulation by state insurance authorities. It is a financial subsidiary, but is inactive.


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The Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (the “Code”), as amended, provides requirements that must be met with respect to Seacoast National’s indirect subsidiary, FNB RE Services, Inc., which has elected to be taxed as a “real estate investment trust” under the Code. FNB RE Services, Inc. was dissolved at the end of May 2009.
 
FDIC Insurance Assessments
 
Seacoast National’s deposits are insured by the FDIC’s DIF, and Seacoast National is subject to FDIC assessments for its deposit insurance, as well as assessments by the FDIC to pay interest on Financing Corporation (“FICO”) bonds.
 
Effective January 1, 2009, the FDIC increased it deposit insurance assessment rates uniformly by 7 basis points annually for the first quarter 2009 assessment period only. Annual rates applicable to the first quarter 2009 assessments, which were collected at the end of June, were as follows:
 
     
    Deposit Insurance
Risk Category
 
Assessment Rate
 
I
  12 to 14 basis points
II
  17 basis points
III
  35 basis points
IV
  50 basis points
 
The FDIC issued another final rule effective April 1, 2009, to change the way that the FDIC’s assessment system differentiates for risk, make corresponding changes to assessment rates beginning with the second quarter of 2009, as well as other changes to the deposit insurance assessment rules. In addition, a one-time special assessment was imposed for the second quarter of 2009 only, based on the total assets of Seacoast National, and resulting in an additional $976,000 of premium paid. The FDIC’s new rules include a decrease for long-term unsecured debt, including senior and subordinated debt and, for small institutions with assets under $10 billion, a portion of Tier 1 capital; (2) an increase for secured liabilities above a threshold amount; and (3) an increase for brokered deposits above a threshold amount. The new assessment rules increase assessments for banks that use brokered deposits above a threshold level to fund “rapid asset growth”. As a result, we have been required to pay significantly increased premiums or additional special assessments.
 
In 2009, we paid $5.0 million in FDIC insurance premiums, including $976,000 for a special industry-wide FDIC deposit insurance assessment of five basis points of an institution’s assets minus Tier 1 capital as of June 30, 2009. In addition, to restore the FDIC’s Deposit Insurance Fund, all FDIC-insured institutions were required to prepay their deposit premiums for the next 3 years on December 30, 2009. The FDIC ruling also provided for maintaining the assessment rates at their current levels through the end of 2010, with a uniform increase of $0.03 per $100 of covered deposits effective January 1, 2011. On December 30, 2009, we prepaid $14.8 million of FDIC insurance premiums for the calendar quarters ending December 31, 2009 through December 31, 2012. In 2010, we recorded $3.8 million to expense in FDIC insurance premiums.
 
Under the FDIC’s Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program (the “TLG”), the entire amount in any eligible noninterest bearing transaction accounts was guaranteed by the FDIC to the extent such balances were not covered by FDIC insurance. The TLG also provides FDIC guarantees to newly issued senior unsecured debt of banks and holding companies. The TLG debt guarantee program expired on December 31, 2009. We and Seacoast National did not issue any guaranteed debt under TLG. Seacoast National did not opt out from the extension of the transaction account guarantee program that expired December 31, 2010, and provisions under the recent Dodd-Frank legislation will provide coverage for all noninterest bearing transaction account balances at all financial institutions through December 31, 2012. Banks participating in the extended noninterest bearing transaction account guarantee program pay the FDIC an increased fee of 15 to 25 basis points depending on an institution’s risk category for deposit insurance purposes.
 
FICO assessments are set by the FDIC quarterly and ranged from 1.14 basis points in the first quarter of 2008 to 1.10 basis points in the last quarter of 2008, 1.14 basis points in the first quarter of 2009 to 1.02 basis points in the last quarter of 2009, and 1.06 basis points in the first quarter of 2010 to 1.04 basis points in the


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last quarter of 2010. The FICO assessment rate for the first quarter of 2011 is 1.02 basis points. FICO assessments of approximately $224,000, $192,000 and $184,000 were paid to the FDIC in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively.
 
Participation in Treasury’s Capital Purchase Program
 
On October 3, 2008, the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 (“EESA”) became law. Under the TARP authorized by EESA, the Treasury established the CPP providing for the purchase of senior preferred shares of qualifying FDIC-insured depository institutions and their holding companies. On December 19, 2008, pursuant to a letter agreement (the “Purchase Agreement”), we sold 2,000 shares of Series A Preferred Stock (the “Series A Preferred Stock”) and warrants (the “Warrant”) to acquire 1,179,245 shares of common stock to the Treasury pursuant to the CPP for an aggregate consideration of $50 million. Pursuant to the Purchase Agreement, the successful public capital raise conducted by the Company during 2009 reduced the number of shares under the Warrant by 50 percent to 589,625 shares of common stock. As a result of our participation in the CPP, we have agreed to certain limitations on our dividends, distributions and executive compensation.
 
Specifically, we are unable to declare dividend payments on our common, junior preferred or pari passu preferred shares if we are in arrears on the dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock. Further, without the Treasury approval, we are not permitted to increase dividends on our common stock above $0.01 per share without the Treasury’s approval until December 19, 2011 unless all of the Series A Preferred Stock has been redeemed or transferred by the Treasury. In addition, we cannot repurchase shares of common stock or use proceeds from the Series A Preferred Stock to repurchase trust preferred securities. Consent of the Treasury generally is required for us to make any stock repurchase until December 19, 2011 unless all of the Series A Preferred Stock has been redeemed or transferred by the Treasury to a third party. Further, our common, junior preferred or pari passu preferred shares may not be repurchased if we are in arrears on the Series A Preferred Stock dividends. In the event that we fail to pay dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock for an aggregate of at least six quarterly dividend periods (whether or not consecutive) the Treasury will have the right to appoint two directors to our board of directors until all accrued but unpaid dividends have been paid; otherwise, except as required by law, holders of the Series A Preferred Stock have limited voting rights. We currently have failed to pay dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock for seven consecutive quarterly dividend periods.
 
In addition, we have adopted the Treasury’s standards for executive compensation and corporate governance for the period during which the Treasury holds the equity issued pursuant to the Purchase Agreement, including the common stock which may be issued pursuant to the warrant. These standards generally apply to our chief executive officer, chief financial officer and the three next most highly compensated senior executive officers. The standards include:
 
  •  ensuring that incentive compensation for senior executives does not encourage unnecessary and excessive risks that threaten the value of the financial institution;
 
  •  required clawback of any bonus or incentive compensation paid to a senior executive based on statements of earnings, gains or other criteria that are later proven to be materially inaccurate;
 
  •  prohibition on making golden parachute payments to senior executives; and
 
  •  an agreement not to deduct for tax purposes executive compensation in excess of $500,000 for each senior executive.
 
On February 17, 2009 President Obama signed into law The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the “ARRA”), commonly known as the economic stimulus or economic recovery package. The ARRA retroactively imposes certain new executive compensation and corporate expenditure limits and corporate governance standards on all current and future TARP recipients, including us, that are in addition to those previously announced by the Treasury, until the institution has repaid the Treasury. The Treasury released an interim final rule on TARP standards for compensation and corporate governance on June 10, 2009, which implemented and further expanded the limitations and restrictions imposed on executive compensation and corporate governance by the TARP CPP and ARRA. The new Treasury interim final rules


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also prohibit any tax gross-up payments to senior executive officers and the next 20 highest paid executives; require “say on pay” vote in annual shareholders’ meeting; and impose restrictions on bonus payments with the exceptions for long-term restricted stock.
 
In addition, we are also required to include certificates from our management in our annual report on Form 10-K regarding the compliance with all regulations summarized above as a result of our participation in TARP CPP.
 
Repayment of the outstanding Series A Preferred Stock and the Warrant is now permitted under the ARRA without penalty and without the need to raise new capital, subject to the Treasury’s consultation with the recipient’s appropriate regulatory agency, the prior approval of the Federal Reserve and the maintenance of appropriate levels of capital by the issuers and their subsidiaries. .
 
Other Regulations
 
Anti-Money Laundering.  The International Money Laundering Abatement and Anti-Terrorism Funding Act of 2001 specifies “know your customer” requirements that obligate financial institutions to take actions to verify the identity of the account holders in connection with opening an account at any U.S. financial institution. Banking regulators will consider compliance with the Act’s money laundering provisions in acting upon acquisition and merger proposals, and sanctions for violations of the Act can be imposed in an amount equal to twice the sum involved in the violating transaction, up to $1 million.
 
Under the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (“USA PATRIOT”) Act of 2001, financial institutions are subject to prohibitions against specified financial transactions and account relationships as well as enhanced due diligence and “know your customer” standards in their dealings with foreign financial institutions and foreign customers.
 
The USA PATRIOT Act requires financial institutions to establish anti-money laundering programs. The USA PATRIOT Act sets forth minimum standards for these programs, including:
 
  •  the development of internal policies, procedures, and controls;
 
  •  the designation of a compliance officer;
 
  •  an ongoing employee training program; and
 
  •  an independent audit function to test the programs.
 
Transactions with Related Parties.  We are a legal entity separate and distinct from Seacoast National and our other subsidiaries. Various legal limitations restrict our banking subsidiaries from lending or otherwise supplying funds to us or our non-bank subsidiaries. We and our banking subsidiaries are subject to Section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act and Federal Reserve Regulation W thereunder. Section 23A defines “covered transactions” to include extensions of credit, and limits a bank’s covered transactions with any affiliate to 10% of such bank’s capital and surplus. All covered and exempt transactions between a bank and its affiliates must be on terms and conditions consistent with safe and sound banking practices, and banks and their subsidiaries are prohibited from purchasing low-quality assets from the bank’s affiliates. Finally, Section 23A requires that all of a bank’s extensions of credit to its affiliates be appropriately secured by acceptable collateral, generally United States government or agency securities.
 
We and our bank subsidiaries also are subject to Section 23B of the Federal Reserve Act, which generally requires covered and other transactions among affiliates to be on terms, including credit standards, that are substantially the same or at least as favorable to the bank or its subsidiary as those prevailing at the time for similar transactions with unaffiliated companies.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act generally enhances the restrictions on transactions with affiliates under Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act, including an expansion of the definition of “covered transactions” and an increase in the amount of time for which collateral requirements regarding covered credit transactions must be satisfied. The ability of the Federal Reserve Board to grant exemptions from these


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restrictions is also narrowed by the Dodd-Frank Act, including with respect to the requirement for the OCC, FDIC and Federal Reserve Board to coordinate with one another.
 
Concentrations in Lending.  During 2006, the federal bank regulatory agencies released guidance on “Concentrations in Commercial Real Estate Lending” (the “Guidance”). The Guidance defines commercial real estate (“CRE”) loans as exposures secured by raw land, land development and construction (including 1-4 family residential construction), multi-family property, and non-farm nonresidential property where the primary or a significant source of repayment is derived from rental income associated with the property (that is, loans for which 50 percent or more of the source of repayment comes from third party, non-affiliated, rental income) or the proceeds of the sale, refinancing, or permanent financing of the property. Loans to Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REIT”) and unsecured loans to developers that closely correlate to the inherent risks in CRE markets would also be considered CRE loans under the Guidance. Loans on owner occupied CRE are generally excluded.
 
The Guidance requires that appropriate processes be in place to identify, monitor and control risks associated with real estate lending concentrations. This could include enhanced strategic planning, CRE underwriting policies, risk management, internal controls, portfolio stress testing and risk exposure limits as well as appropriately designed compensation and incentive programs. Higher allowances for loan losses and capital levels may also be required. The Guidance is triggered when CRE loan concentrations exceed either:
 
  •  Total reported loans for construction, land development, and other land of 100 percent or more of a bank’s total capital; or
 
  •  Total reported loans secured by multifamily and nonfarm nonresidential properties and loans for construction, land development, and other land of 300 percent or more of a bank’s total capital.
 
The Guidance also applies when a bank has a sharp increase in CRE loans or has significant concentrations of CRE secured by a particular property type.
 
The Guidance applies to our CRE lending activities due to the concentration in construction and land development loans. At December 31, 2010, we had outstanding $47.8 million in commercial construction and residential land development loans and $31.5 in residential construction loans to individuals, which represents approximately 39 percent of Seacoast National’s total risk based capital at December 31, 2010, well below the Guidance’s threshold.
 
We have always had significant exposures to loans secured by commercial real estate due to the nature of our markets and the loan needs of both retail and commercial customers. We believe our long term experience in CRE lending, underwriting policies, internal controls, and other policies currently in place, as well as our loan and credit monitoring and administration procedures, are generally appropriate to managing our concentrations as required under the Guidance. The federal bank regulators are looking more closely at the risks of various assets and asset categories and risk management, and the need for additional rules regarding liquidity, as well as capital rules that better reflects risk. We have agreed with the OCC to manage our CRE risks. At December 31, 2010, total CRE exposure for Seacoast National had been significantly reduced to 218 percent of total risk based capital, below the Guidance’s threshold. See “Item 1. Business — Enforcement Policies and Actions.”
 
Community Reinvestment Act.  We and our banking subsidiaries are subject to the provisions of the CRA and related federal bank regulatory agencies’ regulations. Under the CRA, all banks and thrifts have a continuing and affirmative obligation, consistent with their safe and sound operation, to help meet the credit needs for their entire communities, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. The CRA requires a depository institution’s primary federal regulator, in connection with its examination of the institution, to assess the institution’s record of assessing and meeting the credit needs of the communities served by that institution, including low- and moderate-income neighborhoods. The bank regulatory agency’s assessment of the institution’s record is made available to the public. Further, such assessment is required of any institution which has applied to: (i) charter a national bank; (ii) obtain deposit insurance coverage for a newly-chartered institution; (iii) establish a new branch office that accepts deposits; (iv) relocate an office; (v) merge or consolidate with, or acquire the assets or assume the liabilities of, a federally regulated financial institution, or


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(vi) expand other activities, including engaging in financial services activities authorized by the GLB. A less than satisfactory CRA rating will slow, if not preclude, expansion of banking activities and prevent a company from becoming or remaining a financial holding company.
 
Following the enactment of the GLB, CRA agreements with private parties must be disclosed and annual CRA reports must be made to a bank’s primary federal regulator. A bank holding company will not be permitted to become or remain a financial holding company and no new activities authorized under GLB may be commenced by a holding company or by a bank financial subsidiary if any of its bank subsidiaries received less than a “satisfactory” CRA rating in its latest CRA examination. Federal CRA regulations require, among other things, that evidence of discrimination against applicants on a prohibited basis, and illegal or abusive lending practices be considered in the CRA evaluation.
 
Privacy and Data Security.  The GLB Act imposed new requirements on financial institutions with respect to consumer privacy. The GLB Act generally prohibits disclosure of consumer information to non-affiliated third parties unless the consumer has been given the opportunity to object and has not objected to such disclosure. Financial institutions are further required to disclose their privacy policies to consumers annually. Financial institutions, however, will be required to comply with state law if it is more protective of consumer privacy than the GLB Act. The GLB Act also directed federal regulators, including the FDIC and the OCC, to prescribe standards for the security of consumer information. Seacoast National is subject to such standards, as well as standards for notifying customers in the event of a security breach. Under federal law, Seacoast National must disclose its privacy policy to consumers, permit customers to opt out of having nonpublic customer information disclosed to third parties in certain circumstances, and allow customers to opt out of receiving marketing solicitations based on information about the customer received from another subsidiary. States may adopt more extensive privacy protections. The Company is similarly required to have an information security program to safeguard the confidentiality and security of customer information and to ensure proper disposal. Customers must be notified when unauthorized disclosure involves sensitive customer information that may be misused.
 
Consumer Regulation.  Activities of Seacoast National are subject to a variety of statutes and regulations designed to protect consumers. These laws and regulations include provisions that:
 
  •  limit the interest and other charges collected or contracted for by Seacoast National, including new rules respecting the terms of credit cards and of debit card overdrafts;
 
  •  govern Seacoast National’s disclosures of credit terms to consumer borrowers;
 
  •  require Seacoast National to provide information to enable the public and public officials to determine whether it is fulfilling its obligation to help meet the housing needs of the community it serves;
 
  •  prohibit Seacoast National from discriminating on the basis of race, creed or other prohibited factors when it makes decisions to extend credit; and
 
  •  govern the manner in which Seacoast National may collect consumer debts.
 
New rules on credit card interest rates, fees, and other terms took effect on February 22, 2010, as directed by the Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility and Disclosure (“CARD”) Act. Among the new requirements are (1) 45-days advance notice to a cardholder before the interest rate on a card may be increased, subject to certain exceptions; (2) a ban on interest rate increases in the first year; (3) an opt-in for over-the-limit charges; (4) caps on high fee cards; (5) greater limits on the issuance of cards to persons below the age of 21; (6) new rules on monthly statements and payment due dates and the crediting of payments; and (7) the application of new rates only to new charges and of payments to higher rate charges.
 
New rules regarding overdraft charges for debit card and automatic teller machine, or ATM, transactions took effect on July 1, 2010. These rules eliminated automatic overdraft protection arrangements now in common use and required banks to notify and obtain the consent of customers before enrolling them in an overdraft protection plan. For existing debit card and ATM card holders, the current automatic programs expired on August 15, 2010. The notice and consent process is a requirement for all new cards issued on or after July 1, 2010. The new rules do not apply to overdraft protection on checks or to automatic bill payments.


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As a result of the turmoil in the residential real estate and mortgage lending markets, there are several concepts currently under discussion at both the federal and state government levels that could, if adopted, alter the terms of existing mortgage loans, impose restrictions on future mortgage loan originations, diminish lenders’ rights against delinquent borrowers or otherwise change the ways in which lenders make and administer residential mortgage loans. If made final, any or all of these proposals could have a negative effect on the financial performance of Seacoast National’s mortgage lending operations, by, among other things, reducing the volume of mortgage loans that Seacoast National can originate and sell into the secondary market and impairing Seacoast National’s ability to proceed against certain delinquent borrowers with timely and effective collection efforts.
 
The deposit operations of Seacoast National are also subject to laws and regulations that:
 
  •  require Seacoast National to adequately disclose the interest rates and other terms of consumer deposit accounts;
 
  •  impose a duty on Seacoast National to maintain the confidentiality of consumer financial records and prescribe procedures for complying with administrative subpoenas of financial records;
 
  •  require escheatment of unclaimed funds to the appropriate state agencies after the passage of certain statutory time frames; and
 
  •  govern automatic deposits to and withdrawals from deposit accounts with Seacoast National and the rights and liabilities of customers who use automated teller machines, or ATMs, and other electronic banking services. As described above, beginning in July 2010, new rules took effect that limited Seacoast National’s ability to charge fees for the payment of overdrafts for every day debit and ATM card transactions.
 
As noted above, Seacoasts National will likely face a significant increase in its consumer compliance regulatory burden as a result of the combination of the newly-established CFPB and the significant roll back of federal preemption of state laws in the area.
 
Non-Discrimination Policies.  Seacoast National is also subject to, among other things, the provisions of the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (the “ECOA”) and the Fair Housing Act (the “FHA”), both of which prohibit discrimination based on race or color, religion, national origin, sex, and familial status in any aspect of a consumer or commercial credit or residential real estate transaction. The Department of Justice (the “DOJ”), and the federal bank regulatory agencies have issued an Interagency Policy Statement on Discrimination in Lending that provides guidance to financial institutions in determining whether discrimination exists, how the agencies will respond to lending discrimination, and what steps lenders might take to prevent discriminatory lending practices. The DOJ has increased its efforts to prosecute what it regards as violations of the ECOA and FHA.
 
Statistical Information
 
Certain statistical and financial information (as required by SEC Guide 3) is included in response to Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Certain additional statistical information is also included in response to Item 6 and Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
Item 1A.   Risk Factors
 
In addition to the other information contained in this Form 10-K, you should carefully consider the risks described below, as well as the risk factors and uncertainties discussed in our other public filings with the SEC under the caption “Risk Factors” in evaluating us and our business and making or continuing an investment in our stock. The risks contained in this Form 10-K are not the only risks that we face. Additional risks that are not presently known, or that we presently deem to be immaterial, could also harm our business, results of operations and financial condition and an investment in our stock. The trading price of our securities could decline due to the materialization of any of these risks, and our shareholders may lose all or part of their investment. This Form 10-K also contains forward-looking statements that may not be realized as


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a result of certain factors, including, but not limited to, the risks described herein and in our other public filings with the SEC. Please refer to the section in this Form 10-K entitled “Special Cautionary Notice Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” for additional information regarding forward-looking statements.
 
Risks Related to Our Business
 
Difficult market conditions have adversely affected and may continue to affect our industry.
 
We are exposed to downturns in the U.S. economy, and particularly the local markets in which we operate in Florida. Declines in the housing markets over the past three years, including falling home prices and sales volumes, and increasing foreclosures, have negatively affected the credit performance of mortgage loans and resulted in significant write-downs of asset values by financial institutions, including government-sponsored entities and major commercial and investment banks, as well as Seacoast National. These write-downs have caused many financial institutions to seek additional capital, to merge with larger and stronger institutions and, in some cases, to fail. Many lenders and institutional investors have reduced or ceased providing funding to borrowers, including other financial institutions. This market turmoil and the tightening of credit have led to increased levels of commercial and consumer delinquencies, lack of consumer confidence, increased market volatility and reductions in business activity generally. The resulting economic pressure on consumers and lack of confidence in the financial markets has adversely affected our business, financial condition and results of operations. We do not expect that the difficult conditions in the financial markets are likely to improve in the near future. A worsening of these conditions would likely exacerbate the adverse effects of these difficult market conditions on us and other financial institutions. In particular:
 
  •  We expect to face increased regulation of our industry, including as a result of recent regulatory reform initiatives by the U.S. government. Compliance with such regulations may increase our costs and limit our ability to pursue business opportunities.
 
  •  Market developments, government programs and the winding down of various government programs may continue to adversely affect consumer confidence levels and may cause adverse changes in borrower behaviors and payment rates, resulting in further increases in delinquencies and default rates, which could affect our loan charge-offs and our provisions for credit losses.
 
  •  Our ability to assess the creditworthiness of our customers or to estimate the values of our assets and collateral for loans will be reduced if the models and approaches we use become less predictive of future behaviors, valuations, assumptions or estimates. We estimate losses inherent in our credit exposure, the adequacy of our allowance for loan losses and the values of certain assets by using estimates based on difficult, subjective, and complex judgments, including estimates as to the effects of economic conditions and how these economic conditions might affect the ability of our borrowers to repay their loans or the value of assets.
 
  •  Our ability to borrow from other financial institutions on favorable terms or at all, or to raise capital, could be adversely affected by further disruptions in the capital markets or other events, including, among other things, deterioration in investor expectations and changes in the FDIC’s resolution authority or practices.
 
  •  Failures of other depository institutions in our markets and increasing consolidation of financial services companies as a result of current market conditions could increase our deposits and assets, necessitating additional capital, and may have unexpected adverse effects upon our ability to compete effectively.
 
We are not paying dividends on our preferred stock or common stock and are deferring distribution on our trust preferred securities, and we are restricted in otherwise paying cash dividends on our common stock. The failure to resume paying dividends on our preferred stock and trust preferred securities may adversely affect us.
 
We suspended dividend payments on our preferred and common stock and distributions on our trust preferred securities on May 19, 2009, pursuant to the request of the Federal Reserve, because of the Federal Reserve’s policy that bank holding companies should not pay dividends or make distributions on trust


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preferred securities using funds from the TARP CPP. There is no assurance that we will receive approval to resume paying cash dividends. Even if we are allowed to resume paying dividends by the Federal Reserve, future payment of cash dividends on our common stock, if any, will be subject to the prior payment of all unpaid dividends and deferred distributions on our Series A Preferred Stock and trust preferred securities. Further, we need prior Treasury approval to increase our quarterly cash dividends above $0.01 per common share through the earliest of December 19, 2011, the date we redeem all shares of Series A Preferred Stock or the Treasury has transferred all shares of Series A Preferred Stock to third parties. All dividends are declared and paid at the discretion of our board of directors and are dependent upon our liquidity, financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements and such other factors as our board of directors may deem relevant
 
Further, dividend payments on our Series A Preferred Stock and distributions on our trust preferred securities are cumulative and therefore unpaid dividends and distributions will accrue and compound on each subsequent dividend payment date. In the event of any liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the affairs of our Company, holders of the Series A Preferred Stock shall be entitled to receive for each share of Series A Preferred Stock the liquidation amount plus the amount of any accrued and unpaid dividends. We cannot pay dividends on our outstanding shares of Series A Preferred Stock or our common stock until we have paid in full all deferred distributions on our trust preferred securities, which will require prior approval of the Federal Reserve.
 
The Treasury currently has the right to appoint two directors to the Company’s board of directors.
 
Because we have missed more than six quarterly dividend payments, the Treasury has the right to appoint two directors to our board of directors until all accrued but unpaid dividends have been paid. In the event that the Treasury elects to exercise this right, we could face negative publicity and the decision making authority of current members of our board of directors could be significantly impacted.
 
Nonperforming assets could result in an increase in our provision for loan losses, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
 
At December 31, 2010 and 2009, our nonperforming loans (which consist of non-accrual loans) totaled $68.3 million and $97.9 million, or 5.5 percent and 7.0 percent of the loan portfolio, respectively. At December 31, 2010 and 2009, our nonperforming assets (which include foreclosed real estate) were $94.0 million and $123.3 million, or 4.7 percent and 5.7 percent of assets, respectively. In addition, we had approximately $5.0 million and $8.8 million in accruing loans that were 30 days or more delinquent at December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. Our nonperforming assets adversely affect our net income in various ways. Until economic and market conditions improve, we may incur additional losses relating to an increase in nonperforming loans. We do not record interest income on nonaccrual loans or other real estate owned, thereby adversely affecting our income, and increasing our loan administration costs. When we take collateral in foreclosures and similar proceedings, we are required to mark the related loan to the then fair market value of the collateral, which may result in a loss. These loans and other real estate owned also increase our risk profile and the capital our regulators believe is appropriate in light of such risks. If economic conditions and market factors negatively and/or disproportionately affect some of our larger loans, then we could see a sharp increase in our total net charge-offs and also be required to significantly increase our allowance for loan losses. Any further increase in our nonperforming assets and related increases in our provision for losses on loans could negatively affect our business and could have a material adverse effect on our capital, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Seacoast National has adopted and implemented a written program to ensure Bank adherence to a written program designed to eliminate the basis of criticism of criticized assets as required by the OCC pursuant to the formal agreement that Seacoast National entered into with the OCC. While we have reduced our problem assets significantly through loan sales, workouts, restructurings and otherwise, decreases in the value of these remaining assets, or the underlying collateral, or in these borrowers’ performance or financial conditions, whether or not due to economic and market conditions beyond our control, could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, the resolution of nonperforming assets requires significant commitments of time from management and our directors, which can be detrimental to the


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performance of their other responsibilities. There can be no assurance that we will not experience further increases in nonperforming loans in the future, or that nonperforming assets will not result in further losses in the future.
 
 
Liquidity is essential to our business. An inability to raise funds through deposits, borrowings, the sale of loans and other sources could have a substantial negative effect on our liquidity. Our funding sources include federal funds purchases, securities sold under repurchase agreements, non-core deposits, and short- and long-term debt. We are also members of the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta (the “FHLB”) and the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, where we can obtain advances collateralized with eligible assets. We maintain a portfolio of securities that can be used as a secondary source of liquidity. There are other sources of liquidity available to us or Seacoast National should they be needed, including our ability to acquire additional non-core deposits, the issuance and sale of debt securities, and the issuance and sale of preferred or common securities in public or private transactions.
 
Our access to funding sources in amounts adequate to finance or capitalize our activities or on terms which are acceptable to us could be impaired by factors that affect us specifically or the financial services industry or economy in general. Factors that could detrimentally impact our access to liquidity sources include a downturn in the markets in which our loans are concentrated or adverse regulatory action against us. In addition, our access to deposits may be affected by the liquidity and/or cash flow needs of depositors. Although we have historically been able to replace maturing deposits and FHLB advances as necessary, we might not be able to replace such funds in the future and can lose a relatively inexpensive source of funds and increase our funding costs if, among other things, customers move funds out of bank deposits and into alternative investments, such as the stock market, that are perceived as providing superior expected returns. We may be required to seek additional regulatory capital through capital raising at terms that may be very dilutive to existing stockholders. In addition, our liquidity, on a parent only basis, is adversely affected by our current inability to receive dividends from Seacoast National without prior regulatory approval.
 
Our ability to borrow could also be impaired by factors that are not specific to us, such as further disruption in the financial markets or negative views and expectations about the prospects for the financial services industry in light of recent turmoil faced by banking organizations and the continued deterioration in credit markets.
 
Our allowance for loan losses may prove inadequate or we may be adversely affected by credit risk exposures.
 
Our business depends on the creditworthiness of our customers. We periodically review our allowance for loan losses for adequacy considering economic conditions and trends, collateral values and credit quality indicators, including past charge-off experience and levels of past due loans and nonperforming assets. The determination of the appropriate level of the allowance for loan losses involves a high degree of subjectivity and judgment and requires us to make significant estimates of current credit risks and future trends, all of which may undergo material changes. We cannot be certain that our allowance for loan losses will be adequate over time to cover credit losses in our portfolio because of unanticipated adverse changes in the economy, market conditions or events adversely affecting specific customers, industries or markets, or borrower behaviors towards repaying their loans. The credit quality of our borrowers has deteriorated as a result of the economic downturn in our markets. If the credit quality of our customer base or their debt service behavior materially decreases further, if the risk profile of a market, industry or group of customers declines further or weaknesses in the real estate markets and other economics persist or worsen, or if our allowance for loan losses is not adequate, our business, financial condition, including our liquidity and capital, and results of operations could be materially adversely affected. In addition, bank regulatory agencies periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require an increase in the provision for loan losses or the recognition of further loan charge-offs, based on judgments different than those of management. If charge-offs in future periods exceed the allowance for loan losses, we will need additional provisions to increase the allowance for


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loan losses, which would result in a decrease in net income and capital, and could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.
 
All of our loan portfolios have been affected by the sustained economic weakness of our markets and the effects of higher unemployment rates. Our commercial and residential real estate and real estate-related portfolios have been especially affected by adverse market conditions, including reduced real estate prices and sales levels.
 
Our commercial and residential real estate and real estate-related loans, especially construction and development loans, have been affected adversely by the on-going correction in real estate prices, reduced levels of sales during the recessions, and the economic weakness of our Florida markets and the effects of higher unemployment rates. We may have to increase our allowance for loan losses through additional provisions for loan losses because of continued adverse changes in the economy, market conditions, and events that adversely affect our customers or markets. Our business, financial condition, liquidity, capital (especially tangible common equity), and results of operations could be materially adversely affected by additional provisions for loan losses.
 
Current and further deterioration in the real estate markets, including the secondary market for residential mortgage loans, have adversely affected us and may continue to adversely affect us.
 
The effects of ongoing mortgage market challenges, combined with the correction in residential real estate market prices and reduced levels of home sales, could result in further price reductions in single family home values, further adversely affecting the liquidity and value of collateral securing commercial loans for residential land acquisition, construction and development, as well as residential mortgage loans and residential property collateral securing loans that we hold, mortgage loan originations and gains on sale of mortgage loans. Declining real estate prices have caused higher delinquencies and losses on certain mortgage loans, generally, particularly second lien mortgages and home equity lines of credit. Significant ongoing disruptions in the secondary market for residential mortgage loans have limited the market for and liquidity of most residential mortgage loans other than conforming Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac loans. These trends could continue, notwithstanding various government programs to boost the residential mortgage markets and stabilize the housing markets. Declines in real estate values, home sales volumes and financial stress on borrowers as a result of job losses, interest rate resets on adjustable rate mortgage loans or other factors could have further adverse effects on borrowers that result in higher delinquencies and greater charge-offs in future periods, which would adversely affect our financial condition, including capital and liquidity, or results of operations. In the event our allowance for loan losses is insufficient to cover such losses, our earnings, capital and liquidity could be adversely affected.
 
 
Florida has experienced a deeper recession and more dramatic slowdown in economic activity than other states and the decline in real estate values in Florida has been significantly higher than the national average. The declines in home prices and the volume of home sales in Florida, along with the reduced availability of certain types of mortgage credit, have resulted in increases in delinquencies and losses in our portfolios of home equity lines and loans, and commercial loans related to residential real estate acquisition, construction and development. Further declines in home prices coupled with the continued economic recession in our markets and continued high or increased unemployment levels could cause additional losses which could adversely affect our earnings and financial condition, including our capital and liquidity.
 
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act could increase our regulatory compliance burden and associated costs or otherwise adversely affect our business.
 
On July 21, 2010, the Dodd-Frank Act was signed into law. The Dodd-Frank Act represents a significant overhaul of many aspects of the regulation of the financial services industry.


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The Dodd-Frank Act directs applicable regulatory authorities to promulgate regulations implementing its provisions, and its effect on the Company and on the financial services industry as a whole will be clarified as those regulations are issued. The Dodd-Frank Act addresses a number of issues including capital requirements, compliance and risk management, debit card overdraft fees, healthcare, incentive compensation, expanded disclosures and corporate governance. The Act establishes a new, independent CFPB, which will have broad rulemaking, supervisory and enforcement authority over consumer financial products and services, including deposit products, residential mortgages, home-equity loans and credit cards. States will be permitted to adopt stricter consumer protection laws and can enforce consumer protection rules issued by the CFPB.
 
The Dodd-Frank Act will likely increase our regulatory compliance burden and may have a material adverse effect on us, including increasing the costs associated with our regulatory examinations and compliance measures. The changes resulting from the Dodd-Frank Act, as well as the resulting regulations promulgated by federal agencies, may impact the profitability of our business activities, require changes to certain of our business practices, impose upon us more stringent capital, liquidity and leverage ratio requirements or otherwise adversely affect our business. These changes may also require us to invest significant management attention and resources to evaluate and make necessary changes to comply with new laws and regulations. For a more detailed description of the Dodd-Frank Act, see “Item 1. Business — Supervision and Regulation.”
 
Our concentration in commercial real estate loans could result in further increased loan losses.
 
Commercial real estate (“CRE”) is cyclical and poses risks of loss to us due to our concentration levels and similar risks of the asset. As of December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively, 47.7 percent and 50.7 percent of our loan portfolio was comprised of CRE loans. The banking regulators continue to give CRE lending greater scrutiny, and banks with higher levels of CRE loans are expected to implement improved underwriting, internal controls, risk management policies and portfolio stress testing, as well as higher levels of allowances for possible losses and capital levels as a result of CRE lending growth and exposures. During 2010, we added $31.7 million to our provisions for loan losses compared to $124.8 million in 2009, and $88.6 million in 2008, in part reflecting collateral evaluations in response to recent changes in the market values of land collateralizing acquisition and development loans.
 
Pursuant to the formal agreement that Seacoast National entered into with the OCC, Seacoast National adopted and implemented a written commercial real estate concentration risk management program. However, there is no guarantee that the program will effectively reduce our concentration in commercial real estate.
 
Higher FDIC deposit insurance premiums and assessments could adversely affect our financial condition.
 
FDIC insurance premiums increased substantially in 2009 and we expect to pay significantly higher FDIC premiums in the future. Market developments have significantly depleted the insurance fund of the FDIC and reduced the ratio of reserves to insured deposits. The FDIC adopted a revised risk-based deposit insurance assessment schedule on February 27, 2009, which raised deposit insurance premiums. On May 22, 2009, the FDIC implemented a five basis point special assessment of each insured depository institution’s assets minus Tier 1 capital as of June 30, 2009, but no more than 10 basis points times the institution’s assessment base for the second quarter of 2009, collected on September 30, 2009. The FDIC also required all FDIC-insured institutions to prepay their estimated quarterly risk-based assessments for the fourth quarter of 2009 and for all of 2010, 2011 and 2012, which was paid on December 30, 2009.
 
We also participate in the FDIC’s TLG for noninterest-bearing transaction deposit accounts. Banks that participate in the TLG’s noninterest-bearing transaction account guarantee paid the FDIC an annual assessment of 10 basis points on the amounts in such accounts above the amounts covered by FDIC deposit insurance. TLG’s noninterest-bearing transaction deposit account guarantee program was scheduled to expire on December 31, 2009, but was extended to December 31, 2010. Management decided to participate in the extended program. Institutions that participate in the program are required to pay an annualized fee of 15 to 25 basis points in accordance with their risk category rating assigned by the FDIC. To the extent that these TLG assessments are insufficient to cover any loss or expenses arising from the TLG program, the FDIC is


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authorized to impose an emergency special assessment on all FDIC-insured depository institutions. The FDIC has authority to impose charges for the TLG program upon depository institution holding companies, as well. The increased premiums and TLG assessments charged by the FDIC increased our noninterest expense in 2010 and 2009.
 
Under the Dodd-Frank legislation recently passed, unlimited deposit insurance coverage on noninterest bearing transaction accounts to all FDIC insured institutions was approved through December 31, 2012. Unlike the TLG program, which will expire at December 31, 2010, the Dodd-Frank provisions apply at all FDIC insured institutions and will cover only traditional checking accounts that do not pay interest. Under this legislation our noninterest expense is expected to continue to increase prospectively.
 
 
The capital and credit markets have been experiencing volatility and disruption for more than three years. In some cases, the markets have produced downward pressure on stock prices and credit availability for certain issuers without regard to those issuers’ underlying financial condition or performance. If current levels of market disruption and volatility continue or worsen, we may experience adverse effects, which may be material, on our ability to maintain or access capital and on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
Our loans, deposits, fee businesses and employees have increased as a result of our organic growth and acquisitions. Our failure to successfully manage and support this growth with sufficient human resources, training and operational, financial and technology resources in challenging markets and economic conditions could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition.
 
We are required to maintain capital to meet regulatory requirements, and if we fail to maintain sufficient capital, whether due to losses, an inability to raise additional capital or otherwise, our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations, as well as our compliance with regulatory requirements, would be adversely affected.
 
Both we and Seacoast National must meet regulatory capital requirements and maintain sufficient liquidity and our regulators may modify and adjust such requirements in the future. Seacoast National agreed to an informal letter agreement with the OCC to maintain a Tier 1 leverage capital ratio of 8.50 percent and a total risk-based capital ratio of 12.00 percent, which are higher than the regulatory minimum capital ratios. We also face significant regulatory and other governmental risk as a financial institution and a participant in the TARP CPP.
 
Our ability to raise additional capital, when and if needed, will depend on conditions in the capital markets, general economic conditions and a number of other factors, including investor perceptions regarding the banking industry and the market, governmental activities, many of which are outside our control, and on our financial condition and performance. Accordingly, we cannot assure you that we will be able to raise additional capital if needed or on terms acceptable to us. If we fail to meet these capital and other regulatory requirements, our financial condition, liquidity and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.
 
Although we currently comply with all capital requirements, we may be subject to more stringent regulatory capital ratio requirements in the future and we may need additional capital in order to meet those requirements. Our failure to remain “well capitalized” for bank regulatory purposes could affect customer confidence, our ability to grow, our costs of funds and FDIC insurance costs, our ability to pay dividends on common and preferred stock, make distributions on our trust preferred securities, our ability to make acquisitions, and our business, results of operation and financial conditions, generally. Under FDIC rules, if Seacoast National ceases to be a “well capitalized” institution for bank regulatory purposes, its ability to accept brokered deposits may be restricted and the interest rates that it pays may be restricted.


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Our ability to realize our deferred tax assets may be further reduced in the future if our estimates of future taxable income from our operations and tax planning strategies do not support our deferred tax amount, and the amount of net operating loss carry-forwards and certain other tax attributes realizable for income tax purposes may be reduced under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code by sales of our capital securities.
 
As of December 31, 2010, we had deferred tax assets of $18.9 million after we recorded $47.9 million of valuation allowance based on management’s estimation of the likelihood of those deferred tax assets being realized. These and future deferred tax assets may be further reduced in the future if our estimates of future taxable income from our operations and tax planning strategies do not support the amount of the deferred tax asset.
 
The amount of net operating loss carry-forwards and certain other tax attributes realizable annually for income tax purposes may be reduced by an offering and/or other sales of our capital securities, including transactions in the open market by 5% or greater shareholders, if an ownership change is deemed to occur under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code. The determination of whether an ownership change has occurred under Section 382 is highly fact specific and can occur through one or more acquisitions of capital stock (including open market trading) if the result of such acquisitions is that the percentage of our outstanding common stock held by shareholders or groups of shareholders owning at least 5% of our common stock at the time of such acquisition, as determined under Section 382, is more than 50 percentage points higher than the lowest percentage of our outstanding common stock owned by such shareholders or groups of shareholders within the prior three-year period. Our sales of common stock in April 2010 increased the risk of a possible future change in control under Section 382.
 
 
Our cost of funds may increase as a result of general economic conditions, FDIC insurance assessments, interest rates and competitive pressures. We have traditionally obtained funds principally through local deposits and we have a base of lower cost transaction deposits. Generally, we believe local deposits are a cheaper and more stable source of funds than other borrowings because interest rates paid for local deposits are typically lower than interest rates charged for borrowings from other institutional lenders and reflect a mix of transaction and time deposits, whereas brokered deposits typically are higher cost time deposits. Our costs of funds and our profitability and liquidity are likely to be adversely affected if, and to the extent, we have to rely upon higher cost borrowings from other institutional lenders or brokers to fund loan demand or liquidity needs, and changes in our deposit mix and growth could adversely affect our profitability and the ability to expand our loan portfolio.
 
 
Our profitability depends upon net interest income, which is the difference between interest earned on assets, and interest expense on interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowings. Net interest income will be adversely affected if market interest rates change such that the interest we pay on deposits and borrowings and our FDIC deposit insurance assessments increase faster than the interest earned on loans and investments. Interest rates, and consequently our results of operations, are affected by general economic conditions (domestic and foreign) and fiscal and monetary policies may materially affect the level and direction of interest rates. From June 2004 to mid-2006, the Federal Reserve raised the federal funds rate from 1.0 percent to 5.25 percent. Since then, beginning in September 2007, the Federal Reserve decreased the federal funds rates by 100 basis points to 4.25 percent over the remainder of 2007, and has since reduced the target federal funds rate by an additional 400 basis points to a range between zero and 25 basis points beginning in December 2008. Decreases in interest rates generally increase the market values of fixed-rate, interest-bearing investments and loans held, and increase the values of loan sales and mortgage loan activities. However, the production of mortgages and other loans and the value of collateral securing our loans, are dependent on demand within the markets we serve, as well as interest rates. The levels of sales, as well as the values of real estate in our markets, have declined. Declining rates reflect efforts by the Federal Reserve to


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stimulate the economy, but may not be effective, and thus may negatively affect our results of operations and financial condition, liquidity and earnings.
 
On February 18, 2010, the Federal Reserve raised the discount rate from 0.5 percent to 0.75%. Increases in interest rates generally decrease the market values of fixed-rate, interest-bearing investments and loans held and the production of mortgage and other loans and the value of collateral securing our loans, and therefore may adversely affect our liquidity and earnings.
 
The TARP CPP and the ARRA impose, and other proposed rules may impose additional, executive compensation and corporate governance requirements that may adversely affect us and our business, including our ability to recruit and retain qualified employees.
 
The purchase agreement we entered into in connection with our participation in the TARP CPP required us to adopt the Treasury’s standards for executive compensation and corporate governance while the Treasury holds the equity issued pursuant to the TARP CPP, including the common stock which may be issued pursuant to the warrant to purchase 589,623 shares of common stock (or the “Warrant”) which we refer to as the TARP Assistance Period. These standards generally apply to our chief executive officer, chief financial officer and the three next most highly compensated senior executive officers. The standards include:
 
  •  ensuring that incentive compensation for senior executives does not encourage unnecessary and excessive risks that threaten the value of the financial institution;
 
  •  required clawback of any bonus or incentive compensation paid to a senior executive based on statements of earnings, gains or other criteria that are later proven to be materially inaccurate;
 
  •  prohibition on making golden parachute payments to senior executives; and
 
  •  agreement not to deduct for tax purposes executive compensation in excess of $500,000 for each senior executive.
 
In particular, the change to the deductibility limit on executive compensation may increase the overall cost of our compensation programs in future periods.
 
The ARRA imposed further limitations on compensation during the TARP Assistance Period including:
 
  •  a prohibition on making any golden parachute payment to a senior executive officer or any of our next five most highly compensated employees;
 
  •  a prohibition on any compensation plan that would encourage manipulation of the reported earnings to enhance the compensation of any of its employees; and
 
  •  a prohibition of the five highest paid executives from receiving or accruing any bonus, retention award or incentive compensation, or bonus except for long-term restricted stock with a value not greater than one-third of the total amount of annual compensation of the employee receiving the stock.
 
The Treasury released an interim final rule on TARP standards for compensation and corporate governance on June 10, 2009, which implemented and further expanded the limitations and restrictions imposed on executive compensation and corporate governance by the TARP CPP and ARRA. The new Treasury interim final rules also prohibit any tax gross-up payments to senior executive officers and the next 20 highest paid executives; require a “say on pay” vote in annual shareholders’ meetings; and restrict stock or units that may vest or become transferable granted to executives.
 
The Federal Reserve has proposed guidelines on executive compensation. The FDIC also has proposed a rule to incorporate employee compensation factors into the risk assessment system which would adjust risk-based deposit insurance assessment rates if the design of certain compensation programs does not satisfy certain FDIC goals to prevent executive compensation from encouraging undue risk-taking.
 
These provisions and any future rules issued by the Treasury, the Federal Reserve and the FDIC or any other regulatory agencies could adversely affect our ability to attract and retain management capable and motivated sufficiently to manage and operate our business through difficult economic and market conditions. If


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we are unable to attract and retain qualified employees to manage and operate our business, we may not be able to successfully execute our business strategy.
 
The short-term and long-term impact of the new Basel III capital standards and the forthcoming new capital rules for non-Basel U.S. banks is uncertain.
 
On September 12, 2010, the Group of Governors and Heads of Supervision, the oversight body of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, announced an agreement to a strengthened set of capital requirements for internationally active banking organizations in the United States and around the world, known as Basel III. When implemented by U.S. banking authorities, which have expressed support for the new capital standards. For a more detailed description of Basel III, see “Item 1. Business — Supervision and Regulation.”
 
Changes in accounting and tax rules applicable to banks could adversely affect our financial conditions and results of operations.
 
From time to time, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (the “FASB”) and the SEC change the financial accounting and reporting standards that govern the preparation of our financial statements. These changes can be hard to predict and can materially impact how we record and report our financial condition and results of operations. In some cases, we could be required to apply a new or revised standard retroactively, resulting in us restating prior period financial statements.
 
 
Congress and the bank regulators have encouraged recipients of TARP capital to use such capital to make loans and it may not be possible to safely, soundly and profitably make sufficient loans to creditworthy persons in the current economy to satisfy such goals. Congressional demands for additional lending by recipients of TARP capital, and regulatory demands for demonstrating and reporting such lending, are increasing. On November 12, 2008, the bank regulatory agencies issued a statement encouraging banks to, among other things, “lend prudently and responsibly to creditworthy borrowers” and to “work with borrowers to preserve homeownership and avoid preventable foreclosures.” We continue to lend and have expanded our mortgage loan originations, and to report our lending to the Treasury. The future demands for additional lending are unclear and uncertain, and we could be forced to make loans that involve risks or terms that we would not otherwise find acceptable or in our shareholders’ best interest. Such loans could adversely affect our results of operation and financial condition, and may be in conflict with bank regulations and requirements as to liquidity and capital. The profitability of funding such loans using deposits may be adversely affected by increased FDIC insurance premiums.
 
Changes of TARP program and future rules applicable to banks generally or to TARP recipients could adversely affect our operations, financial condition, and results of operations.
 
The rules and policies applicable to recipients of capital under the TARP CPP continue to evolve and their scope, timing and effect cannot be predicted. Any redemption of the securities sold to the Treasury to avoid these restrictions would require prior Federal Reserve and Treasury approval. Based on recently issued Federal Reserve guidelines, institutions seeking to redeem TARP CPP preferred stock must demonstrate an ability to access the long-term debt markets without reliance on the FDIC’s TLG, successfully demonstrate access to public equity markets and meet a number of additional requirements and considerations before we can redeem any securities sold to the Treasury. Therefore, it is uncertain if we will be able to redeem such securities even if we have sufficient financial resources to do so.
 
In addition, the government is contemplating potential new programs under TARP, including programs to promote small business lending, among other initiatives. It is uncertain whether we will qualify for those new programs and whether those new programs may impose additional restrictions on our operation and affect our financial condition in the future.


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Our continued participation in the TARP Capital Purchase Program may adversely affect our ability to retain customers, attract investors, compete for new business opportunities and retain high performing employees.
 
Several financial institutions which participated in the TARP CPP received approval from the Treasury to exit the program during the second half of 2009 and in 2010. These institutions have, or are in the process of, repurchasing the preferred stock and repurchasing or auctioning the warrant issued to the Treasury as part of the TARP CPP. We have not yet requested approval to repurchase the preferred stock and warrant from the Treasury. In order to repurchase one or both securities, in whole or in part, we must establish that we have satisfied all of the conditions to repurchase, and there can be no assurance that we will be able to repurchase these securities from the Treasury.
 
Our customers, employees, counterparties in our current and future business relationships, and the media may draw negative implications regarding the strength of Seacoast as a financial institution based on our continued participation in the TARP CPP following the exit of one or more of our competitors or other financial institutions. Any such negative perceptions may impair our ability to effectively compete with other financial institutions for business. In addition, because we have not yet repurchased the Treasury’s TARP CPP investment, we remain subject to the restrictions on incentive compensation contained in the ARRA. Financial institutions which have repurchased the Treasury’s CPP investment are relieved of the restrictions imposed by the ARRA and its implementing regulations. Due to these restrictions, we may not be able to successfully compete with financial institutions that have repurchased the Treasury’s investment to retain and attract high performing employees. If this were to occur, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected, perhaps materially.
 
 
We operate in the highly competitive markets of Martin, St. Lucie, Brevard, Indian River and Palm Beach Counties in southeastern Florida, the Orlando, Florida metropolitan statistical area, as well as in more rural competitive counties in the Lake Okeechobee, Florida region. Our future growth and success will depend on our ability to compete effectively in these markets. We compete for loans, deposits and other financial services in geographic markets with other local, regional and national commercial banks, thrifts, credit unions, mortgage lenders, and securities and insurance brokerage firms. Many of our competitors offer products and services different from us, and have substantially greater resources, name recognition and market presence than we do, which benefits them in attracting business. Larger competitors may be able to price loans and deposits more aggressively than we can, and have broader customer and geographic bases to draw upon.
 
We are dependent on key personnel and the loss of one or more of those key personnel could harm our business.
 
Our future success significantly depends on the continued services and performance of our key management personnel. We believe our management team’s depth and breadth of experience in the banking industry is integral to executing our business plan. We also will need to continue to attract, motivate and retain other key personnel. The loss of the services of members of our senior management team or other key employees or the inability to attract additional qualified personnel as needed could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, results of operations and cash flows.
 
We are subject to losses due to fraudulent and negligent acts on the part of loan applicants, mortgage brokers, other vendors and our employees.
 
When we originate mortgage loans, we rely heavily upon information supplied by loan applicants and third parties, including the information contained in the loan application, property appraisal, title information and employment and income documentation provided by third parties. If any of this information is misrepresented and such misrepresentation is not detected prior to loan funding, we generally bear the risk of loss associated with the misrepresentation.


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Our ability to engage in routine funding and other transactions could be adversely affected by the actions and commercial soundness of other financial institutions. Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty or other relationships. As a result, defaults by, or even rumors or questions about, one or more financial services institutions, or the financial services industry generally, have led to market-wide liquidity problems, losses of depositor, creditor and counterparty confidence and could lead to losses or defaults by us or by other institutions. We could experience increases in deposits and assets as a result of other banks’ difficulties or failure, which would increase the capital we need to support such growth.
 
 
We and our subsidiaries are regulated by several regulators, including the Federal Reserve, the OCC, the SEC, the FDIC and FINRA, and since December 2008, the Treasury. Our success is affected by state and federal regulations affecting banks and bank holding companies, and the securities markets and securities and insurance regulators. Banking regulations are primarily intended to protect depositors, not shareholders. The financial services industry also is subject to frequent legislative and regulatory changes and proposed changes, the effects of which cannot be predicted. Federal bank regulatory agencies and the Treasury, as well as the Congress and the President, are evaluating and have proposed numerous significant changes in the regulation of banks, other financial services providers and the financial markets. These changes, if adopted, could require us to maintain more capital, liquidity and risk controls which could adversely affect our growth, profitability and financial condition.
 
Federal banking agencies periodically conduct examinations of our business, including for compliance with laws and regulations, and our failure to comply with any supervisory actions to which we are or become subject as a result of such examinations may adversely affect us.
 
The Federal Reserve and the OCC periodically conduct examinations of our business and Seacoast National’s business, including for compliance with laws and regulations. If, as a result of an examination, the Federal Reserve and/or the OCC were to determine that the financial condition, capital resources, asset quality, asset concentrations, earnings prospects, management, liquidity, sensitivity to market risk, or other aspects of any of our or Seacoast National’s operations had become unsatisfactory, or that we or our management were in violation of any law, regulation or guideline in effect from time to time, the regulators may take a number of different remedial actions as they deem appropriate. These actions include the power to enjoin “unsafe or unsound” practices, to require affirmative actions to correct any conditions resulting from any violation or practice, to issue an administrative order that can be judicially enforced, to direct an increase in our capital, to restrict our growth, to change the composition of our concentrations in portfolio or balance sheet assets, to assess civil monetary penalties against our officers or directors or to remove officers and directors.
 
 
We are required to comply with various corporate governance and financial reporting requirements under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as rules and regulations adopted by the SEC, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and Nasdaq. In particular, we are required to include management and independent registered public accounting firm reports on internal controls as part of our annual report on Form 10-K pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. We are also subject to a number of disclosure and reporting requirements as a result of our participation in TARP CPP. The SEC also has proposed a number of new rules or regulations requiring additional disclosure, such as lower-level employee compensation. We expect to continue to spend significant amounts of time and money on compliance with these rules. Our failure to track and comply with the various rules may materially adversely affect our reputation, ability to obtain the necessary certifications to financial statements, and the value of our securities.


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The financial services industry is undergoing rapid technological changes with frequent introductions of new technology-driven products and services. In addition to serving clients better, the effective use of technology may increase efficiency and may enable financial institutions to reduce costs. Our future success will depend, in part, upon our ability to use technology to provide products and services that provide convenience to customers and to create additional efficiencies in operations. We may need to make significant additional capital investments in technology in the future, and we may not be able to effectively implement new technology-driven products and services. Many competitors have substantially greater resources to invest in technological improvements.
 
 
Florida law and our Articles of Incorporation include anti-takeover provisions, such as provisions that encourage persons seeking to acquire control of us to consult with our board, and which enable the board to negotiate and give consideration on behalf of us and our shareholders and other constituencies to the merits of any offer made. Such provisions, as well as supermajority voting and quorum requirements and a staggered board of directors, may make any takeover attempts and other acquisitions of interests in us, by means of a tender offer, open market purchase, a proxy fight or otherwise, that have not been approved by our board of directors more difficult and more expensive. These provisions may discourage possible business combinations that a majority of our shareholders may believe to be desirable and beneficial. As a result, our board of directors may decide not to pursue transactions that would otherwise be in the best interests of holders of our common stock.
 
 
Our market areas in Florida are susceptible to hurricanes and tropical storms and related flooding and wind damage. Such weather events can disrupt operations, result in damage to properties and negatively affect the local economies in the markets where we operate. We cannot predict whether or to what extent damage that may be caused by future hurricanes will affect our operations or the economies in our current or future market areas, but such weather events could result in a decline in loan originations, a decline in the value or destruction of properties securing our loans and an increase in the delinquencies, foreclosures or loan losses. Our business or results of operations may be adversely affected by these and other negative effects of future hurricanes or tropical storms, including flooding and wind damage. Many of our customers have incurred significantly higher property and casualty insurance premiums on their properties located in our markets, which may adversely affect real estate sales and values in our markets.
 
We may engage in FDIC-assisted transactions, which could present additional risks to our business.
 
We may have opportunities to acquire the assets and liabilities of failed banks in FDIC-assisted transactions, which present general acquisition risks, as well as risks specific to these transactions. Although FDIC-assisted transactions typically provide for FDIC assistance to an acquiror to mitigate certain risks, which may include loss-sharing, where the FDIC absorbs most losses on covered assets and provides some indemnity, we would be subject to many of the same risks we would face in acquiring another bank in a negotiated transaction, without FDIC assistance, including risks associated with pricing such transactions, the risks of loss of deposits and maintaining customer relationships and the failure to realize the anticipated acquisition benefits in the amounts and within the timeframes we expect. In addition, because these acquisitions provide for limited diligence and negotiation of terms, these transactions may require additional resources and time, servicing acquired problem loans and costs related to integration of personnel and operating systems, the establishment of processes to service acquired assets, and require us to raise additional capital, which may be dilutive to our existing shareholders. If we are unable to manage these risks, FDIC-


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assisted acquisitions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
While we seek continued organic growth, as our earnings and capital position improve, we may consider the acquisition of other businesses. We expect that other banking and financial companies, many of which have significantly greater resources, will compete with us to acquire financial services businesses. This competition could increase prices for potential acquisitions that we believe are attractive. Also, acquisitions are subject to various regulatory approvals. If we fail to receive the appropriate regulatory approvals, we will not be able to consummate an acquisition that we believe is in our best interests. Among other things, our regulators consider our capital, liquidity, profitability, regulatory compliance and levels of goodwill and intangibles when considering acquisition and expansion proposals. Any acquisition could be dilutive to our earnings and shareholders’ equity per share of our common stock.
 
Risks Related to our Common Stock
 
We may issue additional shares of common or preferred stock securities, which may dilute the interests of our shareholders and may adversely affect the market price of our common stock.
 
We are currently authorized to issue up to 130 million shares of common stock, of which 93,487,581 shares were outstanding as of December 31, 2010, and up to 4 million shares of preferred stock, of which 2,000 shares are outstanding. During the second quarter of 2010, the Company issued Series B convertible preferred stock raising $47.1 million in capital, with additional common stock of 34,465,348 shares issued at conversion five days after approval by shareholders at the annual shareholders’ meeting on June 22, 2010. Our board of directors has authority, without action or vote of the shareholders, to issue all or part of the remaining authorized but unissued shares and to establish the terms of any series of preferred stock. These authorized but unissued shares could be issued on terms or in circumstances that could dilute the interests of other shareholders.
 
The Series A Preferred Stock diminishes the net income available to our common shareholders and earnings per common share, and the Warrant we issued to Treasury may be dilutive to holders of our common stock.
 
The dividends accrued and the accretion on discount on the Series A Preferred Stock reduce the net income available to common shareholders and our earnings per common share. The Series A Preferred Stock is cumulative, which means that any dividends not declared or paid will accumulate and will be payable when we resume paying dividends. Shares of Series A Preferred Stock will also receive preferential treatment in the event of liquidation, dissolution or winding up of Seacoast. Additionally, the ownership interest of the existing holders of our common stock will be diluted to the extent the Warrant is exercised. The shares of common stock underlying the Warrant represent approximately 0.6 percent of the shares of our common stock outstanding as of December 31, 2010 (including the shares issuable upon exercise of the Warrant in our total outstanding shares). Although Treasury has agreed not to vote any of the shares of common stock it receives upon exercise of the Warrant, a transferee of any portion of the Warrant or of any shares of common stock acquired upon exercise of the Warrant is not bound by this restriction.
 
 
In the event that we fail to pay dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock for an aggregate of at least six quarterly dividend periods (whether or not consecutive) the Treasury will have the right to appoint two directors to our board of directors until all accrued but unpaid dividends have been paid; otherwise, except as required by law, holders of the Series A Preferred Stock have limited voting rights. We currently have failed to pay dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock for seven consecutive quarterly dividend periods. So long as


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shares of the Series A Preferred Stock are outstanding, in addition to any other vote or consent of shareholders required by law or our amended and restated charter, the vote or consent of holders owning at least 662/3 percent of the shares of Series A Preferred Stock outstanding is required for:
 
  •  any authorization or issuance of shares ranking senior to the Series A Preferred Stock;
 
  •  any amendment to the rights of the Series A Preferred Stock so as to adversely affect the rights, preferences, privileges or voting power of the Series A Preferred Stock; or
 
  •  consummation of any merger, share exchange or similar transaction unless the shares of Series A Preferred Stock remain outstanding, or if we are not the surviving entity in such transaction, are converted into or exchanged for preference securities of the surviving entity and the shares of Series A Preferred Stock remaining outstanding or such preference securities have such rights, preferences, privileges and voting power as are not materially less favorable to the holders than the rights, preferences, privileges and voting power of the shares of Series A Preferred Stock. Holders of Series A Preferred Stock could block the foregoing transitions, even where considered desirable by, or in the best interests of, holders of our common stock.
 
The holders of Series A Preferred Stock, including the Treasury, may have different interests from the holders of our common stock, and could vote to disapprove transactions that are favored by, or are in the best interests of, our common shareholders.
 
Item 1B.   Unresolved Staff Comments
 
None.
 
Item 2.   Properties
 
We and Seacoast National’s main office occupies approximately 66,000 square feet of a 68,000 square foot building in Stuart, Florida. This building, together with an adjacent 10-lane drive-through banking facility and an additional 27,000-square foot office building, are situated on approximately eight acres of land in the center of Stuart that is zoned for commercial use. The building and land are owned by Seacoast National, which leases out portions of the building not utilized by our company and Seacoast National to unaffiliated third parties.
 
Adjacent to the main office, Seacoast National leases approximately 21,400 square feet of office space to house operational departments, consisting primarily of information systems and retail support. Seacoast National owns its equipment, which is used for servicing bank deposits and loan accounts as well as on-line banking services, and providing tellers and other customer service personnel with access to customers’ records. In addition, Seacoast National acquired Big Lake’s operations center as a result of the acquisition of Big Lake on April 1, 2006. The operations center is situated on 1.44 acres in a 4,939 square foot building in Okeechobee, Florida, all owned by Seacoast National; during 2010, 1.81 acres of vacant land adjacent to Big Lake’s operations center was sold. Our PGA Blvd. branch is utilized as a disaster recovery site should natural disasters or other events preclude use of Seacoast National’s primary operations center.
 
In February 2000, Seacoast National opened a lending office in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida for its Seacoast Marine Finance Division. In November 2002, additional office space was acquired for the Seacoast Marine Finance Division in Alameda, California (430 square feet of leased space), and Newport Beach, California (1,200 square feet of leased space). Since January 2005, the Ft. Lauderdale, Florida office has been in a 2,009 square feet leased facility. The furniture and equipment at these locations is owned by Seacoast National.
 
As of December 31, 2010, the net carrying value of branch offices of Seacoast National (excluding the main office) was approximately $27.6 million. Seacoast National’s branch offices are described as follows:
 
Jensen Beach, opened in 1977, is a free-standing facility located in the commercial district of a residential community contiguous to Stuart. The 1,920 square foot bank building and land are owned by


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Seacoast National. Improvements include three drive-in teller lanes and one drive-up ATM, as well as a parking lot and landscaping.
 
East Ocean Boulevard, was originally opened in 1978 and relocated in 1995. This office is located on the main thoroughfare between downtown Stuart and Hutchinson Island’s beachfront residential developments. This branch is housed in a four-story office condominium. The 2,300 square foot branch area on the first floor operates as a full service branch including five drive-in lanes and a drive-up ATM. The remaining 2,300 square feet on the ground floor was sold in June 1996, the third floor was sold in December 1995, and the second floor was sold in December 1998.
 
Cove Road, opened in late 1983, is conveniently located close to housing developments in the residential areas south of Stuart known as Port Salerno and Hobe Sound. South Branch Building, Inc., a subsidiary of Seacoast National, is a general partner in a partnership that entered into a long-term land lease for approximately four acres of property on which it constructed a 7,500 square foot building. Seacoast National leases the building and utilizes 3,450 square feet of the available space. Remaining space is sublet by Seacoast National to other business tenants. Seacoast National has improved the premises with three drive-in lanes, bank equipment, and furniture and fixtures, all of which are owned by Seacoast National. A drive-up ATM was added in early 1997.
 
Hutchinson Island, opened on December 31, 1984, is in a shopping center located on a coastal barrier island, close to numerous oceanfront condominium developments. In 1993, the branch was expanded from 2,800 square feet to 4,000 square feet and is under a long-term lease to Seacoast National. Seacoast National has improved the premises with bank equipment, a walk-up ATM and three drive-in lanes, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Rivergate, opened October 28, 1985, originally occupied 1,700 square feet of leased space in the Rivergate Shopping Center, Port St. Lucie, Florida. Seacoast National moved the branch to larger facilities in the shopping center in April 1999. Furniture and bank equipment located in the prior facilities were moved to the new facility, which occupied approximately 3,400 square feet, with three drive-in lanes and a drive-up ATM. This office closed in the second quarter of 2008, simultaneous with the opening of Seacoast National’s new Westmoreland branch office (across the street from Rivergate). The Westmoreland office is situated in a stand alone building owned by Seacoast National with 4,468 square feet of space (2,821 square feet to be occupied by the branch, the remainder to be leased to tenants) on leased land, with three drive-in lanes, a drive-up ATM, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. Located on the corner of a heavily traversed thoroughfare, the new location is more prominent than the existing store front location in the shopping plaza.
 
Wedgewood Commons, opened in April 1988, is located on an out-parcel under long term ground lease in the Wedgewood Commons Shopping Center, south of Stuart on U.S. Highway 1. The property consists of a 2,800 square foot building that houses four drive-in lanes, a walk-up ATM and various bank equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. This office closed simultaneously in January 2009, with its relocation to a new stand alone building on a leased out parcel in the same shopping center, but with a greater presence on the corner of U.S. 1 and offering better ingress and egress. The new building owned by Seacoast National contains 5,477 square feet of space (2,836 square feet to be occupied by the branch, the remainder to be leased to tenants), with four drive-in lanes, a drive-up ATM, and furniture and equipment, all of which are owned by Seacoast National.
 
Bayshore, opened in September 1990, occupies 3,520 square feet of a 50,000 square foot shopping center located in Port St. Lucie. Seacoast National has leased the premises under a long-term lease agreement and has made improvements to the premises, including the addition of three drive-in lanes and a walk-up ATM, all of which are owned by Seacoast National.
 
Hobe Sound, acquired in December 1991 from the Resolution Trust Corporation, is a two-story facility containing 8,000 square feet and is centrally located in Hobe Sound. Of 2,800 square feet on the second floor, 1,225 square feet is utilized by local community organizations. Improvements include two


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drive-in teller lanes, a drive-up ATM, and equipment and furniture, all of which are owned by Seacoast National.
 
Fort Pierce, acquired in December 1991, is a 2,895 square foot facility owned by Seacoast National in the heart of Fort Pierce that has three drive-in lanes and a drive-up ATM. Equipment and furniture at this location are all owned by Seacoast National. In August 2007, Seacoast National sold this building, realizing a gain of $280,000. Under the terms of the sales agreement, Seacoast National obtained an accommodation whereby it could continue to occupy the location until construction of its new Ft. Pierce location was completed. The new location on U.S. 1 is situated on leased land with 5,477 square feet of space (2,836 square feet to be occupied by the branch, the remainder to be leased to tenants), with three drive-in lanes, a drive-up ATM, and furniture and equipment, all of which are owned by Seacoast National. The new location opened in October 2008.
 
Martin Downs, acquired in February 1992, is a 3,960 square foot bank building owned by Seacoast National located at a high traffic intersection in Palm City, an emerging commercial and residential community west of Stuart. Improvements include three drive-in teller lanes, a drive-up ATM, equipment and furniture.
 
Tiffany, acquired in May 1992 and owned by Seacoast National, is a two-story facility containing 8,250 square feet and is located on a corner of U.S. Highway 1 in Port St. Lucie offering excellent exposure in one of the fastest growing residential areas in the region. Seacoast National uses the second story space to house brokerage and loan origination personnel, a training facility and conference area. Three drive-in teller lanes, a walk-up ATM, equipment and furniture are utilized and owned by Seacoast National.
 
Vero Beach, acquired in February 1993 and owned by Seacoast National, is a 3,300 square foot bank building located in Vero Beach on U.S. Highway 1 at the intersection with 12th Street. Seacoast National holds a long-term ground lease on the property. Improvements include three drive-in teller lanes, a walk-up ATM, equipment and furniture, all of which are owned by Seacoast National.
 
Beachland, opened in February 1993, consists of 4,150 square feet of leased space located in a three-story commercial building on Beachland Boulevard, the main beachfront thoroughfare in Vero Beach, Florida. This facility has 2 drive-in teller lanes, a drive-up ATM, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. In November 2008, Seacoast National closed this location and relocated branch personnel, as well as furniture and equipment, to a separate leased facility in close proximity on Cardinal Drive.
 
Sandhill Cove, opened in September 1993, in a leased facility in an upscale life-care retirement community. The 135 square foot office was located within community facilities on a 36-acre development in Palm City, Florida containing approximately 168 private residences. Seacoast National closed this office in November 2010.
 
St. Lucie West, opened in November 1994 in a different location, was moved to the Renar Centre, located at 1100 SW St. Lucie West Blvd., Port St. Lucie, Florida, in June 1997, where Seacoast National leases 4,320 square feet on the first floor. The facility includes three drive-in teller lanes, a drive-up ATM, and furniture and equipment.
 
Mariner Square, acquired in April 1995, was a 3,600 square foot leased space located on the ground floor of a three-story office building located on U.S. Highway 1 between Hobe Sound and Port Salerno. Approximately 700 square feet of the space was sublet to a third party. The space occupied by Seacoast National had been improved to be a full service branch with two drive-in lanes, one serving as a drive-up ATM lane as well as a drive-in teller lane, all owned by Seacoast National. Seacoast National closed this location in March 2008.
 
Sebastian, opened in May 1996, is located within a 174,000 square foot Wal-Mart Superstore on U.S. Highway 1 in northern Indian River County. The leased space occupied by Seacoast National totals 865 square feet. The facility has a walk-up ATM, owned by Seacoast National.


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South Vero Square, opened in May 1997 in a 3,150 square foot building owned by Seacoast National on South U.S. Highway 1 in Vero Beach. The facility includes three drive-in teller lanes, a drive-up ATM, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Oak Point, opened in June 1997, occupies 5,619 square feet of leased space on the first floor of a 19,700 square foot three-story building in Indian River County. The office is in close proximity to Indian River Memorial Hospital and the peripheral medical community adjacent to the hospital. The facility includes three drive-in teller lanes, a walk-up ATM, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. Seacoast National sublets 2,030 square feet of space on the first floor to a third party.
 
Route 60 Vero, opened in July 1997.  Similar to the Sebastian office, this facility is housed in a Wal-Mart Superstore in western Vero Beach in Indian River County. The branch occupies 750 square feet of leased space and includes a walk-up ATM.
 
Sebastian West, opened in March 1998 in a 3,150 square foot building owned by Seacoast National. It is located at the intersection of Fellsmere Road and Roseland Road in Sebastian. The facility includes three drive-in teller lanes, a drive-up ATM, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Jensen West, opened in July 2000, is located on an out parcel under a long-term ground lease on U.S. Highway 1 in northern Martin County. The facility consists of a 3,930 square foot building, with four drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM and furniture and equipment, all of which are owned by Seacoast National and are located on the leased property. This office replaced Seacoast National’s U.S. Highway 1 and Port St. Lucie Boulevard office, one-half mile north of this location, which originally opened in June 1997.
 
Ft. Pierce Wal-Mart, opened in June 2001, was another Wal-Mart Superstore location. The branch occupied 540 square feet of leased space and included a walk-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. This location was closed at the end of February 2008.
 
Port St. Lucie Wal-Mart, opened in October 2002, occupied 695 square feet of leased space in a Wal-Mart Superstore on U.S. Highway 1 in southern Port St. Lucie. The branch included a walk-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. This location was closed at the end of December 2007.
 
Jupiter, located on U.S. Highway 1 in Jupiter, Florida, this office opened as a loan production office in August 2002 and converted to a full-service branch during 2003. Commercial and residential lending personnel as well as certain executive offices were maintained at this location until May 2006 when our PGA Blvd. location opened. In May 2006 this office was closed. Seacoast National’s obligation for 3,718 square feet of leased space under lease expired at the end of July 2007. No ATM or night depository existed for this location.
 
Tequesta, opened in January 2003, is a 3,500 square foot building acquired and owned by Seacoast National located on U.S. Highway 1 on property subject to a long term ground lease. The Tequesta location has two drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Jupiter Indiantown, opened in December 2004, is a free standing office located on Indiantown Road, a prime thoroughfare in Jupiter, Florida. Seacoast National owns the building and leases the land. The building is 2,881 square feet and includes three drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Juno Beach was acquired during 2004.  Seacoast National’s Jupiter Bluff’s branch was relocated to this facility at the end of December 2004, following renovation of the building. The building is 2,891 square feet, located on U.S. Highway 1 in Juno Beach, and includes three drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. We closed this location at the end of March 2008.


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60 West was acquired in January 2005 from another financial institution. Seacoast National owns the land and the 2,500 square foot building at this location on Route 60 in Vero Beach. The office has three drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Northlake, is a 2,881 square foot location built on land owned by Seacoast National and opened in February 2005. Located on a bustling east / west thoroughfare in northern Palm Beach County, the facility includes 3 drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. This location was closed in June 2009.
 
Downtown Orlando, acquired in April 2005, is a 6,752 square foot leased facility occupying the ground floor of a six floor 62,100 square foot commercial office building on Orange Avenue in the heart of downtown Orlando. The location includes a walk-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Maitland/Winter Park, acquired in April 2005, occupies 4,536 square feet of leased space on the first floor of a three-story 32,975 square foot office building on Orlando Avenue. The location includes 3 drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Longwood, acquired in April 2005, occupies 4,596 square feet of leased space on the first floor of a three-story 35,849 square foot office building on North State Road 434. The location includes 3 drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
PGA Blvd., a signature Palm Beach County headquarters office opened in May 2006 in Palm Beach Gardens in northern Palm Beach County. Located across the street from the Gardens Mall on PGA Blvd., this leased office is in a high-rise office building. Seacoast National occupies a total of 13,454 square feet: 5,600 square feet on the first floor and 7,854 square feet on the second floor. The office has three drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM and night depository.
 
Offices acquired from Big Lake include branches in eight locations in central Florida. Some locations are leased, others owned. The eight locations are as follows:
 
South Parrott, acquired in April 2006, located in Okeechobee County, this office is comprised of an 8,232 square foot two-story building on approximately 3 acres of land, all owned by Seacoast National. The office was constructed in 1986 and has eight drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
North Parrott, acquired in April 2006, located in Okeechobee County, is a 3,920 square foot one-story building built in 2004 on 2 acres of land. The office and land are owned by Seacoast National. The office has 4 drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Arcadia, acquired in April 2006, located in DeSoto County, originally was a 1,681 square foot one-story branch on approximately 1.5 acres, all owned by Seacoast National. Built in 1984, the office has 3 drive-up lanes, a walk-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. An expansion of this office adding 1,575 square feet was completed in April 2008.
 
Moore Haven, acquired in April 2006, located in Glades County, is a 640 square foot office. The office is under a lease, the initial term of which expired in 2003 and now is renewed annually in November. The office is a storefront location, with a walk-up ATM, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Wauchula, acquired in April 2006, located in Hardee County, is a 4,278 square foot office. It is leased under a 10-year lease that expired in 2008, but with a renewal option that extends the lease for an additional five years to 2013. The office has 2 drive-up lanes, a walk-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.


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Clewiston, acquired in April 2006, located in Hendry County, consists of a 5,661 square foot building that is 32 years old on 2 plus acres. The land and building are owned. It has 4 drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
LaBelle, acquired in April 2006, located in Hendry County, is a one-story building consisting of 2,361 square feet on approximately one acre of land. The land and building are owned by Seacoast National. The building is 21 years old. The office has three drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Lake Placid, acquired in April 2006, located in Highlands County, is a 2,125 square foot building. The building and land (approximately one-half acre) are owned by Seacoast National. It has a drive-up window, a walk-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
Additional offices opened since the acquisition of Big Lake include the following:
 
Viera-The Avenues, which opened in February 2007, is Seacoast National’s first branch location in Brevard County, located in the Viera area. The branch is 5,999 square feet in size, with 3 drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. This location is under a ground lease.
 
Middle River was opened in October 2007 in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida on U.S. 1. The location occupies 2,350 square feet of leased space on the first floor of a brand new one-story building. The location has a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. The location replaced 1,089 square feet of space acquired on a short term lease in early 2007 in Boca Raton, Florida, temporarily housing a new loan production office. All personnel were relocated to the Middle River site. This location was closed in early December 2009.
 
Murrell Road, located in Brevard County, is Seacoast National’s second office in this market. The branch is a two-story office owned by Seacoast National with 9,041 square feet, of which 4,307 square feet on the first floor houses banking and loan offices and 4,264 square feet on the second floor is available to lease (of which 2,408 square feet is leased to an outside party). The branch has 3 drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National. This location is under a ground lease and opened in April 2008.
 
Gatlin Boulevard, located in St.  Lucie County, opened in March 2008 on an out parcel directly in front of a Sam’s Club and adjacent to a Wal-Mart. The office is two stories, with 2,782 square feet on the first floor occupied by Seacoast National and 2,518 square feet on the second floor available for leasing to outside parties. Seacoast National owns the land and building. The branch has 4 drive-up lanes, a drive-up ATM, a night depository, and furniture and equipment, all owned by Seacoast National.
 
For additional information regarding our properties, please refer to Notes G and K of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Our 2010 Annual Report, certain portions of which are incorporated herein by reference pursuant to Part II, Item 8 of this report.
 
No new or planned offices are projected to open over the remainder of 2011.
 
Item 3.   Legal Proceedings
 
We and our subsidiaries are subject, in the ordinary course, to litigation incident to the businesses in which we are engaged. Management presently believes that none of the legal proceedings to which we are a party are likely to have a material effect on our consolidated financial position, operating results or cash flows, although no assurance can be given with respect to the ultimate outcome of any such claim or litigation.
 
Item 4.   [Reserved]


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Item 5.   Market For Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
Holders of our common stock are entitled to one vote per share on all matters presented to shareholders as provided in our Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation.
 
Our common stock is traded under the symbol “SBCF” on the Nasdaq Global Select Market, which is a national securities exchange (“Nasdaq”). As of March 11, 2011 there were 93,504,788 shares of our common stock outstanding, held by approximately 1,332 record holders.
 
The table below sets forth the high and low sale prices per share of our common stock on Nasdaq and the dividends paid per share of our common stock for the indicated periods.
 
                         
    Sale Price Per Share of
  Quarterly Dividends
    Seacoast Common Stock   Declared Per Share of
    High   Low   Seacoast Common Stock
 
2009
                       
First Quarter
  $ 6.870     $ 2.170     $ 0.01  
Second Quarter
    4.350       2.150       0.00  
Third Quarter
    2.840       1.910       0.00  
Fourth Quarter
    2.620       1.180       0.00  
2010
                       
First Quarter
  $ 2.040     $ 1.370     $ 0.00  
Second Quarter
    2.500       1.280       0.00  
Third Quarter
    1.480       1.120       0.00  
Fourth Quarter
    1.460       1.120       0.00  
 
Dividends
 
Dividends from Seacoast National are our primary source of funds to pay dividends on our common stock. Under the National Bank Act, national banks may in any calendar year, without the approval of the OCC, pay dividends to the extent of net profits for that year, plus retained net profits for the preceding two years (less any required transfers to surplus). The need to maintain adequate capital in Seacoast National also limits dividends that may be paid to us. Beginning in the third quarter of 2008, we reduced our dividend per share of common stock to de minimis $0.01. On May 19, 2009, the Company’s board of directors voted to suspend quarterly dividends on common stock.
 
In addition, our ability to pay dividends is limited by our participation in the TARP CPP. Prior to December 19, 2011, unless we have redeemed the preferred stock issued to the Treasury in the CPP or the Treasury has transferred the preferred stock to a third party, we cannot increase its quarterly dividend above $0.01 per share of common stock. Furthermore, if we are not current in the payment of quarterly dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock, we cannot pay dividends on our common stock. Due to recent operating losses, we are currently restricted by the Federal Reserve from paying dividends on the Series A Preferred Stock. As a result, we have deferred the payment of seven dividends to the Treasury and are unable to pay dividends on our common stock.
 
Additional information regarding restrictions on the ability of Seacoast National to pay dividends to us is contained in Note C of the “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements” in our 2010 Annual Report, portions of which are incorporated by reference herein, including in Part II, Item 8 of this report. See “Item 1. Business- Payments of Dividends” for information with respect to the regulatory restrictions on dividends. We do not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future and expect to retain all earnings, if any, to support our capital adequacy and growth.


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Outstanding Warrants
 
Pursuant to the Purchase Agreement between us and the Treasury on December 19, 2008, we sold the Warrant to acquire 1,179,245 shares of our common stock to the U.S. Treasury and the exercise price of the Warrant is $6.36. As a result of the Company’s public offering in the third quarter of 2009, the number of shares under the Warrant was reduced by 50 percent to 589,625 shares. The Warrant will expire on December 19, 2018.
 
Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
 
See the information included under Part III, Item 12, which is incorporated in response to this item by reference.
 
Performance Graph
 
The following line-graph compares the cumulative, total return on the Company’s Common Stock from December 31, 2005 to December 31, 2010, with that of the NASDAQ Composite Index and the SNL Southeast Bank Index. Cumulative total return represents the change in stock price and the amount of dividends received over the indicated period, assuming the reinvestment of dividends.
 
Total Return Performance
 
(PERFORMANCE GRAPH)
 
                                                 
    Period Ending
Index
  12/31/05   12/31/06   12/31/07   12/31/08   12/31/09   12/31/10
 
Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida
    100.00       110.54       47.51       31.66       7.84       7.02  
NASDAQ Composite
    100.00       110.39       122.15       73.32       106.57       125.91  
SNL Southeast Bank
    100.00       117.26       88.33       35.76       35.90       34.86  
 
Source: SNL Financial LC, Charlottesville,VA
© 2011
www.snl.com
 
Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities
 
On December 17, 2009, Seacoast sold 6,000,000 shares of its common stock to CapGen Capital Group III LP (“CapGen”), a Delaware limited partnership, pursuant to the definitive Stock Purchase Agreement dated as of October 23, 2009 between the Company and CapGen, a copy of which was filed with the SEC on October 29, 2009 as Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K. Fox-Pitt Kelton Cochran Caronia Waller (USA) LLC, and its successor, Macquarie Capital (USA) Inc. acted as placement agent. The


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Company received total gross proceeds of $13.5 million from the sale, and paid $540,000 of fees paid to the placement agent, in addition to the reimbursement of reasonable expenses in connection with the placement. The private placement was made pursuant to exemptions from registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended and Regulation D thereunder.
 
A stock offering was completed during April of 2010 adding $50 million of Series B Mandatorily Convertible Noncumulative Nonvoting Preferred Stock (“Series B Preferred Stock”) as permanent capital, resulting in approximately $47.1 million in additional Tier 1 risk-based equity, net of issuance costs. The shares of Series B Preferred Stock were mandatorily convertible into common shares five days subsequent to shareholder approval, which was granted at the Company’s annual meeting on June 22, 2010 (see Part II., Item 4, Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders contained in our report on form 10-Q dated August 9, 2010). Upon the conversion of the Series B Preferred Stock, approximately 34,482,759 shares of our common stock were issued pursuant to the Investment Agreement, dated as of April 8, 2010 between the Company and the investors, a copy of which was filed with the SEC on July 14, 2010 as Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K/A.
 
Item 6.   Selected Financial Data
 
Selected financial data of the Company is set forth under the caption “Financial Highlights” in the 2010 Annual Report and is incorporated herein by reference.
 
Item 7.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations is set forth under the caption “Financial Review — 2010 Management’s Discussion and Analysis” in the 2010 Annual Report and is incorporated herein by reference.
 
Item 7A.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
 
The narrative under the heading of “Market Risk” in the 2010 Annual Report is incorporated herein by reference. Table 19, “Interest Rate Sensitivity Analysis”, the narrative under the heading of “Securities”, and the narrative under the heading of “Interest Rate Sensitivity” in the 2010 Annual Report are incorporated herein by reference. The information regarding securities owned by us set forth in Table 15, “Securities Held for Sale” and Table 16, “Securities Held for Investment,” in the 2010 Annual Report is incorporated herein by reference.
 
Item 8.   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 
The report of KPMG LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, and the Consolidated Financial Statements are included in the 2010 Annual Report and are incorporated herein by reference. “Selected Quarterly Information — Consolidated Quarterly Average Balances, Yields & Rates” and “Quarterly Consolidated Income Statements” are included in the 2010 Annual Report and are incorporated herein by reference.
 
Item 9.   Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
 
None.
 
Item 9A.   Controls and Procedures
 
Disclosure Controls and Procedures.  We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to management, including our Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) and Chief Financial Officer (“CFO”), as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, as defined in SEC Rule 13a-15


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under the Exchange Act, management recognized that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives.
 
In connection with the preparation of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, as of the end of the period covered by this report, an evaluation was performed, with the participation of the CEO and CFO, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures, as required by Rule 13a-15 of the Exchange Act. Based upon that evaluation, the CEO and CFO concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of the end of the period covered by this report.
 
Internal Control over Financial Reporting.  Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Our internal control system was designed to provide reasonable assurance to our management and board of directors regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes.
 
Management conducted an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010. This assessment was based on the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in Internal Control — Integrated Framework. Based on this assessment, management believes that, as of December 31, 2010, our internal control over financial reporting was effective.
 
Our independent registered public accounting firm, KPMG LLP, has issued an attestation report on our internal control over financial reporting which is included in Exhibit 23.1 to this report.
 
Change in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting — There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during our last fiscal quarter that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
 
Item 9B.   Other Information.
 
None.
 
 
Item 10.   Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
 
Information concerning our directors and executive officers is set forth under the headings “Proposal 1 — Election of Directors” and “Corporate Governance” in the 2011 Proxy Statement, as well as under the heading “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance” in the 2011 Proxy Statement, incorporated herein by reference.
 
Item 11.   Executive Compensation
 
Information regarding the compensation paid by us to our directors and executive officers is set forth under the headings “Executive Compensation,” “Compensation Discussion & Analysis,” “Salary and Benefits Committee Report” and “Director Compensation” in the 2011 Proxy Statement which are incorporated herein by reference.


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Item 12.   Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
 
The following table sets forth information about our common stock that may be issued under all of our existing compensation plans as of December 31, 2010.
 
Equity Compensation Plan Information
 
December 31, 2010
 
                         
                Number of Securities
 
    Number of
          Remaining Available
 
    Securities to be
    Weighted Average
    for Future Issuance
 
    Issued Upon
    Exercise Price of
    Under Equity
 
    Exercise of
    Outstanding
    Compensation Plans
 
    Outstanding
    Options,
    (Excluding
 
    Options, Warrants
    Warrants and
    Securities
 
Plan category
  and Rights     Rights     Reflected in Column (a))  
 
Equity compensation plans approved by shareholders:
                       
1996 Plan(1)
        $        
2000 Plan(2)
    546,796       21.39       510,155  
2008 Plan(3)
                1,500,000  
Employee Stock Purchase Plan(4)
                228,407  
                         
TOTAL
    546,796     $ 21.39       2,238,562  
                         
 
 
(1) Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida 1996 Long-Term Incentive Plan. Shares reserved under this plan are available for issuance pursuant to the exercise of stock options and stock appreciation rights granted under the plan, and may be granted as awards of restricted stock, performance shares, or other stock-based awards, including unrestricted stock.
 
(2) Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida 2000 Long-Term Incentive Plan. Shares reserved under this plan are available for issuance pursuant to the exercise of stock options and stock appreciation rights granted under the plan and may be granted as awards of performance shares, and awards of restricted stock or stock-based awards.
 
(3) Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida 2008 Long-Term Incentive Plan. Shares reserved under this plan are available for issuance pursuant to the exercise of stock options and stock appreciation rights granted under the plan, and may be granted as awards of restricted stock, performance shares, or other stock-based awards.
 
(4) Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida Employee Stock Purchase Plan, as amended.
 
Additional information regarding the ownership of our common stock is set forth under the headings “Proposal 1 — Election of Directors” and “Principal Shareholders” in the 2011 Proxy Statement, and is incorporated herein by reference.
 
Item 13.   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
 
Information regarding certain relationships and transactions between us and our officers, directors and significant shareholders is set forth under the heading “Salary and Benefits Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation” and “Certain Transactions and Business Relationships” and “Corporate Governance” in the 2011 Proxy Statement and is incorporated herein by reference.
 
Item 14.   Principal Accountant Fees and Services
 
Information concerning our principal accounting fees and services is set forth under the heading “Independent Auditors” in the 2011 Proxy Statement, and is incorporated herein by reference.


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Item 15.   Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
 
(a)(1) List of all financial statements
 
The following consolidated financial statements and reports of independent registered public accounting firm of Seacoast, included in the 2010 Annual Report, are incorporated by reference into Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
 
Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2010 and 2009
Consolidated Statements of Income for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 
(a)(2) List of financial statement schedules
 
All schedules normally required by Form 10-K are omitted, since either they are not applicable or the required information is shown in the financial statements or the notes thereto.
 
(a)(3) Listing of Exhibits
 
PLEASE NOTE: It is inappropriate for readers to assume the accuracy of, or rely upon any covenants, representations or warranties that may be contained in agreements or other documents filed as Exhibits to, or incorporated by reference in, this report. Any such covenants, representations or warranties may have been qualified or superseded by disclosures contained in separate schedules or exhibits not filed with or incorporated by reference in this report, may reflect the parties’ negotiated risk allocation in the particular transaction, may be qualified by materiality standards that differ from those applicable for securities law purposes, may not be true as of the date of this report or any other date, and may be subject to waivers by any or all of the parties. Where exhibits and schedules to agreements filed or incorporated by reference as Exhibits hereto are not included in these Exhibits, such exhibits and schedules to agreements are not included or incorporated by reference herein.
 
The following Exhibits are attached hereto or incorporated by reference herein (unless indicated otherwise, all documents referenced below were filed pursuant to the Exchange Act by Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida, Commission File No. 0-13660):
 
Exhibit 3.1.1 Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report of Form 10-Q, filed May 10, 2006.
 
Exhibit 3.1.2 Articles of Amendment to the Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 23, 2008.
 
Exhibit 3.1.3 Articles of Amendment to the Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 3.4 to the Company’s Form S-1, filed June 22, 2009.
 
Exhibit 3.1.4 Articles of Amendment to the Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed July 20, 2009.
 
Exhibit 3.1.5 Articles of Amendment to the Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 3, 2009.
 
Exhibit 3.1.6 Articles of Amendment to the Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K/A, filed July 14, 2010.
 
Exhibit 3.1.7 Articles of Amendment to the Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed June 25, 2010.


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Exhibit 3.2 Amended and Restated By-laws of the Corporation
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 3.2 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 21, 2007.
 
Exhibit 4.1 Specimen Common Stock Certificate
Incorporated herein by reference from the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, dated March 28, 2003.
 
Exhibit 4.2 Junior Subordinated Indenture
Dated as of March 31, 2005, between the Company and Wilmington Trust Company, as Trustee (including the form of the Floating Rate Junior Subordinated Note, which appears in Section 2.1 thereof), incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed April 5, 2005.
 
Exhibit 4.3 Guarantee Agreement
Dated as of March 31, 2005 between the Company, as Guarantor, and Wilmington Trust Company, as Guarantee Trustee, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed April 5, 2005.
 
Exhibit 4.4 Amended and Restated Trust Agreement
Dated as of March 31, 2005, among the Company, as Depositor, Wilmington Trust Company, as Property Trustee, Wilmington Trust Company, as Delaware Trustee and the Administrative Trustees named therein, as Administrative Trustees (including exhibits containing the related forms of the SBCF Capital Trust I Common Securities Certificate and the Preferred Securities Certificate), incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed April 5, 2005.
 
Exhibit 4.5 Indenture
Dated as of December 16, 2005, between the Company and U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee (including the form of the Junior Subordinated Debt Security, which appears as Exhibit A to the Indenture), incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed December 21, 2005.
 
Exhibit 4.6 Guarantee Agreement
Dated as of December 16, 2005, between the Company, as Guarantor, and U.S. Bank National Association, as Guarantee Trustee, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed December 21, 2005.
 
Exhibit 4.7 Amended and Restated Declaration of Trust
Dated as of December 16, 2005, among the Company, as Sponsor, Dennis S. Hudson, III and William R. Hahl, as Administrators, and U.S. Bank National Association, as Institutional Trustee (including exhibits containing the related forms of the SBCF Statutory Trust II Common Securities Certificate and the Capital Securities Certificate), incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed December 21, 2005.
 
Exhibit 4.8 Indenture
Dated June 29, 2007, between the Company and LaSalle Bank, as Trustee (including the form of the Junior Subordinated Debt Security, which appears as Exhibit A to the Indenture), incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed July 3, 2007.
 
Exhibit 4.9 Guarantee Agreement
Dated June 29, 2007, between the Company, as Guarantor, and LaSalle Bank, as Guarantee Trustee, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed July 3, 2007.
 
Exhibit 4.10 Amended and Restated Declaration of Trust
Dated June 29, 2007, among the Company, as Sponsor, Dennis S. Hudson, III and William R. Hahl, as Administrators, and LaSalle Bank, as Institutional Trustee (including exhibits containing the related forms of the SBCF Statutory Trust III Common Securities Certificate and the Capital Securities Certificate), incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed July 3, 2007.
 
Exhibit 4.11 Trust Agreement of SBCF Capital Trust IV
Dated May 16, 2008, among the Company, as Depositor and Wilmington Trust Company, a Delaware


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banking corporation, as Trustee (including exhibits containing the related forms of Junior Subordinated Indenture, Subordinated Indenture, Senior Indenture, Guarantee Agreement and the Amended and Restated Trust Agreement of SBCF Capital Trust IV), incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 4.13 to the Company’s Form S-3 filed May 23, 2008.
 
Exhibit 4.12 Trust Agreement of SBCF Capital Trust V
Dated May 16, 2008, among the Company, as Depositor and Wilmington Trust Company, a Delaware banking corporation, as Trustee (including exhibits containing the related forms of Junior Subordinated Indenture, Subordinated Indenture, Senior Indenture, Guarantee Agreement and the Amended and Restated Trust Agreement of SBCF Capital Trust V), incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 4.14 to the Company’s Form S-3 filed May 23, 2008.
 
Exhibit 4.13 Specimen Preferred Stock Certificate
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 23, 2008.
 
Exhibit 4.14 Warrant for Purchase of Shares of Common Stock
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 4.2 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 23, 2008.
 
Exhibit 4.15 Stock Purchase Agreement
Dated October 23, 2009, between the Company and CapGen Capital Group III, L.P., incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed October 29, 2009.
 
Exhibit 4.16 Registration Rights Agreement
Dated October 23, 2009, between the Company and CapGen Capital Group III, L.P., incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed October 29, 2009.
 
Exhibit 4.17 Registration Rights Agreement
Dated as of April 8, 2010, among the Company and the investors named on the signature pages thereto, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Form 8-K/A, filed July 14, 2010.
 
Exhibit 10.1 Amended and Restated Retirement Savings Plan*
 
Exhibit 10.2 Amended and Restated Employee Stock Purchase Plan*
Incorporated by reference from Exhibit A to the Company’s Definitive Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A, filed with the Commission on April 27, 2009.
 
Exhibit 10.5 Executive Employment Agreement*
Dated January 18, 1994 between Dennis S. Hudson, III and the Bank, incorporated herein by reference from the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, dated March 28, 1995.
 
Exhibit 10.6 Executive Employment Agreement*
Dated January 2, 2007 between Harry R. Holland, III and the Bank, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed January 3, 2007.
 
Exhibit 10.7 2000 Long Term Incentive Plan as Amended*
Incorporated herein by reference from the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 File No. 333-49972, filed November 15, 2000.
 
Exhibit 10.8 Executive Deferred Compensation Plan*
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.12 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed March 30, 2001.
 
Exhibit 10.9 Line of Credit Agreement
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.13 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed March 28, 2003.
 
Exhibit 10.10 Change of Control Employment Agreement*
Dated December 24, 2003 between Dennis S. Hudson, III and the Company, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.14 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 29, 2003.


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Exhibit 10.11 Change of Control Employment Agreement*
Dated December 24, 2003 between William R. Hahl and the Company, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.17 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 29, 2003.
 
Exhibit 10.12 Change of Control Employment Agreement*
Dated December 24, 2003 between Jean Strickland and the Company, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.18 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed January 9, 2004.
 
Exhibit 10.13 Change of Control Employment Agreement*
Dated July 18, 2006 between Richard A. Yanke and the Company, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.19 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed March 15, 2007.
 
Exhibit 10.14 Directors Deferred Compensation Plan*
Dated June 15, 2004, but effective July 1, 2004, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.23 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, filed on March 17, 2005.
 
Exhibit 10.15 Executive Employment Agreement*
Dated March 26, 2008 between O. Jean Strickland and the Bank and Company, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed March 26, 2008.
 
Exhibit 10. 16 2008 Long-Term Incentive Plan*
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit A to the Company’s Proxy Statement on Form DEF 14A, filed March 18, 2008.
 
Exhibit 10.17 Letter Agreement
Dated December 19, 2008, between the Company and the United States Department of the Treasury incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 23, 2008.
 
Exhibit 10.18 Formal Agreement
Dated December 16, 2008, between the Company and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.4 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 23, 2008
 
Exhibit 10.19 Waiver of Senior Executive Officers*
Dated December 19, 2008, issued to the United Stated Department of the Treasury incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 23, 2008.
 
Exhibit 10.20 Consent of Senior Executive Officers*
Dated December 19, 2008, issued to the United States Department of the Treasury incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed December 23, 2008.
 
Exhibit 10.21 Form of 409A Amendment to Employment Agreements with Dennis S. Hudson, III, William R. Hahl, A. Douglas Gilbert, O. Jean Strickland and H. Russell Holland, III*
Incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K, filed January 5, 2009.
 
Exhibit 10.22 Investment Agreement
Dated as of April 8, 2010, among Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida and the investors named on the signature pages thereto, incorporated herein by reference from Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K/A filed July 14, 2010.
 
Exhibit 13 2010 Annual Report.  The following portions of the 2010 Annual Report are incorporated herein by reference:
 
Financial Highlights
 
Financial Review — Management’s Discussion and Analysis
 
Selected Quarterly Information — Quarterly Consolidated Income Statements
 
Selected Quarterly Information — Consolidated Quarterly Average Balances, Yields & Rates


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Consolidated Financial Statements
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 
Financial Statements — Reports of Independent Certified Public Accountants
 
Exhibit 21 Subsidiaries of Registrant
 
Exhibit 23.1 Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
Exhibit 31.1 Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
Exhibit 31.2 Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002
 
Exhibit 32.1** Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and Section 111 the Emergency Economic Stability Act, as amended
 
Exhibit 32.2** Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and Section 111 the Emergency Economic Stability Act, as amended
 
Exhibit 99.1 31 C.F.R. § 30.15 Certification of Chief Executive Officer
 
Exhibit 99.2 31 C.F.R. § 30.15 Certification of Chief Financial Officer
 
 
Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.
 
** The certifications attached as Exhibits 32.1 and 32.2 accompany this Annual Report on Form 10-K and are “furnished” to the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and shall not be deemed “filed” by the Company for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act.
 
(b) Exhibits
 
The response to this portion of Item 15 is submitted above.
 
(c) Financial Statement Schedules
 
None.


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SIGNATURES
 
Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
 
SEACOAST BANKING CORPORATION OF FLORIDA
(Registrant)
 
  By: 
/s/  Dennis S. Hudson, III
Dennis S. Hudson, III
Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer
 
Date: March 14, 2011
 
 
KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that each of the undersigned being a director of Seacoast Banking Corporation of Florida, a Florida corporation (the “Company”), constitutes and appoints each of Dennis S. Hudson, III, O. Jean Strickland and William R. Hahl, as agent, with full power of substitution, for his and in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to sign any and all amendments, including post-effective amendments, to this annual report on Form 10-K, and to file the same, therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, and to make any and all state securities law filings, granting unto said attorney-in-fact and agent, full power and authority to do and perform each and every act and thing requisite or necessary to be done in about the premises, as fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in person, hereby ratifying the confirming all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or any substitute or substitutes, may lawfully do or cause to be done by virtue hereof.
 
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.
 
         
       
Date
 
     
/s/  Dennis S. Hudson, III

Dennis S. Hudson, III,
Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Director
(principal executive officer)
  March 14, 2011
     
/s/  Dale M. Hudson

Dale M. Hudson,
Vice-Chairman of the Board and Director
  March 14, 2011
     
/s/  William R. Hahl

William R. Hahl,
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
(principal financial and accounting officer)
  March 14, 2011
     
/s/  Stephen E. Bohner

Stephen E. Bohner,
Director
  March 14, 2011


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Date
 
     
/s/  John H. Crane

John H. Crane, Director
  March 14, 2011
     
/s/  T. Michael Crook

T. Michael Crook, Director
  March 14, 2011
     
/s/  H. Gilbert Culbreth, Jr.

H. Gilbert Culbreth, Jr, Director
  March 14, 2011
     
/s/  Robert B. Goldstein

Robert B. Goldstein, Director
  March 14, 2011
     
/s/  Christopher E. Fogal

Christopher E. Fogal, Director
  March 14, 2011
     
/s/  Dennis S. Hudson, Jr.

Dennis S. Hudson, Jr., Director
  March 14, 2011
     
/s/  Thomas E. Rossin

Thomas E. Rossin, Director
  March 14, 2011
     
/s/  Edwin E. Walpole, III

Edwin E. Walpole, III, Director
  March 14, 2011


54

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