SCSS » Topics » 6. Stock-Based Compensation

This excerpt taken from the SCSS DEF 14A filed Jul 28, 2009.

4. Stock-Based Compensation

        We compensate officers, directors and key employees with stock-based compensation under three plans approved by our shareholders in 1990, 1997 and 2004 and administered under the supervision of our Board of Directors. Stock-based compensation awards are generally granted annually. We have awarded stock options, performance shares and restricted stock under these plans. Stock-based compensation expense is determined based on the grant-date fair value and is recognized ratably over the vesting period of each grant, which is generally four years. Stock-based compensation expense for the three months ended April 4, 2009 and March 29, 2008, was $1.0 million and $0.8 million, respectively.

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-Q filed May 13, 2009.

4. Stock-Based Compensation

 

We compensate officers, directors and key employees with stock-based compensation under three plans approved by our shareholders in 1990, 1997 and 2004 and administered under the supervision of our Board of Directors. Stock-based compensation awards are generally granted annually. We have awarded stock options, performance shares and restricted stock under these plans. Stock-based compensation expense is determined based on the grant-date fair value and is recognized ratably over the vesting period of each grant, which is generally four years. Stock-based compensation expense for the three months ended April 4, 2009 and March 29, 2008, was $1.0 million and $0.8 million, respectively.

 



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SELECT COMFORT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements – (continued)

(unaudited)

 

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-K filed Mar 19, 2009.

Stock-Based Compensation

We record stock-based compensation expense based on the provisions of SFAS No. 123R, “Share-Based Payment” based on the award’s fair value at the date of grant and the awards that are expected to vest. We recognize stock-based compensation expense over the period during which an employee is required to provide services in exchange for the award, or to their eligible retirement date, if earlier. We use the Black-Scholes-Merton option-pricing model to estimate the fair value of stock options and resulting compensation expense. The most significant inputs into the Black-Scholes-Merton option-pricing model are exercise price, our estimate of expected stock price volatility and the weighted-average expected life of the options. We include as part of cash flows from financing activities the benefit of tax deductions in excess of recognized compensation expense as prescribed in SFAS No. 123R. We adopted SFAS No. 123R at the beginning of 2006 using the modified prospective transition method.

See Note 6, Shareholders’ Equity, for additional information on stock-based compensation.

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-Q filed Oct 29, 2008.

6. Stock-Based Compensation

We compensate officers, directors and key employees with stock-based compensation under three plans approved by our shareholders in 1990, 1997 and 2004 and administered under the supervision of our Board of Directors. Stock-based compensation awards are generally granted annually during the first quarter. We have awarded stock options, performance shares and restricted stock under these plans. Stock-based compensation expense is determined based on the grant-date fair value and is recognized ratably over the vesting period of each grant, which is generally four years. Stock-based compensation expense for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 was $1.2 million and $3.3 million, respectively, and for the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007 was $1.5 million and $5.6 million, respectively.

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-Q filed Aug 1, 2008.

6.  Stock-Based Compensation

 

We compensate officers, directors and key employees with stock-based compensation under three plans approved by our shareholders in 1990, 1997 and 2004 and administered under the supervision of our Board of Directors. Stock-based compensation awards are generally granted annually during the first quarter. We have awarded stock options, performance shares and restricted stock under these plans. Stock-based compensation expense is determined based on the grant-date fair value and is recognized ratably over the vesting period of each grant, which is generally four years. Stock-based compensation expense for the three and six months ended June 28, 2008 was $1.3 million and $2.1 million, respectively, and for the three and six months ended June 30, 2007 was $2.0 million and $4.1 million, respectively.

 

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-Q filed May 8, 2008.

6.   Stock-Based Compensation

 

We compensate officers, directors and key employees with stock-based compensation under three plans approved by our shareholders in 1990, 1997 and 2004 and administered under the supervision of our Board of Directors. Stock-based compensation awards are generally granted annually during the first quarter. We have awarded stock options, performance shares and restricted stock under these plans. Stock-based compensation expense is determined based on the grant-date fair value and is recognized ratably over the vesting period of each grant, which is generally four years. Stock-based compensation expense for the three months ended March 29, 2008, and March 31, 2007, was $813,000 and $2.1 million, respectively. The year-over-year decline in stock-based compensation expense was primarily due to an increase in our estimated forfeiture rates resulting from recent workforce reductions.

 

These excerpts taken from the SCSS 10-K filed Feb 26, 2008.

Stock-Based Compensation

 

At the beginning of 2006, we adopted the fair value recognition provisions of SFAS No. 123R, “

Stock-Based Compensation



 



At the beginning of 2006, we adopted the fair value recognition provisions of SFAS No. 123R, “

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-Q filed Nov 7, 2007.

6.   Stock-Based Compensation

 

We compensate officers, directors and key employees with stock-based compensation under three plans approved by our shareholders in 1990, 1997 and 2004 and administered under the supervision of our Board of Directors. Stock-based compensation awards are generally granted annually during the first quarter. We have awarded stock options, performance shares and restricted stock under these plans. Stock-based compensation expense is determined based on the grant-date fair value and is recognized ratably over the vesting period of each grant, which is generally four years. Stock-based compensation expense for the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007 was $1,493,000 and $5,560,000, respectively, and for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2006 was $2,143,000 and $6,115,000, respectively.

 

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-Q filed Aug 8, 2007.

6.   Stock-Based Compensation

 

We compensate officers, directors and key employees with stock-based compensation under three plans approved by our shareholders in 1990, 1997 and 2004 and administered under the supervision of our Board of Directors. Stock-based compensation awards are generally granted annually during the first quarter. We have awarded stock options, employee stock purchase plan shares, performance shares and restricted stock under these plans. At June 30, 2007, a total of 1,517,000 shares were available for future grant under these plans. Stock-based compensation expense is determined based on the grant-date fair value and is recognized ratably over the vesting period of each grant, which is generally four years. Stock-based compensation expense for the three and six months ended June 30, 2007 was $1,995,000 and $4,067,000, respectively, and for the three and six months ended July 1, 2006 was $2,144,000 and $3,972,000, respectively.

 

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-Q filed May 9, 2007.

5.   Stock-Based Compensation

 

We compensate officers, directors and key employees with stock-based compensation under three plans approved by our shareholders in 1990, 1997 and 2004 and administered under the supervision of our Board of Directors. Stock-based compensation awards are generally granted annually during the first quarter. We have awarded stock options, employee stock purchase plan shares, performance shares and restricted stock under these plans. At March 31, 2007, a total of 1,449,000 shares were available for future grant under these plans. Stock-based compensation expense is determined based on the grant-date fair value and is recognized proportionally over the vesting period of each grant, which is generally four years. Stock-based compensation expense for the three months ended March 31, 2007 and April 1, 2006 was $2,072,000 and $1,828,000, respectively.

 

 

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Table of Contents

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-K filed Feb 27, 2007.

Stock-Based Compensation

 

In December 2004, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 123R, “

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-Q filed Oct 27, 2006.

Stock-based compensation

 

Effective January 1, 2006, we changed our accounting for stock options in accordance with SFAS 123R to the fair value method and now recognize stock option compensation expense in the consolidated financial statements. The valuation of stock options and resulting compensation expense is determined using the Black-Scholes-Merton single option pricing model with the most significant inputs into the model being exercise price, our estimate of expected stock price volatility and the weighted average expected life of the options. Previously, two alternative methods existed for accounting for stock options: the intrinsic value method and the fair value method. Prior to fiscal 2006, we used the intrinsic value method of accounting for stock options and accordingly, no compensation expense was recognized in the financial statements for options granted to employees, or for the discount feature of our employee stock purchase plan. This change in accounting policy has a material impact on our consolidated results of operations and earnings per share. See Notes 1 and 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-Q filed Aug 10, 2006.

Stock-based compensation

 

Effective January 1, 2006, we changed our accounting for stock options in accordance with SFAS 123R to the fair value method and now recognize stock option compensation expense in the consolidated financial statements. The valuation of stock options and resulting compensation expense is determined using the Black-Scholes-Merton single option pricing model with the most significant inputs into the model being exercise price, our estimate of expected stock price volatility and the weighted average expected life of the options. Previously, two alternative methods existed for accounting for stock options: the intrinsic value method and the fair value method. Prior to fiscal 2006, we used the intrinsic value method of accounting for stock options and accordingly, no compensation expense was recognized in the financial statements for options granted to employees, or for the discount feature of our employee stock purchase plan. This change in accounting policy has a material impact on our consolidated results of operations and earnings per share. See Notes 1 and 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-Q filed May 9, 2006.

Stock-based compensation

 

Effective January 1, 2006, we changed our accounting for stock options in accordance with SFAS 123R to the fair value method and now recognize stock option compensation expense in the consolidated financial statements. The valuation of stock options and resulting compensation expense is determined using the Black-Scholes-Merton single option pricing model with the most significant inputs into the model being exercise price, our estimate of expected stock price volatility and the weighted average expected life of the options. Previously, two alternative methods existed for accounting for stock options: the intrinsic value method and the fair value method. Prior to fiscal 2006, we used the intrinsic value method of accounting for stock options and accordingly, no compensation expense was recognized in the financial statements for options granted to employees, or for the discount feature of our employee stock purchase plan. This change in accounting policy has a material impact on our consolidated results of operations and earnings per share. See Notes 1 and 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

This excerpt taken from the SCSS 10-K filed Mar 16, 2005.

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Two alternative methods currently exist for accounting for stock options: the intrinsic value method and the fair value method. We use the intrinsic value method of accounting for stock options, and accordingly, no compensation expense has been recognized in the financial statements for options granted to employees, or for the discount feature of our employee stock purchase plan. Recently, the FASB issued SFAS 123R, which will require the Company to change its accounting practice for stock options to the fair value method by the third quarter of fiscal 2005, beginning July 3, 2005.

 

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