SLAB » Topics » Competition

These excerpts taken from the SLAB 10-K filed Feb 11, 2009.

Competition

        The markets for semiconductors generally, and for analog and mixed-signal ICs in particular, are intensely competitive. We anticipate that the market for our products will continually evolve and will be subject to rapid technological change. We believe the principal competitive factors in our industry are:

        •   Product size;     Power requirement;
        •   Level of integration;     Customer support;
        •   Product capabilities;     Reputation;
        •   Reliability;     Ability to rapidly introduce new products to market; and
        •   Price;     Intellectual property.
        •   Performance;        

        We believe that we are competitive with respect to these factors, particularly because our ICs typically are smaller in size, are highly integrated, achieve high performance specifications at lower

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price points than competitive products and are manufactured in standard CMOS which generally enables us to supply them on a relatively rapid basis to customers to meet their product introduction schedules. However, disadvantages we face include our relatively short operating history in certain of our markets and the need for customers to redesign their products and modify their software to implement our ICs in their products.

        As we target and supply products to numerous markets and applications, we face competition from a relatively large number of competitors. We compete with Analog Devices, Atmel, Broadcom, Conexant, Cypress, Epson, Freescale, Infineon Technologies, LSI, Maxim Integrated Products, Microchip, NXP Semiconductors, Renesas, STMicroelectronics, Texas Instruments, Vectron International, Zarlink Semiconductor and others. We expect to face competition in the future from our current competitors, other manufacturers and designers of semiconductors, and innovative start-up semiconductor design companies. Our competitors may also offer bundled chipset kit arrangements offering a more complete product, which may negatively impact our competitive position despite the technical merits or advantages of our products. In addition, our customers could develop products or technologies internally that would replace their need for our products and would become a source of competition. As the markets for electronic products grow, we also may face competition from traditional electronic device companies. These companies may enter the mixed-signal semiconductor market by introducing their own products, including components within their products that would eliminate the need for our ICs, or by entering into strategic relationships with or acquiring other existing IC providers.

        Many of our competitors and potential competitors have longer operating histories, greater name recognition, access to larger customer bases, complementary product offerings, and significantly greater financial, sales and marketing, manufacturing, distribution, technical and other resources than us. Current and potential competitors have established or may establish financial and strategic relationships between themselves or with our existing or potential customers, resellers or other third parties. Accordingly, it is possible that new competitors or alliances among competitors could emerge and rapidly acquire significant market share.

Competition



        The markets for semiconductors generally, and for analog and mixed-signal ICs in particular, are intensely competitive. We anticipate
that the market for our products will continually evolve and will be subject to rapid technological change. We believe the principal competitive factors in our industry are:





































































        • Product size;  Power requirement;
        • Level of integration;  Customer support;
        • Product capabilities;  Reputation;
        • Reliability;  Ability to rapidly introduce new products to market; and
        • Price;  Intellectual property.
        • Performance;    




        We
believe that we are competitive with respect to these factors, particularly because our ICs typically are smaller in size, are highly integrated, achieve high performance
specifications at lower



10











price
points than competitive products and are manufactured in standard CMOS which generally enables us to supply them on a relatively rapid basis to customers to meet their product introduction
schedules. However, disadvantages we face include our relatively short operating history in certain of our markets and the need for customers to redesign their products and modify their software to
implement our ICs in their products.



        As
we target and supply products to numerous markets and applications, we face competition from a relatively large number of competitors. We compete with Analog Devices, Atmel, Broadcom,
Conexant, Cypress, Epson, Freescale, Infineon Technologies, LSI, Maxim Integrated Products, Microchip, NXP Semiconductors, Renesas, STMicroelectronics, Texas Instruments, Vectron International,
Zarlink Semiconductor and others. We expect to face competition in the future from our current competitors, other manufacturers and designers of semiconductors, and innovative start-up
semiconductor design companies. Our competitors may also offer bundled chipset kit arrangements offering a more complete product, which may negatively impact our competitive position despite the
technical merits or advantages of our products. In addition, our customers could develop products or technologies internally that would replace their need for our products and would become a source of
competition. As the markets for electronic products grow, we also may face competition from traditional electronic device companies. These companies may enter the mixed-signal semiconductor market by
introducing their own products, including components within their products that would eliminate the need for our ICs, or by entering into strategic relationships with or acquiring other existing IC
providers.



        Many
of our competitors and potential competitors have longer operating histories, greater name recognition, access to larger customer bases, complementary product offerings, and
significantly greater financial, sales and marketing, manufacturing, distribution, technical and other resources than us. Current and potential competitors have established or may establish financial
and strategic relationships between themselves or with our existing or potential customers, resellers or other third parties. Accordingly, it is possible that new competitors or alliances among
competitors could emerge and rapidly acquire significant market share.




These excerpts taken from the SLAB 10-K filed Feb 7, 2008.

Competition

        The markets for semiconductors generally, and for analog and mixed-signal ICs in particular, are intensely competitive. We anticipate that the market for our products will continually evolve and will be subject to rapid technological change. We believe the principal competitive factors in our industry are:

    Product size;

    Level of integration;

    Product capabilities;

    Reliability;

    Price;

    Performance;

12


    Intellectual property;

    Customer support;

    Reputation;

    Ability to rapidly introduce new products to market; and

    Power requirements.

        We believe that we are competitive with respect to these factors, particularly because our ICs typically are smaller in size, are highly integrated, achieve high performance specifications at lower price points than competitive products and are manufactured in standard CMOS which generally enables us to supply them on a relatively rapid basis to customers to meet their product introduction schedules. However, disadvantages we face include our relatively short operating history in certain of our markets and the need for customers to redesign their products and modify their software to implement our ICs in their products.

        As we target and supply products to numerous markets and applications, we face competition from a relatively large number of competitors. We compete with Analog Devices, Atmel, Broadcom, Conexant, Cypress, Epson, Freescale, Fujitsu, Infineon Technologies, Zarlink Semiconductor, LSI, Maxim Integrated Products, Microchip, National Semiconductor, NXP Semiconductors, Renesas, Texas Instruments, Vectron International and others. We expect to face competition in the future from our current competitors, other manufacturers and designers of semiconductors, and innovative start-up semiconductor design companies. Our competitors may also offer bundled chipset kit arrangements offering a more complete product, which may negatively impact our competitive position despite the technical merits or advantages of our products. In addition, our customers could develop products or technologies internally that would replace their need for our products and would become a source of competition. As the markets for electronic products grow, we also may face competition from traditional electronic device companies. These companies may enter the mixed-signal semiconductor market by introducing their own products, including components within their products that would eliminate the need for our ICs, or by entering into strategic relationships with or acquiring other existing IC providers.

        Many of our competitors and potential competitors have longer operating histories, greater name recognition, access to larger customer bases, complementary product offerings, and significantly greater financial, sales and marketing, manufacturing, distribution, technical and other resources than us. Current and potential competitors have established or may establish financial and strategic relationships between themselves or with our existing or potential customers, resellers or other third parties. Accordingly, it is possible that new competitors or alliances among competitors could emerge and rapidly acquire significant market share.

Competition



        The markets for semiconductors generally, and for analog and mixed-signal ICs in particular, are intensely competitive. We anticipate that the market for our
products will continually evolve and will be subject to rapid technological change. We believe the principal competitive factors in our industry are:





    Product
    size;


    Level
    of integration;


    Product
    capabilities;


    Reliability;


    Price;


    Performance;


12













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    Intellectual
    property;


    Customer
    support;


    Reputation;


    Ability
    to rapidly introduce new products to market; and


    Power
    requirements.



        We
believe that we are competitive with respect to these factors, particularly because our ICs typically are smaller in size, are highly integrated, achieve high performance
specifications at lower price points than competitive products and are manufactured in standard CMOS which generally enables us to supply them on a relatively rapid basis to customers to meet their
product introduction schedules. However, disadvantages we face include our relatively short operating history in certain of our markets and the need for customers to redesign their products and modify
their software to implement our ICs in their products.



        As
we target and supply products to numerous markets and applications, we face competition from a relatively large number of competitors. We compete with Analog Devices, Atmel, Broadcom,
Conexant, Cypress, Epson, Freescale, Fujitsu, Infineon Technologies, Zarlink Semiconductor, LSI, Maxim Integrated Products, Microchip, National Semiconductor, NXP Semiconductors, Renesas, Texas
Instruments, Vectron International and others. We expect to face competition in the future from our current competitors, other manufacturers and designers of semiconductors, and innovative
start-up semiconductor design companies. Our competitors may also offer bundled chipset kit arrangements offering a more complete product, which may negatively impact our competitive
position despite the technical merits or advantages of our products. In addition, our customers could develop products or technologies internally that would replace their need for our products and
would become a source of competition. As the markets for electronic products grow, we also may face competition from traditional electronic device companies. These companies may enter the mixed-signal
semiconductor market by introducing their own products, including components within their products that would eliminate the need for our ICs, or by entering into strategic relationships with or
acquiring other existing IC providers.



        Many
of our competitors and potential competitors have longer operating histories, greater name recognition, access to larger customer bases, complementary product offerings, and
significantly greater financial, sales and marketing, manufacturing, distribution, technical and other resources than us. Current and potential competitors have established or may establish financial
and strategic relationships between themselves or with our existing or potential customers, resellers or other third parties. Accordingly, it is possible that new competitors or alliances among
competitors could emerge and rapidly acquire significant market share.




This excerpt taken from the SLAB 10-K filed Feb 7, 2007.

Competition

The markets for semiconductors generally, and for analog and mixed-signal ICs in particular, are intensely competitive. We believe the principal competitive factors in our industry are:

·       Product size;

·       Level of integration;

13




·       Product capabilities;

·       Reliability;

·       Price;

·       Performance;

·       Intellectual property;

·       Customer support;

·       Reputation;

·       Ability to rapidly introduce new products to market; and

·       Power requirements.

We believe that we are competitive with respect to these factors, particularly because our ICs typically are smaller in size, are highly integrated, achieve high performance specifications at lower price points than competitive products and are manufactured in standard CMOS which generally enables us to supply them on a relatively rapid basis to customers to meet their product introduction schedules. However, disadvantages we face include our relatively short operating history in certain of our markets and the need for customers to redesign their products and modify their software to implement our ICs in their products.

We anticipate that the market for our products will continually evolve and will be subject to rapid technological change. For example, the mobile handset market is transitioning to more advanced air interfaces including EDGE and Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) in addition to the GSM/GPRS standard. We have extended our Aero family to meet the EDGE standard with the Aero IIe single-chip EDGE Radio and the Aero IIed. However, we cannot be certain any product we develop for these standards will achieve market acceptance. In addition, as we target and supply products to numerous markets and applications, we face competition from a relatively large number of competitors. We compete with Agere Systems, Atmel, Analog Devices, Broadcom, Conexant, Cypress, Epson, Freescale, Fujitsu, Infineon Technologies, Legerity, Maxim Integrated Products, MediaTek, Microchip, National Semiconductor, NXP Semiconductors, Renesas, RF Micro Devices, Semtech, Skyworks Solutions, Texas Instruments, Vectron International and others. We expect to face competition in the future from our current competitors, other manufacturers and designers of semiconductors, and innovative start-up semiconductor design companies. Our competitors may also offer bundled chipset kit arrangements offering a more complete product, which may negatively impact our competitive position despite the technical merits or advantages of our products. In addition, our customers could develop products or technologies internally that would replace their need for our products and would become a source of competition. As the markets for electronic products grow, we also may face competition from traditional electronic device companies. These companies may enter the mixed-signal semiconductor market by introducing their own products, including components within their products that would eliminate the need for our ICs, or by entering into strategic relationships with or acquiring other existing IC providers.

Many of our competitors and potential competitors have longer operating histories, greater name recognition, access to larger customer bases, complementary product offerings, and significantly greater financial, sales and marketing, manufacturing, distribution, technical and other resources than us. Current and potential competitors have established or may establish financial and strategic relationships between themselves or with our existing or potential customers, resellers or other third parties. Accordingly, it is possible that new competitors or alliances among competitors could emerge and rapidly acquire significant market share.

14




This excerpt taken from the SLAB 10-K filed Apr 24, 2006.
COMPETITION

The markets for semiconductors generally, and for analog and mixed-signal ICs in particular, are intensely competitive. We believe the principal competitive factors in our industry are:

·  Product size;

 

·  Intellectual property;

·  Level of integration;

 

·  Customer support;

·  Product capabilities;

 

·  Reputation;

·  Reliability;

 

·  Ability to rapidly introduce

·  Price;

 

new products to market; and

·  Performance;

 

·  Power requirements.

 

We believe that we are competitive with respect to these factors, particularly because our ICs typically are smaller in size, are highly integrated, achieve high performance specifications at lower price points than competitive products and are manufactured in standard CMOS which generally enables us to supply them on a relatively rapid basis to customers to meet their product introduction schedules. However, disadvantages we face include our relatively short operating history in certain of our markets and the need for customers to redesign their products and modify their software to implement our ICs in their products.

We anticipate that the market for our products will continually evolve and will be subject to rapid technological change. For example, the mobile handset market is transitioning to more advanced air interfaces including Enhanced Data Rates for Global Evolution (EDGE) and Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) in addition to the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM)/General Packet Radio Services (GPRS) standard. We will also need to develop ICs that meet transitioning standards within each air interface category. Our GSM/GPRS mobile handset products have accounted for substantially all of our mobile handset revenue to date. If we are not able to develop EDGE and/or WCDMA compliant products that gain similar acceptance, our mobile handset revenue and overall operating results would be adversely affected. In addition, as we target and supply products to numerous markets and applications, we face competition from a relatively large number of competitors. Across our product offerings, we compete with Agere Systems, Atmel, Analog Devices, Broadcom, Conexant, Cypress, Freescale, Fujitsu, Infineon Technologies, Legerity, Maxim Integrated Products, MediaTek, Microchip, National Semiconductor, Philips, Renesas, RF Micro Devices, Semtech, Skyworks Solutions, Texas Instruments and others. We expect to face competition in the future from our current competitors, other manufacturers and designers of semiconductors, and innovative start-up semiconductor design companies. Our competitors may also offer bundled chipset kit arrangements offering a more complete product, which may negatively impact our competitive position despite the technical merits or advantages of our products. In addition, our customers could develop products or technologies internally that would replace their need for our products and would become a source of competition. As the markets for electronic products grow, we also may face competition from traditional electronic device companies. These companies may enter the mixed-signal semiconductor market by introducing their own products, including components within their products that would eliminate the need for our ICs, or by entering into strategic relationships with or acquiring other existing IC providers.

Many of our competitors and potential competitors have longer operating histories, greater name recognition, access to larger customer bases, complementary product offerings, and significantly greater financial, sales and marketing, manufacturing, distribution, technical and other resources than us. Current and potential competitors have established or may establish financial and strategic relationships between themselves or with our existing or potential customers, resellers or other third parties. Accordingly, it is possible that new competitors or alliances among competitors could emerge and rapidly acquire significant market share.

15




This excerpt taken from the SLAB 10-K filed Feb 9, 2006.
COMPETITION

The markets for semiconductors generally, and for analog and mixed-signal ICs in particular, are intensely competitive. We believe the principal competitive factors in our industry are:

·  Product size;

 

·  Intellectual property;

·  Level of integration;

 

·  Customer support;

·  Product capabilities;

 

·  Reputation;

·  Reliability;

 

·  Ability to rapidly introduce

·  Price;

 

new products to market; and

·  Performance;

 

·  Power requirements.

 

We believe that we are competitive with respect to these factors, particularly because our ICs typically are smaller in size, are highly integrated, achieve high performance specifications at lower price points than competitive products and are manufactured in standard CMOS which generally enables us to supply them on a relatively rapid basis to customers to meet their product introduction schedules. However, disadvantages we face include our relatively short operating history in certain of our markets and the need for customers to redesign their products and modify their software to implement our ICs in their products.

We anticipate that the market for our products will continually evolve and will be subject to rapid technological change. For example, the mobile handset market is transitioning to more advanced air interfaces including Enhanced Data Rates for Global Evolution (EDGE) and Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (WCDMA) in addition to the Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM)/General Packet Radio Services (GPRS) standard. We will also need to develop ICs that meet transitioning standards within each air interface category. Our GSM/GPRS mobile handset products have accounted for substantially all of our mobile handset revenue to date. If we are not able to develop EDGE and/or WCDMA compliant products that gain similar acceptance, our mobile handset revenue and overall operating results would be adversely affected. In addition, as we target and supply products to numerous markets and applications, we face competition from a relatively large number of competitors. Across our product offerings, we compete with Agere Systems, Atmel, Analog Devices, Broadcom, Conexant, Cypress, Freescale, Fujitsu, Infineon Technologies, Legerity, Maxim Integrated Products, MediaTek, Microchip, National Semiconductor, Philips, Renesas, RF Micro Devices, Semtech, Skyworks Solutions, Texas Instruments and others. We expect to face competition in the future from our current competitors, other manufacturers and designers of semiconductors, and innovative start-up semiconductor design companies. Our competitors may also offer bundled chipset kit arrangements offering a more complete product, which may negatively impact our competitive position despite the technical merits or advantages of our products. In addition, our customers could develop products or technologies internally that would replace their need for our products and would become a source of competition. As the markets for electronic products grow, we also may face competition from traditional electronic device companies. These companies may enter the mixed-signal semiconductor market by introducing their own products, including components within their products that would eliminate the need for our ICs, or by entering into strategic relationships with or acquiring other existing IC providers.

Many of our competitors and potential competitors have longer operating histories, greater name recognition, access to larger customer bases, complementary product offerings, and significantly greater financial, sales and marketing, manufacturing, distribution, technical and other resources than us. Current and potential competitors have established or may establish financial and strategic relationships between themselves or with our existing or potential customers, resellers or other third parties. Accordingly, it is possible that new competitors or alliances among competitors could emerge and rapidly acquire significant market share.

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