SKYW » Topics » Maintenance.

These excerpts taken from the SKYW 10-K filed Feb 23, 2009.

Maintenance

        We use the direct-expense method of accounting for our regional jet aircraft engine overhaul costs. Under this method, the maintenance liability is not recorded until the maintenance services are performed. We use the "deferral method" of accounting for our Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls, which provides for engine overhaul costs to be capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. For leased aircraft, we are subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the "life" of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. With respect to engine overhauls related to leased Brasilia turboprops to be returned, we adjust the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates. With respect to SkyWest Airlines, a third-party vendor provides our long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for engines on our CRJ700s operated under our United Express Agreement. Under the terms of the vendor agreement, we pay a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third-party vendor assumes the obligation to repair the engines at no additional cost to us, subject to certain specified exclusions.

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Maintenance



        We use the direct-expense method of accounting for our regional jet aircraft engine overhaul costs. Under this method, the maintenance
liability is not recorded until the maintenance services are performed. We use the "deferral method" of accounting for our Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls, which provides for engine overhaul costs
to be capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. For leased aircraft, we are subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the "life" of an
overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. With respect to engine overhauls related to leased Brasilia turboprops to be returned, we adjust the estimated useful lives of the final
engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates. With respect to SkyWest Airlines, a third-party vendor provides our long-term engine services covering the scheduled and
unscheduled repairs for engines on our CRJ700s operated under our United Express Agreement. Under the terms of the vendor agreement, we pay a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis
and the third-party vendor assumes the obligation to repair the engines at no additional cost to us, subject to certain specified exclusions.



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Table of Contents



Maintenance

        The Company operates under an FAA-approved continuous inspection and maintenance program. The Company uses the direct expense method of accounting for its regional jet engine overhauls wherein the expense is recorded when the overhaul event occurs. The Company has an engine services agreement with a third party vendor to provide long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for certain of its CRJ700 regional jet aircraft. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company pays a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third party vendor will assume the responsibility to repair the engines at no additional cost to the Company, subject to certain specified exclusions. Maintenance costs under these contracts are recognized when the engine hour is flown pursuant to the terms of the contract. The Company uses the "deferral method" of accounting for its Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls wherein the overhaul costs are capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. The costs of maintenance for airframe and avionics components, landing gear and normal recurring maintenance are expensed as incurred. For leased aircraft, the Company is subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the "life" of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. For Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls related to leased aircraft to be returned, the Company adjusts the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates.

Maintenance



        The Company operates under an FAA-approved continuous inspection and maintenance program. The Company uses the direct
expense method of accounting for its regional jet engine overhauls wherein the expense is recorded when the overhaul event occurs. The Company has an engine services agreement with a third party
vendor to provide long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for certain of its CRJ700 regional jet aircraft. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company
pays a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third party vendor will assume the responsibility to repair the engines at no additional cost to the Company, subject to
certain specified exclusions. Maintenance costs under these contracts are recognized when the engine hour is flown pursuant to the terms of the contract. The Company uses the "deferral method" of
accounting for its Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls wherein the overhaul costs are capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. The costs of maintenance for airframe
and avionics components, landing gear and normal recurring maintenance are expensed as incurred. For leased aircraft, the Company is subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion
of the "life" of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. For Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls related to leased aircraft to be returned, the Company adjusts the estimated
useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates.



This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed Nov 6, 2008.
Maintenance. Maintenance costs increased $63.0 million, or 28.9%, during the nine months ended September 30, 2008, compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2007.  The increase was primarily related to the timing of engine overhaul events. Our engine overhaul expense increased approximately $39.5 million during the nine months ended September 30, 2008 compared to the nine months ended September 30, 2007.  The majority of the engine overhauls related to aircraft operated under our Delta Connection Agreements and we were reimbursed for such engine overhaul costs by Delta.  Such reimbursements are reflected as passenger revenue in our unaudited condensed consolidated statements of income.  The increase in maintenance excluding engine overhaul costs was principally due to other scheduled maintenance events. Additionally, since September 30, 2007, we added seven used CRJ200s and two used CRJ700s to our fleet. Compared to new aircraft, used aircraft typically experience higher maintenance costs during the first year of service.

 

Under the United Express and Midwest Services Agreements, we recognize revenue at a fixed hourly rate for mature engine maintenance on regional jet engines, which we record at the gross amount as revenue in our unaudited consolidated statements of  income, and we recognize engine maintenance expense on our CRJ 200 regional jet engines on an as incurred basis as maintenance expense in our unaudited consolidated statements of income. As a result, during the nine months ended September 30, 2008, we collected and recorded $25.1 million (pretax) of revenue in excess of our maintenance expense under the United Express Agreement and the Midwest Services Agreement, which is intended to compensate us for the expense of future engine maintenance overhauls.

 

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed Aug 8, 2008.
Maintenance. Maintenance costs increased $39.8 million, or 28.1%, during the six months ended June 30, 2008,

 

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compared to the six months ended June 30, 2007.  The increase was primarily related to the timing of engine overhaul events. Our engine overhaul expense increased approximately $22.5 million during the six months ended June 30, 2008 compared to the six months ended June 30, 2007.  The majority of the engine overhauls related to aircraft operated under our Delta Connection Agreements and we were reimbursed for such engine overhaul costs by Delta.  Such reimbursements are reflected as passenger revenue in our condensed consolidated statements of income.  The increase in maintenance excluding engine overhaul cost was due to other scheduled maintenance events. Additionally, since June 30, 2007, we added seven used CRJ200s to our fleet. Compared to new aircraft, used aircraft typically experience higher maintenance costs during the first year of service. Under our United Express Agreement and our Midwest Agreement, we recognize revenue at a fixed hourly rate for mature engine maintenance on regional jet engines, which we record at the gross amount as revenue in our consolidated statements of  income, and we recognize engine maintenance expense on our on our CRJ 200 regional jet engines on an as incurred basis as maintenance expense in our consolidated statements of income. As a result, during the six months ended June 30, 2008, we collected and recorded $17.5 million (pretax) of revenue in excess of our maintenance expense under the United Express Agreement and Midwest Services Agreement, which is intended to compensate us for future engine maintenance overhauls.

 

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed May 9, 2008.
Maintenance.  The cost per ASM for maintenance expense increased to 1.5¢ for the three months ended March 31, 2008, compared to 1.3¢ for the three months ended March 31, 2007. The increase was primarily related to the timing of engine overhaul events on aircraft operated under our Delta Connection Agreements and other scheduled direct maintenance events during the three months ended March 31, 2008.  Additionally, since March 31, 2007, we added 15 used aircraft to our fleet, which typically results in higher maintenance costs in the first year of service than new aircraft. Under our United Express Agreement and our Midwest Agreement, specific amounts are included in the rates and charges for mature maintenance on regional jet engines that we record as revenue. However, consistent with the direct expense maintenance policy, we record maintenance expense on our CRJ200 engines as it is incurred. As a result, during the three months ended March 31, 2008, we collected and recorded as revenue $8.1 million (pretax) under the United Express Agreement and Midwest Services Agreement to compensate us for future engine maintenance overhauls.

 

These excerpts taken from the SKYW 10-K filed Feb 27, 2008.

Maintenance

        The Company operates under an FAA-approved continuous inspection and maintenance program. The Company uses the direct expense method of accounting for its regional jet engine overhauls where the expense is recorded when the overhaul event occurs. In 2004, the Company entered into an engine services agreement with a third party vendor to provide long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for certain of its CRJ700 regional jet aircraft. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company pays a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third party vendor will assume the responsibility to repair the engines at no additional cost to the Company, subject to certain specified exclusions. Maintenance costs under these contracts are recognized pursuant to the terms of the contract. The Company uses the "deferral method" of accounting for its Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls where the overhaul costs are capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. The costs of maintenance for airframe and avionics components, landing gear and normal recurring maintenance are expensed as incurred. For leased aircraft, the Company is subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the "life" of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. For Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls related to leased aircraft to be returned, the Company adjusts the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates.

Maintenance



        The Company operates under an FAA-approved continuous inspection and maintenance program. The Company uses the direct expense method of accounting for
its regional jet engine overhauls where the expense is recorded when the overhaul event occurs. In 2004, the Company entered into an engine services agreement with a third party vendor to provide
long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for certain of its CRJ700 regional jet aircraft. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company pays a set dollar
amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third party vendor will assume the responsibility to repair the engines at no additional cost to the Company, subject to certain specified
exclusions. Maintenance costs under these contracts are recognized pursuant to the terms of the contract. The Company uses the "deferral method" of accounting for its Brasilia turboprop engine
overhauls where the overhaul costs are capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. The costs of maintenance for airframe and avionics components, landing gear and normal
recurring maintenance are expensed as incurred. For leased aircraft, the Company is subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the "life" of an overhaul be remaining on the
engine at the lease return date. For Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls related to leased aircraft to be returned, the Company adjusts the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based
on the respective lease return dates.



This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed Nov 8, 2007.
Maintenance.  The cost per ASM for maintenance expense increased to 1.2¢ for the nine months ended September 30, 2007, compared to 1.1¢ for the nine months ended September 30, 2006.  The increase was primarily related to the timing of engine overhaul events on aircraft operated under our Delta Connection Agreements and other direct maintenance events during the nine months ended September 30, 2007.  Under our United Express Agreement and our Midwest Agreement, specific amounts are included in the rates and charges for mature maintenance on regional jet engines that we record as revenue.  However, consistent with the direct expense maintenance policy, we record maintenance expense on our CRJ200 engines as it is incurred.  As a result, during the nine months ended September 30, 2007, we collected and recorded as revenue $22.5 million (pretax) under the United Express and Midwest Agreements to compensate us for future engine maintenance overhauls, with no corresponding expense relative to CRJ200 engine maintenance overhauls.  Because the “Maintenance” line in the table above does not include salaries, wages and employee benefits associated with our maintenance operations (those costs are included in the “Salary, wages and employee benefits” line in the table above), the “Maintenance” expense line in the above table differs from the “Maintenance” line in our condensed consolidated statements of income.

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed Aug 8, 2007.
Maintenance.  The cost per ASM for maintenance expense increased to 1.3¢ for the six months ended June 30, 2007, compared to 1.1¢ for the six months ended June 30, 2006.  The increase was primarily related to the timing of engine overhaul events on aircraft operated under the Delta code and other direct maintenance events during the six months ended June 30, 2007.  Under our United Express Agreement, specific amounts are included in the rates and charges for mature maintenance on regional jet engines that we record as revenue.  However, consistent with the direct expense maintenance policy, we record maintenance expense on our CRJ200 engines as it is incurred.  As a result, during the six months ended June 30, 2007, we collected and recorded as revenue $14.8 million (pretax) under the United Express Agreement to compensate us for future engine maintenance overhauls, with no corresponding expense relative to CRJ200 engine maintenance overhauls.  Because the “Maintenance” line in the table above does not include salaries, wages and employee benefits associated with our maintenance operations (those costs are included in the “Salary, wages and employee benefits” line in the table above), the “Maintenance” expense line in the above table differs from the “Maintenance” line in our condensed consolidated statements of income.

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-K filed Mar 1, 2007.

Maintenance

The Company operates under an FAA-approved continuous inspection and maintenance program. The Company uses the direct expense method of accounting for its regional jet engine overhauls where the

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expense is recorded when the overhaul event occurs. In 2004, the Company entered into an engine services agreement with a third party vendor to provide long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for certain of its CRJ700 regional jet aircraft. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company pays a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third party vendor will assume the responsibility to repair the engines at no additional cost to the Company, subject to certain specified exclusions. Maintenance costs under these contracts are recognized pursuant to the terms of the contract. The Company uses the “deferral method” of accounting for its Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls where the overhaul costs are capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. The costs of maintenance for airframe and avionics components, landing gear and normal recurring maintenance are expensed as incurred. For leased aircraft, the Company is subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the “life” of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. For Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls related to leased aircraft to be returned, the Company adjusts the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates.

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed Nov 9, 2006.

Maintenance

We use the direct-expense method of accounting for our regional jet aircraft engine overhaul costs. Under this method, the maintenance liability is not recorded until the maintenance services are performed, thus substantially reducing significant estimates and judgments inherent under the accrual method. We use the “deferral method” of accounting for our Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls, which provides for engine overhaul costs to be capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. For leased aircraft, we are subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the “life” of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. With respect to engine overhauls related to leased Brasilia turboprops to be returned, we adjust the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates. With respect to SkyWest Airlines, a third-party vendor provides our long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for engines on our CRJ700s. Under the terms of the agreement, we pay a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third-party vendor assumes the obligation to repair the engines at no additional cost to us, subject to certain specified exclusions.

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed Aug 9, 2006.

Maintenance

     We use the direct-expense method of accounting for our regional jet aircraft engine overhaul costs. Under this method, the maintenance liability is not recorded until the maintenance services are performed, thus substantially reducing significant estimates and judgments inherent under the accrual method. We use the “deferral method” of accounting for our Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls, which provides for engine overhaul costs to be capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. For leased aircraft, we are subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the “life” of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the

17




lease return date. With respect to engine overhauls related to leased Brasilia turboprops to be returned, we adjust the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates. With respect to SkyWest Airlines, a third-party vendor provides our long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for engines on our CRJ700s. Under the terms of the agreement, we pay a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third-party vendor assumes the obligation to repair the engines at no additional cost to us, subject to certain specified exclusions.

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed May 10, 2006.

Maintenance

 

       We use the direct-expense method of accounting for our regional jet aircraft engine overhaul costs. Under this method, the maintenance liability is not recorded until the maintenance services are performed, thus substantially reducing significant estimates and judgments inherent under the accrual method. We use the “deferral method” of accounting for our Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls, which provides for engine overhaul costs to be capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. For leased aircraft, we are subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the “life” of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. With respect to engine overhauls related to leased Brasilia turboprops to be returned, we adjust the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates. With respect to SkyWest Airlines, a third-party vendor provides our long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for engines on our CRJ700s. Under the terms of the

 

17



 

agreement, we pay a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third-party vendor assumes the obligation to repair the engines at no additional cost to us, subject to certain specified exclusions.

 

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-K filed Mar 14, 2006.

Maintenance

The Company operates under an FAA-approved continuous inspection and maintenance program. The Company uses the direct expense method of accounting for its regional jet engine overhauls where the expense is recorded when the overhaul event occurs. In 2004, the Company entered into an engine services agreement with a third party vendor to provide long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for engines certain of its CRJ700 regional jet aircraft. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company pays a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third party vendor will assume the responsibility to repair the engines at no additional cost to the Company, subject to certain specified exclusions. Maintenance costs under these contracts are recognized when a contractual obligation exists. The Company uses the “deferral method” of accounting for its Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls where the overhaul costs are capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. The costs of maintenance for airframe and avionics components, landing gear and normal recurring maintenance are expensed as incurred. For leased aircraft, the Company is subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the “life” of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. For Brasilia turboprop engine overhauls related to leased aircraft to be returned, the Company adjusts the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates.

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed Nov 9, 2005.

Maintenance

We use the direct-expense method of accounting for our regional jet aircraft engine overhaul costs. Under this method, the maintenance liability is not recorded until the maintenance services are performed, thus substantially reducing significant estimates and judgments inherent under the accrual method. We use the “deferral method” of accounting for our Brasilia turboprops engine overhauls, which provides for engine overhaul costs to be capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. For leased aircraft, we are subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the “life” of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. With respect to engine overhauls related to leased Brasilia turboprops to be returned, we adjust the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates. A third-party vendor provides our long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for engines on our CRJ700s. Under the terms of the agreement, we pay a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third party vendor assumes the obligation to repair the engines at no additional cost to us, subject to certain specified exclusions. During the nine months ended September 30, 2005, we recorded expenses of approximately $8.1 million under the agreement.

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed Aug 8, 2005.

Maintenance

 

The Company uses the “deferral method” of accounting for its EMB120 engine overhauls, which provides for engine overhaul costs to be capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine.  For leased aircraft, the Company is subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the “life” of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. For EMB120 engine overhauls related to leased aircraft to be returned, the Company adjusts the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates.

 

The Company uses the direct-expense method of accounting for CRJ200 engine overhaul costs.  Under this method, the maintenance liability is not recorded until the maintenance services are performed thus substantially reducing significant estimates and judgments inherent under the accrual method.

 

During the quarter ended December 31, 2004, the Company completed negotiations and signed an engine services agreement with a third-party vendor to provide long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for engines on its CRJ700 regional jet aircraft effective January, 2004.  Under the terms of the agreement, the Company will pay a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third party vendor will assume the obligation to repair the engines at no additional cost to the Company, subject to certain specified exclusions.  During the three and six months ended June 30, 2005, the Company recorded expenses of approximately $3.1 million and $4.6 million, respectively, under the agreement.

 

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-Q filed May 6, 2005.

Maintenance

 

The Company uses the “deferral method” of accounting for its EMB120 engine overhauls, which provides for engine overhaul costs to be capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine.  For leased aircraft, the Company is subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the “life” of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. For EMB120 engine overhauls related to leased aircraft to be returned, the Company adjusts the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates.

 

The Company uses the direct-expense method of accounting for CRJ200 engine overhaul costs because the maintenance liability is not recorded until the maintenance services are performed thus eliminating significant estimates and judgments inherent under the accrual method and it is the predominant method used in the airline industry.

 

During the quarter ended December 31, 2004, the Company completed negotiations and signed an engine services agreement with a third party vendor to provide long-term engine services covering the scheduled and unscheduled repairs for engines on its CRJ700 regional jet aircraft effective January, 2004.  Under the terms of the agreement, the Company will pay a set dollar amount

 

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per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third party vendor will assume the responsibility to repair the engines at no additional cost to the Company, subject to certain specified exclusions.  During the quarter ended March 31, 2005, the Company recorded expenses of approximately $1.9 million related to the agreement.

 

This excerpt taken from the SKYW 10-K filed Mar 10, 2005.

Maintenance

        The Company operates under an FAA-approved continuous inspection and maintenance program. The Company uses the direct expense method of accounting for its Canadair 50-seat Regional Jet ("CRJ200") engine overhauls where the expense is recorded when the overhaul event occurs. During the quarter ended December 31, 2004, the Company completed negotiations and signed an engine services agreement with a third party vendor to provide long-term engine services covering the scheduled and certain unscheduled repairs for engines on its CRJ700 regional jet aircraft effective January, 2004. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company will pay a set dollar amount per engine hour flown on a monthly basis and the third party vendor will assume the responsibility to repair the engines at no additional cost to the Company, subject to certain specified exclusions. During the year ended December 31, 2004, the Company recorded expenses of approximately $2.8 million related to the agreement.

        The Company uses the "deferral method" of accounting for its 30-seat Embraer Brasilia EMB120 ("EMB120") engine overhauls where the overhaul costs are capitalized and depreciated over the estimated useful life of the engine. The costs of maintenance for airframe and avionics components, landing gear and normal recurring maintenance are expensed as incurred. For leased aircraft, the

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Company is subject to lease return provisions that require a minimum portion of the "life" of an overhaul be remaining on the engine at the lease return date. For EMB120 engine overhauls related to leased aircraft to be returned, the Company adjusts the estimated useful lives of the final engine overhauls based on the respective lease return dates.

        Due to the change in the Company's contractual arrangement with one of its major partners and based on a letter agreement executed by and between the Company and GE Engine Services, Inc. in April 2002 (the "Letter Agreement"), the Company elected to change from the accrual method of accounting to the direct-expense method of accounting for CRJ200 engine overhaul costs effective January 1, 2002. The Company believes the direct-expense method is preferable in the circumstances because the maintenance liability is not recorded until the maintenance services are performed, the direct-expense method eliminates significant estimates and judgments inherent under the accrual method, and it is the predominant method used in the airline industry. Accordingly, effective January 1, 2002, the Company reversed its engine overhaul accrual that totaled $14.1 million by recording a cumulative effect of change in accounting principle of $8.6 million (net of income taxes of $5.5 million).

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