Annual Reports

 
Quarterly Reports

  • 10-Q (Nov 8, 2013)
  • 10-Q (Oct 15, 2010)
  • 10-Q (Jul 7, 2010)
  • 10-Q (Dec 16, 2009)
  • 10-Q (Sep 24, 2009)
  • 10-Q (Jun 26, 2009)

 
8-K

 
Other

Star Buffet 10-Q 2010

Documents found in this filing:

  1. 10-Q
  2. Ex-31.1
  3. Ex-31.2
  4. Ex-32.1
  5. Ex-32.2
  6. Ex-99.1
  7. Ex-99.1
star_10q-051710.htm
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C.
20549
 
FORM 10-Q
 
(Mark  One)
[X] QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the quarterly period ended: May 17, 2010
OR
 
[  ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from _______  to  ________

Commission File Number:  0-6054

STAR BUFFET, INC.
    (Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
DELAWARE
84-1430786
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(IRS Employer Identification Number)
 
1312 N. Scottsdale Road,
Scottsdale, AZ 85257
 (Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

(480) 425-0397
 (Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes X  No __

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
Yes X  No __

Indicated by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or smaller reporting company.  See definition of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-3 of the Exchange Act. (check one)
Large accelerated filer                      Accelerated filer                          Non-accelerated filer                    Smaller reporting company x

Indicate by checkmark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
Yes __ No X

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer's classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.  As of June 30, 2010 there were 3,213,075 shares of Common Stock, $ .001 par value, outstanding.
 
 
 

 
STAR BUFFET, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

INDEX

 
       Page
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
   
Item 1.   Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements:
 
   
Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of May 17, 2010 and
 
January 25, 2010
3
   
Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income for the sixteen weeks
 
ended May 17, 2010 and May 18, 2009
5
   
Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the sixteen weeks ended
 
May 17, 2010 and May 18, 2009
6
   
Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
8
   
Item 2.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and
 
Results of Operations
18
   
Item 4.  Controls and Procedures
27
   
PART II.   OTHER INFORMATION
 
   
Item 1.   Legal Proceedings
29
   
Item 1A. Risk Factors
29
   
Item 5.    Other Information
29
   
Item 6.    Exhibits and Reports on Form 8-K
30
   
Signatures
31
 

 
2

 
PART I:  FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1:    Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

STAR BUFFET, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 
ASSETS
 
May 17,
 2010
   
January 25,
 2010
 
   
(Unaudited)
   
(Unaudited)
 
Current assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 921,000     $ 893,000  
Receivables, net
    306,000       514,000  
Income tax receivable
    466,000       475,000  
Inventories
    546,000       520,000  
Deferred income taxes
    316,000       361,000  
Prepaid expenses
    284,000       71,000  
                 
Total current assets
    2,839,000       2,834,000  
                 
Property, buildings and equipment:
               
     Property, buildings and equipment, net
    22,985,000       24,213,000  
     Property and equipment leased to third parties, net
    661,000       669,000  
     Property, buildings and equipment held for future use, net
    4,022,000       3,340,000  
     Property held for sale
    731,000       731,000  
     Total property, buildings and equipment
    28,399,000       28,953,000  
                 
Other assets:
               
Notes receivable, net of current portion
    415,000       415,000  
Deposits and other
    455,000       460,000  
Loan cost, net
    331,000       381,000  
                 
Total other assets
    1,201,000       1,256,000  
                 
Deferred income taxes, net
    2,981,000       3,148,000  
                 
Intangible assets:
               
Goodwill
    551,000       551,000  
Other intangible assets, net
    460,000       486,000  
                 
Total intangible assets
    1,011,000       1,037,000  
                 
Total assets
  $ 36,431,000     $ 37,228,000  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the condensed consolidated financial statements.

(Continued)
 
3

 
STAR BUFFET, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (Continued)

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
 
May 17,
 2010
   
January 25,
 2010
 
   
(Unaudited)
   
(Unaudited)
 
Current liabilities:
           
Accounts payable-trade
  $ 4,194,000     $ 3,194,000  
Checks written in excess of bank balance
    501,000       1,712,000  
Payroll and related taxes
    1,529,000       1,531,000  
Sales and property taxes
    1,113,000       1,382,000  
Rent, licenses and other
    1,161,000       1,274,000  
Current maturities of obligations under long-term debt
    1,655,000       1,630,000  
                 
Total current liabilities
    10,153,000       10,723,000  
                 
Deferred rent payable
    242,000       588,000  
Note payable to officer
    1,992,000       1,992,000  
Long-term debt, net of current maturities
    11,432,000       11,417,000  
                 
Total liabilities
    23,819,000       24,720,000  
                 
Stockholders’ equity:
               
Preferred stock, $.001 par value; authorized 1,500,000 shares; none issued or outstanding
               
Common stock, $.001 par value; authorized 8,000,000 shares; issued and outstanding 3,213,075 and 3,213,075 shares
    3,000       3,000  
Additional paid-in capital
    17,743,000       17,743,000  
Accumulated deficit
    (5,134,000 )     (5,238,000 )
                 
Total stockholders’ equity
    12,612,000       12,508,000  
                 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 36,431,000     $ 37,228,000  

 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
4

 
STAR BUFFET, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES>
 CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(Unaudited)
 
   
Sixteen Weeks Ended
 
   
May 17,
   
May 18,
 
   
2010
   
2009
 
Total revenues
  $ 19,649,000     $ 28,155,000  
                 
Costs and expenses
               
Food costs
    7,794,000       10,818,000  
Labor costs
    6,415,000       8,683,000  
Occupancy and other expenses
    3,563,000       5,424,000  
General and administrative expenses
    571,000       759,000  
Depreciation and amortization
    824,000       854,000  
                 
                 
Total costs and expenses
    19,167,000       26,538,000  
                 
Income from operations
    482,000       1,617,000  
                 
Interest expense
    (287,000 )     (289,000 )
Interest income
          75,000  
Other income
    133,000       11,000  
                 
Income before income taxes
    328,000       1,414,000  
                 
Income taxes
    224,000       560,000  
                 
Net income
  $ 104,000     $ 854,000  
                 
Net income per common share – basic
  $ 0.03     $ 0.27  
Net income per common share – diluted
  $ 0.03     $ 0.27  
                 
Weighted average shares outstanding – basic
    3,213,075       3,213,075  
Weighted average shares outstanding – diluted
    3,213,075       3,213,075  


The accompanying notes are an integral part of the condensed consolidated financial statements.

 
5

 
 
STAR BUFFET, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
   
Sixteen Weeks Ended
 
   
May 17, 2010
   
May 18, 2009
 
Cash flows from operating activities:
           
Net income
  $ 104,000     $ 854,000  
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
               
    Depreciation
    798,000       825,000  
    Amortization of franchise and licenses
    26,000       29,000  
    Amortization of loan costs
    56,000       53,000  
    Deferred income taxes
    212,000       173,000  
    Change in operating assets and liabilities:
               
          Receivables, net
    208,000       42,000  
          Inventories
    (26,000 )     (38,000 )
          Prepaid expenses
    (213,000 )     (168,000 )
          Deposits and other
    5,000       1,000  
          Deferred rent payable
    (346,000 )     (52,000 )
          Accounts payable-trade
    1,000,000       (574,000 )
          Income taxes receivable
    9,000       658,000  
          Income taxes payable
          361,000  
          Other accrued liabilities
    (384,000 )     (277,000 )
               Total adjustments
    1,345,000       1,033,000  
          Net cash provided by operating activities
    1,449,000       1,887,000  
                 
Cash flows from investing activities:
               
 Acquisition of property, buildings and equipment
    (245,000 )     (165,000 )
          Net cash used in investing activities
    (245,000 )     (165,000 )
                 
Cash flows from financing activities:
               
   Checks written in excess of cash in bank
    (1,211,000 )     54,000  
   Payments on long term debt
    (434,000 )     (2,904,000 )
   Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt
          1,194,000  
   Payments/proceeds on line of credit, net
    475,000        
   Capitalized loan costs
    (6,000 )     (14,000 )
   Principal payment on capitalized lease obligations
          (16,000 )
          Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
    (1,176,000 )     (1,686,000 )
                 
Net change in cash and cash equivalents
    28,000       36,000  
                 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    893,000       1,118,000  
                 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 921,000     $ 1,154,000  

 
6

 
STAR BUFFET, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (continued)
(Unaudited)
 
 
 
   
Sixteen Weeks Ended
 
   
May 17, 2010
   
May 18, 2009
 
             
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:
           
             
Cash paid during the period for:
           
     Interest
  $ 174,000     $ 239,000  
                 
     Income taxes
  $ 3,000     $ 14,000  
 
Non cash investing and financing activities:
 
None.                                                                                     
 



The accompanying notes are an integral part of the condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
7

 
STAR BUFFET, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Note (A) Basis of Presentation

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts for Star Buffet, Inc., together with its direct and indirect wholly-owned independently capitalized subsidiaries Summit Family Restaurants Inc., HTB Restaurants, Inc., Northstar Buffet, Inc., Star Buffet Management, Inc., Starlite Holdings, Inc., StarTexas Restaurants, Inc., JB’s Star Holdings, Inc., 4B’s Holdings, Inc., KB’s Star Holdings, Inc., Florida Buffet Holdings, Inc., and Sizzlin Star, Inc (collectively the “Company”) and have been prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles, the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X.  These financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements, and the notes thereto, included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 25, 2010.  In the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair presentation of the financial position and results of operations for the interim periods presented have been reflected herein.  Results of operations for such interim periods are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for the full fiscal year or for any future periods.  The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements include the results of operations and assets and liabilities directly related to the Company’s operations.  The preparation of financial statements in conformity with United States generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.

The following is a summary of the Company's restaurant properties as of May 17, 2010. The Company has two reporting segments, the Buffet Division and the Non-Buffet Division. The Company’s reportable segments are aggregated based on operating similarities.  The Buffet Division includes 12 Barnhill’s Buffets, five HomeTown Buffets, three BuddyFreddys, two Whistle Junction restaurants and one JJ North’s Grand Buffet.  The Buffet Division also has four restaurants closed for remodeling and repositioning, a closed restaurant reported as property held for sale, and a restaurant located in Arizona that is leased to a third-party operator.  In addition, two closed restaurants are used as warehouses for equipment in Florida and Utah.   The Non-Buffet Division includes seven JB’s restaurants, six 4B’s restaurants, three K-BOB’S Steakhouses, two Casa Bonita restaurants, a Western Sizzlin restaurant, a Holiday House restaurant, a Bar-H Steakhouse and a Pecos Diamond Steakhouse.  Additionally, the Non-Buffet Division has a K-BOB’S Steakhouse and Western Sizzlin restaurant closed for remodeling.

 
Buffet
Division
 
Non-Buffet
Division
 
 
Total
Owned
11
 
9
 
20
Leased
20
 
15
 
35
     Total
31
 
24
 
55


 
8

 
 
As of May 17, 2010, the Company’s operating and non-operating restaurants are located in the following states:
 
Number of Restaurants
             
 
State
 
Buffet
Division
 
Non-Buffet
Division
 
 
Total
Alabama
 
1
 
 
1
Arkansas
 
1
 
1
 
2
Arizona
 
5
 
 
5
Colorado
 
 
1
 
1
Florida
 
14
 
1
 
15
Idaho
 
 
1
 
1
Mississippi
 
5
 
1
 
6
Montana
 
 
8
 
8
New Mexico
 
 
3
 
3
Oklahoma
 
 
1
 
1
Oregon
 
1
 
 
1
Tennessee
 
2
 
 
2
Texas
 
 
4
 
4
Utah
 
1
 
3
 
4
Wyoming
 
1
 
 
1
     Total
 
31
 
24
 
55

As of May 17, 2010, the Company’s non-operating restaurants are located in the following states:
 
Number of
Non-Operating Restaurants

 
State
 
Buffet
Division
 
Non-Buffet
Division
 
 
Total
Arizona
 
1
 
 
1
Arkansas
 
 
1
 
1
Florida
 
4
 
 
4
Mississippi
 
2
 
 
2
Texas
 
 
1
 
1
Utah
 
1
 
 
1
     Total
 
8
 
2
 
10


 
9

 
 
As of May 18, 2009, the Company’s operating and non-operating restaurants were located in the following states:
 
Number of Restaurants
             
 
State
 
Buffet
Division
 
Non-Buffet
Division
 
 
Total
Alabama
 
1
 
 
1
Arkansas
 
1
 
1
 
2
Arizona
 
9
 
 
9
Colorado
 
 
1
 
1
Florida
 
14
 
2
 
16
Idaho
 
 
1
 
1
Louisiana
 
3
 
 
3
Mississippi
 
6
 
1
 
7
Montana
 
 
6
 
6
New Mexico
 
1
 
2
 
3
Oklahoma
 
 
1
 
1
Oregon
 
1
 
 
1
Tennessee
 
3
 
 
3
Texas
 
 
4
 
4
Utah
 
1
 
3
 
4
Washington
 
1
 
 
1
Wyoming
 
1
 
 
1
     Total
 
42
 
22
 
64
 
As of May 18, 2009, the Company’s non-operating restaurants were located in the following states:
 
Number of
Non-Operating Restaurants
 
State
 
Buffet
Division
 
Non-Buffet
Division
 
 
Total
Arizona
 
1
 
 
1
Florida
 
4
 
 
4
Texas
 
 
1
 
1
     Total
 
5
 
1
 
6
 
The operating results for the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010 included operations shown in the tables above and fixed charges for 10 non-operating restaurants for the entire quarter. Six of 10 non-operating restaurants remain closed for remodeling and repositioning, one restaurant was leased to a third party and the one remaining non-operating restaurant was closed and reported as property held for sale.  In addition, two non-operating restaurants were used as warehouses for equipment in Florida and Utah.  The operating results for the 16-week period ended May 18, 2009 included operations shown in the tables above and the fixed charges for eight restaurants closed the entire quarter.

The Company utilizes a 52/53 week fiscal year which ends on the last Monday in January.  The first quarter of each year contains 16 weeks while the other three quarters each contain 12 weeks, except the fourth quarter has 13 weeks if the fiscal year has 53 weeks.

 
10

 
Note (B) Recent Developments

On January 31, 2010 the Company closed the HomeTown Buffet restaurant in Albuquerque, New Mexico and on March 29, 2010 closed the Barnhill’s Buffet restaurant in Monroe, Louisiana. The Company had fully impaired the assets of Albuquerque in the prior fiscal year and assets in Monroe are warehoused until a new store is opened. After the quarter ended, the Company closed a Barnhill’s Buffet restaurant in Orange City, Florida on June 13, 2010.
 
On February 22, 2010 Vistar Corporation (‘Vistar”) in the Superior Court of the State of Arizona filed a lawsuit against the Company for the failure of the Company to pay $1.3 million in food invoices. The Company believes that Vistar overcharged the Company per the contract between the two companies. The Company has an amount of $1.0 million reserved in accounts payable on May 17, 2010.  The Company has reached a legal settlement with Vistar requiring payments of approximately $1,000,000 over the next nine months. The Company reduced costs by $185,000 and paid approximately $115,000 in the first quarter of fiscal 2011.
 
The Company entered into lease with an option to purchase a 4B’s restaurant in Polson, Montana in March 2010. The Company opened the restaurant on May 9, 2010.

Note (C) Related Party Transactions

Mr. Robert E. Wheaton owns approximately 45.3% of the Company's outstanding common shares including exercisable options which have vested and may have the effective power to elect members of the board of directors and to control the vote on substantially all other matters without the approval of the other stockholders.  The Company has borrowed approximately $1,992,000 from Mr. Robert E. Wheaton, a principal shareholder, officer and director of the Company.  This loan dated June 15, 2007 is subordinated to the obligation to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. and bears interest at 8.5%.  The Company expensed $52,000 to Mr. Wheaton for interest during the first quarter of fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009. The Company owes Mr. Wheaton $91,000 and $0 for interest as of May 17, 2010 and May 18, 2009, respectively. The principal balance and any unpaid interest are due and payable in full on June 5, 2012.  The Company used the funds borrowed from Mr. Wheaton for working capital requirements. The Company owes Mr. Wheaton approximately $109,000 as of May 17, 2010 and January 25, 2010 for business expense reimbursements.

Note (D) Segment and Related Reporting

The Company has two reporting segments, the Buffet Division and the Non-Buffet Division. The Company’s reportable segments are aggregated based on operating similarities.

The accounting policies of the reportable segments are the same as those described in Note 1 of the audited consolidated financial statements included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended January 25, 2010. The Company evaluates the performance of its operating segments based on income before income taxes.

Summarized financial information concerning the Company’s reportable segments is shown in the following table. The other assets presented in the condensed consolidated balance sheets and not in the reportable segments relate to the Company as a whole, and not individual segments. Also certain corporate overhead income and expenses in the condensed consolidated statements of operations are not included in the reportable segments.

 
11

 

   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
16 Weeks Ended
 May 17, 2010
 
Buffets
   
Non-Buffets
   
Other
   
Total
 
Revenues  
  $ 11,779     $ 7,870     $     $ 19,649  
Interest income 
                       
Interest expense
                (287 )     (287 )
Depreciation & amortization 
    521       293       10       824  
Goodwill
          551             551  
Property Acquisition 
    32       136       77       245  
Impairment of long-lived assets
                       
Income (loss) before income taxes
    138       961       (771 )     328  
Total assets  
  $ 18,669     $ 12,477     $ 5,285     $ 36,431  
 
   
(Dollars in Thousands)
 
16 Weeks Ended
 May 18, 2009
 
Buffets
   
Non-Buffets
   
Other
   
Total
 
Revenues 
  $ 19,409     $ 8,746     $     $ 28,155  
Interest income  
                75       75  
Interest expense 
    (1 )           (288 )     (289 )
Depreciation & amortization 
    584       259       11       854  
Goodwill  
          551             551  
Property Acquisition 
    34       40       91       165  
Impairment of long-lived assets
                       
Income (loss) before income taxes
    1,074       1,179       (839 )     1,414  
Total assets  
  $ 23,505     $ 12,827     $ 3,515     $ 39,847  

 
Note (E) Net Income per Common Share

Net income per common share - basic is computed based on the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period.  Net income per common share – diluted is computed based on the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period plus the effect of dilutive common stock equivalents outstanding during the period.  Dilutive stock options are considered to be common stock equivalents and are included in the diluted calculation using the treasury stock method.

The following table summarizes the calculation of basic and diluted net income per common share for the respective fiscal periods:

 
12

 
 
16 Weeks Ended May 17, 2010
 
Net Income
   
Shares
   
Per Share Amount
 
Weighted average common shares outstanding – basic
  $ 104,000       3,213,075     $ 0.03  
Weighted average common shares outstanding – diluted
  $ 104,000       3,213,075     $ 0.03  
 
16 Weeks Ended May 18, 2009
                 
Weighted average common shares outstanding – basic
  $ 854,000       3,213,075     $ 0.27  
Weighted average common shares outstanding – diluted
  $ 854,000       3,213,075     $ 0.27  

Weighted-average common shares outstanding for the sixteen weeks ended May 17, 2010 and May 18, 2009 used to calculate diluted earnings per share exclude stock options to purchase 22,000 and 39,000 shares of common stock, respectively, due to the market price of the underlying stock being less than the exercise price.

Note (F) Goodwill

Goodwill represents the excess of the purchase price paid over the fair value of the net assets acquired in connection with business acquisitions. The Company reviews goodwill for possible impairment on an annual basis or when triggering events occur in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 350.  ASC 350 requires goodwill to be tested for impairment at the reporting unit level, which is an operating segment or one level below an operating segment.  The Company considers each asset group to be a reporting unit and therefore reviews goodwill for possible impairment by restaurant.

The Company utilizes a two-part impairment test.  First, the fair value of the reporting unit is compared to carrying value (including goodwill).  If the carrying value is greater than the fair value, the second step is performed.  In the second step, the implied fair value of the reporting unit goodwill is compared to the carrying amount of goodwill.  If the carrying value is greater, a loss is recognized. The goodwill impairment test considers the impact of current conditions and the economic outlook for the restaurant industry, the general overall economic outlook including market data, and governmental and environmental factors in establishing the assumptions used to compute the fair value of each reporting unit.  We also take into account the historical, current and future (based on probability) operating results of each reporting unit and any other facts and data pertinent to valuing the reporting units in our impairment test.

The Company performs its annual impairment analysis on February 1st.    There were no triggering events during the quarter ending May 17, 2010 that would have had an impact on goodwill. There were no goodwill impairment losses for the 16-week periods ended May 17, 2010 and May 18, 2009.

Note (G) Other Intangible Assets

Other intangible assets consist of franchise fees, trademarks, and the JB's license agreement. Franchise fees are amortized using the straight-line method over the terms of the franchise agreements, which typically range from 10 to 20 years.  The JB's license agreement is being amortized using the straight-line method over 11 years. The Company has recorded values for trademarks of Whistle Junction and 4B’s of $230,000 and $25,000, respectively.  These assets have an indefinite asset life and are subject to possible impairment on an annual basis or when triggering events occur in accordance with ASC 350.

Note (H) Inventories

Inventories consist of food, beverage, gift shop items and certain restaurant supplies and are valued at the lower of cost or market, determined by the first-in, first-out method.

 
13

 
Note (I) Accounting for Long-Lived Assets

The Company determines that an impairment writedown is necessary for long-lived assets whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to future undiscounted net cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If such assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment to be recognized is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the assets exceeds the fair value of the assets.

Note (J) Properties, Building and Equipment

The components of property, buildings and equipment used in restaurant operations and two properties used as warehouses, excluding non-operating properties, are as follows:

 
 
 
May 17,
2010
   
January 25,
2010
 
Property, buildings and equipment:
           
   Furniture, fixtures and equipment
  $ 20,822,000     $ 21,081,000  
   Land
    5,332,000       5,332,000  
   Buildings and leasehold improvements
    18,751,000       19,295,000  
      44,905,000       45,708,000  
   Less accumulated depreciation
    (21,920,000 )     (21,495,000 )
    $ 22,985,000     $ 24,213,000  
 
Total property, buildings and equipment includes the following land, equipment and buildings and leaseholds associated with 10 non-operating units as of May 17, 2010 and as of January 25, 2010. Six of 10 non-operating restaurants remain closed for remodeling and repositioning, one non-operating restaurant was leased to a third party and the one remaining non-operating restaurant was closed and reported as property held for sale.  In addition, two non-operating restaurants were used as warehouses for equipment in Florida and Utah and are included in the table above. During the quarter the Company closed two stores. The store in Albuquerque, New Mexico had been fully in impaired in the prior fiscal year and the equipment with a net book value of $274,000 in Monroe, Louisiana is warehoused in property, buildings and equipment held for future use. The components are as follows:

   
May 17,
2010
   
January 25,
2010
 
Property and equipment leased to third parties:
               
     Equipment
  $ 222,000     $ 222,000  
     Land
    124,000       124,000  
     Buildings and leaseholds
    685,000       685,000  
      1,031,000       1,031,000  
                 
   Less accumulated depreciation
    (370,000 )     (362,000 )
    $ 661,000     $ 669,000  

 
14

 
 
   
 May 17,
2010
   
January 25,
2010       
 
Property, buildings and equipment held for future use:                
Equipment
  $ 2,055,000     $ 1,671,000  
Land
    1,042,000       1,042,000  
Buildings and leaseholds
    2,855,000       2,828,000  
      5,952,000       5,541,000  
 
   Less accumulated depreciation
    (1,930,000 )     (2,201,000 )
    $ 4,022,000     $ 3,340,000  

   
May 17,
2010
   
January 25,
2010
 
Property held for sale:                
     Land
  $ 367,000     $ 367,000  
     Buildings
    364,000       364,000  
    $ 731,000     $ 731,000  

The Company did not record an impairment expense in the first quarter of fiscal 2011 or fiscal 2010.

Note (K) Stock-Based Compensation

The Company did not grant any stock options in the first quarter of fiscal 2011 or fiscal 2010. The intrinsic value of the outstanding stock options was $0 as of May 17, 2010.

Note (L) Commitments and Contingencies

Prior to the Company’s formation in 1998, HTB entered into franchise agreements for each of its HomeTown Buffet locations which require the payment of a royalty fee to HomeTown Buffet, Inc. The royalty fee is 2% of the gross sales of each HomeTown Buffet restaurant. The franchise agreements have a 20-year term (with two five-year renewal options). The franchisor requires HTB to operate each restaurant in conformity with Franchise Operating Manuals and Recipe Manuals and Menus. The franchise agreements also place certain limits on the Company’s ability to operate competing buffet businesses within specified geographic areas.  The HomeTown franchisor may terminate a franchise agreement for a number of reasons, including the Company’s failure to pay royalty fees when due, failure to comply with applicable laws or repeated failure to comply with one or more requirements of the franchise agreement. However, many state franchise laws limit the ability of a franchisor to terminate or refuse to renew a franchise.
 
On February 1, 2005, the Company announced in a press release that it had entered into a strategic alliance with K-BOB’S USA Inc. and related affiliates. In accordance with the terms of the strategic alliance, the Company agreed to lend K-BOB’S up to $1.5 million on a long-term basis. In exchange, K-BOB’S granted the Company an option to purchase as many as five corporate owned and operated K-BOB’S restaurants located in New Mexico and Texas.  On January 28, 2008, the Company exercised its option under the terms of the strategic alliance and purchased three K-BOB’S restaurants. In connection with the purchase, the Company entered into license agreements which require the payment of certain fees to K-BOB’S based on the restaurant gross sales.

On April 21, 2006, the Company announced in a press release that it had entered into a strategic alliance with Western Sizzlin Corporation. In connection with the strategic alliance, the Company acquired three Western Sizzlin franchised restaurants and entered into license agreements with Western Sizzlin Corporation for each. The license agreements require the payment of certain fees to Western Sizzlin Corporation based on the restaurant gross sales.

 
15

 
In connection with the Company’s employment contract with Robert E. Wheaton, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and President, the Company has agreed to pay Mr. Wheaton six years salary and bonus if he resigns related to a change of control of the Company or is terminated, unless the termination is for cause.
 
On February 22, 2010, Vistar Corporation filed a lawsuit against the Company in the State of Arizona for the failure to pay $1.3 million in food invoices. The Company believes that Vistar Corporation overcharged the Company per the contract between the two companies. The Company has an amount of $1.0 million reserved in accounts payable on May 17, 2010 with respect to this matter.

In addition, the Company and its subsidiaries are engaged in ordinary and routine litigation incidental to its business. Management does not anticipate that the resolution of any of these routine proceedings will require payments that will have a material effect on the Company's consolidated statements of operations or financial position or liquidity.

Note (M) Taxes

The Company was not able to take advantage or utilize the Credit for Employer Social Security and Medicare Taxes Paid on certain Employee Tips and other business credits resulting in a higher effective tax rate of approximately 68.3% for the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010 compared to 39.6% for the 16-week periods ended May 18, 2009 because the has Company more general business credits available after a new temporary IRS ruling allowed the Company loss carrybacks for five years. The IRS does not allow the use of tax credits when carrying back losses. The Company has deferred income taxes of $3,297,000 and $2,527,000 on May 17, 2010 and January 25, 2010, respectively.  The deferred tax asset is primarily the timing difference on deferred rent and fixed assets.

Note (N) Insurance Programs

Historically, the Company has purchased first dollar insurance for workers’ compensation claims; high-deductible primary property coverage; and excess policies for casualty losses.  Effective January 1, 2008, the Company modified its program for insuring casualty losses by lowering the self-insured retention levels from $2 million per occurrence to $100,000 per occurrence.  Accruals for self-insured casualty losses include estimates of expected claims payments.  Because of large, self-insured retention levels, actual liabilities could be materially different from calculated accruals.  The valuation reserves for the quarters ended May 17, 2010 and May 18, 2009 were $34,000 and $43,000, respectively.

Note (O) Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The carrying amounts of the Company’s cash and cash equivalents, receivables, accounts payable and accrued expenses approximates fair value because of the short maturity of these instruments.

The carrying amounts of the Company’s notes receivable, long-term debt and capital lease obligations approximate fair value and are based on discounted cash flows using market rates at the balance sheet dates. The Company cannot estimate the fair value of the note payable to officer because of the related party nature of the transaction.

The Company previously adopted guidance related to Fair Value Measurements.  This authoritative guidance among other things, defines fair value, establishes a consistent framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosure for each major asset and liability category measured at fair value on either a recurring or nonrecurring basis. This authoritative guidance clarifies that fair value is an exit price, representing the amount that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants. As such, fair value is a market-based measurement that should be determined based on assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability. As a basis for considering such assumptions, this authoritative guidance establishes a three-tier fair value hierarchy, which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value as follows:
 
 
16

 
Level 1: Observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets;
 
Level 2: Inputs, other than the quoted prices in active markets, that are observable either directly or indirectly; and
 
Level 3: Unobservable inputs in which there is little or no market data, which require the reporting entity to develop its own assumptions.
 
The fair value measurements determined for purposes of performing the Company’s impairment tests are considered to be Level 2 for real property and Level 3 for other assets under the fair value hierarchy.  The Level 2 inputs included sales and listing prices on properties that the Company considered to be similar to those properties included in the impairment analysis.  The Level 3 inputs were utilized for other assets because they required significant unobservable inputs to be developed using estimates and assumptions determined by the Company and reflecting those that a market participant would use.

Note (P) Subsequent Events

On June 13, 2010, the Company closed a Barnhill’s Buffet restaurant in Orange City, Florida.
 
The Company has evaluated subsequent events through the date that these financial statements were filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 
17

 
STAR BUFFET, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Item 2.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following Management’s Discussion and Analysis should be read in conjunction with the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements, and the notes thereto, presented elsewhere in this report and the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements and Management’s Discussion and Analysis included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 25, 2010.  Comparability of periods may be affected by the closure of restaurants or the implementation of the Company’s acquisition and strategic alliance strategies.  The costs associated with integrating new restaurants or under-performing or unprofitable restaurants, if any, acquired or otherwise operated by the Company may have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations in any individual period.

This quarterly report on Form 10-Q contains forward looking statements, which are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause the actual results, performance, or achievements of the Company to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.  Such factors include, among others, the following: general economic and business conditions; success of integrating newly acquired under-performing or unprofitable restaurants; the impact of competitive products and pricing; success of operating initiatives; advertising and promotional efforts; adverse publicity; changes in business strategy or development plans; quality of management; availability, terms and deployment of capital; changes in prevailing interest rates and the availability of financing; food, labor, and employee benefits costs; changes in, or the failure to comply with, government regulations; weather conditions; construction schedules; implementation of the Company’s acquisition and strategic alliance strategy; the effect of the Company’s accounting polices and other risks detailed in the Company’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 25, 2010, and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Overview

Consolidated net income for the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010 decreased $750,000 to $104,000 or $0.03 per diluted share as compared with net income of $854,000 or $0.27 per diluted share for the comparable prior year period.  The decrease in net income is due to a decrease in income from operations of approximately $1.1 million primarily from higher food and labor costs offset by lower occupancy costs and higher other income. Total revenues decreased approximately $8.6 million or 30.2% from $28.2 million in the 16 weeks ended May 18, 2009 to $19.6 million in the 16 weeks ended May 17, 2010. The decrease in revenues was primarily attributable to 16 closed stores resulting in a sales decline of approximately $6.1 million and sales declines of approximately $2.7 million in comparable same store sales.  The decline in sales was partially offset by approximately a $400,000 increase in sales from three new stores or stores only opened for a portion of the first quarter of last year.

Recent Developments

On January 31, 2010 the Company closed the HomeTown Buffet restaurant in Albuquerque, New Mexico and on March 29, 2010 closed the Barnhill’s Buffet restaurant in Monroe, Louisiana. After the quarter ended, the Company closed a Barnhill’s Buffet restaurant in Orange City, Florida on June 13, 2010.
 
On February 22, 2010 Vistar Corporation (‘Vistar”) in the Superior Court of the State of Arizona filed a lawsuit against the Company for the failure of the Company to pay $1.3 million in food invoices. The Company believes that Vistar overcharged the Company per the contract between the two companies. The Company has an amount of $1.0 million reserved in accounts payable on May 17, 2010.  The Company has reached a legal settlement with Vistar requiring payments of approximately $1,000,000 over the next nine months. The Company reduced costs by $185,000 and paid approximately $115,000 in the first quarter of fiscal 2011.

 
18

 
The Company entered into lease with an option to purchase a 4B’s restaurant in Polson, Montana in March 2010. The Company opened the restaurant on May 9, 2010.

Components of Income from Operations

Total revenues include a combination of food, beverage, merchandise and vending sales and are net of applicable state and city sales taxes.

Food costs primarily consist of the cost of food and beverage items.  Various factors beyond the Company’s control, including adverse weather and natural disasters, may affect food costs.  Accordingly, the Company may incur periodic fluctuations in food costs.  Generally, these temporary increases are absorbed by the Company and not passed on to customers; however, management may adjust menu prices to compensate for increased costs of a more permanent nature.

Labor costs include restaurant management salaries, bonuses, hourly wages for unit level employees, various health, life and dental insurance programs, vacations and sick pay and payroll taxes.

Occupancy and other expenses are primarily fixed in nature and generally do not vary with restaurant sales volume especially in the short term. It is sometimes possible to lower occupancy and other expenses if given a longer period of time to adjust. For example, rent may be negotiated lower and the advertising may be reduced if the decline in sales is more permanent.  Rent, insurance, property taxes, utilities, maintenance and advertising account for the major expenditures in this category.

General and administrative expenses include all corporate and administrative functions that serve to support the existing restaurant base and provide the infrastructure for future growth.  Management, supervisory and staff salaries, employee benefits, data processing, training and office supplies are the major items of expense in this category.



 
19

 
Results of Operations

The following table summarizes the Company’s results of operations as a percentage of total revenues for the 16 weeks ended May 17, 2010 and May 18, 2009.
 
   
Sixteen Weeks Ended
 
   
May 17,
2010
   
May 18,
2009
 
             
Total revenues
    100.0 %     100.0 %
                 
Costs and expenses
               
   Food costs
    39.7       38.4  
   Labor  costs
    32.6       30.8  
   Occupancy and other expenses
    18.1       19.3  
   General and administrative expenses
    2.9       2.7  
   Depreciation and amortization
    4.2       3.0  
   Impairment of long-lived assets
    0.0       0.0  
   Total costs and expenses
    97.5       94.3  
                 
Income from operations
    2.5       5.7  
                 
   Interest expense
    (1.5 )     (1.0 )
   Interest income
    0.7       0.3  
   Other income
    0.0       0.0  
       Income before income taxes
    1.7       5.0  
                 
Income taxes
    1.2       2.0  
                 
Net income
    0.5 %     3.0 %
                 
Effective income tax rate
    68.3 %     39.6 %
 
Summarized financial information concerning the Company’s reportable segments is shown in the following table. The other assets presented in the condensed consolidated balance sheet and not in the reportable segments relate to the Company as a whole, and not individual segments. Also certain corporate overhead income and expenses in the condensed consolidated statements of operations are not included in the reportable segments.

(Dollars in Thousands)
16 Weeks Ended
 May 17, 2010
 
Buffet
Division (1)
   
Non-Buffet
Division(2)
   
Other
   
Total
 
Revenues
  $ 11,779     $ 7,870     $     $ 19,649  
Food cost
    5,220       2,574             7,794  
Labor cost
    3,718       2,697             6,415  
Interest income
                       
Interest expense
                (287 )     (287 )
Depreciation & amortization
    521       293       10       824  
Impairment of long-lived assets
                       
Income (loss) before income taxes
    138       961       (771 )     328  
 
 
20

 
16 Weeks Ended
 May 18, 2009
 
Buffet
Division (1)
   
Non-Buffet
Division(2)
   
Other
   
Total
 
Revenues
  $ 19,409     $ 8,746     $     $ 28,155  
Food cost
    8,086       2,732             10,818  
Labor cost
    5,664       3,019             8,683  
Interest income
                75       75  
Interest expense
    (1 )           (288 )     (289 )
Depreciation & amortization
    584       259       11       854  
Impairment of long-lived assets
                       
Income (loss) before income taxes
    1,074       1,179       (839 )     1,414  

(1) The sales decrease in the Buffet Division was primarily from declines in comparable same store sales and 14 closed restaurants.  The food cost as a percentage of revenue increased this year primarily due to decreases in revenue and increases in wholesale food prices as compared to the prior year.  Labor cost increased as a percentage of revenue this year primarily due to decreases in revenue and increases in minimum wages compared to the prior year.  Income (loss) before income taxes decreased primarily from the decline in revenue and increases in food and labor costs.

(2) The sales decrease in the Non-Buffet Division was primarily from declines in comparable same store sales and two closed restaurants.  The food cost as a percentage of revenue increased this year primarily due to decreases in revenue and increases in wholesale food prices as compared to the prior year.  Labor cost increased as a percentage of revenue this year primarily due to decreases in revenue and increases in minimum wages compared to the prior year.  Income (loss) before income taxes decreased primarily from the decline in revenue and increases in food and labor costs.

Total revenues decreased approximately $8.6 million or 30.2% from $28.2 million in the 16 weeks ended May 18, 2009 to $19.6 million in the 16 weeks ended May 17, 2010. The decrease in revenues was primarily attributable to 16 closed stores resulting in a sales decline of approximately $6.1 million and sales declines of approximately $2.7 million in comparable same store sales.  The decline in sales was partially offset by approximately a $400,000 increase in sales from three new stores or stores only opened for a portion of the first quarter of last year.

Food costs as a percentage of total revenues increased from 38.4% during the 16-week period ended May 18, 2009 to 39.7% during the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010. The increase as a percentage of total revenues was primarily attributable to higher prices for some commodities and a generally lower revenue base.  Food costs decreased by approximately $3.0 million in the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010 primarily due to the net decrease of 13 stores. The company reduced food costs by approximately $185,000 resulting from a legal settlement with Vistar Corporation.

Labor costs as a percentage of total revenues increased from 30.8% during the 16-week period ended May 18, 2009 to 32.6% during the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010.  The increase as a percentage of total revenues was primarily attributable to a generally lower revenue base and higher minimum wages. Labor costs decreased by approximately $2.3 million in the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010 primarily due to the net decrease of 13 stores.
 
Occupancy and other expenses as a percentage of total revenues decreased from 19.3% during the 16-week period ended May 18, 2009 to 18.1% during the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010. The decrease as a percentage of total revenues was primarily attributable to a decrease in facility costs as a percentage of revenues in the current year compared to the prior year. The facility cost decrease is primarily from deferred rent credits of $346,000 in the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010. Occupancy and other expenses costs decreased by approximately $1.9 million in the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010 primarily due to the net decrease of 13 stores.
 
 
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General and administrative expense as a percentage of total revenues increased from 2.7% during the 16-week period ended May 18, 2009 to 2.9% during the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010. The increase as a percentage of total revenues was primarily due to a lower revenue base primarily due to the net decrease of 13 stores for the 16 weeks ended May 17, 2010 as compared to the same period of the prior year.

Depreciation and amortization expense a percentage of total revenues increased from 3.0% during the 16-week period ended May 18, 2009 to 4.2% during the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010. The increase as a percentage of total revenues was primarily attributable to lower revenue for the 16 weeks ended May 17, 2010 as compared to the same period of the prior year.

Interest expense decreased from $289,000 during the 16-week period ended May 18, 2009 to $287,000 during the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010.  The decrease was primarily attributable to a lower average debt balance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010 as compared to fiscal 2009.

Interest income decreased from $75,000 for the 16-week period ended May 18, 2009 to $0 during the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010. Interest income was primarily generated by the Company’s outstanding Federal income tax receivable in the prior year.

Other income is primarily from legal settlements of $120,000 in the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010. The legal settlements included $85,000 for the Utah Department of Transportation and $35,000 for credit cards. Rental income was $13,000 for one property leased for the entire 16-week period ended May 17, 2010.  Rental income was $11,000 for two properties leased for the entire 16-week period ended May 18, 2009.

The income tax provision totaled $224,000 or 68.3% of pre-tax income for the 16-week period ended May 17, 2010 as compared to $560,000 or 39.6% of pre-tax income for the 16-week period ended May 18, 2009. The difference in the tax provision as a percentage of pre-tax income was primarily from the non-utilization of tax credits in the current year compared to the prior year.

Impact of Inflation

The impact of inflation on the cost of food, labor, equipment and construction and remodeling of stores could affect the Company’s operations.  Many of the Company’s employees are paid hourly rates related to the federal and state minimum wage laws so that changes in these laws can result in higher labor costs to the Company. In addition, the cost of food commodities utilized by the Company is subject to market supply and demand pressures.  Shifts in these costs may have an impact on the Company’s food costs.  The Company anticipates that modest increases in these costs can be offset through pricing and other cost control efforts; however, there is no assurance that the Company would be able to pass more significant costs on to its customers, or if it were able to do so, it could do so in a short period of time.


 
22

 
 
Liquidity and Capital Resources

In recent years, the Company has financed operations through a combination of cash on hand, cash provided from operations, available borrowings under bank lines of credit and loans from our principal shareholder.
 
As of May 17, 2010, the Company had $921,000 in cash.  Cash and cash equivalents increased by $28,000 during the 16-weeks ended May 17, 2010. The net working capital deficit was $(7,314,000) and $(7,889,000) at May 17, 2010 and January 25, 2010, respectively.  The Company spent approximately $245,000 on capital expenditures in the 16-weeks ending May 17, 2010.
 
Cash provided by operations was $1.4 million for the 16-weeks ending May 17, 2010 and $1.9 million for the 16-weeks ending May 18, 2009.  The decrease in cash generated from operating activities for the 16-week period ending May 17, 2010 was primarily a result of lower net income. The decrease in net income resulted primarily from higher food and labor costs offset by lower occupancy costs and higher other income.

Cash used by financing activities was approximately $1,200,000. The Company decreased checks written in excess of bank balance by $1.2 million.

The following table is a summary of the Company’s outstanding debt obligations.
 
   
May 17
   
May 17
   
January 25
   
January 25
 
   
2010
   
2010
   
2010
   
2010
 
Type of Debt
 
Total Debt
   
Current Portion
   
Total Debt
   
Current Portion
 
Real Estate Mortgages
  $ 6,387,000     $ 755,000     $ 6,597,000     $ 730,000  
Bank Debt-Revolver
    2,475,000       -       2,000,000       -  
Bank Debt-Term
    4,225,000       900,000       4,450,000       900,000  
Subordinated Debt
    1,992,000       -       1,992,000       -  
Total Debt
  $ 15,079,000     $ 1,655,000     $ 15,039,000     $ 1,630,000  
 
The Company has a Credit Facility with Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. consisting of an $8,000,000 term loan and a $2,500,000 revolving line of credit.  The Credit Facility is guaranteed by Star Buffet’s subsidiaries and bears interest, at the Company’s option, at Wells Fargo’s base rate plus 0.25% or at LIBOR plus 2.00%.  The Credit Facility is secured by a first priority lien on all of the Company’s assets, except for those assets that are currently pledged as security for existing obligations, in which case Wells Fargo will have a second lien.  The term loan matures on January 31, 2012 and provides for principal to be amortized at $225,000 per quarter with any remaining balance due at maturity.  Interest is payable monthly.  The $2,500,000 revolving line of credit matures on January 31, 2012.  Interest on the revolver is payable monthly.  Based on the financial results of the quarter ended May 17, 2010, the Company was not in compliance with the financial covenant requiring a maximum Total Lease Adjusted Leverage Ratio of 5:1.  The Company received a waiver of this requirement for the first quarter only from Wells Fargo.  In addition, the Company is required to meet the following financial covenants: The Consolidated Pre-Distribution Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio requires a minimum ratio of 1.2:1, the Consolidated Post-Distribution Fixed Charge Coverage Ratio requires a minimum ratio of 1.05:1 and Growth Capital Expenditures Made or Committed can not exceed $2,000,000 in the fiscal year.  As of May 17, 2010 the Company was in compliance with the other three covenant requirements.  There can be no assurance that future operating results will be sufficient to remain in compliance with the financial covenants required by the Credit Facility.

 
23

 
During fiscal 2008, the Company borrowed approximately $1,400,000 from Mr. Robert E. Wheaton, a principal shareholder, officer and director of the Company.  This loan dated June 15, 2007 is subordinated to the obligation to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. and bears interest at 8.5%.  In June, 2008, the Company borrowed an additional $592,000 from Mr. Wheaton under the same terms.  This resulted in an increase in the subordinated note balance from $1,400,000 to $1,992,000, the balance as of May 17, 2010 and May 18, 2009.  The Company expensed $52,000 to Mr. Wheaton for interest during the first quarter of fiscal 2010 and fiscal 2009. The Company owes Mr. Wheaton $91,000 and $0 for interest as of May 17, 2010 and May 18, 2009, respectively. The principal balance and any unpaid interest are due and payable in full on June 5, 2012.  The Company used the funds borrowed from Mr. Wheaton for working capital requirements. The Company owes Mr. Wheaton approximately $109,000 as of May 17, 2010 and January 25, 2010 for business expense reimbursements.

The Company has indicated that it plans moderate growth based primarily on acquisitions. Growth plans through acquisition is capital intensive particularly when an acquisition involves the purchase of real estate. Traditionally, the Company has financed acquisitions through a combination of cash on hand, bank borrowings and real estate mortgages. Given limited bank borrowing capacity and troubles in real estate financing markets, it is unlikely that the Company achieve growth objectives until conditions improve.

The Company believes that cash on hand, availability under the revolving line of credit and cash flow from operations will be sufficient to satisfy working capital, capital expenditure and refinancing requirements during the next 12 months.  Additionally, management does not believe that the net working capital deficit will have any material effect on the Company’s ability to operate the business or meet obligations as they come due.  However, there can be no assurance that cash on hand, availability under the revolving line of credit and cash flow from operations will be sufficient to satisfy its working capital, capital expenditure and refinancing requirements.  Furthermore, given uncertain financial market conditions, on February 20, 2009 the Board of Directors voted to indefinitely suspend the annual dividend on the outstanding common stock of the Company.


The Company prepares its condensed consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. The Company's condensed consolidated financial statements are based on the application of certain accounting policies, the most significant of which are described in Note 1—Summary of Significant Accounting Policies included in the Company’s Annual Report filed on Form 10-K. Certain of these policies require numerous estimates and strategic or economic assumptions that may prove inaccurate or subject to variations and may significantly affect the Company's reported results and financial position for the period or in future periods. Changes in underlying factors, assumptions or estimates in any of these areas could have a material impact on the Company's future financial condition and results of operations. The Company considers the following policies to be the most critical in understanding the judgments that are involved in preparing its consolidated financial statements.

Property, Buildings and Equipment

Property, building and equipment are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Depreciation and amortization are provided using the straight-line method over the following useful lives:

 
Years
Buildings
40
Building and leasehold improvements
15 – 20
Furniture, fixtures and equipment
5 – 8

 
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Building and leasehold improvements are amortized over the lesser of the life of the lease or estimated economic life of the assets. The life of the lease includes renewal options determined by management at lease inception as reasonably likely to be exercised. If a previously scheduled lease option is not exercised, any remaining unamortized leasehold improvements may be required to be expensed immediately which could result in a significant charge to operating results in that period.

Property and equipment in non-operating units or stored in warehouses is depreciated and is recorded on the balance sheet as property, building and equipment held for future use. Property and equipment in non-operating units held for remodeling or repositioning is depreciated and is recorded on the balance sheet as property, building and equipment held for future use.

Property and equipment placed on the market for sale is not depreciated and is recorded on the balance sheet as property held for sale and recorded at the lower of cost or market.

Repairs and maintenance are charged to operations as incurred. Major equipment refurbishments and remodeling costs are generally capitalized.

The Company's accounting policies regarding buildings and equipment include certain management judgments regarding the estimated useful lives of such assets, the residual values to which the assets are depreciated and the determination as to what constitutes increasing the life of existing assets. These judgments and estimates may produce materially different amounts of depreciation and amortization expense than would be reported if different assumptions were used. As discussed further below, these judgments may also impact the Company's need to recognize an impairment charge on the carrying amount of these assets as the cash flows associated with the assets are realized.

Impairment of Goodwill

Goodwill primarily represents the excess of the purchase price paid over the fair value of the net assets acquired in connection with business acquisitions. The Company reviews goodwill for possible impairment on an annual basis or when triggering events occur in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 350.  ASC 350 requires goodwill to be tested for impairment at the reporting unit level, which is an operating segment or one level below an operating segment.  The Company considers each asset group to be a reporting unit and therefore reviews goodwill for possible impairment by restaurant.

The Company utilizes a two-part impairment test.  First, the fair value of the reporting unit is compared to carrying value (including goodwill).  If the carrying value is greater than the fair value, the second step is performed.  In the second step, the implied fair value of the reporting unit goodwill is compared to the carrying amount of goodwill.  If the carrying value is greater, a loss is recognized. The goodwill impairment test considers the impact of current conditions and the economic outlook for the restaurant industry, the general overall economic outlook including market data, and governmental and environmental factors in establishing the assumptions used to compute the fair value of each reporting unit.  We also take into account the historical, current and future (based on probability) operating results of each reporting unit and any other facts and data pertinent to valuing the reporting units in our impairment test.

The Company performs its annual impairment analysis on February 1st.    There were no triggering events during the quarter ending May 17, 2010 that would have had an impact on goodwill. There were no goodwill impairment losses for the 16-week periods ended May 17, 2010 and May 18, 2009.

 
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Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company evaluates impairment of long-lived assets in accordance with ASC 360, “Property, Plant and Equipment”.  The Company assesses whether an impairment write-down is necessary whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable.  Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to future undiscounted net cash flows expected to be generated by the asset.  If such asset is considered to be impaired, the impairment loss to be recognized is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset. Any impairment is recognized as a charge to earnings, which would adversely affect operating results in the affected period.

Judgments made by the Company related to the expected useful lives of long-lived assets and the ability of the Company to realize undiscounted net cash flows in excess of the carrying amounts of such assets are affected by factors such as the ongoing maintenance and improvements of the assets, changes in economic conditions, and changes in operating performance. As the Company assesses the ongoing expected net cash flows and carrying amounts of its long-lived assets, these factors could cause the Company to realize a material impairment charge and could adversely affect operating results in any period.

Insurance Programs

Historically, the Company has purchased first dollar insurance for workers’ compensation claims; high-deductible primary property coverage; and excess policies for casualty losses.  Effective January 1, 2008, the Company modified its program for insuring casualty losses by lowering the self-insured retention levels from $2 million per occurrence to $100,000 per occurrence.  Accruals for self-insured casualty losses include estimates of expected claims payments.  Because of large, self-insured retention levels, actual liabilities could be materially different from calculated accruals.

Commitments and Contractual Obligations

The Company’s contractual obligations and commitments principally include obligations associated with our outstanding indebtedness and future minimum operating and capital lease obligations of its wholly-owned direct and indirect independently capitalized subsidiaries as set forth in the following table:
 
Contractual Obligations:
 
Total
   
Less than
one year
   
One to
three years
   
Three to
five years
   
Greater than
five years
 
               
(Dollars in thousands)
             
Long-term debt
  $ 15,079     $ 1,655     $ 9,626     $ 2,825     $ 973  
Operating leases
    9,585       1,744       2,907       1,577       3,357  
Capital leases
                             
Purchase commitments
                             
Total contractual cash obligations
  $ 24,664     $ 3,399     $ 12,533     $ 4,402     $ 4,330  

 
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Off Balance Sheet Arrangements

Under the terms of the current financing with Wells Fargo, the Company was required to obtain interest rate protection through an interest rate swap or cap with respect to not less than 50% of the term loan amount. Wells Fargo has agreed to permanently waive the requirement for an interest rate swap or cap agreement.

Adopted and Recently Issued Accounting Standards

In June 2009, the FASB issued authoritative guidance that changes how a reporting entity determines when an entity that is insufficiently capitalized or is not controlled through voting (or similar rights) should be consolidated and requires companies to more frequently assess whether they must consolidate these entities. The determination of whether a reporting entity is required to consolidate another entity is based on, among other things, the other entity’s purpose and design and the reporting entity’s ability to direct the activities that most significantly impact the other entity’s economic performance. The provisions are effective for annual periods beginning after November 15, 2009, which for us is fiscal 2011. We have not yet evaluated the impact of adopting the requirements of the authoritative guidance on our consolidated financial position or results of operations. 
 
In January 2010, the FASB issued ASU 2010-06, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures. ASU 2010-06 amends ASC 820-10, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, and requires new disclosures surrounding certain fair value measurements. ASU 2010-06 is effective for the first interim or annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2009, except for certain disclosures about purchases, sales, issuances, and settlements in the rollforward of activity in Level 3 fair value measurements, which are effective for the first interim and annual reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2010. The Company is in the process of evaluating these additional disclosure requirements and does not expect they will have a significant impact on its Consolidated Financial Statements.

In October 2009, the FASB issued ASU 2009-13, Multiple Deliverable Revenue Arrangements. ASU 2009-13 amends ASC 605-10, Revenue Recognition, and addresses accounting for multiple-deliverable arrangements to enable vendors to account for products or services (deliverables) separately rather than as a combined unit, and provides guidance on how to measure and allocate arrangement consideration to one or more units of accounting. ASU 2009-13 is effective for revenue arrangements entered into or materially modified in fiscal years beginning on or after June 15, 2010. Early adoption is permitted, but certain requirements must be met. The Company is in the process of evaluating ASU 2009-13 and does not expect it will have a significant impact on its Consolidated Financial Statements

Item 4.  Controls and Procedures

The Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the Exchange Act), is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the required time periods and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Accounting Officer, as appropriate, to allow for timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

As required by Rule 13a-15(b) under the Exchange Act, we conducted an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including the Chief Executive Officer and the Principal Accounting Officer, of the effectiveness and the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report.  Based on such evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and the Principal Accounting Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of the end of the period covered by this report as a result of the material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting discussed in our report on Form 10-K for the year ended January 25, 2010.

 
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Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

We are currently undertaking a number of measures to remediate the material weaknesses  involving inadequate segregation of duties and untimely account reconciliation discussed in our report on Form 10-K for the year ended January 25, 2010 to ensure that account reconciliations are completed earlier in the accounting cycle.  Those measures will be implemented during our fiscal year 2011, and will materially affect, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.  Other than as described above, there have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the fiscal year 2011 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 
 
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PART II:  OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

On February 22, 2010 Vistar Corporation (‘Vistar”) in the Superior Court of the State of Arizona filed case number CV-2010-04632 against the Company for the failure of the Company to pay $1.3 million in food invoices. The Company believes that Vistar overcharged the Company per the contract between the two companies. The Company has an amount of $1.0 million reserved in accounts payable on May 17, 2010.  The Company has reached a legal settlement with Vistar requiring payments of approximately $1,000,000 over the next nine months. The Company has reduced costs by $185,000 and paid approximately $115,000 in the first quarter of fiscal 2011.  The Company filed to move the case to Federal District Court. The case number in federal court is CV-10-0593-PHX-NVW. There is a pending motion to remove the matter to the Florida District Court.

The Company is from time to time the subject of complaints or litigation from customers alleging injury on properties operated by the Company, illness related to food quality or operational concerns. Adverse publicity resulting from such allegations may materially adversely affect the Company and its restaurants, regardless of whether such allegations are valid or whether the Company is liable. The Company also is the subject of complaints or allegations from employees from time to time. The Company believes that generally the lawsuits, claims and other legal matters to which it is subject to in the ordinary course of its business are not material to the Company's business, financial condition or results of operations, but an existing or future lawsuit or claim could result in an adverse decision against the Company that could have a material adverse effect on the Company's business, financial condition and results of operations.

Item 1A. Risk Factors

There have been no material changes from the risk factors disclosed in Part 1, Item 1A of our Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 25, 2010.

Item 5. Other Information

None.
 
 
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Item 6.  Exhibits

(a)           The following exhibits are attached to this report unless noted as previously filed:

Exhibit 
Description
Number
of Exhibit                                                                                                           

3.1 
Certificate of Incorporation*
3.2 
Bylaws, as amended on September 22, 1997*
4.1 
Form of Common Stock Certificate**
31.1 
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of theSarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
31.2 
Certification of Principal Accounting Officer pursuant to Section 302 of theSarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.1 
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 906 of theSarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.2 
Certification of Principal Accounting Officer pursuant to Section 906 of theSarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
99.1 
Press release dated July 6, 2010.

* Previously filed as an exhibit to the Registration Statement on Form S-1, Amendment No. 1 (Registration No. 333- 32249).
** Previously filed as an exhibit to the Registration Statement on Form S-1, Amendment No. 2 (Registration No. 333- 32249).


 
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SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned hereunto duly authorized.

  STAR BUFFET, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES  
       
       
July 6, 2010 
By:
/s/ Robert E. Wheaton  
   
Robert E. Wheaton
Chairman of the Board,
President, Chief Executive Officer and
Principal Executive Officer
 
       
       
July 6, 2010    /s/ Ronald E. Dowdy   
   
Ronald E. Dowdy
Group Controller,
Treasurer, Secretary and
Principal Accounting Officer
 
 

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