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SurModics 10-K 2009
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SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, DC 20549
 
 
Form 10-K
 
 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
 
For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009
 
 
Commission file number 0-23837
 
 
 
 
 
     
Minnesota   41-1356149
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (IRS Employer
Identification No.)
     
9924 West 74th Street
Eden Prairie, Minnesota
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
  55344
(Zip Code)
 
 
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
(952) 829-2700
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
     
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Exchange on Which Registered
 
Common Stock, $0.05 par value
  NASDAQ Global Select Market
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes o     No þ
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes o     No þ
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes þ     No o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes o     No o
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
     
Large accelerated filer o
  Accelerated filer þ
Non-accelerated filer o
  Smaller reporting company o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes o     No þ
 
The aggregate market value of the Common Stock held by shareholders other than officers, directors or holders of more than 5% of the outstanding stock of the registrant as of March 31, 2009 was approximately $197 million (based upon the closing sale price of the registrant’s Common Stock on such date).
 
The number of shares of the registrant’s Common Stock outstanding as of December 7, 2009 was 17,471,760.
 
 
Portions of the Registrant’s definitive Proxy Statement for the Registrant’s 2010 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated by reference into Part III.
 


 

 
 
                 
        Page
 
Part I
      Business     3  
      Risk Factors     20  
      Unresolved Staff Comments     27  
      Properties     27  
      Legal Proceedings     27  
      Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders     28  
        Executive Officers of the Registrant     28  
 
      Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities     31  
      Selected Financial Data     33  
      Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations     33  
      Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk     44  
      Financial Statements and Supplementary Data     45  
      Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure     45  
      Controls and Procedures     45  
      Other Information     47  
 
      Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance     47  
      Executive Compensation     47  
      Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters     47  
      Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence     47  
      Principal Accountant Fees and Services     47  
 
      Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules     48  
 EX-3.2
 EX-10.18
 EX-10.27
 EX-10.28
 EX-10.29
 EX-10.30
 EX-21
 EX-23
 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-32.1
 EX-32.2
 
We make available, free of charge, copies of our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act on our web site, www.surmodics.com, as soon as reasonably practicable after filing such material electronically or otherwise furnishing it to the SEC. We are not including the information on our web site as a part of, or incorporating it by reference into, our Form 10-K.


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ITEM 1.   BUSINESS.
 
 
SurModics, Inc. (referred to as “SurModics,” “the Company,” “we,” “us,” “our” and other like terms) is a leading provider of drug delivery and surface modification technologies to the healthcare industry. Our mission is to exceed our customers’ expectations and enhance the well-being of patients by providing the world’s foremost, innovative drug delivery and surface modification technologies and products. We partner with many of the world’s leading and emerging medical device, pharmaceutical and life science companies to develop and commercialize innovative products designed to improve patient outcomes. Our core offerings include: drug delivery technologies (coatings, microparticles, and implants); surface modification coating technologies that impart lubricity, prohealing, and biocompatibility characteristics; and components for in vitro diagnostic test kits and specialized surfaces for cell culture and microarrays. Our strategy is to build on our technical leadership in the field of drug delivery and surface modification technologies and products, enabling us to strengthen our position as a leading edge product development partner to the healthcare industry.
 
Our drug delivery and surface modification technologies are utilized by our customers to enable drug delivery through our microparticle, polymer implant or device platforms; alter the characteristics of the surfaces of devices and biological materials (e.g., lubricity or hemocompatibility); or create new functions for the surfaces of the devices (e.g., drug delivery or promotion of healing). For example, our patented drug delivery technologies can create new device capabilities by enabling site specific, controlled release drug delivery in cases where devices (e.g., stents or balloon catheters) are themselves necessary to treat a medical condition and in cases where devices serve only as a vehicle to deliver a drug (e.g., ophthalmology implants and drug delivery depots). Microparticles can be used to provide sustained drug delivery, allowing patients to receive injections at less frequent intervals (e.g., monthly instead of daily). Similarly, our patented PhotoLink® technology enhances the maneuverability of minimally invasive devices (e.g., dilatation catheters and guidewires) within the body by improving the lubricity of the device surface.
 
We believe that site specific, localized drug delivery has the potential to change the landscape of the current medical device industry. Drug-eluting stents are one of the first manifestations of how drugs and devices can be combined to dramatically improve patient outcomes. We believe that drug-eluting balloons may also show great promise, and that significant opportunities exist for site specific drug delivery from a wide range of other medical devices. Working with both pharmaceutical and medical device companies, we believe we are poised to exploit this growing market opportunity as drugs and devices converge to create improved products and therapies.
 
In January 2005, we extended the application of our drug delivery technologies beyond the cardiovascular market, where our drug delivery polymer expertise first gained prominence, into the ophthalmology market by acquiring all of the assets of InnoRx, Inc., including its innovative sustained drug delivery platform technologies used to treat a variety of serious eye diseases. A Phase I clinical trial to demonstrate safety of the I-vationtm intravitreal implant in patients with diabetic macular edema (DME) was initiated during fiscal 2005. The study was fully enrolled in fiscal 2006 and patients completed their three-year follow-up during fiscal 2009. The clinical data suggest that the I-vationtm TA (triamcinolone acetonide) intravitreal implant is safe and well tolerated in patients with DME. In June 2007, we entered into a License and Research Collaboration Agreement and separate Supply Agreement with Merck & Co., Inc. (“Merck”) related to this technology. Under the terms of the Merck agreements, we received an up front license fee of $20 million and were eligible to receive up to an additional $288 million in fees and development milestones associated with the successful product development and attainment of appropriate U.S. and EU regulatory approvals, as well as payment for our research and development activities. In September 2008, following a strategic review of its business and product portfolio, Merck terminated its collaborative research and license agreement with us covering the development and possible commercialization of products incorporating our I-vationtm platform, including the I-vationtm TA product. The termination became effective in December 2008. Merck’s termination was not related to safety or efficacy concerns with either the I-vationtm platform, generally, or the I-vationtm TA product, specifically. We continue to believe that if future clinical trials demonstrate longer term safety and efficacy of this product, I-vationtm TA could represent a viable commercial product.
 
On October 5, 2009, we entered into a License and Development Agreement with F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Ltd. (“Roche”) and Genentech, Inc., a wholly owned member of the Roche Group (“Genentech”). Under the terms of the


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License Agreement, Roche and Genentech has an exclusive license to develop and commercialize a sustained drug delivery formulation of Lucentis® (ranibizumab injection) utilizing SurModics’ proprietary biodegradable microparticles drug delivery system. Under the terms of the agreement, we received an up front licensing fee of $3.5 million, are eligible to receive potential payments of up to approximately $200 million in fees and milestone payments in the event of the successful development and commercialization of multiple products, and will be paid for development work done on these products. Roche and Genentech will have the right to obtain manufacturing services from SurModics. In the event a commercial product is developed, we will also receive royalties on sales of such products.
 
We plan to continue to invest in our technologies and products to expand our core capabilities for ophthalmic drug delivery platforms. We anticipate entering into one or more additional strategic relationships to further advance these ophthalmic technologies and products, and eventually commercialize such technologies if they lead to viable, approved treatment solutions.
 
In July 2007, we acquired Brookwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a leading provider of drug delivery technology primarily to the pharmaceutical industry. This acquisition created our SurModics Pharmaceuticals business unit (formerly known as our Brookwood Pharmaceuticals business unit) and greatly increased our drug delivery capabilities in the areas of proprietary injectable microparticles and implant technology, both of which are based on biodegradable polymers, to provide sustained drug delivery. SurModics Pharmaceuticals’ customer projects target a number of key clinical indications in the diabetes, oncology, ophthalmology, cardiovascular, orthopedics, dermatology and central nervous system (CNS) markets, in addition to other fields. SurModics Pharmaceuticals generates revenue from research and development fees, polymer sales, and license fees.
 
In August 2007, we acquired BioFX Laboratories, Inc. (“BioFX”). Based in Owings Mills, Maryland, BioFX is a leading provider of innovative reagents and substrates for the biomedical research and medical diagnostic markets. BioFX offers both colorimetric and chemiluminescent substrates, as well as other products for use in in vitro diagnostic applications. This acquisition expanded our product offerings for customers developing diagnostic test kits.
 
In November 2008, we extended our technology offerings by acquiring a portfolio of intellectual property and collaborative drug delivery projects from PR Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a drug delivery company specializing in injectable, biodegradable sustained release microparticle formulations. We believe that this acquisition, together with our SurModics Pharmaceuticals business unit, strengthens our portfolio of drug delivery technologies available to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.
 
We continue to commercialize our drug delivery and surface modification technologies primarily through licensing and royalty arrangements with medical device manufacturers, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Additionally, we continue to strengthen our ability to partner with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies allowing for the integration of their proprietary drugs with our unique drug delivery platform technologies, such as our polymer-based microparticles and implants as well as our I-vationtm intravitreal implant, through similar licensing and royalty arrangements. We believe this approach allows us to focus our resources on the further development of our core technologies and enables us to expand our licensing activities into new markets.
 
Revenue from our licensing arrangements typically includes research and development revenue, license fees and milestone payments, minimum royalties, and royalties based on a percentage of licensees’ product sales. In addition to research and development services, we offer manufacturing services for clinical trial materials as well as for commercial products through the state-of-the-art Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) facility we are completing in Birmingham, Alabama. We have completed construction of the facility, and expect to fully complete cGMP qualification in the near future. In addition to licensing fees and research and development fees, we generate revenue from the manufacture and sale of a variety of products. We manufacture and sell the chemical reagents used by our customers in coating their products. We also sell a range of biodegradable polymers under our Lakeshore Biomaterials brand. Additionally, through our CodeLink® microarray slide product line, which we re-acquired from GE Healthcare in September 2008 along with the right to use the CodeLink® trademark, we manufacture and sell microarray slides to the diagnostic and biomedical research markets. Other immunoassay diagnostic products include a line of stabilization products used to extend the shelf life of immunoassay diagnostic


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tests, substrates used to detect and signal a result in immunoassay diagnostic tests and recombinant human antigens through our role as exclusive North American distributor for DIARECT AG.
 
In November 2008, we changed our organizational structure from seven business units into four clinically and market focused business units. In addition, a new centralized research and development function was formed to serve the needs of our business units, other than the SurModics Pharmaceuticals business unit, which continues to maintain certain R&D operations. The following is a summary of our four business units: Cardiovascular, Ophthalmology, In Vitro Technologies, and SurModics Pharmaceuticals.
 
  •  Cardiovascular, supporting the drug delivery and surface modification needs of our cardiovascular customers by providing drug delivery polymers and coating technologies including our advanced lubricity (slippery) coatings which ease placement and maneuverability of medical devices in the body.
 
  •  Ophthalmology, developing drug delivery systems intended to enhance performance, safety, patient convenience and patient compliance for a variety of drugs and other bioactive agents that are being developed by pharmaceutical and ophthalmology companies for the treatment of serious eye diseases.
 
  •  SurModics Pharmaceuticals, specializing in proprietary injectable microparticles and implants to provide sustained delivery of drugs being developed by leading pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device clients as well as emerging companies. These microparticles and implants are based on biodegradable polymers. This business also supplies biodegradable polymers to corporate and academic customers.
 
  •  In Vitro Technologies, specializing in in vitro diagnostic products and technologies for the biomedical research and medical diagnostic markets. These products and technologies include protein stabilization reagents, substrates, recombinant autoimmune antigens, surface chemistry technologies for nucleic acid and protein immobilization, and diagnostic format intellectual property.
 
We believe we have sufficient financial resources available to continue developing and growing our business. We intend to continue investing in research and development to advance our drug delivery and surface modification technologies and to expand uses for our technology bases. In addition, we continue to pursue access to products and technologies developed outside the Company as appropriate to complement our internal research and development efforts.
 
The Company was organized as a Minnesota corporation in June 1979 and became a public company, with shares of our common stock becoming listed for trading on the Nasdaq market, in 1998.
 
 
 
Advances in medical device technology have helped drive improved device efficacy and patient outcomes. Pacemakers and defibrillators have dramatically reduced deaths from cardiac arrhythmias. Stents, particularly drug-eluting stents, have significantly reduced the need for repeat intravascular procedures, and they have diminished the need for more invasive cardiac bypass surgery. Hip, knee and spine implants have relieved pain and increased mobility. Acceptance of these and other similar innovations by patients, physicians and insurance companies has helped the U.S. medical device industry grow at a faster pace than the economy as a whole. The attractiveness of the industry has drawn intense competition among the companies participating in this area. In an effort to improve their existing products or develop entirely new devices, a growing number of medical device manufacturers are exploring or using drug delivery and surface modification technologies as product differentiators or device enablers. In addition, the continuing trend toward minimally invasive surgical procedures, which often employ catheter-based delivery technologies, has increased the demand for hydrophilic, lubricious coatings and other technologies.
 
 
The pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries have become increasingly competitive as a result of the launch of new products (many of which have limited differentiating characteristics), patent expirations, and reimbursement pressures. In response to these competitive pressures, companies in these industries are continually


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seeking to develop new products with improved efficacy, safety and convenience. Reducing dosing frequency through polymer-based sustained release systems has the opportunity to enable the development of new drug entities, as well as to improve a broad range of existing drugs. Converting a drug that must, for instance, be given daily as a pill or injection, to one that can be administered by injection or implant weekly, monthly or even less frequently, may have several patient benefits. Sustained, controlled drug release has the potential to eliminate undesirable peak and trough drug levels in the body, which can lead to both improved drug safety and efficacy. Additionally, fewer treatments and improved patient convenience can result in improved patient compliance with a specified administration schedule, thereby further enabling the drug’s effect to be optimized.
 
Drug delivery solutions such as those offered by SurModics also create opportunities for local delivery of medications to sites of disease in the body. In certain applications such as ocular, orthopedic and pain applications, it can be beneficial to provide a high local concentration of drug. Such local delivery may enhance efficacy and reduce side effects by focusing the drug’s effect where it is needed and limiting the amount of drug impacting other parts of the body.
 
Pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have also found that sustained drug delivery solutions can enhance product sales by creating competitive advantage and extending patent protection through the issuance of patents on controlled delivery formulations of their drugs.
 
We believe the benefits of polymer-based sustained release systems make them applicable to drugs targeting a wide range of therapeutic fields, including ophthalmology, orthopedics, dermatology, metabolic disease, alcoholism, central nervous system disorders, and cardiovascular disease, among others.
 
 
The convergence of the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device industries, often made possible by drug delivery and surface modification technologies, presents a powerful opportunity for major advancements in the healthcare industry. The dramatic success of drug-eluting stents in interventional cardiology has captured the attention of the drug and medical device industries. We believe the benefits of combining drugs and biologics with implantable devices are becoming increasingly valuable in applications in cardiology, ophthalmology, orthopedics, and other large markets. In addition, the ability to create sustained release formulations of drugs and biologics presents another opportunity for the Company.
 
SurModics’ Drug Delivery and Surface Modification Technologies — Overview
 
We believe SurModics is uniquely positioned to exploit the continuing trend of incorporating drug delivery and surface modification technologies into the design of products such as devices and drugs, potentially leading to more efficient and effective products as well as creating entirely new product applications. We have a growing portfolio of proprietary technologies, market expertise and insight, and unique collaborative research and development capabilities — all key ingredients to bring innovation together for the benefit of patients, the Company, and the healthcare industry.
 
 
Our drug delivery coating technologies allow therapeutic drugs to be incorporated within our proprietary polymer matrices to provide controlled, site specific release of the drug into the surrounding environment. The release of the drug can be tuned to elute quickly (in a few days) or slowly (ranging from several months to over a year), illustrating the wide range of release profiles that can be achieved with our coating systems. On a wide range of devices, drug-eluting coatings can help improve device performance, increase patient safety and enable innovative new treatments. We work with companies in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device industries to develop specialized coatings that allow for the controlled release of drugs from device surfaces. We see at least three primary areas with strong future potential: (1) improving the function of a device which itself is necessary to treat the medical condition; (2) enabling drug delivery in cases where the device serves only as a vehicle to deliver a drug to a specific site in the body; and (3) enhancing the biocompatibility of a medical device to ensure that it continues to function over a long period of time.


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We offer customers several distinct polymer families for site specific drug delivery. Our Bravotm Drug Delivery Polymer Matrix is utilized on the CYPHER® Sirolimus-eluting Coronary Stent from Cordis Corporation, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson. CYPHER® is a trademark of Cordis Corporation. The Bravo polymer is a durable coating and is also used on our I-vationtm TA (triamcinolone acetonide) intravitreal implant within our Ophthalmology business unit. In addition, we offer several biodegradable polymer technologies that can be used for drug delivery applications. Because some biodegradable polymers can deliver proteins and other large molecule therapeutic agents, they have the potential to expand the breadth of drug delivery applications we can pursue. Biodegradable polymers can be combined with one or more drugs and applied to a medical device, and the drug is then released as the polymer degrades in the body over time.
 
Our proprietary PhotoLink coating technology is a versatile, easily applied, coating technology that modifies medical device surfaces by creating covalent bonds between device surfaces and a variety of chemical agents. PhotoLink coatings can impart many performance enhancing characteristics, such as advanced lubricity (slippery) and hemocompatibility (preventing clot formation), when bound onto surfaces of medical devices or other biological materials without materially changing the dimensions or other physical properties of devices. Our PhotoLink technology utilizes proprietary, light activated (photochemical) reagents, which include advanced polymers or active biomolecules having desired surface characteristics and an attached light reactive chemical compound (photogroup). When the reagent is exposed to a direct light source, typically ultraviolet light, a photochemical reaction creates a covalent bond between the photogroup and the surface of the medical device, thereby imparting the desired property to the surface. A covalent bond is a very strong chemical bond that results from the sharing of electrons between carbon atoms of the substrate and the applied coating, making the coating very durable and resilient.
 
Our proprietary PhotoLink reagents can be applied to a variety of substrates. Our reagents are easily applied to the material surface by a variety of methods including, but not limited to, dipping, spraying, roll coating, ink jetting or brushing. We continue to expand our portfolio of proprietary reagents for use by our customers. These reagents enable our customers to develop novel surface features for their devices, satisfying the expanding requirements of the healthcare industry. We are also continually working to expand the list of materials that are compatible with our drug delivery and surface modification reagents. Additionally, we develop coating processes and coating equipment to meet the device quality, manufacturing throughput and cost requirements of our customers.
 
Key differentiating characteristics of our coatings are their durability, flexibility and ease of use. In terms of flexibility, coatings can be applied to many different kinds of surfaces and can immobilize a variety of chemical, pharmaceutical and biological agents. This flexibility allows customers to be innovative in the design of their products without significantly changing the dimensions or other physical properties of the device. Additionally, the surface modification process can be tailored to provide customers with the ability to improve the performance of their devices by choosing the specific coating properties desired for particular applications. Our surface modification technologies also can be combined to deliver multiple surface-enhancing characteristics on the same device.
 
In terms of ease of use, unlike competing coating processes, the PhotoLink coating process is relatively simple and is easily integrated into the customer’s manufacturing process. In addition, it does not subject the coated products to harsh chemical or temperature conditions, produces no hazardous byproducts, and does not require lengthy processing or curing time. Further, our Photolink coatings are generally compatible with accepted sterilization processes, so the surface attributes are not lost when the medical device is sterilized.
 
 
Through our acquisition of SurModics Pharmaceuticals in July 2007, and certain proprietary technology from PR Pharmaceuticals, Inc. in November 2008, as well as internal development and other acquisition of biodegradable material technology, we offer customers drug delivery systems based on polymer-based microparticles and implants. These systems enable the controlled delivery of a broad variety of drugs, ranging in size from small molecule drugs to larger molecule drugs such as peptides and proteins. Depending on the drug and application, our microparticles and implants can incorporate drugs for delivery over days, weeks or months.


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SurModics Pharmaceuticals scientists have developed an extensive body of experience, proprietary know-how and patented capability in the field of microparticle drug delivery, working with a wide range of drug classes. Our microparticles incorporate a customer’s drug and our polymers into very small particles that are measured in microns (1,000 microns equals one millimeter). Using our extensive technology base, we can develop long-acting, injectable microparticles for systemic, local, and cellular delivery of active pharmaceutical ingredients. A variety of commercially viable, proprietary microencapsulation processes are used including: solvent extraction, solvent evaporation, phase separation, fluid bed coating, and spray drying. Based on the desired product specifications, our scientists and engineers can select the appropriate microencapsulation process, as well as the formulation variables to achieve dose, duration and other product specifications.
 
Injectable solid implants are rod, coil or other-shaped devices with drug dispersed throughout a polymer matrix. They are designed to release the drug at a prescribed rate for days, weeks, or months. This type of drug delivery dosage form is especially suitable when efficacy is dependent on delivering a dose of a drug over a long duration. The polymer matrix controls the rate of release of the drug from the implant. We are developing long-acting implants with biodegradable and non-biodegradable polymers. One of our biodegradable drug delivery implant systems has shape memory properties. This capability allows the implant to be delivered in one shape so that it can be placed through a catheter or other delivery device, after which the implant returns to its original shape once delivered to the desired site in the body.
 
Through our SurModics Pharmaceuticals business unit, we are also collaborating with Genzyme Pharmaceuticals, a business unit of Genzyme Corporation, to develop novel drug delivery solutions, with an initial focus on peptide delivery. The relationship offers customized solutions for parenteral formulations by combining expertise in design for peptide delivery, peptide synthesis, and drug delivery technologies.
 
 
  •  Drug Delivery.  We provide drug delivery polymer technology to enable controlled, site specific or systemic delivery of therapeutic agents. Our proprietary polymer reagents create coatings, microparticles and implants which serve as reservoirs for therapeutic drugs. The drugs can then be released on a controlled basis over days, weeks or months. Some of our systems can release drugs for over a year. For instance, when a drug-eluting stent is implanted into a patient, the drug releases from the surface of the stent into the blood vessel wall where it can act to inhibit unwanted tissue growth, thereby reducing the occurrence of restenosis. Cordis Corporation is currently selling throughout the world a drug-eluting stent incorporating SurModics’ technology. We have also developed the I-vationtm sustained drug delivery system for the treatment of serious retinal diseases. In addition to our biodurable polymer technologies, we offer a number of biodegradable polymer technologies allowing us to deliver both large and small molecule drugs and address a wide variety of applications. For example, in collaboration with Genentech we are developing a sustained release formulation of Lucentistm (ranibizumab injection) using our proprietary biodegradable microparticle technology. We believe that we are unique in our ability to offer our medical device, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry customers and their patients delivery of such a broad range of drugs through coatings, microparticles and implants.
 
  •  Lubricity.  Low friction or lubricious coatings reduce the force and time required for insertion, navigation and removal of devices in a variety of minimally invasive applications. Lubricity also reduces tissue irritation and damage caused by products such as catheters, guidewires and endoscopy devices. Based on internal and customer evaluation, when compared with uncoated surfaces, our PhotoLink coatings have reduced the friction on surfaces by more than 90%, depending on the surface being coated.
 
  •  Prohealing.  Biologically based extracellular matrix (ECM) protein coatings for use in various applications are designed to improve and accelerate the healing of the tissue at or near the implant site through nature’s own healing mechanisms following procedures involving implantable medical devices. Certain ECM proteins, such as collagen and laminin, specifically stimulate the migration and proliferation of endothelial cells (cells that line blood vessels) to promote healing. By covalently attaching the appropriate ECM proteins to device surfaces utilizing the PhotoLink coating process, the biomimetic surface can signal endothelial


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  cells in the blood and vascular wall to form a stable endothelial lining over the implant. We believe these prohealing coatings could help prevent late stent thrombosis.
 
  •  Hemo/biocompatibility.  Hemocompatible/biocompatible coatings help reduce adverse reactions that may be created when a device is inserted into the body and comes in contact with blood. Heparin has been used for decades as an injectable drug to reduce blood clotting in patients. PhotoLink reagents can be used to immobilize heparin on the surface of medical devices, thereby inhibiting blood clotting on the device surface, minimizing patient risk and enhancing the performance of the device. We have also developed synthetic, non-biological coatings that provide medical device surfaces with improved blood compatibility without the use of heparin. These coatings prevent undesirable cells and proteins that lead to clot formation from adhering to the device surface. These coatings may also reduce fibrous encapsulation.
 
  •  DNA and Protein Immobilization.  Both DNA and protein microarrays are useful tools for the pharmaceutical, diagnostic and research industries. During a DNA gene analysis, typically thousands of different probes need to be placed in a pattern on a surface, called a DNA microarray. These microarrays are used by the pharmaceutical industry to screen for new drugs, by genome mappers to sequence human, animal or plant genomes, or by diagnostic companies to search a patient sample for disease causing bacteria or viruses. However, DNA does not readily adhere to most surfaces. We have developed various surface chemistries for both DNA and protein immobilization. In September 2008, we re-acquired the rights to our microarray slide product line which had previously been marketed by GE Healthcare under the CodeLink® trademark. As part of this transaction, we obtained the right to use the CodeLink® trademark from GE Healthcare in the sale and marketing of the product lines we re-acquired. Protein microarrays are used as diagnostic and research tools to determine the presence and/or quantity of proteins in a biological sample. The most common type of protein microarray is the antibody microarray, where antibodies are spotted onto a surface and used as capture molecules for protein detection.


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The table below identifies several market segments where drug delivery and surface modification technologies are desired to improve and enable both existing and new medical devices and drugs.
 
     
    Desired Surface Property and
Market Segment Served
 
Examples of Applications
 
Interventional cardiology and vascular access
 
Lubricity: catheters, guidewires, delivery systems
   
Hemocompatibility: vascular stents, catheters, distal protection devices
   
Drug/biologics delivery: vascular stents, catheters
   
Prohealing: vascular stents, vascular grafts
Cardiac rhythm management
 
Lubricity: pacemaker and defibrillator leads, electrophysiology devices
   
Hemocompatibility: electrophysiology devices
   
Prohealing: pacemaker and defibrillator leads
   
Drug/biologics delivery: pacemaker and defibrillator leads
Cardiothoracic surgery
 
Prohealing: heart valves, septal defect repair devices
   
Hemocompatibility: minimally invasive bypass devices, vascular grafts, ventricular assist devices
In Vitro Diagnostics
 
Lubricity: microfluidic devices
   
Hemocompatibility: blood/glucose monitoring devices, biosensors
   
Biomolecule immobilization: DNA and protein arrays, protein attachment to synthetic extracellular matrix for cell culture applications
Interventional neurology and Neurosurgery
 
Lubricity: catheters, guidewires
   
Prohealing: neuroembolic devices
   
Tissue engineering: aneurysm repair devices
Urology and gynecology
 
Lubricity: urinary catheters, incontinence devices, ureteral stents, fertility devices
   
Drug/biologics delivery: prostatic stents, microparticle injections
   
Tissue engineering: female sterilization devices
Ophthalmology
 
Drug/biologics delivery: sustained drug delivery implants and microparticle injections
Orthopedics
 
Cell growth and tissue integration: bone and cartilage growth
   
Infection resistance: orthopedic and trauma implants
   
Drug/biologics delivery: orthopedic and trauma implants and microparticle injections
Metabolic disease
 
Drug/biologics delivery: microparticle injections
   
Tissue engineering: cell encapsulation
Central nervous system disorders
 
Drug/biologics delivery: microparticle injections, polymer implants
Dermatology
 
Drug/biologics delivery: polymer implants
   
Tissue engineering: tissue bulking, space filling materials


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Examples of applications for our coating technologies include guidewires, angiography catheters, IVUS catheters, neuro microcatheters/infusion catheters, PTCA/PTA laser and balloon angioplasty catheters, atherectomy systems, chronic total occlusion catheters, stent delivery catheters, cardiovascular stents, embolic protection devices, vascular closure devices, EP catheters, pacemaker leads, drug infusion catheters, wound drains, ureteral stents, urological catheters and implants, hydrocephalic shunts, ophthalmic implants, among other devices. Beyond coatings, our drug delivery technologies have also been applied to a wide range of drugs currently in preclinical and clinical development.
 
 
We commercialize our drug delivery and surface modification technologies primarily through licensing arrangements with medical device and drug manufacturers. We believe this approach allows us to focus our resources on further developing new technologies and expanding our licensing activities. Many of our technologies have been designed to allow manufacturers to easily implement them into their own manufacturing processes so customers can control production and quality internally without the need to send their products to a contract manufacturer. Other customers, particularly in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, prefer to outsource the manufacturing of drug delivery formulations to partners. Accordingly, we are investing in our SurModics Pharmaceuticals manufacturing facility in Alabama in order to meet the Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) manufacturing needs of our customers. We have completed construction of the facility, and expect to fully complete cGMP qualification in the near future.
 
We generate the largest portion of our revenue through licensing arrangements. Royalties and license fees represented 62.1%, 53.4% and 72.0% of our total revenue in fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Revenue from these licensing arrangements typically includes license fees and milestone payments, minimum royalties, and royalties based on a percentage of licensees’ product sales. We also generate revenue from sales of chemical reagents to licensees for use in their coating processes, and from polymer sales under our Lakeshore Biomaterials brand. Our In Vitro Technologies business unit generates revenue from: sales of stabilization products, substrates, antigens and microarray slides to diagnostics customers; and licensing our proprietary diagnostic formats for use in point-of-care testing. Product sales represented 15.9%, 20.7% and 18.5% of total revenue in fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Research and development fees represented 22.0%, 26.0% and 9.5% of total revenue in fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. The increase in research and development revenue since 2007 reflects the addition of our SurModics Pharmaceuticals business unit.
 
The licensing process begins with the customer specifying a desired product feature to be created such as lubricity, drug delivery, etc. Because each device and drug is unique, we routinely conduct a feasibility study to qualify each new potential product application; often generating research and development revenue. Once the feasibility phase has been completed in a manner satisfactory to the customer, the customer funds a development project to optimize the formulation to meet the customer’s specific technical needs. At any time prior to commercialization, a license agreement may be executed granting the licensee rights to use our technology. We often support our customers by providing coating assistance for parts required in animal tests and human clinical trials. However, most customers perform the coating work internally once a product has received regulatory approval and is being actively marketed. Our SurModics Pharmaceuticals business unit also supports many of our drug delivery customers by manufacturing microparticles and implants incorporating customers’ drugs through preclinical and clinical trials and by providing an option to manufacture products upon commercialization as well.
 
The term of a license agreement is generally for a specified number of years or the life of our patents, whichever is longer, although a license generally may be terminated by the licensee for any reason upon 90 days’ advance written notice. Our license agreements may include certain license fees and/or milestone payments. The license can be either exclusive or nonexclusive, but a significant majority of our licensed applications are nonexclusive, allowing us to license technology to multiple customers. Moreover, even exclusive licenses may be limited to a specific “field of use,” allowing us the opportunity to further license technology to other customers. The royalty rate on a substantial number of the agreements has traditionally been in the 2% to 3% range, but there are certain contracts with lower or higher rates. Royalty rates in certain more recent agreements have been trending higher, especially where the relevant SurModics technology is an enabling component of the customer’s device (i.e., the device could not perform as desired without our technology). The amount of the license fees, milestone


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payments, and the royalty rate are based on various factors, including the stage of development of the product or technology being licensed, whether the arrangement is exclusive or nonexclusive, the perceived value of our technology to the customer’s product, size of the potential market, and customer preferences. Most of our agreements also incorporate a minimum royalty to be paid by the licensee. Royalties are generally paid one quarter after the customer’s actual product sales occur because of the delay in reporting sales by our licensees.
 
As of September 30, 2009, we had 103 licensed product classes (customer products utilizing SurModics technology) already on the market generating royalties and 108 customer product classes incorporating our technology pending regulatory approval. These 211 product classes are being sold or developed by 106 licensed customers. We signed 22 new licenses in fiscal 2009, compared with 23 in fiscal 2008.
 
Under most of our licensing agreements, we are required to keep the identity of our customers confidential unless they approve of such disclosure. Some of our licensed customers who allow the use of their name are: Abbott Laboratories, Boston Scientific Corporation, CardioMind, Inc., Conor Medsystems, LLC (a wholly owned subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson), Cook Medical, Cordis Corporation (a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson), Edwards Lifesciences Corporation, Evalve, Inc. (a subsidiary of Abbott Laboratories), Elixir Medical Corporation, ev3 Inc., F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Ltd. and its subsidiary Genentech, Inc., Medtronic, Inc., Nexeon MedSystems, Inc. (formerly Paragon Intellectual Properties, LLC), NuPathe, Inc., OrbusNeich Medical, Inc., Spectranetics Corporation, St. Jude Medical, Inc., and ThermopeutiX Inc.
 
In Vitro Products
 
 
SurModics offers a full line of stabilization products for the in vitro diagnostics market. These products increase sensitivity and extend the shelf life of diagnostic kits, thereby producing more consistent assay results. SurModics’ stabilization products are ready-to-use, eliminating the preparation time and cost of producing stabilization and blocking reagents in house.
 
 
Since the acquisition of BioFX in August 2007, SurModics has provided colorimetric and chemiluminescent substrates to the in vitro diagnostics market. A substrate is the component of a diagnostic test kit that detects and signals that a reaction has taken place so that a result can be recorded. Colorimetric substrates signal a positive diagnostic result through a color change. Chemiluminescent substrates signal a positive diagnostic result by emitting light. We believe that our substrates offer a high level of stability, sensitivity and consistency.
 
 
SurModics is the exclusive North American distributor (and non-exclusive distributor in Japan) of DIARECT AG’s line of recombinant autoimmune antigens. Because of the lack of high-quality antigens from natural sources, DIARECT produces these proteins and other components using biotechnological methods. DIARECT has strong capabilities in the bacilovirus/Sf9 expression system for autoimmune antigens as well as E. coli systems for particular expression tasks.
 
 
During fiscal 1999, we began offering microarray slide products for use in the diagnostic and biomedical research markets. Microarray slides are used by researchers for DNA analysis. In September 2008, we re-acquired the rights to market our microarray slide product line from GE Healthcare, including the right to use the CodeLink® trademark in connection with these products. Previously, these products had been marketed by GE Healthcare under the CodeLink® trademark.
 
 
In December 2008, the diagnostic patents we licensed to Abbott Laboratories expired. Because net sales are reported, and royalties paid, following the end of a calendar quarter, we also recognized revenue from these patents


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in fiscal 2009. In addition, we recognized additional royalty income of $1.3 million in 2009 in connection with the settlement of previously disclosed litigation involving Abbott Laboratories and Church & Dwight Co, Inc. We do not anticipate any further revenue from these patents.
 
 
Our research and development (R&D) personnel work to enhance and expand our technology offerings in the area of drug delivery and surface modification through internal scientific investigation. These scientists and engineers also evaluate external technologies in support of our corporate development activities. All of these efforts are guided by the needs of the markets in which we do business. Additionally, the R&D staff support the sales staff and business units in performing feasibility studies, providing technical assistance to potential customers, optimizing the relevant technologies for specific customer applications, supporting clinical trials, training customers, and integrating our technologies and know-how into customer manufacturing operations.
 
We work together with our customers to integrate the best possible drug delivery and surface modification technologies with their products, not only to meet their performance requirements, but also to perform services quickly so that the product may reach the market ahead of the competition. To quickly solve problems that might arise during the development and optimization process, we have developed extensive capabilities in analytical chemistry and surface characterization within our R&D organization. Our state-of-the-art instrumentation and extensive experience allow us to test the purity of coating reagents, to monitor the elution rate of drug from coatings, microparticles and implants, to measure coating thickness and smoothness, and to map the distribution of chemicals throughout coatings, microparticles and implants. We believe our capabilities far exceed those of our direct competitors, and sometimes even exceed those of our large-company customers. In order to better serve our customers, in November 2008 we announced the creation of a new centralized R&D function to serve the needs of the Company’s clinically and market focused business units, other than our SurModics Pharmaceuticals business unit, which continues to have its own R&D operations.
 
As medical products become more sophisticated and complex and as competition increases, we believe the need for drug delivery and surface modification will continue to grow. We intend to continue our development efforts to expand our drug delivery and surface modification technologies to provide additional optimized properties to meet these needs across multiple medical markets. In addition, we are expanding our drug delivery and surface modification technology expertise to capture more of the final product value. We are doing this by, in selected cases, developing or acquiring technologies or devices to develop from feasibility stage up to and including animal and human clinical testing stage. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in developing or acquiring additional technologies or devices.
 
After thorough consideration of each market opportunity, our technical strategy is to target selected formulation characteristics for further development, to facilitate and shorten the license cycle. We continue to perform research into applications for future products both on our own and in conjunction with some of our customers. Some of the R&D projects currently in progress include additional polymer systems for site specific and systemic drug delivery, including microparticles, nanoparticles and biodegradable technologies, as well as technologies to improve healing around implantable devices, technologies to deliver nucleic acids, proteins and cell therapies, slide-based microarray technologies and drug delivery platforms for ophthalmic applications.
 
In fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, our R&D expenses were $34.4 million, $40.5 million and $28.5 million, respectively. Of the above amounts, $21.2 million, $21.3 million and $22.6 million were spent on internal R&D in fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively, and $13.2 million, $19.2 million and $5.8 million in those years, respectively, were spent on customer-sponsored R&D, which includes technology optimization and other development work on customer product applications. We intend to continue investing in R&D to advance our drug delivery and surface modification technologies and to expand uses for our technology platforms. In addition, we continue to pursue access to products and technologies developed outside the Company as appropriate to complement our internal R&D efforts.


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Patents and other forms of proprietary rights are an essential part of the SurModics business model. We protect our extensive portfolio of technologies through a number of United States patents covering a variety of coatings, drug delivery methods, reagents, and formulations, as well as particular clinical device applications. We generally file international patent applications in the locations matching the major markets of our customers (primarily in North America, Europe, and Japan) in parallel with United States applications. In fiscal 2009, we filed 38 United States patent applications, expanding the portfolio protection around our current technologies as well as enabling pursuit of new technology concepts, innovations, and directions.
 
In particular, we have licensed our patented Bravotm Drug Delivery Polymer Matrix (“Bravo”) to Cordis Corporation, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, for utilization with its Cypher® Sirolimus-eluting Coronary Stent. Bravo is protected by 6 issued U.S. patents and 26 issued international patents. The expiration dates for these patents range from 2019 to 2023. Additionally, we have 3 pending U.S. patent applications and 6 pending international patent applications protecting various aspects of Bravo, including methods of manufacturing and coating products.
 
The Company aggressively pursues patent protection covering the proprietary technologies that we consider important to our business. In addition to seeking patent protection in the U.S., we also generally file patent applications in European countries and additional foreign countries, including Australia, Canada and Japan, on a selective basis. Generally, the expiration dates of our issued patents are determined based on the filing date of the earliest filed patent application from which the patent claims priority. We strategically manage our patent portfolio so as to ensure that we have valid and enforceable patent rights protecting our technological innovations.
 
As of September 30, 2009, we had 164 pending United States patent applications, 6 of which were exclusively licensed from others, and 283 foreign patent applications, of which 39 were exclusively licensed from others. Likewise, as of September 30, 2009, we owned 124 issued United States patents, 13 of which were exclusively licensed from others, and 244 international patents, of which 50 were exclusively licensed from others.
 
We also rely upon trade secrets and other unpatented proprietary technologies. We seek to maintain the confidentiality of such information by requiring employees, consultants and other parties to sign confidentiality agreements and by limiting access by parties outside the Company to such information. There can be no assurance, however, that these measures will prevent the unauthorized disclosure or use of this information, or that others will not be able to independently develop such information. Additionally, there can be no assurance that any agreements regarding confidentiality and non-disclosure will not be breached, or, in the event of any breach, that adequate remedies would be available to us.
 
 
We market our technologies and products throughout the world using a direct sales force consisting of dedicated sales professionals who focus on specific markets and companies. These sales professionals work in concert with business unit personnel to coordinate customer activities. We believe that our new organizational structure allows us to better understand and meet the needs of our customers by organizing our business around patient needs. The specialization of our sales professionals fosters an in-depth knowledge of the issues faced by our customers within these markets such as industry trends, technology changes, biomaterial changes and the regulatory environment. In addition, we enter into sales and marketing relationships with third-parties to distribute our diagnostic products around the world. See Note 11 to the consolidated financial statements for information regarding domestic and foreign revenue.
 
In general, we license our technologies on a non-exclusive basis to customers for use on specific products, or on an exclusive basis, but limited to a specific “field of use.” This strategy enables us to license our technologies to multiple customers in the same market. We also target new product applications with existing customers.
 
To support our marketing and sales activities, we publish technical literature on our various surface modification, drug delivery, and in vitro technologies and products. In addition, we exhibit at major trade shows and technical meetings, advertise in selected trade journals and through our website, and conduct direct mailings to appropriate target markets.


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We also offer ongoing customer service and technical support throughout our licensees’ relationships with us. This service and support may begin with a feasibility study, and also may include additional services such as assistance in the transfer of the technology to the licensee, further optimization, process control and troubleshooting, preparation of product for clinical studies, and assistance with regulatory submissions for product approval. Most of these services are billable to customers.
 
 
In order to further our strategic objectives and strengthen our existing businesses, we intend to continue to explore acquisitions, investments and strategic collaborations to diversify and grow our business. As a result, we expect to make future investments or acquisitions where we believe that we can broaden our technology offerings and expand our sources of revenue and the number of markets in which we participate. See Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements for further information regarding our minority equity investments. Mergers and acquisitions of medical technology companies are inherently risky and no assurance can be given that any of our previous or future acquisitions will be successful or will not materially adversely affect our consolidated results of operations, financial condition, or cash flows.
 
In July 2007, we acquired Brookwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (now known as SurModics Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) for an up-front payment, including fees, of $42.3 million and potential additional payments of up to $22 million based upon achievement of certain milestones. Since the acquisition, we have paid the sellers additional consideration of $5 million related to achievement of milestones. The additional cash consideration was recorded as an increase to goodwill.
 
In August 2007, we acquired BioFX Laboratories, Inc. (“BioFX”) for consideration consisting of an up-front payment, including fees, of $11.6 million and potential additional payments of up to $11.4 million based upon achievement of certain milestones. Since the acquisition, we have paid the sellers additional consideration of $1.1 million related to achievement of a milestone, and the sellers are still eligible to receive up to $7.6 million in additional consideration.
 
In November 2008, we extended our technology offerings by acquiring a portfolio of intellectual property and collaborative drug delivery projects from PR Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a drug delivery company specializing in injectable, biodegradable sustained release formulations for an up-front payment, including fees, of $3.2 million and potential payments of up to $6.0 million based upon achievement of certain milestones. Since the acquisition, we have paid the sellers additional consideration of $2.4 million related to achievement of milestones.
 
 
We have two customers that each provided more than 10% of our revenue in fiscal 2009. Revenue from Merck and Johnson & Johnson represented approximately 37% and 11%, respectively, of our total revenue for the year ended September 30, 2009.
 
Our contract with Merck was terminated in December 2008. This termination resulted in deferred revenue in the amount of $35 million being recognized in the first quarter of fiscal 2009. In addition, in the first quarter of fiscal 2009 we recognized a $9 million milestone payment from Merck associated with the termination of the triamcinolone acetonide development program. Additionally, as previously discussed, on October 5, 2009, we entered into a License and Development Agreement with F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Ltd. (“Roche”) and Genentech, Inc., a wholly- owned member of the Roche Group (“Genentech”). Under the terms of the agreement, we received an up front licensing fee of $3.5 million, are eligible to receive potential payments of up to approximately $200 million in fees and milestone payments in the event of the successful development and commercialization of multiple products, and will be paid for development work done on these products. Roche and Genentech will have the right to obtain manufacturing services from SurModics. In the event a commercial product is developed, we will also receive royalties on sales of such products.
 
The loss of one or more of our largest customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flow as discussed in more detail below.


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The ability for drug delivery and surface modification technologies to improve the performance of medical devices and drugs and to enable new product categories has resulted in increased competition in these markets. Some of our competitors offer drug delivery technologies, while others specialize in lubricious or hemocompatible coating technology. Some of these companies target ophthalmology applications, while others target cardiovascular or other medical device applications. In addition, because of the many product possibilities afforded by surface modification technologies, many of the large medical device manufacturers have developed, or are engaged in efforts to develop, internal competency in the area of drug delivery and surface modification. Many of our existing and potential competitors have greater financial, technical and marketing resources than we have.
 
We attempt to differentiate ourselves from our competitors by providing what we believe is a high value added approach to drug delivery and surface modification technology. We believe that the primary factors customers consider in choosing a particular technology include performance (e.g., flexibility, ability to fine tune drug elution profiles, biocompatibility, etc.), ease of manufacturing, time-to-market, intellectual property protection, ability to produce multiple properties from a single process, compliance with manufacturing regulations, ability to manufacture clinical and commercial products (especially for SurModics Pharmaceuticals customers), customer service and total cost of goods (including manufacturing process labor). We believe our technologies deliver exceptional performance in these areas, allowing us to compete favorably with respect to these factors. We believe that the cost and time required to obtain the necessary regulatory approvals significantly reduces the likelihood of a customer changing the manufacturing process it uses once a device or drug has been approved for sale.
 
Because a significant portion of our revenue depends on the receipt of royalties based on sales of medical devices incorporating our technologies, we are also affected by competition within the markets for such devices. We believe that the intense competition within the medical device market creates opportunities for our technologies as medical device manufacturers seek to differentiate their products through new enhancements or to remain competitive with enhancements offered by other manufacturers. Because we seek to license our technologies on a non-exclusive basis, we may further benefit from competition within the medical device markets by offering our technologies to multiple competing manufacturers of a device. However, competition in the medical device market could also have an adverse effect on us. While we seek to license our products to established manufacturers, in certain cases our licensees may compete directly with larger, dominant manufacturers with extensive product lines and greater sales, marketing and distribution capabilities. We also are unable to control other factors that may impact commercialization of coated devices or drug products, such as regulatory approval, marketing and sales efforts of our licensees or competitive pricing pressures within the particular market. There can be no assurance that products employing our technologies will be successfully commercialized by our licensees or that such licensees will otherwise be able to compete effectively.
 
Competition in the diagnostics market is highly fragmented. In the product lines in which we compete (protein stabilization reagents, substrates, recombinant autoimmune antigens and surface chemistry technologies), we face an array of competitors ranging from large manufacturers with multiple business lines to small manufacturers that offer a limited selection of products. Many of our competitors have substantially more capital resources, marketing experience, research and development resources and production facilities than we do. We believe that our products compete on performance, stability (shelf life), sensitivity (lower levels detected, faster results), consistency and price. We believe that our continued competitive success will depend on our ability to develop or acquire new proprietary products, obtain patent or other protection for our products and successfully market our products directly or through partners.
 
 
Historically, we have performed limited manufacturing activities for our customers. In general, we do not coat medical devices that are intended for commercial sale by our customers, though we often support our customers by coating products intended for pre-clinical and clinical development, including human clinical trials. Some of our customers, particularly in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, prefer to outsource the manufacturing of drug delivery formulations to partners. Accordingly, in April 2008, we acquired a facility in Birmingham, Alabama with approximately 286,000 square feet of space in order to upgrade our manufacturing capabilities.


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We attempt to maintain multiple sources of supply for the key raw materials used to manufacture our products. We do, however, purchase some raw materials from single sources, but we believe that additional sources of supply are readily available. Further, to the extent additional sources of supply are not readily available, we believe that we could manufacture such raw materials.
 
We follow quality management procedures in accordance with applicable regulations and guidance for the development and manufacture of materials and pharmaceutical, device, biotechnology or combination products that support clinical trials and commercialization. In an effort to better meet our customers’ needs in this area, our Eden Prairie, Minnesota facility received ISO 13485 and ISO 9001 certification in fiscal 2004 and has maintained and updated those certifications without interruption since.
 
 
Although our drug delivery and surface modification technologies themselves are not directly regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the medical devices, pharmaceutical and biotechnology products incorporating our technologies are subject to FDA regulation. New medical devices utilizing our technologies can only be marketed in the United States after a 510(k) application has been cleared or a pre-market approval application (PMA) has been approved by the FDA. This process can take anywhere from three months for a 510(k) application, to two or three years or more for a PMA application. The burden of demonstrating to the FDA that a new device is either substantially equivalent to a previously marketed device (510(k) marketing clearance process), or in the case of implantable devices, safe and effective (PMA process), rests with our customers as the medical device manufacturers. New pharmaceutical and biotechnology products utilizing our technologies can only be marketed in the United States after a New Drug Application (NDA) or Biologics License Application (BLA) has been approved by the FDA. The burden of obtaining FDA approval of the NDA or BLA rests with our customers.
 
In support of our customers’ regulatory filings, we maintain various confidential Drug Master Files, Device Master Files and Veterinary Master Files with the FDA and with other regulatory agencies outside the U.S. regarding the nature, chemical structure and biocompatibility of our reagents. Although our licensees generally do not have direct access to these files, they may, with our permission, reference these files in their various regulatory submissions to these agencies. This approach allows regulatory agencies to understand in confidence the details of our technologies without us having to share this highly confidential information with our customers.
 
U.S. legislation allows companies, prior to obtaining FDA clearance or approval to market a medical product in the U.S., to manufacture medical products in the U.S. and export them for sale in international markets. This generally allows us to realize earned royalties sooner. However, sales of medical products outside the U.S. are subject to international requirements that vary from country to country. The time required to obtain approval for sale internationally may be longer or shorter than that required by the FDA.
 
 
As of December 1, 2009, we had 248 employees, of whom 206 were engaged in research, product development, quality, or manufacturing positions, with the remainder in sales, marketing, or administrative positions. Post-graduate degrees are held by 64 of our employees, 30 of whom hold Ph.D. degrees. We are not a party to any collective bargaining agreements, and we believe that our employee relations are good.
 
We believe that our future success will depend in part on our ability to attract and retain qualified technical, management and marketing personnel. Such experienced personnel are in high demand, and we must compete for their services with other firms that may be able to offer more favorable compensation packages or benefits.
 
 
Certain statements contained in this Form 10-K, or in other reports of the Company and other written and oral statements made from time to time by the Company, do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. As such, they are considered “forward-looking statements” that provide current expectations or forecasts of future events. These forward-looking statements are made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements can be identified by the use of terminology such as “anticipate,” “believe,”


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“could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “forecast,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “possible,” “project,” “will” and similar words or expressions. Any statement that is not a historical fact, including estimates, projections, future trends and the outcome of events that have not yet occurred, are forward-looking statements. The Company’s forward-looking statements generally relate to its growth strategy, financial prospects, product development programs, sales efforts, and the impact of the Cordis and Genentech agreements, as well as other significant customer agreements. You should carefully consider forward-looking statements and understand that such statements involve a variety of risks and uncertainties, known and unknown, and may be affected by inaccurate assumptions. Consequently, no forward-looking statement can be guaranteed and actual results may vary materially. The Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement.
 
Although it is not possible to create a comprehensive list of all factors that may cause actual results to differ from the Company’s forward-looking statements, such factors include, among others:
 
  •  the Company’s reliance on a small number of significant customers, which causes our financial results and stock price to be subject to factors affecting those significant customers and their products, the timing of market introduction of their or competing products, product safety or efficacy concerns and intellectual property litigation, the outcome of which could adversely affect the royalty revenue we derive based on the sales of licensed products;
 
  •  general economic conditions we are subject to which are beyond our control, including the impact of recession, business investment and changes in consumer confidence;
 
  •  frequent intellectual property litigation in the medical device and pharmaceutical industries that may directly or indirectly adversely affect our customers’ ability to market their products incorporating our technologies;
 
  •  our ability to protect our own intellectual property;
 
  •  healthcare reform efforts, including reduced reimbursement rates and new taxes on medical devices and pharmaceutical products that may adversely affect our customers’ ability to cost-effectively market and sell devices incorporating our technologies or affect the prices they receive for such products thereby affecting the Company’s revenue;
 
  •  the Company’s ability to attract new licensees and to enter into agreements for additional product applications with existing licensees, the willingness of potential licensees to sign license agreements under the terms offered by the Company, changes in the development and marketing priorities of our licensees and development partners and the Company’s ability to maintain satisfactory relationships with its licensees;
 
  •  the Company’s ability to increase the number of market segments and applications that use its technologies through its sales and marketing and research and development efforts;
 
  •  the decrease in available financing for the Company’s customers and for new ventures which could potentially become customers can reduce the Company’s potential opportunities;
 
  •  market acceptance of products sold by customers incorporating our technologies and the timing of new product introductions by licensees;
 
  •  market acceptance of products sold by customers’ competitors and the timing and pricing of new product introductions by customers’ competitors;
 
  •  the difficulties and uncertainties associated with the lengthy and costly new product development and foreign and domestic regulatory approval processes, such as delays, difficulties or failures in achieving acceptable clinical results or obtaining foreign or FDA marketing clearances or approvals, which may result in lost market opportunities or postpone or preclude product commercialization by licensees;
 
  •  efficacy or safety concerns with respect to products marketed by us and our licensees, whether scientifically justified or not, that may lead to product recalls, withdrawals or declining sales;
 
  •  the ability to secure raw materials for reagents the Company sells;


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  •  the Company’s ability to successfully manage clinical trials and related foreign and domestic regulatory processes for the I-vationtm intravitreal implant or other products under development by the Company, whether delays, difficulties or failures in achieving acceptable clinical results or obtaining foreign or FDA marketing clearances or approvals postpone or preclude product commercialization of the intravitreal implant or other products, and whether the intravitreal implant and any other products remain viable commercial prospects;
 
  •  product liability claims against which we are not indemnified or that are not covered by insurance;
 
  •  the development of new products or technologies by competitors, technological obsolescence and other changes in competitive factors;
 
  •  the trend of consolidation in the medical device and pharmaceutical industries, resulting in more significant, complex and long term contracts than in the past and potentially greater pricing pressures;
 
  •  the Company’s ability to identify suitable businesses to acquire or with whom to form strategic relationships to expand its technology development and commercialization, its ability to successfully integrate the operations of companies it may acquire from time to time and its ability to create synergies from acquisitions and other strategic relationships;
 
  •  the Company’s ability to successfully internally perform certain product development activities and governmental and regulatory compliance activities which the Company has not previously undertaken in any significant manner;
 
  •  acts of God or terrorism which impact the Company’s personnel or facilities; and
 
  •  other factors described below in “Risk Factors.”
 
Many of these factors are outside the control and knowledge of the Company, and could result in increased volatility in period-to-period results. Investors are advised not to place undue reliance upon the Company’s forward-looking statements and to consult any further disclosures by the Company on this subject in its filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Many of the factors identified above are discussed in more detail below under “Risk Factors.”


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ITEM 1A.   RISK FACTORS.
 
 
 
During periods of economic slowdown or recession, such as the United States and world economies are currently experiencing, many of our customers are forced to delay or terminate some of their product development plans. Because we rely on licensing and commercialization of our technology by third parties, we may be severely impacted by the decreasing research and development budgets of our customers. In addition, in an environment of decreasing research and development spending, sales of our In Vitro Technologies products may similarly suffer as a result of the decreased utilization of research-focused products. Although we attempt to manage these risks, any sustained period of decreased research and development spending by our customers and potential customers could adversely affect our financial position, liquidity, and results of operations.
 
The decrease in available financing for our customers and for new ventures that could potentially become our customers can reduce our potential opportunities.
 
One of the consequences of the economic slowdown has been a decrease in the availability of financing for both start-up and other developing ventures, which can impact our business in several ways. For example, some customers have been unable to obtain additional financing and were forced to cease their operations. Because our financial results depend substantially on the success of our customers in commercializing their products, a reduced ability by companies to take their products to market can substantially adversely affect our results of operations. In addition, the decrease in available financing has resulted in fewer start-up medical device and biotechnology companies than in prior years. To the extent that fewer new companies are started, the number of potential customers for our technologies will be smaller, and we may be unable to meet our business goals, which could substantially affect our financial performance.
 
 
We have two customers that each provided 10% or more of our revenue in fiscal 2009. Revenue from Merck and Johnson & Johnson represented approximately 37% and 11%, respectively, of our total revenue for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009. In addition, as discussed earlier, we recently entered into a License Agreement with Roche and Genentech which provided for an up front licensing fee of $3.5 million, potential payments of up to approximately $200 million in fees and milestone payments in the event of the successful development and commercialization of multiple products, and payment for development work done on these products. The loss of one or more of our largest customers, or reductions in business from them, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flow. For example, in December 2008, following a strategic review of its business and product portfolio, Merck terminated its collaboration with us relating to the development and potential commercialization of our I-vationtm intravitreal implant and we do not expect to have any revenue from Merck in fiscal 2010. There can be no assurance that revenue from any customer will continue at their historical levels. If we cannot broaden our customer base, we will continue to depend on a small number of customers for a significant portion of our revenue.
 
 
A significant portion of our revenue is derived from a relatively small number of customer products. We intend to continue pursuing a strategy of licensing our technologies to a diversified base of medical device and drug manufacturers and other customers, thereby expanding the commercialization opportunities for our technologies. Success will depend, in part, on our ability to attract new licensees, to enter into agreements for additional applications with existing licensees and to develop and market new applications. There can be no assurance that we will be able to identify, develop and adapt our technologies for new applications in a timely and cost effective manner; that new license agreements will be executed on terms favorable to us; that new applications will be


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accepted by customers in our target markets; or that products incorporating newly licensed technology, including new applications, will gain regulatory approval, be commercialized or gain market acceptance. Delays or failures in these efforts could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
We operate in a competitive and evolving field and new developments are expected to continue at a rapid pace. Our success depends, in part, upon our ability to maintain a competitive position in the development of technologies and products in the field of drug delivery and surface modification. Our drug delivery and surface modification technologies compete with technologies developed by a number of other companies. In addition, many medical device manufacturers have developed, or are engaged in efforts to develop, drug delivery or surface modification technologies for use on their own devices. Some of our existing and potential competitors (especially medical device manufacturers pursuing coating solutions through their own research and development efforts) have greater financial and technical resources and production and marketing capabilities than us. Competitors may succeed in developing competing technologies or obtaining governmental approval for products before us. Products incorporating our competitors’ technologies may gain market acceptance more rapidly than products using ours. Developments by competitors may render our existing and potential products uncompetitive or obsolete. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that new products or technologies developed by others, or the emergence of new industry standards, will not render our products or technologies or licensees’ products incorporating our technologies uncompetitive or obsolete. Any new technologies that make our drug delivery or surface modification technologies less competitive or obsolete would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
An important part of our growth in the future may involve strategic investments and the acquisition of complementary businesses or technologies. Our identification of suitable investment opportunities and acquisition candidates involves risks inherent in assessing the technology, value, strengths, weaknesses, overall risks and profitability, if any, of investment and acquisition candidates. We may not be able to identify suitable investment and acquisition candidates. If we do not make suitable investments and acquisitions, we may find it more difficult to realize our growth objectives.
 
 
In recent years we have made several significant acquisitions, including SurModics Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (formerly Brookwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc.), the largest acquisition in our history. The process of integrating acquired businesses into our operations poses numerous risks, including:
 
  •  an inability to assimilate acquired operations, personnel, technology, information systems, and internal control systems and products;
 
  •  diversion of management’s attention, including the need to manage several remote locations with a limited management team;
 
  •  difficulties and uncertainties in transitioning the customers or other business relationships from the acquired entity to us; and
 
  •  the loss of key employees of acquired companies.
 
In addition, future acquisitions by us may be dilutive to our shareholders, and cause large one-time expenses or create goodwill or other intangible assets that could result in significant asset impairment charges in the future. Strategic investments may result in impairment charges if the value of any such investment declines significantly. In addition, if we acquire entities that have not yet commercialized products but rather are developing technologies for future commercialization, our earnings per share may fluctuate as we expend significant funds for continued research and development efforts for acquired technology necessary to commercialize such technology. We cannot


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guarantee that we will be able to successfully complete any investments or acquisitions or that we will realize any anticipated benefits from investments or acquisitions that we complete.
 
 
The success of our business depends on a number of factors, including our continued research and development of new technologies for future commercialization. In researching and developing such new technologies, we may incur significant expenses that may adversely affect our operating results, including our profitability. Additionally, these activities are subject to risks of failure that are inherent in the development of new medical technologies and as a result, may never result in commercially viable technologies.
 
 
Our operations are expanding, and we expect this trend to continue as we execute our business strategy. Executing our business strategy has placed significant demands on management and our administrative, development, operational, information technology, manufacturing, financial and personnel resources. Accordingly, our future operating results will depend on the ability of our officers and other key employees to continue to implement and improve our operational, development, customer support and financial control systems, and effectively expand, train and manage our employee base. Otherwise, we may not be able to manage our growth successfully.
 
 
Our revenue recognition policies involve application of various complex accounting standards, including Securities and Exchange Commission Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 104 (SAB 104), and accounting guidance associated with revenue arrangements with multiple deliverables. Our compliance with such accounting standards often involves management’s judgment regarding whether the criteria set forth in the standards have been met such that we can recognize as revenue the amounts that we receive as payment for our products or services. We base our judgments on assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. However, these judgments, or the assumptions underlying them, may change over time. In addition, the SEC or the Financial Accounting Standards Board may issue new positions or revised guidance on the treatment of complex accounting matters. Changes in circumstances or third-party guidance could cause our judgments to change with respect to our interpretations of these complex standards, and transactions recorded, including revenue recognized, for one or more prior reporting periods, which could be adversely affected.
 
 
 
A principal element of our business strategy is to enter into licensing arrangements with medical device, pharmaceutical, and biotechnology companies that manufacture products incorporating our technologies. For the fiscal years ended September 30, 2009, 2008 and 2007, we derived approximately 62%, 53% and 72% of our revenue, respectively, from royalties and license fees. Although we do market certain diagnostic products and reagents, we do not currently market, distribute or sell our own medical devices or pharmaceutical compounds, nor do we intend to do so in the foreseeable future. Thus, our prospects are greatly dependent on the receipt of royalties from licensees of our technologies. The amount and timing of such royalties are, in turn, dependent on the ability of our licensees to gain successful regulatory approval for, market and sell products incorporating our technologies. Failure of certain licensees to gain regulatory approval or market acceptance for such products could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Our customers market and sell (and most manufacture) the products incorporating our licensed technologies. If one or more of our licensees fail to pursue the development or marketing of these products as planned, our revenue and profits may not reach our expectations, or may decline. Additionally, our ability to generate positive operating


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results in connection with the achievement of development or commercialization milestones may also suffer. For example, as discussed previously, Merck terminated their collaboration with us relating to the development and potential commercialization of our I-vationtm intravitreal implant following a strategic review of its business and product development portfolio in 2008. We do not control the timing and other aspects of the development or commercialization of products incorporating our licensed technologies because our customers may have priorities that differ from ours or their development or marketing efforts may be unsuccessful, resulting in delayed or discontinued products. Hence, the amount and timing of royalty payments received by us will fluctuate, and such fluctuations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Under our standard license agreements, licensees can terminate the license for any reason upon 90 days’ prior written notice. Existing and potential licensees have no obligation to deal exclusively with us in obtaining drug delivery or surface modification technologies and may pursue parallel development or licensing of competing technological solutions on their own or with third parties. A decision by a licensee to terminate its relationship with us could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
We manufacture all of the products we sell in our existing production labs in our Eden Prairie, Minnesota, Birmingham, Alabama, and Owings Mills, Maryland facilities. If any of our existing production facilities becomes incapable of manufacturing products for any reason, we may be unable to meet production requirements, we may lose revenue and we may not be able to maintain our relationships with our customers, including certain of our licensees. In particular, because most of our customers use these reagents to create royalty-bearing products, failure by us to deliver products, including polymers and reagents, could result in decreased royalty revenue, as well as decreased revenue from the sale of products. Without our existing production facilities, we would have no other means of manufacturing products until we were able to restore the manufacturing capability at a particular facility or develop an alternative manufacturing facility. Although we carry business interruption insurance to cover lost revenue and profits in an amount we consider adequate, this insurance does not cover all possible situations. In addition, our business interruption insurance would not compensate us for the loss of opportunity and potential adverse impact on relations with our existing customers resulting from our inability to produce products for them.
 
 
Under the terms of certain of our licensing agreements, we may be obligated to manufacture pharmaceutical or biotechnology products for existing or future licensees under appropriate circumstances. In addition, certain potential customers may require that we be responsible for the manufacture of pharmaceutical or biotechnology products in order to enter into licensing agreements with us. The manufacture of pharmaceutical or biotechnology products can be an expensive, time consuming, and complex process. Further, any manufacturer of pharmaceutical and biotechnology products is subject to applicable Current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) regulations as prescribed by the Food and Drug Administration or other rules and regulations prescribed by foreign regulatory authorities. Although we have purchased a facility in Alabama and have substantially completed upgrading the facility, we may be unable to maintain our facilities in compliance with cGMP or other applicable regulatory standards. Such a failure to comply with cGMP could result in significant time delays or inability to obtain (and maintain) marketing approval for any future products that we may be required to manufacture, which may result in financial penalties under the terms of license agreements, as well as damage our relationships with our customers in the future. Furthermore, we may be subject to sanctions, including temporary or permanent suspension of operations, product recalls and marketing restrictions, if we fail to comply with the laws and regulations pertaining to our business.
 
 
The development and sale of medical devices and component products involves an inherent risk of product liability claims. Although we expect that devices incorporating our technologies will be manufactured by others and sold under their own labels, and in most cases our customer agreements provide indemnification against such claims,


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there can be no guarantee that we will not become involved in the manufacture and supply of commercial quantities of products to licensees, that product liability claims will not be filed against us for such products, that parties indemnifying us will have the financial ability to honor their indemnification obligations or that such manufacturers will not seek indemnification or other relief from us for any such claims. Any product liability claims, with or without merit, could result in costly litigation, reduced sales, significant liabilities and diversion of our management’s time, attention and resources. We have obtained a level of liability insurance coverage that we believe is appropriate to our activities, however we cannot be sure that our product liability insurance coverage is adequate or that it will continue to be available to us on acceptable terms, if at all. Furthermore, we do not expect to be able to obtain insurance covering our costs and losses as a result of any recall of products or devices incorporating our technologies because of alleged defects, whether such recall is instituted by us, by a customer, or is required by a regulatory agency. A product liability claim, recall or other claim with respect to uninsured liabilities or for amounts in excess of insured liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
We currently purchase some of the components we use to manufacture reagents from sole suppliers. If any of our sole suppliers becomes unwilling to supply components to us, incurs an interruption in its production or is otherwise unable to provide us with sufficient material to manufacture our reagents, we will experience production interruptions. If we lose our sole supplier of any particular reagent component or are otherwise unable to procure all components required for our reagent manufacturing for an extended period of time, we may lose the ability to manufacture the reagents our customers require to commercialize products incorporating our technology. This could result in lost royalties and product sales, which would harm our financial results. Adding suppliers to our approved vendor list may require significant time and resources since we typically thoroughly review a supplier’s business and operations to become comfortable with the quality and integrity of the materials we purchase for use with our technology, including reviewing a supplier’s manufacturing processes and evaluating the suitability of materials and packaging procedures the supplier uses. We routinely attempt to maintain multiple suppliers of each of our significant materials, so we have alternative suppliers, if necessary. However, if the number of suppliers of a material is reduced, or if we are otherwise unable to obtain our material requirements on a timely basis and on favorable terms, our operations may be harmed.
 
 
Our success is dependent upon our ability to retain and attract highly qualified management and technical personnel. We face intense competition for such qualified personnel. We do not maintain key person insurance, nor do we have employment agreements with the majority of our employees, except for certain of our executive officers. Although we have non-compete agreements with most employees, there can be no assurance that such agreements will be enforceable or that they will serve to keep employees working for us. The loss of the services of one or more key employees or the failure to attract and retain additional qualified personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
 
Our success depends, in large part, on our ability to obtain and maintain patents, operate without infringing on the proprietary rights of third parties and protect our proprietary rights against infringement by third parties. We have been granted U.S. and foreign patents and have U.S. and foreign patent applications pending related to our proprietary technologies. There can be no assurance that any pending patent application will be approved, that we will develop additional proprietary technologies that are patentable, that any patents issued will provide us with competitive advantages or will not be challenged or invalidated by third parties, or that the patents of others will not prevent the commercialization of products incorporating our technologies. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that others will not independently develop similar technologies, duplicate any of our technologies or design around our patents.


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Our commercial success also will depend, in part, on our ability to avoid infringing patent or other intellectual property rights of third parties. There has been substantial litigation regarding patent and other intellectual property rights in the medical device and pharmaceutical industries, and intellectual property litigation may be used against us as a means of gaining a competitive advantage. Intellectual property litigation is complex, time consuming and expensive, and the outcome of such litigation is difficult to predict. If we were found to be infringing any third party patent or other intellectual property right, we could be required to pay significant damages, alter our products or processes, obtain licenses from others, which we may not be able to do on commercially reasonable terms, if at all, or cease commercialization of our products and processes. Any of these outcomes could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
Patent litigation or U.S. Patent and Trademark Office interference proceedings may also be necessary to enforce any patents issued or licensed to us or to determine the scope and validity of third party proprietary rights. These activities could result in substantial cost to us, even if the eventual outcome is favorable to us. An adverse outcome of any such litigation or interference proceeding could subject us to significant liabilities to third parties, require disputed rights to be licensed from third parties or require us to cease using our technology. Any action to defend or prosecute intellectual property would be costly and result in significant diversion of the efforts of our management and technical personnel, regardless of outcome, and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
We rely significantly upon proprietary technology, information, processes and know-how that are not subject to patent protection. We seek to protect this information through trade secret or confidentiality agreements with our employees, consultants, potential licensees, or other parties as well as through other security measures. There can be no assurance that these agreements or any security measure will provide meaningful protection for our unpatented proprietary information. In addition, our trade secrets may otherwise become known or be independently developed by competitors.
 
 
We are a party to various agreements through which we have in-licensed or otherwise acquired from third parties rights to certain technologies that are important to our business. In exchange for the rights granted to us under these agreements, we agree to meet certain research, development, commercialization, sublicensing, royalty, indemnification, insurance, and other obligations. If we or one of our licensees fails to comply with these obligations set forth in the relevant agreement through which we have acquired rights, we may be unable to effectively use, license, or otherwise exploit the relevant intellectual property rights and may be deprived of current or future revenues that are associated with such intellectual property.
 
 
Healthcare policy changes, including pending proposals to reform the U.S. healthcare system, may have a material adverse effect on us.
 
Healthcare costs have risen significantly over the past decade. There have been and continue to be proposals by legislators, regulators, and third-party payors to keep these costs down. Certain proposals, if implemented, would impose limitations on the prices our customers will be able to charge for their products, or the amounts of reimbursement available for their products from governmental agencies or third-party payors. Because a portion of our revenue is typically derived from royalties on products which constitute a percentage of the selling price, these limitations could have an adverse effect on our revenue.


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In addition, various members of Congress have proposed significant reforms to the U.S. healthcare system. Both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives have conducted hearings about U.S. healthcare reform. Various proposals have included reduced Medicare payments, reduced drug spending and increased taxes. Various healthcare reform proposals have also emerged at the state level. We cannot predict what healthcare initiatives, if any, will be implemented at the federal or state level, or the effect any future legislation or regulation will have on us. However, an expansion in government’s role in the U.S. healthcare industry may lower reimbursements for our customers’ products, reduce medical procedure volumes (thereby reducing the number of our customers’ products used), and adversely affect our business, our financial position and results of operations.
 
Products incorporating our technologies are subject to continuing regulations and extensive approval or clearance processes. If our licensees are unable to obtain or maintain the necessary regulatory approvals or clearances for such products, then our licensees will not be able to commercialize those products on a timely basis, if at all.
 
Medical devices, biotechnology products or pharmaceutical products incorporating the technologies are subject to regulation by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory authorities. In order to obtain regulatory approval for products incorporating our technologies, extensive preclinical studies as well as clinical trials in humans may be required. Clinical development, including preclinical testing, is a long, expensive and uncertain process. The burden of securing regulatory approval for these products typically rests with our licensees, the medical device or pharmaceutical customer. However, we have prepared Drug Master Files and Device Master Files which may be accessed by the FDA and other regulatory authorities to assist them in their review of the applications filed by our licensees.
 
The process of obtaining FDA and other required regulatory approvals is expensive and time-consuming. Historically, most medical devices incorporating our technologies have been subject to the FDA’s 510(k) marketing approval process, which typically lasts from six to nine months. Supplemental or full pre-market approval reviews require a significantly longer period, delaying commercialization. By contrast, pharmaceutical products incorporating our technologies are subject to the FDA’s New Drug Application process which typically takes a number of years to complete. Additionally, biotechnology products incorporating our technologies are subject to the FDA’s Biologics License Application process, which also typically takes a number of years to complete. In addition, sales of medical devices and pharmaceutical or biotechnology products outside the U.S. are subject to international regulatory requirements that vary from country to country. The time required to obtain approval for sale internationally may be longer or shorter than that required for FDA approval.
 
There can be no assurance that our licensees will be able to obtain regulatory approval for their products on a timely basis, or at all. Regulatory approvals, if granted, may include significant limitations on the indicated uses for which the product may be marketed. In addition, product approval could be withdrawn for failure to comply with regulatory standards or the occurrence of unforeseen problems following initial marketing. Changes in existing regulations or adoption of new governmental regulations or policies could prevent or delay regulatory approval of products incorporating our technologies or subject us to additional regulation. Failure or delay of our licensees in obtaining FDA and other necessary regulatory approval or clearance or the loss of previously obtained approvals could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
Our research, development and manufacturing activities sometimes involve the controlled use of various hazardous materials. Although we believe that our safety procedures for handling and disposing of such materials comply with the standards prescribed by state and federal regulations, the risk of accidental contamination or injury from these materials cannot be completely eliminated. While we currently maintain insurance in amounts that we believe are appropriate, we could be held liable for any damages that might result from any such event. Any such liability could exceed our insurance and available resources and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.


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Additionally, certain of our activities are regulated by federal and state agencies in addition to the FDA. For example, activities in connection with disposal of certain chemical waste are subject to regulation by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. We could be held liable in the event of improper disposal of such materials, even if these acts were done by third parties. Some of our reagent chemicals must be registered with the agency with basic information filed related to toxicity during the manufacturing process as well as the toxicity of the final product. Failure to comply with existing or future regulatory requirements could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
 
The trading price of our common stock has been, and is likely to continue to be, highly volatile, in large part attributable to developments and circumstances related to factors identified in “Forward-Looking Statements” and “Risk Factors.” The market value of shares of our common stock may rise or fall sharply at any time because of this volatility, and also because of significant short positions taken by investors from time to time in our stock. In the fiscal year ended September 30, 2009, the sale price for our common stock ranged from $15.96 to $31.69 per share. The market prices for securities of medical technology, drug delivery and biotechnology companies historically have been highly volatile, and the market has experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies.
 
ITEM 1B.   UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.
 
None.
 
ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES.
 
Our principal operations are located in Eden Prairie, a suburb of Minneapolis, Minnesota, where we own a building that has approximately 64,000 square feet of space. We also own an undeveloped parcel of land adjacent to our principal facility, which we intend to use to accommodate our growth needs.
 
In addition to our Eden Prairie facility, we also own and lease facilities in Birmingham, Alabama in connection with our SurModics Pharmaceuticals operations. The facility which we acquired in the SurModics Pharmaceuticals acquisition consists of approximately 33,000 square feet. In April 2008, we acquired a second building in Birmingham, Alabama that has approximately 286,000 square feet in order to upgrade our manufacturing capabilities. We also lease an approximately 14,000 square foot facility in Birmingham which contains three cleanroom suites primarily used for the manufacture of drug products and a separate facility in Birmingham containing approximately 4,500 square feet of warehouse space. We also lease facilities in Owings Mills, Maryland in connection with our BioFX operations and lease office space in Irvine, California for use by our Ophthalmology business unit.
 
ITEM 3.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.
 
See Note 9 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for information regarding commitments and contingencies.
 
On June 18, 2007, the Company was named as an involuntary plaintiff in patent litigation between Abbott Laboratories (“Abbott”) and Church & Dwight, Inc. (“Church & Dwight”). In the litigation, Abbott alleged that certain of Church & Dwight’s products utilizing lateral flow technology for diagnostic purposes infringe upon certain of the Company’s patents that have been exclusively licensed to Abbott under the terms of a license agreement between the Company and Abbott dated May 30, 1989, as amended and restated. The suit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois seeking a finding of infringement, monetary damages and injunctive relief. On September 17, 2009, the litigation between the Company, Abbott and Church & Dwight was settled. Under the terms of the settlement, we received a payment of $1.3 million, and on October 19, 2009, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois entered an order dismissing all claims and counterclaims with prejudice.


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ITEM 4.   SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS.
 
There were no matters submitted to a vote of security holders during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2009.
 
 
As of December 11, 2009, the names, ages and positions of the Company’s executive officers are as follows:
 
             
Name
 
Age
 
Position
 
Bruce J Barclay
    53     President and Chief Executive Officer
Aron B. Anderson, Ph.D. 
    46     Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer
Philip D. Ankeny
    46     Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Douglas P. Astry
    57     General Manager, In Vitro Technologies
Lise W. Duran, Ph.D. 
    54     Vice President of Research
Paul A. Lopez
    53     Vice President, President — Ophthalmology Division
Charles W. Olson
    45     Vice President, General Manager — Cardiovascular
Bryan K. Phillips
    38     Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary
Brian L. Robey
    46     Vice President of Product Development and Operations
Michael J. Shoup
    49     Vice President of Quality, Regulatory and Clinical Affairs
Arthur J. Tipton, Ph.D. 
    52     Vice President, and President of SurModics Pharmaceuticals
Jan M. Webster
    50     Vice President of Human Resources
 
Bruce J Barclay joined the Company as its President and Chief Operating Officer in December 2003. He became a director of the Company in July 2004 and Chief Executive Officer of the Company in July 2005. Mr. Barclay has more than 30 years of experience in the health care industry. Prior to joining SurModics, he served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Vascular Architects, Inc. from 2000 to 2003. Prior to Vascular Architects, he served at Guidant Corporation, most recently as an officer and Senior Vice President from 1998 to 2000. Previously, he was a Vice President of Guidant’s Interventional Cardiology division with responsibility for the law division, a new therapies technical development team and business development, charged with the acquisition of new products and technologies for the division. Mr. Barclay also has considerable experience in the pharmaceutical area serving in several positions at Eli Lilly and Company. Mr. Barclay received a B.S. in chemistry and a B.A. in biology from Purdue University in 1980 and a J.D. from the Indiana University School of Law in 1984. He is also a registered patent attorney.
 
Aron B. Anderson, Ph.D., joined the Company as an Associate Scientist in 1991. In 1994, he was named Director, Hemocompatibility R&D, in 2001, named Director, Drug Delivery, and in January 2005, Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer. Dr. Anderson serves on the Board of Directors of University Enterprise Laboratories, a partnership between the University of Minnesota and the city of St. Paul, Minnesota that functions as a technology company incubator. Dr. Anderson received a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1985, and received an M.S. in 1987 and Ph.D. in 1991, both in Chemical Engineering, from Stanford University.
 
Philip D. Ankeny joined the Company as its Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in April 2003 with the additional responsibilities of Vice President, Business Development added in April 2004. He was promoted to Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in May 2006. Prior to joining SurModics, he served as Chief Financial Officer for Cognicity, Inc. from 1999 to 2002. Prior to that, Mr. Ankeny served as a Partner at Sherpa Partners, LLC, a venture capital and venture development firm, from 1998 to 1999. He also spent five years in investment banking with Robertson Stephens and Morgan Stanley. In addition, his operating experience includes over five years with IBM and Shiva in sales, marketing and business development roles. Mr. Ankeny also serves on the Board of Directors of Innovex, Inc., which designs and manufactures flexible circuit interconnect solutions to original equipment manufacturers in the electronics industry. Mr. Ankeny received an A.B. degree in economics and engineering from Dartmouth College in 1985 and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School in 1989.


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Douglas P. Astry joined the Company in June 2003 as Manager, Array Business, and was promoted to General Manager, Diagnostics and Drug Discovery (now known as In Vitro Technologies) in April 2004. Prior to joining SurModics, from 2002 to 2003, he was Vice President of Marketing and Business Development at HTS Biosystems, and from 1980 through 2001, he held various research and business management positions at 3M, most recently Business Development Manager of 3M’s Bioanalytical Technologies Group. Mr. Astry received his B.A. degree in Biology from Williams College in 1974, an M.S. in Physiology from the University of Connecticut in 1980, and an M.B.A. from the University of Minnesota in 1987.
 
Lise W. Duran, Ph.D., came to SurModics in 1990, serving as a senior microbiologist and was promoted in 1992 to Director of Microbiology. She was promoted to Vice President of Product Development in 1998. Dr. Duran became Vice President and General Manager of the Regenerative Technologies business unit in April 2004. In November 2008 following the change in our organizational structure, Dr. Duran was named Vice President — Research. From 1988 to 1990, Dr. Duran served as a Study Director for Microbiological Associates, Inc., in the Biotechnology Services Division. She also did a research fellowship in Immunology at the Mayo Clinic and was a postdoctoral associate in Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Duran received her B.S. in microbiology from the University of Maryland in 1977 and a Ph.D. in cellular immunology from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in 1984.
 
Paul A. Lopez joined the Company in July 2005 as Vice President and President of the Company’s Ophthalmology business unit. Before joining SurModics, Mr. Lopez was President and CEO of Valley Forge Pharmaceuticals, an early stage pharmaceutical company from March 2001 to July 2005. Prior to Valley Forge, Mr. Lopez served in various senior level positions at Bausch & Lomb, including President, North America Surgical; Vice President, Commercial Operations, Americas and Asia Pacific Regions; and Vice President, Business Integration from January 1999 to March 2001. Mr. Lopez has also held roles at Monsanto Company, Pharmacia and Upjohn, Inc. and Iolab Corporation. Mr. Lopez serves on the Board of Directors of Alliance Medical Products, a private company located in Irvine, California. Mr. Lopez received a B.S. in Business Administration from California State University, Long Beach in 1979 and an M.B.A. from California State Polytechnic University in 1984.
 
Charles W. Olson joined the Company in July 2001 as Market Development Manager, was promoted in December 2002 to Director, Business Development, named General Manager of the Hydrophilic Technologies business unit in April 2004, and promoted to Vice President and General Manager, Hydrophilic Technologies in October 2004. In April 2005, the position of Vice President, Sales was added to his responsibilities. In November 2008 following the change in our organizational structure, Mr. Olson was named Vice President of our Cardiovascular business unit. Prior to joining SurModics, Mr. Olson was employed as General Manager at Minnesota Extrusion from 1998 to 2001 and at Lake Region Manufacturing in project management and technical sales from 1993 to 1998. Mr. Olson received a B.S. degree in Marketing from Winona State University in 1987.
 
Bryan K. Phillips joined the Company in July 2005 as Patent Counsel and Assistant General Counsel. In January 2006, Mr. Phillips was appointed Corporate Secretary, and he was promoted to Deputy General Counsel in October 2007. He was promoted to his current role as Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary in September 2008. Prior to joining SurModics, from 2001 to 2005, Mr. Phillips served as patent counsel at Guidant Corporation’s Cardiac Rhythm Management Group where he was responsible for developing and implementing intellectual property strategies and also for supporting the company’s business development function. He also practiced law at the Minneapolis-based law firm of Merchant & Gould P.C. Mr. Phillips received a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Kansas in 1993 and a law degree from the University of Minnesota Law School in 1999. He is admitted to the Minnesota bar and is registered to practice before the United States Patent and Trademark Office.
 
Brian L. Robey joined the Company in March 2005 as Senior Director, Commercial Development for Drug Delivery and was promoted to Vice President and General Manager, Drug Delivery in May 2006. In November 2008 following the change in our organizational structure, Mr. Robey was named Vice President of Product Development and Operations. Mr. Robey has nearly 20 years of research and development and management experience in the medical device industry. Most recently, he was Manager, Product Development at Guidant Corporation in the Cardiac Rhythm Management Division from 2002 to 2005. Prior to Guidant, Mr. Robey was employed at Southwest


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Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas from 1987 to 2002, where he held engineering and project management positions of increasing responsibility with his last role as Manager of the Bioengineering Section. Mr. Robey received B.S. and M.S. degrees in biomedical engineering from Louisiana Tech University in 1985 and 1987, respectively, and an M.B.A. from the University of Texas at San Antonio in 2000.
 
Michael J. Shoup joined the Company in March 2006 as Vice President of Quality, Regulatory and Clinical Affairs and assumed additional responsibilities for analytical and characterization sciences in January 2007. Mr. Shoup has over 20 years of experience in quality assurance and manufacturing, including over 15 years in the medical device industry. Before joining SurModics, he was Director of Quality and Design Assurance for St. Jude Medical’s Cardiac Surgery Division from 2005 to 2006 and held various positions at Acorn Cardiovascular from 1998 to 2005, most recently as Director of Operations. Mr. Shoup’s employment history also includes Integ (1994 — 1998), SciMed Life Systems, now part of Boston Scientific (1990 — 1994) and Minco Products (1983 — 1990). He teaches in the area of medical device design and manufacturing at the University of St. Thomas as an adjunct professor in the School of Engineering and is a regular lecturer for the Center of Business Excellence. Mr. Shoup received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Minnesota in 1982 and earned an M.B.A. with a manufacturing systems concentration from the University of St. Thomas in 1995.
 
Arthur J. Tipton, Ph.D., became Vice President, SurModics and President, SurModics Pharmaceuticals, coincident with the acquisition of SurModics Pharmaceuticals by SurModics in July 2007. Dr. Tipton joined Southern Research Institute in 2004 as Vice President of Pharmaceutical Formulations and then became President and CEO of SurModics Pharmaceuticals, when it was launched as a new company based on Southern Research Institute’s pharmaceutical formulations business in January 2005. Prior to joining Southern Research Institute, Dr. Tipton served as Executive Vice President at Durect Corporation from 2001 to 2004. Dr. Tipton also held a variety of positions at Southern BioSystems (now part of Durect), including Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer, where he led all efforts on biodegradable technology from 1993 to 2001. Dr. Tipton was with Atrix Laboratories (now part of QLT Inc.) from 1988 to 1993. He currently serves on the Boards of the Biotechnology Association of Alabama and the Controlled Release Society. Dr. Tipton earned a B.S. in Chemistry from Spring Hill College in 1980 and a Ph.D. in Polymer Science and Engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 1988.
 
Jan M. Webster joined the Company as Vice President of Human Resources in January of 2006. Ms. Webster came to SurModics with over 20 years of experience in the healthcare industry. From 1987 through 2005, she held various human resources and management positions at St. Jude Medical, Inc., most recently as Director of Human Resources for the Cardiac Surgery division. From 1984 to 1987, she served in several human resources roles for Fairview Health Services. Ms. Webster received a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Minnesota State University, Mankato in 1981 and earned an M.A. in human resources and industrial relations from the University of Minnesota in 2006.
 
The executive officers of the Company are elected by and serve at the discretion of the Board of Directors.


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ITEM 5.   MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.
 
Our stock is traded on the Nasdaq Global Select Market under the symbol “SRDX.” The table below sets forth the range of high and low sale prices, by quarter, for our Common Stock, as reported by Nasdaq, in each of the last two fiscal years.
 
                 
Fiscal Quarter Ended:
  High     Low  
 
September 30, 2009
  $ 25.14     $ 20.87  
June 30, 2009
    23.40       17.95  
March 31, 2009
    27.42       15.96  
December 31, 2008
    31.69       18.95  
September 30, 2008
    45.06       28.05  
June 30, 2008
    47.88       42.00  
March 31, 2008
    55.40       38.17  
December 31, 2007
    56.09       48.35  
 
Our transfer agent is:
 
American Stock Transfer & Trust Company
59 Maiden Lane, Plaza Level
New York, New York 10038
(800) 937-5449
 
According to the records of our transfer agent, as of December 7, 2009, there were 264 holders of record of our Common Stock and approximately 10,825 beneficial owners of shares registered in nominee or street name.
 
We have never paid any cash dividends on our Common Stock and do not anticipate doing so in the foreseeable future.
 
The following table presents information with respect to purchases of common stock of the Company made during the three months ended September 30, 2009, by the Company or on behalf of the Company or any “affiliated purchaser” of the Company, as defined in Rule 10b-18(a)(3) under the Exchange Act.
 
                                 
            (c)
  (d)
            Total Number
  Approximate Dollar
            of Shares
  Value of
            Purchased
  Shares That
            as Part of
  May Yet Be
    (a)
  (b)
  Publicly
  Purchased
    Total Number
  Average
  Announced
  Under the
    of Shares
  Price Paid
  Plans or
  Plans or
Period
  Purchased(1)   per Share(1)   Programs   Programs(2)
 
7/1/09 — 7/31/09
    4,655     $ 22.93       0     $ 7,333,728  
8/1/09 — 8/31/09
    0       NA       0     $ 7,333,728  
9/1/09 — 9/30/09
    203     $ 24.02       0     $ 7,333,728  
Total
    4,858     $ 22.97       0     $ 7,333,728  
 
 
(1) The purchases in this column were repurchased by the Company to pay the exercise price and/or to satisfy tax withholding obligations in connection with so-called “stock swap exercises” related to the vesting of employee restricted stock or performance awards.
 
(2) On November 15, 2007, our Board of Directors announced the authorization of the repurchase of $35 million of our outstanding common stock. As of September 30, 2009, we have repurchased 921,648 shares at an average price of $30.02 per share. Under the current authorization, the Company has $7.3 million available for authorized share repurchases as of September 30, 2009. The repurchase authorization does not have an expiration date.


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The following chart compares the cumulative total shareholder return on the Company’s Common Stock with the cumulative total return on the Nasdaq Stock Market and the Nasdaq Medical Industry Index (Medical Devices, Instruments and Supplies). The comparison assumes $100 was invested on September 30, 2004 and assumes reinvestment of dividends.
 
(PERFORMANCE GRAPH)


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ITEM 6.   SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.
 
The data presented below as of and for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2009, 2008 and 2007 are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report. The financial data as of and for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2006 and 2005 are derived from our audited financial statements which are not included in this report. The information set forth below should be read in conjunction with the Company’s consolidated financial statements and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” contained in Item 7 of this report and our consolidated financial statements and related notes beginning on page F-1 and other financial information included in this report.
 
                                         
    Fiscal Year  
    2009     2008     2007     2006     2005  
    (Dollars in thousands, except per share data)  
 
Statements of Operations Data:
                                       
Total revenue
  $ 121,534     $ 97,051     $ 73,164     $ 69,884     $ 62,381  
Operating income
    57,501       27,261       9,899       36,163       2,985  
Net income (loss)
    37,550       14,739       3,347       20,334       (8,246 )
Diluted net income (loss) per share
    2.15       0.80       0.18       1.09       (0.45 )
Balance Sheet Data:
                                       
Cash, short-term and long-term investments
  $ 47,868     $ 71,978     $ 70,225     $ 106,571     $ 73,319  
Total assets
    185,562       191,028       171,331       157,402       124,225  
Retained earnings
    103,989       66,439       51,620       48,273       27,914  
Total stockholders’ equity
    172,372       141,806       130,922       145,203       115,581  
 
ITEM 7.   MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.
 
The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition, results of operations and trends for the future should be read together with “Selected Financial Data” and our audited consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this report. Any discussion and analysis regarding trends in our future financial condition and results of operations are forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions, as more fully identified in “Forward-Looking Statements” and “Risk Factors.” Our actual future financial condition and results of operations may differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking statements.
 
 
SurModics is a leading provider of drug delivery and surface modification technologies to the healthcare industry. In November 2008, we announced a change in our organizational structure into four clinically and market focused business units: Cardiovascular, Ophthalmology, SurModics Pharmaceuticals, and In Vitro Technologies. We believe that this structure improves the visibility, marketing and adoption of the Company’s broad array of technologies within specific markets and helps our customers in the medical device, pharmaceutical and life science industries better solve unmet clinical needs. In addition, a new centralized research and development function has been formed to serve the needs of the Company’s clinically and market focused business units, other than the SurModics Pharmaceuticals business unit, which continues to maintain certain R&D operations.
 
The reorganization change resulted in the Company being comprised of new market focused business units. “Therapeutic” contains: (1) the Cardiovascular business unit, which provides drug delivery and surface modification technologies to customers in the cardiovascular market; (2) the Ophthalmology business unit, which is dedicated to the advancement of treatments for eye diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic macular edema (DME), two of the leading causes of blindness; and (3) the SurModics Pharmaceuticals business unit, which provides proprietary polymer-based drug delivery technologies to companies developing improved pharmaceutical products. Revenue results in Therapeutic are presented by the clinical market areas in which our customers participate (Cardiovascular, Ophthalmology and Other Markets). “Diagnostic” contains the In Vitro Technologies business unit, which includes our microarray slide technologies, our stabilization products, antigens and substrates for immunoassay diagnostic tests, and our in vitro diagnostic format technology.


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Our revenue is derived from three primary sources: (1) royalties and license fees from licensing our proprietary drug delivery and surface modification technologies and in vitro diagnostic formats to customers; the vast majority (typically in excess of 90%) of revenue in the “royalties and license fees” category is in the form of royalties; (2) the sale of polymers and reagent chemicals, stabilization products, antigens, substrates and microarray slides to the diagnostics and biomedical research industry; and (3) research and development fees generated on customer projects. Revenue fluctuates from quarter to quarter depending on, among other factors: our customers’ success in selling products incorporating our technologies; the timing of introductions of licensed products by customers; the timing of introductions of products that compete with our customers’ products; the number and activity level associated with customer development projects; the number and terms of new license agreements that are finalized; the value of reagent chemicals and other products sold to customers; and the timing of future acquisitions we complete, if any.
 
For financial accounting and reporting purposes, we report our results in one reportable segment. We made this determination because each business unit has similar economic characteristics; a significant percentage of our employees provide support services (including research and development) to each business unit; technology and products from each business unit are marketed to the same or similar customers; each business unit uses the same sales and marketing resources; and each business unit operates in the same regulatory environment.
 
In June 2007, we entered into a License and Research Collaboration Agreement and separate Supply Agreement with Merck & Co., Inc. (“Merck”) related to our I-vationtm TA (triamcinolone acetonide) intravitreal implant. Under the terms of the Merck agreements, we received an up front license fee of $20 million and were eligible to receive up to an additional $288 million in fees and development milestones associated with the successful product development and attainment of appropriate U.S. and EU regulatory approvals, as well as payment for our research and development activities. In September 2008, following a strategic review of its business and product development portfolio, Merck gave notice that it was terminating the collaborative research and license agreement, as well as the supply agreement entered into in June 2007. This decision was not based on any concerns about the safety or efficacy of the I-vation system. The termination was effective in December 2008, and we have recognized revenue related to the termination of approximately $45 million in fiscal 2009, principally from amounts that previously had been deferred and amortized under the accounting treatment required by accounting guidance for revenue arrangements with multiple deliverables. The $45 million includes a $9 million milestone payment associated with the termination of the triamcinolone acetonide development program.
 
In November 2008, we acquired a portfolio of intellectual property and collaborative drug delivery projects from PR Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a drug delivery company specializing in injectable, biodegradable sustained release formulations. Total consideration paid through September 30, 2009 was $5.6 million and PR Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is eligible to receive up to an additional $3.6 million in cash upon successful achievement of specified milestones. The proprietary technologies we acquired complement and enhance our existing portfolio of drug delivery capabilities by providing a broader toolkit for protein delivery and the ability to use smaller gauge needles for microparticle injections. In addition, the multiple customer development programs we assumed complement the diversified portfolio of customer projects at SurModics Pharmaceuticals, and we believe will further leverage the investment we are making in cGMP manufacturing.
 
On October 5, 2009, we entered into a License and Development Agreement with F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Ltd. (“Roche”) and Genentech, Inc., a wholly-owned member of the Roche Group (“Genentech”). Under the terms of the License Agreement, Roche and Genentech will have an exclusive license to develop and commercialize a sustained drug delivery formulation of Lucentis® (ranibizumab injection) utilizing SurModics’ proprietary biodegradable microparticles drug delivery system. Under the terms of the agreement, we received an up front licensing fee of $3.5 million and are eligible to receive potential payments of up to approximately $200 million in fees and milestone payments in the event of the successful development and commercialization of multiple products, as well as payment for development work done on these products. Roche and Genentech will have the right to obtain manufacturing services from SurModics. In the event a commercial product is developed, we will also receive royalties on sales of such products.


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The discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations is based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements is based in part on the application of significant accounting policies, many of which require management to make estimates and assumptions (see Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements). Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions and could materially impact our results of operations. We believe the following are critical areas in the application of our accounting policies that currently affect our financial condition and results of operations.
 
Revenue recognition.  In accordance with accounting guidance, revenue is recognized when all of the following criteria are met: (1) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; (2) shipment has occurred or delivery has occurred if the terms specify destination; (3) the sales price is fixed or determinable; and (4) collectability is reasonably assured. However, when there are additional performance requirements, revenue is recognized when such requirements have been satisfied. Royalty revenue is generated when a licensed customer sells products incorporating our technologies. Royalty revenue is recognized as our licensees report it to us, and payment is typically submitted concurrently with a quarterly report. Revenue related to a performance milestone is recognized upon achievement of the milestone and meeting specific revenue recognition criteria. We recognize initial license fees over the term of the related agreement. Minimum royalty fees are recognized in the period earned. Product sales to third parties are recognized at the time of shipment, provided that an order has been received, the price is fixed or determinable, collectability of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured and returns can be reasonably estimated. Our sales terms provide no right of return outside of our standard warranty policy. Payment terms are generally set at 30-45 days. Generally, revenue for research and development is recorded as performance progresses under the applicable contract. When we have revenue arrangements with multiple deliverables, we comply with current accounting guidance and recognize each element as it is earned.
 
Costs related to products delivered are recognized in the period revenue is recognized except for services related to the Merck agreement, which have been recognized as incurred. Customer advances are accounted for as a liability until all criteria for revenue recognition have been met.
 
Valuation of long-lived assets.  We periodically evaluate whether events and circumstances have occurred that may affect the estimated useful life or the recoverability of the remaining balance of long-lived assets, such as property and equipment. If such events or circumstances were to indicate that the carrying amount of these assets would not be recoverable, we would estimate the future cash flows expected to result from the use of the assets and their eventual disposition. If the sum of the expected future cash flows (undiscounted and without interest charges) or other measure of fair value were less than the carrying amount of the assets, we would recognize an impairment charge.
 
Goodwill.  Goodwill represents the excess of the cost of the acquired entities over the fair value assigned to the assets purchased and liabilities assumed in connection with the Company’s acquisitions. Goodwill is not amortized but is subject, at a minimum, to annual tests for impairment in accordance with accounting guidance. Under certain situations, interim impairment tests may be required if events occur or circumstances change indicating that the carrying amount of goodwill may be impaired.
 
Evaluating goodwill for impairment involves the determination of the fair value of our reporting units in which we have recorded goodwill. A reporting unit is a component of our results for which discrete financial information is available and reviewed by management on a regular basis. SurModics has determined that its reporting units are its SurModics Pharmaceuticals business unit, a component within Therapeutics, and the In Vitro Technologies business unit.
 
We performed our annual impairment test of goodwill in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2009 and did not record an impairment charge. In evaluating whether goodwill was impaired, we compared the fair value of reporting units to which goodwill is assigned to their carrying value (step one of the impairment test). In calculating fair value, we used a valuation technique based on multiples of revenue and book value for comparable companies since the technique is consistent with the objective of measuring fair value. The comparison companies selected have


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operations comparable to each of the SurModics reporting units for which indefinite-lived assets were being evaluated.
 
Investments.  Investments consist principally of U.S. government and government agency obligations and mortgage-backed securities and are classified as available-for-sale or held-to-maturity at September 30, 2009. Our investment policy calls for no more than 5% of investments be held in any one credit issue, excluding U.S. government and government agency obligations, net of tax. Available-for-sale investments are reported at fair value with unrealized gains and losses excluded from operations and reported as a separate component of stockholders’ equity, except for other-than-temporary impairments, which are reported as a charge to current operations and result in a new cost basis for the investment in accordance with accounting guidance. Our evaluation of the available-for-sale investments resulted in no loss recognition in fiscal 2009 and loss recognition of $4.3 million related to our investment in OctoPlus N.V. (included in Other Assets in the consolidated balance sheets) in fiscal 2008, as we determined the loss to be an other-than-temporary impairment based on a significant decline in the stock price as of September 30, 2008. The impairment of the OctoPlus N.V. investment resulted in a new cost basis. Investments which management has the intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity and reported at amortized cost. If there is an other-than-temporary impairment in the fair value of any individual security classified as held-to-maturity, the Company will write down the security to fair value with a corresponding adjustment to other income (loss). Interest on debt securities, including amortization of premiums and accretion of discounts, is included in other income (loss). Realized gains and losses from the sales of debt securities, which are included in other income (loss), are determined using the specific identification method.
 
Income tax accruals and valuation allowances.  When preparing the consolidated financial statements, we are required to estimate the income taxes in each of the jurisdictions in which we operate. This process involves estimating the actual current tax obligations based on expected income, statutory tax rates and tax planning opportunities in the various jurisdictions. In the event there is a significant unusual or one-time item recognized in the results of operations, the tax attributable to that item would be separately calculated and recorded in the period the unusual or one-time item occurred. Tax law requires certain items to be included in our tax return at different times than the items are reflected in our results of operations. As a result, the annual effective tax rate reflected in our results of operations is different than that reported on our tax return (i.e., our cash tax rate). Some of these differences are permanent, such as expenses that are not deductible in our tax return, and some are temporary differences that will reverse over time, such as depreciation expense on capital assets. These temporary differences result in deferred tax assets and liabilities, which are included in our consolidated balance sheets. Deferred tax assets generally represent items that can be used as a tax deduction or credit in our tax return in future years for which we have already recorded the expense in our consolidated statements of income. We must assess the likelihood that our deferred tax assets will be recovered from future taxable income, and to the extent we believe that recovery is not likely, we must establish a valuation allowance against those deferred tax assets. Deferred tax liabilities generally represent items for which we have already taken a deduction in our tax return, but we have not yet recognized the items as expense in our results of operations. Significant judgment is required in evaluating our tax positions, and in determining our provision for income taxes, our deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowance recorded against our deferred tax assets. We had total deferred tax assets in excess of total deferred tax liabilities of $2.9 million as of September 30, 2009 and $12.2 million as of September 30, 2008, including valuation allowances of $3.3 million as of September 30, 2009 and $3.4 million as of September 30, 2008. The valuation allowances related to impairment losses on investments and were recorded because the Company does not currently foresee future capital gains within the allowable carry-forward and carry-back periods to offset these capital losses when they are recognized. As such, no tax benefit has been recorded in the consolidated statements of income.
 
The Company adopted accounting provisions on October 1, 2007 which defined new standards for recognizing the benefits of tax return positions in the financial statements as “more-likely-than-not” to be sustained by the taxing authorities based solely on the technical merits of the position. If the recognition threshold is met, the tax benefit is measured and recognized as the largest amount of tax benefit that, in our judgment, is greater than 50 percent likely to be realized. The total gross amount of unrecognized tax benefits as of September 30, 2009 and 2008 was $2.0 million and $1.5 million, respectively, excluding accrued interest and penalties. $2.0 million of these tax benefits would affect our effective tax rate, if recognized. Interest and penalties recorded for uncertain tax positions


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are included in our income tax provision. As of September 30, 2009 and 2008, $0.6 million and $0.4 million, respectively, of interest and penalties were accrued, excluding the tax benefits of deductible interest. Fiscal years 2006, 2007 and 2008 remain subject to examination by federal tax authorities. Tax returns for state and local jurisdictions for fiscal years 2003 through 2008 remain subject to examination by state and local tax authorities. In the event that we have determined not to file tax returns with a particular state or local jurisdiction, all years remain subject to examination by the tax authorities. The ultimate outcome of tax matters may differ from our estimates and assumptions. Unfavorable settlement of any particular issue would require the use of cash and could result in increased income tax expense. Favorable resolution could result in reduced income tax expense. Within the next 12 months, we do not expect that our unrecognized tax benefits will change significantly. See Note 8 to the consolidated financial statements for further information regarding the impact of adopting this new standard as well as changes in unrecognized tax benefits during fiscal 2009 and 2008.
 
Results of Operations
 
Years Ended September 30, 2009 and 2008
 
                                 
    Fiscal
    Fiscal
    Increase/
       
(Dollars in thousands)
  2009     2008     (Decrease)     % Change  
 
Revenue:
                               
Therapeutic
                               
Cardiovascular
  $ 39,841     $ 47,675     $ (7,834 )     (16 )%
Ophthalmology
    52,102       10,252       41,850       408 %
Other Markets
    13,114       17,875       (4,761 )     (27 )%
                                 
Total Therapeutic
    105,057       75,802       29,255       39 %
Diagnostic
    16,477       21,249       (4,772 )     (22 )%
                                 
Total revenue
  $ 121,534     $ 97,051     $ 24,483       25 %
                                 
 
Revenue.  Fiscal 2009 revenue was $121.5 million, an increase of $24.5 million, or 25%, from fiscal 2008. The increase in Therapeutic and decrease in Diagnostic revenue, as detailed in the table above, are further explained in the narrative below.
 
Therapeutic.  Revenue in Therapeutic was $105.1 million in fiscal 2009, a 39% increase compared with $75.8 million in the prior-year period. The increase in total revenue reflects the recognition of revenue of approximately $45 million associated with the terminated Merck collaborative research and license agreement. Excluding these significant event-specific items, Therapeutic revenue decreased $15.7 million, or 21%.
 
Cardiovascular derives a substantial amount of revenue from royalties and license fees and product sales attributable to Cordis Corporation, a Johnson & Johnson company, on its CYPHER® Sirolimus-eluting Coronary Stent. The CYPHER® stent incorporates a proprietary SurModics polymer coating that delivers a therapeutic drug designed to reduce the occurrence of restenosis in coronary artery lesions. The CYPHER® stent faces continuing competition from Boston Scientific, Medtronic, and Abbott Laboratories. Stents from these companies compete directly with the CYPHER® stent both domestically and internationally. Future royalty and reagent sales revenue could decrease as a result of lower CYPHER® stent sales as a result of the ongoing and expected future competition. We anticipate that royalty revenue from the CYPHER® stent may be volatile throughout fiscal 2010 and beyond as the various marketers of drug-eluting stents compete in the marketplace and as others enter the marketplace. We also receive a royalty on sales of the Medtronic Endeavor® drug-eluting stent delivery system incorporating our hydrophilic technology, which is sold in the United States and internationally and commenced sales in Japan in May 2009.
 
Cardiovascular revenue decreased $7.8 million, or 16%, in fiscal 2009, compared with the prior-year period principally as a result of lower royalties and license fees and research and development revenue. Our royalty revenue from Cordis decreased approximately 35% as a result of the decrease in CYPHER® stent sales.


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Ophthalmology revenue increased $41.9 million, or 408%, in fiscal 2009, compared with the prior-year period. The significant increase principally reflects the recognition of approximately $45 million of previously deferred revenue associated with the terminated collaborative research and license agreement with Merck and a milestone payment associated with the termination of the triamcinolone acetonide development program.
 
Ophthalmology revenue, excluding the Merck event-specific items of fiscal 2009 and amortization of revenue in fiscal 2008, was unchanged at $7.1 million in both fiscal years.
 
Other Markets revenue decreased $4.8 million, or 27%, in fiscal 2009, compared with the prior-year period. Lower research and development revenue was the primary reason for the decrease. Selected customers have delayed, slowed or cancelled development projects in fiscal 2009 as a result of various factors including current economic conditions. Other Markets revenue is derived from more than 50 customers.
 
Diagnostic.  Revenue in Diagnostic was $16.5 million in fiscal 2009, a decrease of 22% compared with $21.2 million in the prior-year period. This decrease was attributable to lower royalties and license fees in fiscal 2009. In past years, Diagnostic derived a significant percentage of revenue from Abbott Laboratories. Fiscal 2009 was the last year in which we received royalty revenue from our diagnostic format patent license agreement with Abbott Laboratories. Royalty revenue from Abbott was $4.9 million in fiscal 2009, compared with $8.7 million in fiscal 2008. Product sales in Diagnostic decreased 4% compared with fiscal 2008 as customers slowed purchasing activity in early fiscal 2009.
 
Product costs.  Product costs were $7.5 million in fiscal 2009, an 11% decrease from the prior year. Overall product margins averaged 61%, compared with 58% in the prior year. The increase in product margins reflected the mix of products sold in fiscal 2009 as we had a decrease in sales of our SurModics Pharmaceuticals polymer products, which carry lower margins than our reagent and diagnostic products.
 
Customer research and development expenses.  Customer research and development (“Customer R&D”) expenses were $13.2 million, a decrease of 31% compared with fiscal 2008. The decrease principally reflects the impact of lower research and development revenue, adjusted for Merck. Customer R&D margins were 51%, compared with 24% in fiscal 2008. The margins were 32% and 21% for fiscal 2009 and 2008, respectively, after adjusting for Merck deferred revenue recognition in both periods. The increase in fiscal 2009 margins reflects lower labor and material costs incurred on projects, as well as lower overhead costs allocated to Customer R&D.
 
Other research and development expenses.  Other research and development (“Other R&D”) expenses were $21.2 million, essentially unchanged compared with $21.3 million in fiscal 2008. Our research and development headcount decreased in fiscal 2009 as a result of our November 2008 reorganization, resulting in lower labor costs, which were offset by higher overhead costs being allocated to Other R&D.
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses.  Selling, general and administrative expenses were $17.2 million, a decrease of 17% compared with fiscal 2008. The decrease principally reflects lower employee compensation costs related to our annual incentive compensation program and lower stock-based compensation expense, as fiscal 2008 included costs related to transitions on our Board of Directors.
 
Purchased in-process research and development.  In November 2008, we acquired certain assets comprised of intellectual property and collaborative programs from PR Pharmaceuticals, Inc. The fair value of $3.2 million associated with the in-process research and development intangible asset was determined by management and recognized as an expense.
 
Restructuring charges.  In November 2008, we announced a functional reorganization to better serve our customers and improve our operating performance. As a result of the reorganization, we eliminated 15 positions, or approximately 5% of our workforce. These employee terminations occurred across various functions, and the reorganization plan was completed by the end of the first quarter of fiscal 2009. The reorganization also resulted in SurModics vacating a leased office facility in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, and consolidating into our owned office and research facility also in Eden Prairie.
 
We recorded total restructuring charges of $1.8 million in connection with the reorganization. These pre-tax charges consisted of $0.5 million of severance pay and benefits expenses and $1.3 million of facility-related costs.


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Costs totaling $0.8 million have been paid, and we anticipate paying the remaining $1.0 million within the next fifteen months.
 
Other income (loss), net.  Other income was $2.0 million in fiscal 2009, compared with a loss of $0.4 million in fiscal 2008. Income from investments was $1.8 million in fiscal 2009, compared with $3.3 million in fiscal 2008. The decrease primarily reflects lower investment balances in fiscal 2009. The fiscal 2008 loss primarily reflects a $4.3 million impairment loss on our investment in OctoPlus N.V., based on a significant decline in the stock price as of September 30, 2008.
 
Income tax expense.  The income tax provision was $22.0 million in fiscal 2009, compared with $12.2 million in fiscal 2008. The effective tax rate in fiscal 2009 was 36.9% compared with 45.2% in fiscal 2008. Excluding the impact of the $4.3 million impairment loss in fiscal 2008 (since the Company does not currently foresee offsetting capital gains that could offset this capital loss, no tax benefit has been recorded), the effective tax rate was 38.9%. The decrease in the effective tax rate, adjusted for the one-time item noted, is primarily a result of lower state taxes and the tax reserve associated with uncertain tax positions.
 
Years Ended September 30, 2008 and 2007
 
                                 
    Fiscal
    Fiscal
             
(Dollars in thousands)
  2008     2007     Increase     % Change  
 
Revenue:
                               
Therapeutic
                               
Cardiovascular
  $ 47,675     $ 46,487     $ 1,188       3 %
Ophthalmology
    10,252       2,453       7,799       318 %
Other Markets
    17,875       4,041       13,834       342 %
                                 
Total Therapeutic
    75,802       52,981       22,821       43 %
Diagnostic
    21,249       20,183       1,066       5 %
                                 
Total revenue
  $ 97,051     $ 73,164     $ 23,887       33 %
                                 
 
Revenue.  Fiscal 2008 revenue was $97.1 million, an increase of $23.9 million, or 33%, from fiscal 2007. We experienced growth in both Therapeutic and Diagnostic, as detailed in the table above and further explained in the narrative below.
 
Therapeutic.  Revenue in Therapeutic was $75.8 million in fiscal 2008, a 43% increase compared with $53.0 million in the prior-year period. The increase in total revenue reflects a significant increase in research and development revenue associated with the SurModics Pharmaceuticals acquisition in July 2007. SurModics Pharmaceuticals contributed $20.6 million and $2.4 million in revenue for fiscal 2008 and 2007, respectively. Fiscal 2007 results included SurModics Pharmaceuticals for only two months, as the acquisition closed on July 31, 2007.
 
Cardiovascular derives a substantial amount of revenue from royalties and license fees and product sales attributable to Cordis Corporation, a Johnson & Johnson company, on its CYPHER® Sirolimus-eluting Coronary Stent. The CYPHER® stent incorporates a proprietary SurModics polymer coating that delivers a therapeutic drug designed to reduce the occurrence of restenosis in coronary artery lesions.
 
Cardiovascular revenue increased $1.2 million, or 3%, in fiscal 2008, compared with the prior-year period principally as a result of higher research and development revenue from customers. Overall royalties and license fees revenue increased despite an approximately 22% decrease in our royalty revenue from Cordis, which reflects the decrease in CYPHER® stent sales.
 
Ophthalmology revenue increased $7.8 million, or 318%, in fiscal 2008, compared with the prior-year period. The significant increase principally reflects increased research and development revenue from various ophthalmology customers. Ophthalmology revenue, excluding the amortization of Merck revenue in fiscal 2008 and 2007, was $7.1 million and $2.1 million, respectively.


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Other Markets revenue increased $13.8 million, or 342%, in fiscal 2008, compared with the prior-year period. Higher research and development revenue and product sales were the main contributors to the increase. Other Markets revenue is derived from more than 50 customers.
 
Diagnostic.  Revenue in Diagnostic was $21.2 million in fiscal 2008, an increase of 5% compared with $20.2 million in the prior-year period. The increase was mainly attributable to increased product sales, principally as a result of the addition of $4.6 million of BioFX products sold during the year as compared with BioFX product sales of $0.5 million in fiscal 2007. Operating results of BioFX have been included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements since August 14, 2007. The product sales increase was substantially offset by a 27% decrease in royalties and license fees. In Vitro Technologies derives a significant percentage of its revenue from GE Healthcare and Abbott Laboratories. Royalty revenue generated under our diagnostic format patent license agreement with Abbott Laboratories decreased 13% in fiscal 2008 compared with the prior year. Royalty revenue from GE Healthcare decreased 76% in fiscal 2008 compared with fiscal 2007 as a result of the transition to a non-exclusive license in January 2008.
 
Product costs.  Product costs were $8.5 million in fiscal 2008, a 52% increase from the prior year. Overall product margins averaged 58%, compared with 59% reported in fiscal 2007. The slight decrease in product margins reflects the mix of products sold in the period (in particular, some of our microarray slides and SurModics Pharmaceuticals polymer products carry lower margins than our reagent and stabilization products).
 
Customer research and development expenses.  Customer research and development (“Customer R&D”) expenses were $19.2 million, an increase of $13.3 million, or 229%, compared with fiscal 2007. The increase principally reflects the addition of SurModics Pharmaceuticals. Fiscal 2007 amounts include SurModics Pharmaceuticals for two months of operations following the acquisition. Customer R&D margins were 24% in fiscal 2008, compared with 16% in fiscal 2007. The increase in margins principally reflects the significant increase in research and development revenue as a result of the acquisition of SurModics Pharmaceuticals.
 
Other research and development expenses.  Other research and development expenses (“Other R&D”) were $21.3 million, a decrease of $1.3 million, or 6%, compared with fiscal 2007. The decrease was driven principally by lower labor and benefit costs in fiscal 2008 compared with the prior year period, partially offset by higher Other R&D expenses from SurModics Pharmaceuticals and BioFX.
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses.  Selling, general and administrative expenses were $20.8 million, an increase of 53% compared with fiscal 2007. The increase principally reflects the addition of SurModics Pharmaceuticals and BioFX to our operations and higher stock-based compensation expenses associated with second quarter fiscal 2008 Board of Directors transitions.
 
Purchased in-process research and development.  In July 2007, we acquired all of the assets of SurModics Pharmaceuticals. Results in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2007 include an in-process research and development charge of $15.6 million related to the SurModics Pharmaceuticals acquisition. The fair value of the in-process research and development was determined by management.
 
Other income (loss), net.  Other loss was $0.4 million in fiscal 2008, compared with income of $4.8 million in fiscal 2007. The fiscal 2008 loss primarily reflects a $4.3 million impairment loss on our investment in OctoPlus N.V., based on a significant decline in the stock price. Income from investments was $3.3 million in fiscal 2008, compared with $4.8 million in fiscal 2007. The decrease primarily reflects lower investment balances and lower yields generated from our investment portfolio, as well as the early repayment of a note receivable associated with the fiscal 2005 sale of our contract manufacturing facility located in Bloomington, Minnesota.
 
Income tax expense.  The income tax provision was $12.2 million in fiscal 2008, compared with $11.3 million in fiscal 2007. The effective tax rate in fiscal 2008 was 45.2%. Excluding the impact of the $4.3 million impairment loss in fiscal 2008 (since the Company does not currently foresee offsetting capital gains that could offset this capital loss, no tax benefit has been recorded), the effective tax rate was 38.9%. The effective tax rate in fiscal 2007 was 77.2%. Excluding the impact of the non-tax deductible purchased in-process research and development charges, the fiscal 2007 effective rate was 37.4%. The increase in the effective tax rate, adjusted for the one-time items noted, reflects an increase in state tax contingency reserves in fiscal 2008 and a release of federal tax reserves in fiscal 2007.


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As of September 30, 2009, the Company had working capital of $29.0 million, of which $20.6 million consisted of cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments. Working capital decreased $5.0 million from the September 30, 2008 level driven principally by lower cash, accounts receivable and income taxes receivable balances, offset by lower accrued compensation and deferred revenue balances. Deferred revenue balances have decreased as a result of the termination of the Merck arrangement in fiscal 2009. In addition, accrued annual incentive compensation decreased because fiscal 2009 objectives were not achieved. Our cash, cash equivalents and short-term and long-term investments totaled $47.9 million at September 30, 2009, a decrease of $24.1 million from $72.0 million at September 30, 2008. The decrease was principally driven by redemptions which were used to finance investment in our new manufacturing facility in Alabama, which totaled $24.4 million and for our stock repurchase program, which totaled $15.0 million. The Company’s investments principally consist of U.S. government and government agency obligations and investment grade, interest-bearing corporate debt securities with varying maturity dates, the majority of which are five years or less. The Company’s policy requires that no more than 5% of investments be held in any one credit issue, excluding U.S. government and government agency obligations. The primary investment objective of the portfolio is to provide for the safety of principal and appropriate liquidity while meeting or exceeding a benchmark (Merrill Lynch 1-3 Year Government-Corporate Index) total rate of return. Management plans to continue to direct its investment advisors to manage the Company’s investments primarily for the safety of principal for the foreseeable future as it assesses other investment opportunities and uses of its investments.
 
The Company had positive cash flows from operating activities of approximately $31.3 million in fiscal 2009, compared with $39.8 million in fiscal 2008. The following table depicts our cash flows from operations for each of fiscal 2009 and 2008:
 
                 
    For the Years Ended
 
    September 30,  
    2009     2008  
    (Dollars in thousands)  
 
Net income
  $ 37,550     $ 14,739  
Depreciation and amortization
    5,912       6,071  
Stock-based compensation
    6,853       9,652  
Purchased in-process research and development
    3,200        
Impairment loss on investment
          4,314  
Deferred taxes and other net operating activities
    10,433       (3,938 )
Net change in deferred revenue
    (36,050 )     11,452  
Net change in other operating assets and liabilities
    3,423       (2,468 )
                 
Net cash provided by operating activities
  $ 31,321     $ 39,822  
                 
 
Net income in fiscal 2009 increased compared with fiscal 2008, however cash provided by operating activities was lower. Net income was higher in fiscal 2009 principally as a result of the recognition of previously deferred revenue associated with the Merck agreement, which is a non-cash item. The Merck termination also resulted in a reduction in deferred tax asset balances, which are non-cash. The decrease in cash from operations also reflects lower CYPHER® stent royalties and Abbott royalties in fiscal 2009.
 
We conduct a significant majority of our operations at our Eden Prairie, Minnesota headquarters and at our SurModics Pharmaceuticals subsidiary located in Birmingham, Alabama. In addition to our Eden Prairie and Birmingham locations, we lease approximately 4,800 square feet of commercial office space in Irvine, California, where our Ophthalmology business unit conducts a portion of its operations, and approximately 73,000 square feet of office and warehouse space in Eden Prairie. In December 2008, we consolidated all of our Eden Prairie personnel into our owned facility as part of our reorganization efforts, and subsequently subleased our leased space in Eden Prairie to another company. In April 2008, we purchased a building for $12.2 million with approximately 286,000 square feet of space near our present location in Birmingham, Alabama. We have invested an additional


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$28.8 million in fiscal 2009 and 2008 in this facility to meet the development and cGMP manufacturing needs of our pharmaceutical and biotechnology customers.
 
In January 2005, we made an initial equity investment of approximately $3.9 million in OctoPlus N.V. (“OctoPlus”), a company based in the Netherlands active in the development of pharmaceutical formulations incorporating novel biodegradable polymers. Subsequent investments brought our total investment to $6.0 million, representing an ownership interest of less than 10%. In October 2006, OctoPlus common stock began trading on an international exchange following an initial public offering of its common stock. With a readily determinable fair market value, the Company treats the investment in OctoPlus as an available-for-sale investment rather than a cost method investment. In fiscal 2008, we incurred an impairment loss of $4.3 million on our investment in OctoPlus based on the decline in fair value of the common stock. Our new cost basis in the investment is $1.7 million. We had an unrealized gain of $2.0 million at September 30, 2009 reflected in comprehensive income.
 
In July 2007, we made equity investments in Paragon Intellectual Properties, LLC (“Paragon”) and Apollo Therapeutics, LLC (“Apollo”), a Paragon subsidiary. The Paragon and Apollo investments totaled $3.5 million. SurModics made an additional equity investment of $2.5 million, based upon successful completion of specified development milestones, in fiscal 2008. In October 2008, Paragon announced that it had restructured, moving from a limited liability company with seven subsidiaries to a single C-corporation named Nexeon MedSystems, Inc. (“Nexeon”). We continued to account for our investment in Paragon and Apollo under the equity method in the first quarter of fiscal 2009, as both entities report results to us on a one-quarter lag. Commencing with the second quarter of fiscal 2009, we account for our investment in Nexeon under the cost method as our ownership is less than 20%. SurModics made an additional cash investment in Nexeon of $500,000 in fiscal 2009.
 
In July 2007, we entered into a stock purchase agreement with Southern Research Institute whereby we acquired 100% of the capital stock of SurModics Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (formerly known as Brookwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) (“SurModics Pharmaceuticals”) for $40 million in cash on the closing date, and up to an additional $22 million in cash upon the successful achievement of specified milestones. In fiscal 2009 and 2008, milestones were achieved and $5 million of additional purchase price was recorded as an increase to goodwill. Based in Birmingham, Alabama, SurModics Pharmaceuticals specializes in proprietary injectable microparticles and implants to provide sustained delivery of drugs being developed by leading pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device clients as well as emerging companies. This acquisition has helped us broaden our technology offerings to our customers, diversify the range of markets in which we participate, expand our customer base, and enhance our pipeline of potential revenue generating opportunities. See Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements for further information.
 
In August 2007, we entered into a stock purchase agreement to acquire 100% of the capital stock of BioFX Laboratories, Inc. (“BioFX”) for $11.3 million in cash on the closing date, and up to an additional $11.4 million in cash upon the successful achievement of specified milestones. In fiscal 2008, a milestone was achieved and $1.1 million of additional purchase price was recorded as an increase to goodwill. The sellers are still eligible to receive up to $7.6 million in additional consideration. Based in Owings Mills, Maryland, BioFX is a leading manufacturer of substrates, a critical component of diagnostic test kits used to detect and signal that a certain reaction has taken place. The acquisition of BioFX has broadened our product portfolio in the in vitro diagnostics market. See Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements for further information.
 
In August 2008, we purchased approximately five acres of undeveloped land adjacent to our headquarters in Eden Prairie, Minnesota for approximately $3.6 million.
 
In November 2008, our SurModics Pharmaceuticals subsidiary entered into an asset purchase agreement with PR Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“PR Pharma”) whereby it acquired certain contracts and assets of PR Pharma for $2.9 million in cash on the closing date, $0.3 million in transaction costs, and up to an additional $6.0 million upon the successful achievement of specified milestones. In fiscal 2009 $2.4 million of additional purchase price was paid based on achievement of certain milestones. PR Pharma is eligible to receive up to $3.6 million in cash upon the successful achievement of additional milestones. We believe this acquisition strengthens our portfolio of drug delivery technologies for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.


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In August 2009, the Company invested $2.0 million in a medical technology company. We account for this investment following the cost method, as our ownership level is below 20%.
 
In November 2007, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $35 million of the Company’s common stock in open-market transactions, private transactions, tender offers, or other transactions. The repurchase authorization does not have a fixed expiration date. During fiscal 2009, we purchased 623,800 shares of common stock for $15.0 million at an average price of $24.05 per share. Under the current authorization, the Company has $7.3 million remaining available for authorized share repurchases as of September 30, 2009.
 
As of September 30, 2009, we had no debt outstanding. In February 2009, we entered into a two-year $25.0 million unsecured revolving credit facility. Borrowings under the credit facility, if any, will bear interest at a benchmark rate plus an applicable margin based upon the Company’s funded debt to EBITDA ratio. No borrowings have yet been made on the credit facility. In connection with the credit facility, the Company is required to maintain certain financial and nonfinancial covenants. As of September 30, 2009, the Company was in compliance with all covenants.
 
We do not have any other credit agreements and believe that our existing cash, cash equivalents and investments, together with cash flow from operations, will provide liquidity sufficient to meet the below stated needs and fund our operations for the next twelve months. There can be no assurance, however, that SurModics’ business will continue to generate cash flows at current levels, and disruptions in financial markets may negatively impact the Company’s ability to access capital in a timely manner and on attractive terms. Our anticipated liquidity needs for fiscal 2010 include, but are not limited to, the following: capital expenditures related to equipment purchases for the Alabama cGMP facility in the range of $5 million to $6 million; general capital expenditures in the range of $4 million to $6 million; contingent consideration payments, if any, related to our acquisitions of SurModics Pharmaceuticals and BioFX as well as the purchase of certain assets from PR Pharmaceuticals; and any amounts associated with the repurchase of common stock under the authorization discussed above.
 
 
As of September 30, 2009, the Company did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements with any unconsolidated entities.
 
 
Presented below is a summary of contractual obligations and payments due by period (in thousands). See Note 9 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding the below obligations.
 
                                         
          Less than
                More than
 
    Total     1 Year     1-3 Years     3-5 Years     5 Years  
 
Operating leases
  $ 889     $ 422     $ 303     $ 164     $  
                                         
 
 
In October 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued an update to authoritative accounting guidance to address the accounting for multiple-deliverable arrangements. This accounting update enables vendors to account for products and services (deliverables) separately rather than as a combined unit. This authoritative guidance establishes the accounting and reporting for arrangements under which the vendor will perform multiple revenue-generating activities. The amendments to the authoritative guidance establish a selling price hierarchy for determining the selling price of a deliverable. The selling price used for each deliverable will be based on vendor-specific objective evidence if available, third-party evidence if vendor-specific objective evidence is not available, or estimated selling price if neither vendor-specific objective evidence nor third-party evidence is available. The authoritative guidance also expands the disclosures related to multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements and in the year of adoption requires additional disclosures following previous authoritative guidance. The authoritative guidance is effective for the Company beginning in fiscal 2011, with early adoption permitted. The Company expects to early adopt this authoritative guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010 and is currently evaluating the impact on the consolidated financial statements.


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In June 2009, the FASB issued authoritative guidance to eliminate the historical Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) hierarchy and establish only two levels of U.S. GAAP, authoritative and nonauthoritative. When launched on July 1, 2009, the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) became the single source of authoritative, nongovernmental GAAP, except for rules and interpretive releases of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), which are sources of authoritative GAAP for SEC registrants. All other nongrandfathered, non-SEC accounting literature not included in the ASC became nonauthoritative. The subsequent issuances of new standards will be in the form of Accounting Standards Updates that will be included in the ASC. This authoritative guidance was effective for financial statements for interim or annual reporting periods ended after September 15, 2009. The Company adopted the new codification in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2009. As the codification was not intended to change or alter existing GAAP, it did not have any impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.
 
In April 2008, the FASB issued authoritative accounting guidance which amends the factors that should be considered in developing renewal or extension assumptions used to determine the useful life of intangible assets under goodwill and other intangible asset accounting. The authoritative guidance is intended to improve the consistency between the useful life of a recognized intangible asset under goodwill and intangible asset accounting and the period of the expected cash flows used to measure the fair value of the asset under business combination accounting and other GAAP. The authoritative guidance is effective for the Company in fiscal 2010, with early adoption prohibited. The Company does not expect the adoption of the authoritative guidance to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
 
In December 2007, the FASB issued authoritative accounting guidance which establishes principles and requirements for how an acquirer recognizes and measures in its financial statements the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, and any noncontrolling interest in an acquiree, including the recognition and measurement of goodwill acquired in a business combination. The authoritative guidance is effective for the Company in fiscal 2010 and once adopted will impact recognition and measurement of future business combinations.
 
In September 2006, the FASB issued authoritative accounting guidance associated with fair value measurements. This guidance defines fair value, establishes a consistent framework for measuring fair value, gives guidance regarding methods used for measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. These provisions were implemented in fiscal 2009. See Note 3 to the consolidated financial statements. However, in February 2008, the FASB issued guidance which delayed the effective date from fiscal 2009 to fiscal 2010 for all nonfinancial assets and liabilities, except those that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a recurring basis (at least annually). The Company is currently evaluating the potential impact of the authoritative guidance for which the effective date was delayed until fiscal 2010 on its consolidated financial statements.
 
No other new accounting pronouncement issued or effective has had, or is expected to have, a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.
 
ITEM 7A.   QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK.
 
The Company’s investment policy requires investments with high credit quality issuers and limits the amount of credit exposure to any one issuer. The Company’s investments principally consist of U.S. government and government agency obligations and investment-grade, interest-bearing corporate debt securities with varying maturity dates, the majority of which are five years or less. Because of the credit criteria of the Company’s investment policies, the primary market risk associated with these investments is interest rate risk. SurModics does not use derivative financial instruments to manage interest rate risk or to speculate on future changes in interest rates. A one percentage point increase in interest rates would result in an approximate $591,000 decrease in the fair value of the Company’s available-for-sale and held-to-maturity securities as of September 30, 2009, but no material impact on the results of operations or cash flows.
 
Management believes that a reasonable change in raw material prices would not have a material impact on future earnings or cash flows because the Company’s inventory exposure is not material.


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Although we conduct business in foreign countries, our international operations consist primarily of sales of reagent and stabilization chemicals. Additionally, all sales transactions are denominated in U.S. dollars. Accordingly, we do not expect to be subject to material foreign currency risk with respect to future costs or cash flows from our foreign sales. To date, we have not entered into any foreign currency forward exchange contracts or other derivative financial instruments to hedge the effects of adverse fluctuations in foreign currency exchange.
 
ITEM 8.   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA.
 
The consolidated balance sheets as of September 30, 2009 and 2008 and the consolidated statements of income, stockholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended September 30, 2009, together with Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm and related footnotes (including selected unaudited quarterly financial data) begin on page F-1 of this Form 10-K.
 
ITEM 9.   CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.
 
None.
 
ITEM 9A.   CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.
 
1.   Disclosure Controls and Procedures.
 
As of the end of the period covered by this report, the Company conducted an evaluation under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management, including the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer regarding the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures pursuant to Rule 13a-15(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). Based upon that evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in reports that it files under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time period specified in the Securities Exchange Commission rules and forms, and to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures.
 
2.   Internal Control over Financial Reporting.
 
(a) Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting.  Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company. Management conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting based on the framework in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Based on this evaluation, management concluded that the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was effective as of September 30, 2009. Deloitte & Touche LLP, the registered public accounting firm that audited the financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, has issued the attestation report below regarding the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
 
(b) Attestation Report of the Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.


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Board of Directors and Stockholders
SurModics, Inc.
Eden Prairie, Minnesota
 
We have audited the internal control over financial reporting of SurModics, Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of September 30, 2009, based on criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.
 
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the company’s principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, and effected by the company’s board of directors, management, and other personnel to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
 
Because of the inherent limitations of internal control over financial reporting, including the possibility of collusion or improper management override of controls, material misstatements due to error or fraud may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Also, projections of any evaluation of the effectiveness of the internal control over financial reporting to future periods are subject to the risk that the controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
 
In our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of September 30, 2009, based on the criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.
 
We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended September 30, 2009 of the Company and our report dated December 11, 2009, expressed an unqualified opinion on those financial statements.
 
DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP
 
Minneapolis, Minnesota
December 11, 2009


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3.   Changes in Internal Controls.
 
There was no change in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the fourth quarter of the year covered by this Form 10-K that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
 
ITEM 9B.   OTHER INFORMATION.
 
None.
 
 
ITEM 10.   DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE.
 
The information required by Item 10 relating to directors, our audit committee, the nature of changes, if any, to procedures by which our shareholders may recommend nominees for directors, codes of ethics and compliance with Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is incorporated herein by reference to the sections entitled “Election of Directors,” “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance,” “Corporate Governance — Code of Ethics and Business Conduct” and “Audit Committee Report,” which appear in the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement for its 2010 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. The information required by Item 10 relating to executive officers appears in Part I of this Form 10-K.
 
ITEM 11.   EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION.
 
The information required by Item 11 is incorporated herein by reference to the sections entitled “Executive Compensation and Other Information,” “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” “Director Compensation for Fiscal 2009” and “Compensation Committee Report,” which appear in the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement for its 2010 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.
 
ITEM 12.   SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS.
 
The information required by Item 12 is incorporated herein by reference to the sections entitled “Principal Shareholders,” “Management Shareholdings” and “Equity Compensation Plan Information” which appear in the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement for its 2010 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.
 
ITEM 13.   CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE.
 
The information required by Item 13 is incorporated herein by reference to the sections entitled “Corporate Governance — Related Person Transaction Approval Policy,” “Corporate Governance — Transactions With Related Parties” and “Corporate Governance — Majority of Independent Directors; Committees of Independent Directors,” which appear in the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement for its 2010 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.
 
ITEM 14.   PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES.
 
The information required by Item 14 is incorporated herein by reference to the section entitled “Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm,” which appears in the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement for its 2010 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.


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ITEM 15.   EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES.
 
(a) 1. Financial Statements
 
The following statements are included in this report on the pages indicated:
 
     
    Page (s)
 
  F-1
  F-2
  F-3
  F-4
  F-5
  F-6 to F-27
 
2. Financial Statement Schedules.  See Schedule II — “Valuation and Qualifying Accounts” in this section of this Form 10-K. All other schedules are omitted because they are inapplicable, not required, or the information is in the consolidated financial statements or related notes.
 
3. Listing of Exhibits.  The exhibits which are filed with this report or which are incorporated herein by reference are set forth in the Exhibit Index following the signature page.
 
SurModics, Inc.
Schedule II
Valuation and Qualifying Accounts
 
                                 
    Column B     Column C     Column D     Column E  
    Balance at
    Additions
    Deductions
    Balance at
 
Column A
  Beginning of
    Charged to
    From
    End of
 
Description
  Period     Expenses     Reserves     Period  
 
Year Ended September 30, 2007
                               
Allowance for doubtful accounts
  $ 40     $ 7     $ 7 (a)   $ 40  
                                 
Year Ended September 30, 2008
                               
Allowance for doubtful accounts
  $ 40     $ 228     $ 133 (a)   $ 135  
                                 
Year Ended September 30, 2009
                               
Allowance for doubtful accounts
  $ 135     $ (34 )   $ 19 (a)   $ 82  
                                 
Restructuring accrual
  $     $ 1,763     $ 808 (b)   $ 955  
                                 
 
 
(a) Uncollectible accounts written off and adjustments to the allowance.
 
(b) Adjustments to the accrual account reflect payments or non-cash charges associated with the accrual.


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Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this Report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.
 
SURMODICS, INC.
 
  By: 
/s/  Bruce J Barclay
Bruce J Barclay
Chief Executive Officer
 
Dated: December 11, 2009
 
Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this Report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant, in the capacities, and on the dates indicated.
 
(Power of Attorney)
 
Each person whose signature appears below authorizes BRUCE J BARCLAY and PHILIP D. ANKENY, and constitutes and appoints said persons as his or her true and lawful attorneys-in-fact and agents, each acting alone, with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him or her and in his or her name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to sign any or all amendments to this Annual Report on Form 10-K and to file the same, with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, authorizing said persons and granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, each acting alone, full power and authority to do and perform each and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done in and about the premises, as fully to all intents and purposes as he or she might or could do in person, hereby ratifying and confirming all said attorneys-in-fact and agents, each acting alone, or his substitute or substitutes, may lawfully do or cause to be done by virtue thereof.
 
             
Signature
 
Title
 
Date
 
         
/s/  Bruce J Barclay

Bruce J Barclay
  President and Chief Executive Officer (principal executive officer)   December 11, 2009
         
/s/  Philip D. Ankeny

Philip D. Ankeny
  Senior Vice President and
Chief Financial Officer
(principal financial officer)
  December 11, 2009
         
/s/  Mark A. Lehman

Mark A. Lehman
  Corporate Controller
(principal accounting officer)
  December 11, 2009
         
/s/  José H. Bedoya

José H. Bedoya
  Director   December 11, 2009
         
/s/  John W. Benson

John W. Benson
  Director   December 11, 2009
         
/s/  Mary K. Brainerd

Mary K. Brainerd
  Director   December 11, 2009


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Table of Contents

             
Signature
 
Title
 
Date
 
         
/s/  Robert C. Buhrmaster

Robert C. Buhrmaster
  Director   December 11, 2009
         
/s/  Gerald B. Fischer

Gerald B. Fischer
  Director   December 11, 2009
         
/s/  Kenneth H. Keller

Kenneth H. Keller
  Director   December 11, 2009
         
/s/  Susan E. Knight

Susan E. Knight
  Director   December 11, 2009
         
/s/  John A. Meslow

John A. Meslow
  Director   December 11, 2009


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SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
 
EXHIBIT INDEX TO FORM 10-K
 
For the Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2009
 
SURMODICS, INC.
 
         
Exhibit
   
 
  2 .1   Agreement of Merger, dated January 18, 2005, with InnoRx, Inc. — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 18, 2005, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  2 .2   Stock Purchase Agreement, dated July 31, 2007, between SurModics, Inc. and Southern Research Institute. — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 2.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated July 31, 2007, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  3 .1   Restated Articles of Incorporation, as amended — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-QSB for the quarter ended December 31, 1999, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  3 .2   Restated Bylaws of the Company, as amended.**
  10 .1*   Company’s Incentive 1997 Stock Option Plan, including specimen of Incentive Stock Option Agreement — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 to the Company’s Registration Statement on form SB-2, Reg. No. 333-43217.
  10 .2*   Form of Restricted Stock Agreement under 1997 Plan — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 to the Company’s Registration Statement on form SB-2, Reg. No. 333-43217.
  10 .3*   Form of Non-qualified Stock Option Agreement under 1997 Plan — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 to the Company’s Registration Statement on form SB-2, Reg. No. 333-43217.
  10 .4   Adjusted License Agreement by and between the Company and Cordis Corporation effective as of January 1, 2003 — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.11 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2002, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .5   Reagent Supply Agreement by and between the Company and Cordis Corporation effective as of January 1, 2003 — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.12 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2002, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .6*   Form of officer acceptance regarding employment/compensation — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.9 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2005, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .7*   2003 Equity Incentive Plan (as amended and restated December 13, 2005) (adopted December 13, 2005 by the board of directors and approved by the shareholders on January 30, 2006) — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed February 3, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .8*   Form of SurModics, Inc. 2003 Equity Incentive Plan Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Company’s 8-K filed March 20, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .9*   Form of SurModics, Inc. 2003 Equity Incentive Plan Incentive Stock Option Agreement — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Company’s 8-K filed March 20, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .10*   Form of SurModics, Inc. 2003 Equity Incentive Plan Restricted Stock Agreement — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 to the Company’s 8-K filed March 20, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .11*   Form of SurModics, Inc. 2003 Equity Incentive Plan Performance Share Award Agreement — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 to the Company’s 8-K filed March 20, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .12*   Form of SurModics, Inc. 2003 Equity Incentive Plan Performance Unit Award (cash settled) Agreement — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.5 to the Company’s 8-K filed March 20, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .13*   Form of SurModics, Inc. 2003 Equity Incentive Plan Restricted Stock Unit Agreement — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.6 to the Company’s 8-K filed March 20, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .14*   Form of SurModics, Inc. 2003 Equity Incentive Plan Stock Appreciation Rights (cash settled) Agreement — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.7 to the Company’s 8-K filed March 20, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.


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Exhibit
   
 
  10 .15*   Form of SurModics, Inc. 2003 Equity Incentive Plan Stock Appreciation Rights (stock settled) Agreement — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.8 to the Company’s 8-K filed March 20, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .16*   Change in Control Agreement with Bruce J Barclay, dated April 19, 2006 — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed April 25, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .17*   Change in Control Agreement with Philip D. Ankeny, dated April 19, 2006 — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed April 25, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .18   The Company’s Board Compensation Policy, Amended as of November 17, 2008.**
  10 .19*   Change in Control Agreement with Paul A. Lopez, dated November 15, 2006 — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.27 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .20*   Description of certain retirement benefits for Dale R. Olseth — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.28 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2006, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .21+   Exclusive License and Research Collaboration Agreement with Merck & Co., Inc. dated June 26, 2007 — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2007, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .22+   Supply Agreement with Merck & Co., Inc. dated June 26, 2007 — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 30, 2007, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .23*   Employment Agreement of Arthur J. Tipton, Ph.D., dated July 31, 2007 — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.27 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2007.
  10 .24   Purchase Agreement with Vest Mykyng LLC, dated August 24, 2007 — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.28 to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2007.
  10 .25   Real Estate Purchase and Sale Agreement dated March 11, 2008 by and between Belk, Inc. and SurModics Pharmaceuticals, Inc. — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2008, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .26   Credit Agreement dated as of February 27, 2009, by and between SurModics, Inc. and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association as Sole Lead Arranger and Administrative Agent — incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K filed March 4, 2009, SEC File No. 0-23837.
  10 .27*   Amendment to Change of Control Agreement, dated as of December 23, 2008, between SurModics, Inc. and Bruce J Barclay.**
  10 .28*   Amendment to Change of Control Agreement, dated as of December 23, 2008, between SurModics, Inc. and Philip D. Ankeny.**
  10 .29*   Second Amendment to Change of Control Agreement, dated as of April 19, 2009, between SurModics, Inc. and Bruce J Barclay.**
  10 .30*   Second Amendment to Change of Control Agreement, dated as of April 19, 2009, between SurModics, Inc. and Philip D. Ankeny.**
  21     Subsidiaries of the Registrant.**
  23     Consent of Deloitte & Touche LLP.**
  24     Power of Attorney (included on signature page of this Form 10-K).**
  31 .1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.**
  31 .2   Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.**
  32 .1   Certification of Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.**
  32 .2   Certification of Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.**
 
 
* Management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement
 
** Filed herewith
 
+ Confidential treatment requested as to portions of the exhibit. Confidential portions omitted and provided separately to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

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Board of Directors and Stockholders
SurModics, Inc.
Eden Prairie, Minnesota
 
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of SurModics, Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of September 30, 2009 and 2008, and the related consolidated statements of income, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended September 30, 2009. Our audits also include the financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15. These financial statements and financial statement schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial statements and financial statement schedule based on our audits.
 
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
 
In our opinion, such consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of SurModics, Inc. and subsidiaries as of September 30, 2009 and 2008, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended September 30, 2009, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Also, in our opinion, such financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic consolidated financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein.
 
We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of September 30, 2009, based on the criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated December 11, 2009 expressed an unqualified opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
 
As discussed in Note 8 to the consolidated financial statements, on October 1, 2007, the Company adopted new accounting guidance on the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes.
 
Minneapolis, Minnesota
December 11, 2009


F-1


Table of Contents

SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
As of September 30
 
                 
    2009     2008  
    (In thousands, except share data)  
 
ASSETS
Current Assets
               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 11,636     $ 15,376  
Short-term investments
    8,932       9,251  
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $82 and $135 as of
               
September 30, 2009 and 2008, respectively
    11,320       14,589  
Inventories
    3,330       2,651  
Deferred tax asset
    353       1,058  
Prepaids and other
    1,443       3,584  
                 
Total Current Assets
    37,014       46,509  
                 
Property and equipment, net
    66,915       41,897  
Long-term investments
    27,300       47,351  
Deferred tax asset
    2,548       11,099  
Intangible assets, net
    17,458       16,870  
Goodwill
    21,070       18,001  
Other assets, net
    13,257       9,301  
                 
Total Assets
  $ 185,562     $ 191,028  
                 
 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Current Liabilities
               
Accounts payable
  $ 3,468     $ 3,466  
Accrued liabilities:
               
Compensation
    926       3,015  
Accrued income taxes payable
    186        
Accrued other
    1,637       1,407  
Deferred revenue
    905       4,335  
Other current liabilities
    862       303  
                 
Total Current Liabilities
    7,984       12,526  
Deferred revenue, less current portion
    623       33,243  
Other long-term liabilities
    4,583       3,453  
                 
Total Liabilities
    13,190       49,222  
                 
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 9)
               
Stockholders’ Equity
               
Series A preferred stock — $.05 par value, 450,000 shares authorized;
               
no shares issued and outstanding
           
Common stock — $.05 par value, 45,000,000 shares authorized; 17,471,472
               
and 18,030,270 shares issued and outstanding
    874       901  
Additional paid-in capital
    66,005       74,573  
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
    1,504       (107 )
Retained earnings
    103,989       66,439  
                 
Total Stockholders’ Equity
    172,372       141,806  
                 
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity
  $ 185,562     $ 191,028  
                 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


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Table of Contents

SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
For the Years Ended September 30
 
                         
    2009     2008     2007  
    (In thousands, except net
 
    income per share)  
 
Revenue
                       
Royalties and license fees
  $ 75,464     $ 51,788     $ 52,679  
Product sales
    19,333       20,052       13,543  
Research and development
    26,737       25,211       6,942  
                         
Total revenue
    121,534       97,051       73,164  
                         
Operating Costs and Expenses
                       
Product
    7,508       8,476       5,584  
Customer research and development
    13,183       19,187       5,840  
Other research and development
    21,179       21,311       22,625  
Selling, general and administrative
    17,200       20,816       13,643  
Purchased in-process research and development
    3,200             15,573  
Restructuring charges
    1,763              
                         
Total operating costs and expenses
    64,033       69,790       63,265  
                         
Income from Operations
    57,501       27,261       9,899  
                         
Other Income (Loss)
                       
Investment income, net
    1,839       3,329       4,844  
Impairment loss on investment
          (4,314 )      
Other income (loss), net
    184       616       (75 )
                         
Other income (loss), net
    2,023       (369 )     4,769  
                         
Income Before Income Taxes
    59,524       26,892       14,668  
Income Tax Provision
    (21,974 )     (12,153 )     (11,321 )
                         
Net Income
  $ 37,550     $ 14,739     $ 3,347  
                         
Basic net income per share
  $ 2.15     $ 0.82     $ 0.19  
Diluted net income per share
  $ 2.15     $ 0.80     $ 0.18  
Weighted Average Shares Outstanding
                       
Basic
    17,435       18,026       18,033  
Dilutive effect of outstanding stock options
    34       304       184  
                         
Diluted
    17,469       18,330       18,217  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


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Table of Contents

SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
For the Years Ended September 30, 2009, 2008 and 2007
 
                                                 
                      Accumulated
             
                Additional
    Other
          Total
 
    Common Stock     Paid-in
    Comprehensive
    Retained
    Stockholders’
 
    Shares     Amount     Capital     Income (Loss)     Earnings     Equity  
    (In thousands)  
 
Balance September 30, 2006
    18,830     $ 942     $ 96,281     $ (293 )   $ 48,273     $ 145,203  
Components of comprehensive income, net of tax:
                                               
Net income
                            3,347       3,347  
Unrealized holding gains on available-for-sale securities arising during the period
                      1,999             1,999  
Add reclassification for losses included in net income, net of tax benefit of $10
                      17             17  
                                                 
Comprehensive income
                                  5,363  
                                                 
Issuance of common stock
    14       1       457                   458  
Common stock repurchased
    (1,008 )     (50 )     (34,980 )                 (35,030 )
Common stock options exercised, net
    217       11       4,778                   4,789  
Purchase of common stock to pay employee taxes
    112       5       (379 )                 (374 )
Excess tax benefit from exercise of stock options
                466                   466  
Stock-based compensation
                10,312                   10,312  
Other
                (265 )                 (265 )
                                                 
Balance September 30, 2007
    18,165       909       76,670       1,723       51,620       130,922  
Components of comprehensive income, net of tax:
                                               
Net income
                            14,739       14,739  
Unrealized holding losses on available-for-sale securities arising during the period
                      (5,882 )           (5,882 )
Add reclassification for losses included in net income, net of tax provision of $167
                      4,052             4,052  
                                                 
Comprehensive income
                                  12,909  
                                                 
Issuance of common stock
    16       1       516                   517  
Common stock repurchased
    (342 )     (17 )     (13,954 )                 (13,971 )
Common stock options exercised, net
    114       4       2,514                   2,518  
Purchase of common stock to pay employee taxes
    77       4       (1,678 )                 (1,674 )
Excess tax benefit from exercise of stock options
                1,081                   1,081  
Stock-based compensation
                9,652                   9,652  
Other
                (228 )                 (228 )
Accounting change for income taxes
                            80       80  
                                                 
Balance September 30, 2008
    18,030       901       74,573       (107 )     66,439       141,806  
Components of comprehensive income, net of tax:
                                               
Net income
                            37,550       37,550  
Unrealized holding gains on available-for-sale securities arising during the period
                      2,123             2,123  
Add reclassification for gains included in net income, net of tax provision of $299
                      (512 )           (512 )
                                                 
Comprehensive income
                                  39,161  
                                                 
Issuance of common stock
    40       2       611                   613  
Common stock repurchased
    (624 )     (31 )     (14,967 )                 (14,998 )
Common stock options exercised, net
    15       1       65                   66  
Purchase of common stock to pay employee taxes
    10       1       (569 )                 (568 )
Excess tax benefit from exercise of stock options
                (366 )                 (366 )
Stock-based compensation
                6,853                   6,853  
Other
                (195 )                 (195 )
                                                 
Balance September 30, 2009
    17,471     $ 874     $ 66,005     $ 1,504     $ 103,989     $ 172,372  
                                                 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


F-4


Table of Contents

SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
For the Years Ended September 30
 
                         
    2009     2008     2007  
    (In thousands)  
 
Operating Activities
                       
Net income
  $ 37,550     $ 14,739     $ 3,347  
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by
                       
operating activities
                       
Depreciation and amortization
    5,912       6,071       4,214  
(Gain) loss on equity method investments and sales of investments
    (103 )     415       75  
Amortization of premium (discount) on investments
    139       70       (1,388 )
Impairment loss on investment
          4,314        
Stock-based compensation
    6,853       9,652       10,312  
Purchased in-process research & development
    3,200             15,573  
Restructuring charges
    1,763              
Deferred tax
    8,229       (3,428 )     (9,434 )
Excess tax benefit from exercise of stock options
    366       (1,081 )     (466 )
Loss on disposals of property and equipment
    291       78       379  
Other
    (250 )            
Change in operating assets and liabilities:
                       
Accounts receivable
    3,269       1,548       1,940  
Inventories
    (679 )     (154 )     (850 )
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
    (2,387 )     (264 )     2,594  
Income taxes
    2,656       (5,003 )     5,501  
Deferred revenue
    (36,050 )     11,452       19,166  
Prepaids and other
    562       1,413       (248 )
                         
Net cash provided by operating activities
    31,321       39,822       50,715  
                         
Investing Activities
                       
Purchases of property and equipment
    (29,364 )     (23,866 )     (3,626 )
Sales of property and equipment
          32       37  
Purchases of available-for-sale investments
    (33,568 )     (22,857 )     (136,498 )
Sales/maturities of available-for-sale investments
    55,263       29,258       185,075  
Purchases of held-to-maturity investments
          (6,485 )      
Investment in other strategic assets
    (2,500 )     (2,562 )     (5,749 )
Purchase of licenses and patents
    (631 )     (2,452 )     (1,355 )
Acquisitions, net of cash acquired
    (8,585 )     (3,219 )     (49,112 )
Repayment of notes receivable
          5,870       530  
Other investing activities
    (187 )     (228 )     (265 )
                         
Net cash used in investing activities
    (19,572 )     (26,509 )     (10,963 )
                         
Financing Activities
                       
Excess tax benefit from exercise of stock options
    (366 )     1,081       466  
Issuance of common stock
    679       3,037       5,247  
Repurchase of common stock
    (14,998 )     (13,971 )     (35,030 )
Purchase of common stock to pay employee taxes
    (568 )     (1,674 )     (374 )
Repayment of notes payable
    (236 )     (222 )      
                         
Net cash used in financing activities
    (15,489 )     (11,749 )     (29,691 )
                         
Net change in cash and cash equivalents
    (3,740 )     1,564       10,061  
Cash and Cash Equivalents
                       
Beginning of year
    15,376       13,812       3,751  
                         
End of year
  $ 11,636     $ 15,376     $ 13,812  
                         
Supplemental Information
                       
Cash paid for income taxes
  $ 11,285     $ 21,058     $ 14,930  
Noncash transaction — acquisition of property,
                       
plant, and equipment on account
  $ 1,247     $ 1,745     $ 252  
Noncash transaction — acquisition of intangibles on account
  $ 210     $     $  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.


F-5


Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
September 30, 2009 and 2008
 
1.   Description
 
SurModics, Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) develops, manufactures and markets innovative drug delivery and surface modification technologies for the healthcare industry. The Company’s revenue is derived from three primary sources: (1) royalties and license fees from licensing its patented drug delivery and surface modification technologies and in vitro diagnostic formats to customers; (2) the sale of polymers and reagent chemicals to licensees; substrates, antigens and stabilization products to the diagnostics industry; microarray slides to the diagnostic and biomedical research markets; and (3) research and development fees generated on projects for customers.
 
 
The consolidated financial statements include all accounts and wholly owned subsidiaries, and have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (GAAP). All significant inter-company transactions have been eliminated.
 
 
Subsequent events have been evaluated through December 11, 2009, the date the financial statements were issued.
 
On October 5, 2009, the Company entered into a license and development agreement with F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Ltd. (“Roche”) and Genentech, Inc., a wholly owned member of the Roche Group (“Genentech”), associated with the Company’s proprietary biodegradable microparticles drug delivery system. SurModics received an up front licensing fee of $3.5 million, could be eligible to receive up to approximately $200 million in fees and milestone payments in the event of the successful development and commercialization of multiple products, and will be paid for development work done on these products. Roche and Genentech will have the right to obtain manufacturing services from SurModics. In the event a commercial product is developed, the Company will also receive royalties on sales of such products.
 
2.   Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents consist of financial instruments with original maturities of three months or less and are stated at cost which approximates fair value.
 
 
Investments consist principally of U.S. government and government agency obligations and mortgage-backed securities and are classified as available-for-sale or held-to-maturity at September 30, 2009 and 2008. Available-for-sale investments are reported at fair value with unrealized gains and losses net of tax excluded from operations and reported as a separate component of stockholders’ equity, except for other-than-temporary impairments, which are reported as a charge to current operations. A loss would be recognized when there is an other-than-temporary impairment in the fair value of any individual security classified as available-for-sale, with the associated net unrealized loss reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income with a corresponding adjustment to other income (loss). This adjustment results in a new cost basis for the investment. Investments that management has the intent and ability to hold to maturity are classified as held-to-maturity and reported at amortized cost. If there is an other-than-temporary impairment in the fair value of any individual security classified as held-to-maturity, the Company will write down the security to fair value with a corresponding adjustment to other income (loss). Interest on debt securities, including amortization of premiums and accretion of discounts, is


F-6


Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
included in other income (loss). Realized gains and losses from the sales of debt securities, which are included in other income (loss), are determined using the specific identification method.
 
The original cost, unrealized holding gains and losses, and fair value of available-for-sale investments as of September 30 were as follows (in thousands):
 
                                 
    2009  
    Original Cost     Unrealized Gains     Unrealized Losses     Fair Value  
 
U.S. government obligations
  $ 10,837     $ 253     $     $ 11,090  
Mortgage-backed securities
    7,938       177       (106 )     8,009  
Municipal bonds
    7,210       232             7,442  
Asset-backed securities
    2,334       65       (143 )     2,256  
Corporate bonds
    1,181       3             1,184  
                                 
Total
  $ 29,500     $ 730     $ (249 )   $ 29,981  
                                 
 
                                 
    2008  
    Original Cost     Unrealized Gains     Unrealized Losses     Fair Value  
 
U.S. government obligations
  $ 18,440     $ 91     $ (87 )   $ 18,444  
Mortgage-backed securities
    10,147       46       (179 )     10,014  
Municipal bonds
    11,022       153       (3 )     11,172  
Asset-backed securities
    6,193       2       (171 )     6,024  
Corporate bonds
    4,582       8       (33 )     4,557  
                                 
Total
  $ 50,384     $ 300     $ (473 )   $ 50,211  
                                 
 
The original cost and fair value of investments by contractual maturity at September 30, 2009 were as follows (in thousands):
 
                 
    Original Cost     Fair Value  
 
Debt securities due within:
               
One year
  $ 6,830     $ 6,911  
One to five years
    14,297       14,749  
Five years or more
    8,373       8,321  
                 
Total
  $ 29,500     $ 29,981  
                 
 
The following table summarizes sales of available-for-sale securities for the years ended September 30, 2009, 2008 and 2007 (in thousands):
 
                         
    2009     2008     2007  
 
Proceeds from sales
  $ 55,263     $ 29,258     $ 185,075  
Gross realized gains
  $ 823     $ 454     $ 7  
Gross realized losses
  $ (12 )   $ (26 )   $ (34 )
 
At September 30, 2009, the amortized cost and fair market value of held-to-maturity debt securities were $6.3 million and $6.4 million, respectively. Investments in securities designated as held-to-maturity consist of tax-exempt municipal bonds and have maturity dates ranging between three months and three years from September 30, 2009. At September 30, 2008, the amortized cost and fair market value of held-to-maturity debt securities were $6.4 million and $6.3 million, respectively.


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Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
 
Inventories are principally stated at the lower of cost or market using the specific identification method and include direct labor, materials and overhead. Inventories consisted of the following as of September 30 (in thousands):
 
                 
    2009     2008  
 
Raw materials
  $ 1,287     $ 1,308  
Finished products
    2,043       1,343  
                 
Total
  $ 3,330     $ 2,651  
                 
 
 
Property and equipment are stated at cost and are depreciated using the straight-line method over 1 to 32 years, the estimated useful lives of the assets. The Company recorded depreciation expense of $3.8 million, $3.1 million and $2.2 million for the years ended September 30, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
The September 30, 2009 and 2008 balances in construction-in-progress include the cost of enhancing the capabilities of the Company’s Eden Prairie, Minnesota and Birmingham, Alabama facilities. As assets are placed in service, construction-in-progress is transferred to the specific property and equipment categories and depreciated over the estimated useful lives of the assets.
 
In April 2008, the Company acquired a 286,000 square foot facility situated on 42 acres in Birmingham, Alabama for $12.2 million. The Company has been renovating the existing facility to accommodate research and development, clinical manufacturing and commercial manufacturing of drug delivery products for pharmaceutical and biotechnology customers. The building is currently classified as construction-in-progress until renovation and remodeling is completed. The value of the land associated with the purchase is classified as part of the total land carrying value.
 
In August 2008, the Company acquired approximately five acres of undeveloped land adjacent to its headquarters in Eden Prairie, Minnesota for $3.6 million. The value of the land purchase is classified as part of the total land carrying value.
 
Property and equipment consisted of the following components as of September 30 (in thousands):
 
                         
    Useful Life     2009     2008  
    (In years)              
 
Land
          $ 7,409     $ 7,409  
Laboratory fixtures and equipment
    3 to 12       19,549       15,767  
Building and improvements
    1 to 32       15,911       15,025  
Office furniture and equipment
    3 to 10       4,550       4,156  
Construction-in-progress
            40,210       16,931  
Less accumulated depreciation
            (20,714 )     (17,391 )
                         
Property and equipment, net
          $ 66,915     $ 41,897  
                         
 
 
Other assets consist principally of strategic investments. In fiscal 2009, the balance in other assets increased primarily as a result of an investment in a medical technology company and an increase in the value of the Company’s investment in OctoPlus N.V. (“OctoPlus”).


F-8


Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
In January 2005, the Company made an initial equity investment of approximately $3.9 million in OctoPlus, a company based in the Netherlands active in the development of pharmaceutical formulations incorporating novel biodegradable polymers. Subsequent investments brought the Company’s total investment to $6.0 million. In October 2006, OctoPlus common stock began trading on an international exchange following an initial public offering of its common stock. With a readily determinable fair market value, the Company now treats the investment in OctoPlus as an available-for-sale investment rather than a cost method investment. Available-for-sale investments are reported at fair value with unrealized gains and losses reported as a separate component of stockholders’ equity, except for other-than-temporary impairments, which are reported as a charge to current operations, recorded in the other income (loss) section of the consolidated statements of income, and result in a new cost basis for the investment. As of September 30, 2009, the investment in OctoPlus represented an ownership interest of less than 10%. The Company recorded no realized gain or loss related to this investment in fiscal 2009. The Company recognized an impairment loss on the investment totaling $4.3 million in fiscal 2008 based on a significant decline in the stock price of OctoPlus as a result of market conditions. The cost basis in the Company’s investment in OctoPlus is $1.7 million.
 
Beginning in May 2005, the Company has invested $1.2 million in ThermopeutiX, Inc. (“ThermopeutiX”), a California-based early stage company developing novel medical devices for the treatment of vascular and neurovascular diseases. In addition to the investment, SurModics has licensed its hydrophilic and hemocompatible coating technologies to ThermopeutiX for use with its devices. The Company’s investment in ThermopeutiX, which is accounted for under the cost method, represents an ownership interest of less than 20%.
 
The Company has invested a total of $5.2 million in Novocell, Inc. (“Novocell”), a privately-held California-based biotechnology firm that is developing a unique treatment for diabetes using coated islet cells, the cells that produce insulin in the human body. In fiscal 2006, the Company determined its investment in Novocell was impaired and that the impairment was other-than-temporary. Accordingly, the Company recorded an impairment loss of $4.7 million. The balance of the investment, $559,000, which is accounted for under the cost method, represents less than a 5% ownership interest.
 
In July 2007, the Company made equity investments in Paragon Intellectual Properties, LLC (“Paragon”) and Apollo Therapeutics, LLC (“Apollo”), a Paragon subsidiary, totaling $3.5 million. SurModics made an additional equity investment in fiscal 2008 totaling $2.5 million, based upon successful completion of specified development milestones. In addition to the investments, the Company has licensed its Finaletm prohealing coating technology and provides development services on a time and materials basis to Apollo. In October 2008, Paragon announced that it had restructured, moving from a limited liability company with seven subsidiaries to a single C-corporation named Nexeon MedSystems, Inc. (“Nexeon”). SurModics continued to account for the investments in Paragon and Apollo under the equity method in the first quarter of fiscal 2009, as both entities report results to us on a one-quarter lag. Commencing with the second quarter of fiscal 2009, SurModics accounted for the investment in Nexeon under the cost method as the Company’s ownership level is less than 20%. The Company made an additional investment of $500,000 in Nexeon in fiscal 2009.
 
In August 2009, the Company invested $2.0 million in a medical technology company. The Company’s investment is accounted for under the cost method, as the Company’s ownership interest is less than 20%. This investment is included in the category titled “Other” in the table below.


F-9


Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
Other assets consisted of the following components as of September 30 (in thousands):
 
                 
    2009     2008  
 
Investment in OctoPlus
  $ 3,700     $ 1,714  
Investment in Nexeon MedSystems
    5,651       5,388  
Investment in ThermopeutiX
    1,185       1,185  
Investment in Novocell
    559       559  
Other
    2,162       455  
                 
Other assets, net
  $ 13,257     $ 9,301  
                 
 
In the years ended September 30, 2009, 2008 and 2007, the Company recognized revenue of $1.4 million, $4.1 million and $909,000, respectively, from activity with companies in which it had a strategic investment.
 
 
Intangible assets consist principally of acquired patents and technology, customer relationships, licenses, and trademarks. The Company recorded amortization expense of $2.1 million, $3.0 million, and $2.0 million for the years ended September 30, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
In fiscal 2009, the Company acquired certain assets of PR Pharmaceuticals, Inc., which resulted in an increase to intangible assets. See Note 4 for further information regarding the acquisition.
 
Intangible assets consisted of the following as of September 30 (in thousands):
 
                         
    Useful Life     2009     2008  
    (In years)              
 
Customer lists
    9-11     $ 8,657     $ 7,340  
Abbott license
    4             7,037  
Core technology
    8-18       8,330       6,930  
Patents and other
    2-20       3,076       3,398  
Trademarks
            600       580  
Less accumulated amortization
            (3,205 )     (8,415 )
                         
Intangible assets, net
          $ 17,458     $ 16,870  
                         
 
The Abbott license was fully amortized as of September 30, 2009 and the original cost and accumulated amortization have been removed from the 2009 amounts presented. Based on the intangible assets in service as of September 30, 2009, estimated amortization expense for the next five fiscal years is as follows (in thousands):
 
         
2010
  $ 1,627  
2011
    1,604  
2012
    1,602  
2013
    1,602  
2014
    1,602  
 
 
Goodwill represents the excess of the cost of the acquired entities over the fair value assigned to the assets purchased and liabilities assumed in connection with the Company’s acquisitions (see Note 4 for further information). The carrying amount of goodwill is evaluated annually, and between annual evaluations if events occur or circumstances change indicating that the carrying amount of goodwill may be impaired.


F-10


Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
In fiscal 2009 a milestone was achieved associated with the July 2007 acquisition of SurModics Pharmaceuticals, and $3 million of additional purchase price was recorded as an increase to goodwill.
 
 
The Company periodically evaluates whether events and circumstances have occurred that may affect the estimated useful life or the recoverability of the remaining balance of long-lived assets, such as property and equipment and investments. If such events or circumstances were to indicate that the carrying amount of these assets would not be recoverable, the Company would estimate the future cash flows expected to result from the use of the assets and their eventual disposition. If the sum of the expected future cash flows (undiscounted and without interest charges) or other measure of fair value were less than the carrying amount of the assets, the Company would recognize an impairment loss reducing the carrying value to fair market value.
 
 
In accordance with Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) guidance, revenue is recognized when all of the following criteria are met: (1) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; (2) shipment has occurred or delivery has occurred if the terms specify destination; (3) the sales price is fixed or determinable; and (4) collectability is reasonably assured. However, when there are additional performance requirements, revenue is recognized when all such requirements have been satisfied. Under revenue arrangements with multiple deliverables, the Company recognizes each separable deliverable as it is earned.
 
The Company’s revenue is derived from three primary sources: (1) royalties and license fees from licensing patented drug delivery and surface modification technologies and in vitro diagnostic formats to customers; (2) the sale of polymers and reagent chemicals, stabilization products, antigens, substrates and microarray slides to the diagnostics and biomedical research industries; and (3) research and development fees generated on customer projects.
 
Taxes collected from customers and remitted to governmental authorities are excluded from revenue and amounted to $187,000, $309,000 and $170,000 for the years ended September 30, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
Royalties & License Fees.  The Company licenses technology to third parties and collects royalties. Royalty revenue is generated when a customer sells products incorporating the Company’s licensed technologies. Royalty revenue is recognized as licensees report it to the Company, and payment is typically submitted concurrently with the report. Generally, license fees are recognized as revenue when the Company receives payment and the contract price is fixed or determinable. For stand-alone license agreements, up-front license fees are recognized over the term of the related licensing agreement. Minimum royalty fees are recognized in the period earned.
 
Revenue related to a performance milestone is recognized upon the achievement of the milestone, as defined in the respective agreements and provided the following conditions have been met:
 
  •  The milestone payment is non-refundable.
 
  •  The milestone is achieved, involves a significant degree of risk, and was not reasonably assured at the inception of the arrangement.
 
  •  Accomplishment of the milestone involves substantial effort.
 
  •  The amount of the milestone payment is commensurate with the related effort and risk.
 
  •  A reasonable amount of time passes between the initial license payment and the first and subsequent milestone payments.


F-11


Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
 
If these conditions have not been met, the milestone payment is deferred and recognized over the term of the agreement.
 
Product Sales.  Product sales to third parties are recognized at the time of shipment, provided that an order has been received, the price is fixed or determinable, collectability of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured and returns can be reasonably estimated. The Company’s sales terms provide no right of return outside of the standard warranty policy. Payment terms are generally set at 30-45 days.
 
Research and Development.  The Company performs third party research and development activities, which are typically provided on a time and materials basis. Generally, revenue for research and development is recorded as performance progresses under the applicable contract.
 
Arrangements with multiple deliverables.  Arrangements such as license and development agreements are analyzed to determine whether the deliverables, which often include a license and performance obligations such as research and development, can be separated or whether they must be accounted for as a single unit of accounting in accordance with accounting guidance. The Company recognizes up-front license payments under these agreements over the economic life of the technology licensed. If the fair value of the undelivered performance obligations can be determined, such obligations would then be accounted for separately. If the license is considered to either (i) not have stand-alone value or (ii) have stand-alone value but the fair value of any of the undelivered performance obligations cannot be determined, the arrangement would then be accounted for as a single unit of accounting, and the license payments and payments for performance obligations would be recognized as revenue over the estimated period of when the performance obligations are performed, or the economic life of the technology licensed to the customer. When the Company determines that an arrangement should be accounted for as a single unit of accounting, it recognizes the related revenue based on a time-based accounting model. Revenue associated with arrangements with multiple deliverables totaled $45.3 million, $4.2 million and $0.3 million in fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. The fiscal 2009 revenue associated with multiple deliverable arrangements is reflected in royalties and license fees revenue ($37.6 million) and in research and development revenue ($7.7 million) in the consolidated statements of income.
 
Merck Agreement.  On June 27, 2007 the Company announced a license and research collaboration agreement with Merck & Co., Inc. (“Merck”). The agreement called for SurModics and Merck to pursue the joint development and commercialization of SurModics’ I-vation sustained drug delivery system with TA (triamcinolone acetonide), and other products combining certain of Merck’s proprietary drug compounds and the I-vation system for the treatment of serious retinal diseases. Under the terms of the agreement, Merck led and funded development and commercialization activities. SurModics received an up-front license fee of $20 million in fiscal 2007 and additional license fees totaling $11 million in fiscal 2008. In addition, the Company was paid for its activities in researching and developing the combination products. Research and development fees totaling $5.8 million were billed in fiscal 2008. The Company recognized out-of-pocket reimbursements, totaling $1.6 million in fiscal 2008, as revenue in the period since the related costs were incurred when commensurate value was transferred to Merck in exchange for the reimbursement received.
 
The Company recognized revenue from the up-front license fee, additional license fees and research and development fees over the economic life of the technology licensed to Merck, which was 16 years.
 
In September 2008, following a strategic review of Merck’s business and product development portfolio, Merck gave notice to SurModics of its intent to terminate the collaborative research and license agreement as well as the supply agreement entered into in June 2007. The termination was effective December 2008. The Company recognized all remaining deferred revenue related to the Merck agreement, totaling $34.8 million, as revenue in fiscal 2009. The Company also recognized a $9 million milestone payment from Merck associated with the termination of the triamcinolone acetonide development program in fiscal 2009. As of September 30, 2009, there were no deferred revenue amounts from Merck, compared with $34.8 million of license fees and research and development fees in deferred revenue as of September 30, 2008.


F-12


Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
 
Amounts received prior to satisfying the above revenue recognition criteria are recorded as deferred revenue in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets, with deferred revenue to be recognized beyond one year being classified as non-current deferred revenue. As of September 30, 2009 and 2008, the Company had deferred revenue of $1.5 million and $37.6 million, respectively.
 
Costs related to products and services delivered are recognized in the period revenue is recognized except for services related to the Merck agreement, which were recognized as incurred. Customer advances are accounted for as a liability until all criteria for revenue recognition have been met.
 
 
Research and development costs are expensed as incurred. Some research and development costs are related to third party contracts, and the related revenue is recognized as described in “Revenue Recognition” above. The research and development costs are presented in the consolidated statements of income in two categories; those associated with customer related projects and those associated with other research and development costs.
 
Costs associated with customer related research and development include specific project direct labor costs and material expenses as well as an allocation of overhead costs based on direct labor dollars.
 
 
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Ultimate results could differ from those estimates.
 
 
In October 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued an update to authoritative accounting guidance to address the accounting for multiple-deliverable arrangements. This accounting update enables vendors to account for products and services (deliverables) separately rather than as a combined unit. This authoritative guidance establishes the accounting and reporting for arrangements under which the vendor will perform multiple revenue-generating activities. The amendments to the authoritative guidance establish a selling price hierarchy for determining the selling price of a deliverable. The selling price used for each deliverable will be based on vendor-specific objective evidence if available, third-party evidence if vendor-specific objective evidence is not available, or estimated selling price if neither vendor-specific objective evidence nor third-party evidence is available. The authoritative guidance also expands the disclosures related to multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements and in the year of adoption requires additional disclosures following previous authoritative guidance. The authoritative guidance is effective for the Company beginning in fiscal 2011 with early adoption permitted. The Company expects to early adopt this authoritative guidance in the first quarter of fiscal 2010 and is currently evaluating the impact on the consolidated financial statements.
 
In June 2009, the FASB issued authoritative guidance to eliminate the historical GAAP hierarchy and establish only two levels of GAAP, authoritative and nonauthoritative. When launched on July 1, 2009, the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) became the single source of authoritative, nongovernmental GAAP, except for rules and interpretive releases of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), which are sources of authoritative GAAP for SEC registrants. All other nongrandfathered, non-SEC accounting literature not included in the ASC became nonauthoritative. The subsequent issuances of new standards will be in the form of Accounting Standards Updates that will be included in the ASC. This authoritative guidance was effective for financial statements for interim or annual reporting periods ended after September 15, 2009. The Company adopted the new codification in


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Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
the fourth quarter of fiscal 2009. As the codification was not intended to change or alter existing GAAP, it did not have any impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.
 
In April 2008, the FASB issued authoritative accounting guidance which amends the factors that should be considered in developing renewal or extension assumptions used to determine the useful life of intangible assets under goodwill and other intangible asset accounting. The authoritative guidance is intended to improve the consistency between the useful life of a recognized intangible asset under goodwill and intangible asset accounting and the period of the expected cash flows used to measure the fair value of the asset under business combination accounting and other GAAP. The authoritative guidance is effective for the Company in fiscal 2010, with early adoption prohibited. The Company does not expect the adoption of the authoritative guidance to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
 
In December 2007, the FASB issued authoritative accounting guidance which establishes principles and requirements for how an acquirer recognizes and measures in its financial statements the identifiable assets acquired, the liabilities assumed, and any noncontrolling interest in an acquiree, including the recognition and measurement of goodwill acquired in a business combination. The authoritative guidance is effective for the Company in fiscal 2010 and once adopted will impact recognition and measurement of future business combinations.
 
In September 2006, the FASB issued authoritative accounting guidance associated with fair value measurements. This guidance defines fair value, establishes a consistent framework for measuring fair value, gives guidance regarding methods used for measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. These provisions were implemented in fiscal 2009. See Note 3 for additional information regarding fair value measurements. However, in February 2008, the FASB issued guidance which delayed the effective date from fiscal 2009 to fiscal 2010 for all nonfinancial assets and liabilities, except those that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a recurring basis (at least annually). The Company is currently evaluating the potential impact of the authoritative guidance for which the effective date was delayed until fiscal 2010 on its consolidated financial statements.
 
No other new accounting pronouncement issued or effective has had, or is expected to have, a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.
 
3.   Fair Value Measurements
 
Effective October 1, 2008, the Company adopted new accounting guidance on fair value measurements. The new guidance defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value under GAAP, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. The guidance is applicable for all financial assets and liabilities and for all nonfinancial assets and liabilities recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a recurring basis (at least annually). Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received from selling an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. When determining the fair value measurements for assets and liabilities required or permitted to be recorded at fair value, the Company considers the principal or most advantageous market in which it would transact and also considers assumptions that market participants would use when pricing the asset or liability, such as inherent risk, transfer restrictions and risk of nonperformance.
 
 
New accounting guidance on fair value measurements requires that assets and liabilities carried at fair value be classified and disclosed in one of the following three categories:
 
Level 1 — Quoted (unadjusted) prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.


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Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
The Company’s Level 1 asset consists of its investment in OctoPlus (see Note 2 for further information). The fair market value of this investment is based on the quoted price of OctoPlus shares as traded on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange.
 
Level 2 — Observable inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets; quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the asset or liability.
 
The Company’s Level 2 assets consist of money market funds, U.S. Treasury securities, corporate bonds, municipal bonds, U.S. agency securities, agency and municipal securities and certain asset-backed securities and mortgage-backed securities. Fair market values for these assets are based on quoted vendor prices and broker pricing where all significant inputs are observable.
 
Level 3 — Unobservable inputs to the valuation methodology that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the measurement of the fair value of the assets or liabilities. Level 3 assets and liabilities include those whose fair value measurements are determined using pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar valuation techniques, as well as significant management judgment or estimation.
 
The Company’s Level 3 assets include a U.S. government agency security and certain asset-backed and mortgage-backed securities. The fair market values of these investments were determined by broker pricing where not all significant inputs were observable.
 
In valuing assets and liabilities, the Company is required to maximize the use of quoted market prices and minimize the use of unobservable inputs.
 
We did not significantly change our valuation techniques from prior periods.
 
 
In instances where the inputs used to measure fair value fall into different levels of the fair value hierarchy, the fair value measurement has been determined based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement in its entirety. The Company’s assessment of the significance of a particular item to the fair value measurement in its entirety requires judgment, including the consideration of inputs specific to the asset or liability. The following table presents information about the Company’s financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of September 30, 2009 (in thousands):
 
                                 
    Quoted Prices
                   
    in Active
    Significant
             
    Markets for
    Other
    Significant
    Total Fair
 
    Identical
    Observable
    Unobservable
    Value as of
 
    Instruments
    Inputs
    Inputs
    September 30,
 
    (Level 1)     (Level 2)     (Level 3)     2009  
 
Assets:
                               
Cash equivalents
  $     $ 9,108     $     $ 9,108  
Short-term investments
          6,911             6,911  
Long-term investments
          21,867       1,203       23,070  
Other assets
    3,700                   3,700  
                                 
Total assets measured at fair value
  $ 3,700     $ 37,886     $ 1,203     $ 42,789  
                                 
 
Short-term and long-term investments disclosed in the consolidated balance sheets include held-to-maturity investments totaling $6.3 million as of September 30, 2009 and 2008. Held-to-maturity investments are carried at an amortized cost.


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Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
 
The following table is a reconciliation of financial assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) (in thousands):
 
         
    2009  
 
Balance, beginning of year
  $ 264  
Total realized and unrealized gains included in other comprehensive income
    25  
Purchases, sales and maturities, net
    339  
Transfer in (out) of Level 3
    575  
         
Balance, end of year
  $ 1,203  
         
 
As of September 30, 2009, marketable securities measured at fair value using Level 3 inputs was comprised of $36,000 of a U.S. government agency security, $73,000 of a mortgage-backed security and $1,094,000 of asset-backed securities within the Company’s available-for-sale investment portfolio. These securities were measured using observable market data and Level 3 inputs as a result of the lack of market activity and liquidity. The fair value of these securities was based on the Company’s assessment of the underlying collateral and the creditworthiness of the issuer of the securities.
 
Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on a Non-Recurring Basis
 
The Company’s investments in non-marketable securities of private companies are accounted for using the cost or equity method. These investments as well as held-to-maturity securities are measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis when they are deemed to be other-than-temporarily impaired. In determining whether a decline in value of non-marketable equity investments in private companies has occurred and is other-than-temporary, an assessment is made by considering available evidence, including the general market conditions in the investee’s industry, the investee’s product development status and subsequent rounds of financing and the related valuation and/or the Company’s participation in such financings. The Company also assesses the investee’s ability to meet business milestones and the financial condition and near-term prospects of the individual investee, including the rate at which the investee is using its cash and the investee’s potential need for additional funding at a possibly lower valuation. The valuation methodology for determining the decline in value of non-marketable equity securities is based on inputs that require management judgment and are Level 3 inputs.
 
4.   Acquisitions
 
PR Pharmaceuticals, Inc.  On November 4, 2008, the Company’s SurModics Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (formerly known as Brookwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) subsidiary entered into an asset purchase agreement with PR Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (“PR Pharma”), whereby it acquired certain contracts and assets of PR Pharma for $5.6 million consisting of $2.9 million in cash on the closing date, additional consideration of $2.4 million upon successful achievement of specified milestones and $0.3 million in transaction costs. PR Pharma is eligible to receive up to an additional $3.6 million in cash upon the successful achievement of milestones for contract signing and invoicing, successful patent issuances and product development. Management believes this acquisition strengthens the Company’s portfolio of drug delivery technologies for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. The purchase price was allocated as follows as of November 4, 2008 (in thousands):
 
         
Core technology
  $ 1,400  
Customer relationships
    900  
In-process research and development
    3,200  
Trade names
    20  
Non-compete agreements
    50  
         
Total purchase price
  $ 5,570  
         


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Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
The acquired developed technology is being amortized on a straight-line basis over 18 years, customer relationships are being amortized over 9 years, and non-compete agreements are being amortized over 2 years. The trade names have a life of less than one year and were fully amortized in fiscal 2009. As part of the acquisition, the Company recognized fair value associated with in-process research and development (IPR&D) of $3.2 million. The IPR&D was expensed on the date of acquisition and relates to polymer-based drug delivery systems. The value assigned to IPR&D is related to projects for which the related products have not achieved commercial feasibility and have no future alternative use. The amount of purchase price allocated to IPR&D was based on estimating the future cash flows of each project and discounting the net cash flows back to their present values. The discount rate used was determined at the time of acquisition in accordance with accepted valuation methods. These methodologies include consideration of the risk of the project not achieving commercial feasibility. The research efforts ranged from 5% to 50% complete at the date of acquisition. The Company used the Relief from Royalty valuation method to assess the fair value of the projects with a risk-adjusted discount rate of 25%. The Company determined the method was appropriate based on the nature of the projects and future cash flow streams. The research and development work performed is billed to customers, in most cases, using standard commercial billing rates which include a reasonable markup. Accordingly, the Company has no fixed cost obligations to carry projects forward. There have been no significant changes to the development plans for the acquired incomplete projects. Significant net cash inflows would commence with the commercial launch of customer products that are covered by the intellectual property rights and related agreements acquired from PR Pharma.
 
SurModics Pharmaceuticals, Inc.  On July 31, 2007, the Company entered into a stock purchase agreement with Southern Research Institute (“SRI”) whereby it acquired 100% of the capital stock of SurModics Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (formerly Brookwood Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) (“SurModics Pharmaceuticals”) held by SRI for $42.3 million consisting of $40 million in cash on the closing date and $2.3 million in transaction costs. SRI could receive up to an additional $22 million in cash upon the successful achievement of specified milestones. In fiscal 2009, a milestone was achieved and $3 million of additional purchase price was recorded as an increase to goodwill. In fiscal 2008, a milestone was achieved and $2 million of additional purchase price was recorded as an increase to goodwill. SurModics Pharmaceuticals is a drug delivery company based in Birmingham, Alabama that provides proprietary polymer-based technologies to companies developing pharmaceutical products. SurModics Pharmaceuticals, a wholly owned subsidiary of SurModics, operates as a separate business unit. Management believes this acquisition strengthens SurModics’ portfolio of drug delivery technologies for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries in particular. Operating results of SurModics Pharmaceuticals have been included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements since August 1, 2007.
 
As part of the acquisition, the Company recognized IPR&D of $15.6 million. The IPR&D was expensed on the date of acquisition and relates to polymer-based drug delivery systems. The value assigned to IPR&D is related to projects for which the related products have not received commercial feasibility and have no future alternative use. The amount of purchase price allocated to IPR&D was based on estimating the future cash flows of each project and discounting the net cash flows back to their present values.
 
BioFX Laboratories, Inc.  On August 13, 2007, the Company acquired 100% of the capital stock of BioFX Laboratories, Inc. (“BioFX”), a provider of substrates to the in vitro diagnostics industry, for $11.6 million, $11.3 million of which was in cash paid to the sellers and $300,000 in transaction costs. The Company is also required to pay up to an additional $11.4 million in cash upon the successful achievement of specified revenue targets. In fiscal 2008, a milestone was achieved and $1.1 million of additional purchase price was recorded as an increase to goodwill. The sellers are still eligible to receive up to $7.6 million in additional consideration. BioFX is a wholly owned subsidiary of SurModics, and operates within the In Vitro Technologies business unit. Management believes the acquisition enhances the Company’s technological position in the in vitro diagnostics market. Operating results of BioFX have been included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements since August 14, 2007.


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Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
The following pro forma consolidated condensed financial results of operations for the 2007 fiscal year, are presented as if the SurModics Pharmaceuticals and BioFX acquisitions had been completed at the beginning of fiscal 2007 (in thousands).
 
         
Pro forma revenue
  $ 89,708  
Pro forma income from operations
  $ 28,034  
Pro forma net income
  $ 17,735  
Pro forma basic earnings per share
  $ 0.98  
Pro forma diluted earnings per shares
  $ 0.98  
 
5.   Revolving Credit Facility
 
In February 2009, the Company entered into a two-year $25.0 million unsecured revolving credit facility. Borrowings under the credit facility, if any, will bear interest at a benchmark rate plus an applicable margin based upon the Company’s funded debt to EBITDA ratio. In connection with the credit facility, the Company is required to maintain certain financial and nonfinancial covenants. As of September 30, 2009, the Company had no debt outstanding under this credit facility and was in compliance with all covenants.
 
6.   Stockholders’ Equity
 
The Company has stock-based compensation plans under which it grants stock options and restricted stock awards. Accounting guidance requires all share-based payments to be recognized as an operating expense, based on their fair values, over the requisite service period. The Company’s stock-based compensation expenses for the years ended September 30 were allocated as follows (in thousands):
 
                         
    2009     2008     2007  
 
Product
  $ 87     $ 161     $ 96  
Research and development
    3,621       3,793       5,188  
Selling, general and administrative
    3,145       5,698       5,028  
                         
Total
  $ 6,853     $ 9,652     $ 10,312  
                         
 
As of September 30, 2009, approximately $8.7 million of total unrecognized compensation costs related to non-vested awards is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of approximately 2.6 years. The unrecognized compensation costs include $2.8 million associated with performance share awards that are currently not anticipated to be fully expensed because the performance conditions are not expected to be met.
 
 
The Company uses the Black-Scholes option pricing model to determine the weighted average grant date fair value of stock options granted. The weighted average per share fair value of stock options granted during fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007 was $8.95, $14.85, and $17.42, respectively. The assumptions used as inputs in the model for the years ended September 30 were as follows:
 
                         
    2009   2008   2007
 
Risk-free interest rates
    2.30 %     2.80 %     4.50 %
Expected life
    4.8 years       4.6 years       5.4 years  
Expected volatility
    40 %     37 %     45 %
Dividend yield
    0 %     0 %     0 %
 
The risk-free interest rate assumption was based on the U.S. Treasury’s rates for U.S. Treasury zero-coupon bonds with maturities similar to those of the expected term of the award. The expected life of options granted is


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Table of Contents

 
SurModics, Inc. and Subsidiaries
 
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements — (Continued)
 
determined based on the Company’s experience. Expected volatility is based on the Company’s stock price movement. Based on management’s judgment, dividend rates are expected to be zero for the expected life of the options. The Company also estimates forfeitures of options granted, which are based on historical experience.
 
The Company’s Incentive Stock Options (ISO) are granted at a price of at least 100% of the fair market value of the Common Stock on the date of the grant or 110% with respect to optionees who own more than 10% of the total combined voting power of all classes of stock. ISOs expire in seven years or upon termination of employment and are exercisable at a rate of 20% per year commencing one year after the date of grant. Nonqualified stock options are granted at fair market value on the date of grant. Nonqualified options expire in 7 to 10 years or upon termination of employment or service as a Board member. Nonqualified options granted prior to May 2008 generally become exercisable with respect to 20% of the shares on each of the first five anniversaries following the grant date such that the entire option is fully vested five years after date of grant, and nonqualified options granted subsequent to May 2008 generally become exercisable with respect to 25% on each of the first four anniversaries following the grant date such that the entire option is fully vested four years after the grant date. The Company has authorized 2,400,000 shares for grant under the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan of which 51,000 remain available for future awards. In September 2009, the Company granted 29,066 performance share awards to officers under the 2003 Equity Incentive Plan and 229,552 stock options to officers under the 2009 Equity Incentive Plan. The 2009 Equity Incentive Plan is subject to shareholder approval at the February 2010 Annual Meeting of Shareholders. As of September 30, 2009, the aggregate intrinsic value of the option shares outstanding and option shares exercisable was $0.7 million and $0.6 million, respectively. At September 30, 2009, the average remaining contractual life of options outstanding and options exercisable was 4.3 and 3.2 years, respectively. The intrinsic value of options exercised during fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007 was $235,000, $2.9 million and $4.4 million, respectively.
 
                 
          Weighted
 
    Number of
    Average
 
    Shares     Exercise Price  
 
Outstanding at September 30, 2006
    1,510,780     $ 29.69  
Granted
    166,400       37.85  
Exercised
    (253,060 )     25.82  
Forfeited
    (22,700 )     33.71  
                 
Outstanding at September 30, 2007
    1,401,420       31.29  
Granted
    392,917       41.86  
Exercised
    (163,297 )     27.45  
Forfeited
    (108,250 )     33.59  
                 
Outstanding at September 30, 2008
    1,522,790       34.26  
Granted
    268,700       24.06  
Exercised
    (17,600 )     8.82  
Forfeited
    (104,320