SNPS » Topics » Business Environment Summary

These excerpts taken from the SNPS 10-K filed Dec 22, 2008.

Business Environment Summary

        We generate substantially all of our revenue from customers in the semiconductor and electronics industries. Our customers typically fund purchases of our software and services largely out of their research and development (R&D) budgets and, to a lesser extent, their manufacturing and capital budgets. As a result, our customers' business outlook and willingness to invest in new and increasingly complex chip designs affect their spending decisions and vendor selections.

        Over the past several years, customers have increasingly faced competing challenges of technological complexity and cost pressures. Many electronics companies have refined their business strategies by focusing on their areas of differentiation and in some cases exiting non-differentiating areas. For example, some have outsourced semiconductor manufacturing to a third party foundry or manufacturing consortium. These challenges have varying impacts on members of the Electronic Design Automation (EDA) industry in which we operate. The EDA industry is very competitive. While the importance of offering a broad, integrated portfolio of solutions, along with sizeable, global support, continues to grow, no one factor drives an EDA customer's buying decision and we compete on all fronts to capture a higher portion of our customers' budget. Our customer arrangements are complex, involving hundreds of products and various license rights.

        Many of our customers are large businesses, purchasing substantially all of the capabilities our products offer. Our customers are increasingly focused on reducing their overall costs by demanding a broader portfolio of solutions, support and services. In addition, they bargain intensely on all aspects of the contractual arrangement, seeking more favorable terms at an overall lower cost. As such, customers generally negotiate the total value of the arrangement rather than just unit pricing or volumes.

        We provide our products in four common groupings, or platforms, with hundreds of products within each platform. We enhance the value of our offerings by providing additional rights such as multiple copies of the tools, post-contract customer support, expanded license usage related to duration, location and quantity, contractor and site access, future purchase rights and other unique rights. In some instances, we provide customers with the ability to purchase pools of technology to address a broad spectrum of their design needs and enable our customers to exchange certain quantities of licensed software for unspecified future technology. We also offer post-contract customer support and services. These elements of added value, in addition to per-copy pricing, are some of the many factors which our customers consider when making purchasing decisions.

        Historically, revenue has grown primarily as a result of increased customer demand for these additional rights related to our products, and, more recently, as a result of the impact of our business model shift as discussed below. In general, as our customers negotiate increased rights, the value of the contracts with those customers increases. Collectively, the increase in the value of all of our customer contracts is the primary driver of our overall growth in revenue over time. As further described below, the effect of an increase in value for a particular customer is typically recognized over the life of the customer contract rather than in the particular period in which the enhanced license transaction is completed.

        As a result of customers seeking to conserve cash, we shifted our business model in the fourth quarter of 2004 to allow a substantial majority of our customers to pay for licenses over a period of

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time, rather than upfront at the time of initial purchase. Extended payment terms, as well as arrangements with technology pools and rights to unspecified future products, generate recurring revenue over a period of time, generally three years, rather than non-recurring upfront license revenue. Accordingly, most of the revenue we recognize in any particular quarter results from our selling efforts in each of the prior periods during the last three or so years rather than from efforts or changes in the current period. This business model reduces our dependence on license arrangements that generate non-recurring upfront license revenue in a particular period and provides us with the ability to resist typical software industry quarter-end pressures and to decline business with terms, including pricing terms, which may be less favorable to us. We continue to target achieving greater than 90% of our total revenue as recurring revenue, which we refer to in our financial statements as time-based license and maintenance and service revenue.

Business Environment Summary





        We generate substantially all of our revenue from customers in the semiconductor and electronics industries. Our customers typically
fund purchases of our software and services largely out of their research and development (R&D) budgets and, to a lesser extent, their manufacturing and capital budgets. As a result, our customers'
business outlook and willingness to invest in new and increasingly complex chip designs affect their spending decisions and vendor selections.



        Over
the past several years, customers have increasingly faced competing challenges of technological complexity and cost pressures. Many electronics companies have refined their business
strategies by focusing on their areas of differentiation and in some cases exiting non-differentiating areas. For example, some have outsourced semiconductor manufacturing to a third party
foundry or manufacturing consortium. These challenges have varying impacts on members of the Electronic Design Automation (EDA) industry in which we operate. The EDA industry is very competitive.
While the importance of offering a broad, integrated portfolio of solutions, along with sizeable, global support, continues to grow, no one factor drives an EDA customer's buying decision and we
compete on all fronts to capture a higher portion of our customers' budget. Our customer arrangements are complex, involving hundreds of products and various license rights.




        Many
of our customers are large businesses, purchasing substantially all of the capabilities our products offer. Our customers are increasingly focused on reducing their overall costs by
demanding a broader portfolio of solutions, support and services. In addition, they bargain intensely on all aspects of the contractual arrangement, seeking more favorable terms at an overall lower
cost. As such, customers generally negotiate the total value of the arrangement rather than just unit pricing or volumes.



        We
provide our products in four common groupings, or platforms, with hundreds of products within each platform. We enhance the value of our offerings by providing additional rights such
as multiple copies of the tools, post-contract customer support, expanded license usage related to duration, location and quantity, contractor and site access, future purchase rights and
other unique rights. In some instances, we provide customers with the ability to purchase pools of technology to address a broad spectrum of their design needs and enable our customers to exchange
certain quantities of licensed software for unspecified future technology. We also offer post-contract customer support and services. These elements of added value, in addition to
per-copy pricing, are some of the many factors which our customers consider when making purchasing decisions.



        Historically,
revenue has grown primarily as a result of increased customer demand for these additional rights related to our products, and, more recently, as a result of the impact of
our business model shift as discussed below. In general, as our customers negotiate increased rights, the value of the contracts with those customers increases. Collectively, the increase in the value
of all of our customer contracts is the primary driver of our overall growth in revenue over time. As further described below, the effect of
an increase in value for a particular customer is typically recognized over the life of the customer contract rather than in the particular period in which the enhanced license transaction is
completed.



        As
a result of customers seeking to conserve cash, we shifted our business model in the fourth quarter of 2004 to allow a substantial majority of our customers to pay for licenses over a
period of



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HREF="#bg42401A_main_toc">Table of Contents






time,
rather than upfront at the time of initial purchase. Extended payment terms, as well as arrangements with technology pools and rights to unspecified future products, generate recurring revenue
over a period of time, generally three years, rather than non-recurring upfront license revenue. Accordingly, most of the revenue we recognize in any particular quarter results from our
selling efforts in each of the prior periods during the last three or so years rather than from efforts or changes in the current period. This business model reduces our dependence on license
arrangements that generate non-recurring upfront license revenue in a particular period and provides us with the ability to resist typical software industry quarter-end
pressures and to decline business with terms, including pricing terms, which may be less favorable to us. We continue to target achieving greater than 90% of our total revenue as recurring revenue,
which we refer to in our financial statements as time-based license and maintenance and service revenue.





EXCERPTS ON THIS PAGE:

10-K (2 sections)
Dec 22, 2008
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