TPTX » Topics » Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

This excerpt taken from the TPTX DEF 14A filed Jun 19, 2009.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

 

   

the results of any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

 

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Table of Contents
   

the results of planned preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

 

   

the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

 

   

the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

 

   

the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

 

   

general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

 

   

the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

 

   

issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

 

   

the loss of key employees;

 

   

the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

 

   

failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

 

   

changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

 

   

future sales of our common stock;

 

   

changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

 

   

period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

This excerpt taken from the TPTX 10-Q filed May 1, 2009.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

 

   

the results of any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

 

24


Table of Contents
   

the results of planned preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

 

   

the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

 

   

the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

 

   

the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

 

   

general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

 

   

the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

 

   

issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

 

   

the loss of key employees;

 

   

the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

 

   

failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

 

   

changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

 

   

future sales of our common stock;

 

   

changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

 

   

period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

This excerpt taken from the TPTX 10-K filed Mar 27, 2009.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

 

   

the results of our current and any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

 

   

the results of on-going preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

 

   

the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

 

   

the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

 

   

the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

 

   

general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

 

   

the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

 

   

issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

 

   

the loss of key employees;

 

   

the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

 

   

failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

 

   

changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

 

   

future sales of our common stock;

 

   

changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

 

   

period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

This excerpt taken from the TPTX 10-Q filed Nov 12, 2008.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

 

   

the results of our current and any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

 

   

the results of on-going preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

 

   

the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

 

   

the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

 

   

the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

 

   

general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

 

   

the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

 

   

issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

 

   

the loss of key employees;

 

   

the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

 

   

failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

 

   

changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

 

   

future sales of our common stock;

 

   

changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

 

   

period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

 

26


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the TPTX 10-Q filed Aug 12, 2008.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

 

   

the results of our current and any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

 

   

the results of on-going preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

 

   

the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

 

   

the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

 

   

the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

 

   

general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

 

   

the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

 

   

issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

 

   

the loss of key employees;

 

   

the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

 

   

failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

 

   

changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

 

   

future sales of our common stock;

 

   

changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

 

   

period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

 

26


Table of Contents

Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

This excerpt taken from the TPTX 10-Q filed May 13, 2008.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

 

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

 

·      the results of our current and any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

 

·      the results of on-going preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

 

·      the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

 

·      the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

 

·      the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

 

·      general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

 

·      the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

 

·      issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

 

·      the loss of key employees;

 

·      the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

 

·      failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

 

·      changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

 

·      future sales of our common stock;

 

23



 

·      changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

 

·      period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

 

Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

 

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

 

Anti-takeover provisions in our stockholder rights plan and in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws may prevent or frustrate attempts by stockholders to change the board of directors or current management and could make a third-party acquisition difficult.

 

We are a party to a stockholder rights plan, also referred to as a poison pill, which is intended to deter a hostile takeover of us by making such proposed acquisition more expensive and less desirable to the potential acquirer. The stockholder rights plan and our certificate of incorporation and bylaws, as amended, contain provisions that may discourage, delay or prevent a merger, acquisition or other change in control that stockholders may consider favorable, including transactions in which stockholders might otherwise receive a premium for their shares. These provisions could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock.

 

These excerpts taken from the TPTX 10-K filed Mar 31, 2008.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

        The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have

32



historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

    the results of our current and any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

    the results of on-going preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

    the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

    the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

    the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

    general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

    the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

    issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

    the loss of key employees;

    the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

    failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

    changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

    future sales of our common stock;

    changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

    period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

        Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

        In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company's securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.




        The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and
other life sciences companies have



32











historically
been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:





    the
    results of our current and any future clinical trials of our product candidates;


    the
    results of on-going preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;


    the
    entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;


    the
    results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;


    the
    initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;


    general
    and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;


    the
    results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;


    issues
    in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;


    the
    loss of key employees;


    the
    introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;


    failure
    of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;


    changes
    in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;


    future
    sales of our common stock;


    changes
    in the structure of health care payment systems; and


    period-to-period
    fluctuations in our financial results.



        Moreover,
the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market
fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.



        In
the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company's securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies.
Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.



This excerpt taken from the TPTX 10-Q filed Nov 14, 2007.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

        the results of our current and any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

        the results of ongoing preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

        the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

        the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

        the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

        general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

        the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

        issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

        the loss of key employees;

        the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

        failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

        changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

        future sales of our common stock;

        changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

        period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

Anti-takeover provisions in our stockholder rights plan and in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws may prevent or frustrate attempts by stockholders to change the board of directors or current management and could make a third-party acquisition difficult.

We are a party to a stockholder rights plan, also referred to as a poison pill, which is intended to deter a hostile takeover of us by making such proposed acquisition more expensive and less desirable to the potential acquirer. The stockholder rights plan and our certificate of incorporation and bylaws, as amended, contain provisions that may discourage, delay or prevent a merger, acquisition or other change in control that stockholders may consider favorable, including transactions in which stockholders might otherwise receive a premium for their shares. These provisions could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock.

This excerpt taken from the TPTX 10-Q filed Aug 14, 2007.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

·      the results of our current and any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

·      the results of ongoing preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

·      the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

·      the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

·      the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

·      general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

·      the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

·      issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

·      the loss of key employees;

·      the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

·      failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

·      changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

·      future sales of our common stock;

·      changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

·      period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

Anti-takeover provisions in our stockholder rights plan and in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws may prevent or frustrate attempts by stockholders to change the board of directors or current management and could make a third-party acquisition difficult.

We are a party to a stockholder rights plan, also referred to as a poison pill, which is intended to deter a hostile takeover of us by making such proposed acquisition more expensive and less desirable to the potential acquirer. The stockholder rights plan and our

26




certificate of incorporation and bylaws, as amended, contain provisions that may discourage, delay or prevent a merger, acquisition or other change in control that stockholders may consider favorable, including transactions in which stockholders might otherwise receive a premium for their shares. These provisions could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock.

This excerpt taken from the TPTX 10-Q filed May 14, 2007.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

·         the results of our current and any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

·         the results of ongoing preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

·         the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

·         the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

·         the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

·         general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

·         the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

·         issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

·         the loss of key employees;

·         the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

24




·   failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

·   changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

·   future sales of our common stock;

·   changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

·   period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

Anti-takeover provisions in our stockholder rights plan and in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws may prevent or frustrate attempts by stockholders to change the board of directors or current management and could make a third-party acquisition difficult.

We are a party to a stockholder rights plan, also referred to as a poison pill, which is intended to deter a hostile takeover of us by making such proposed acquisition more expensive and less desirable to the potential acquirer. The stockholder rights plan and our certificate of incorporation and bylaws, as amended, contain provisions that may discourage, delay or prevent a merger, acquisition or other change in control that stockholders may consider favorable, including transactions in which stockholders might otherwise receive a premium for their shares. These provisions could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock.

This excerpt taken from the TPTX 10-K filed Mar 29, 2007.

Our stock price has been, and is expected to continue to be, volatile.

The market price of our common stock could be subject to significant fluctuations. Market prices for securities of early-stage pharmaceutical, biotechnology and other life sciences companies have historically been particularly volatile. Some of the factors that may cause the market price of our common stock to fluctuate include:

·       the results of our current and any future clinical trials of our product candidates;

·       the results of ongoing preclinical studies and planned clinical trials of our preclinical product candidates;

·       the entry into, or termination of, key agreements, including key strategic alliance agreements;

·       the results and timing of regulatory reviews relating to the approval of our product candidates;

·       the initiation of, material developments in, or conclusion of litigation to enforce or defend any of our intellectual property rights;

·       general and industry-specific economic conditions that may affect our research and development expenditures;

·       the results of clinical trials conducted by others on drugs that would compete with our product candidates;

·       issues in manufacturing our product candidates or any approved products;

·       the loss of key employees;

·       the introduction of technological innovations or new commercial products by our competitors;

·       failure of any of our product candidates, if approved, to achieve commercial success;

·       changes in estimates or recommendations by securities analysts, if any, who cover our common stock;

·       future sales of our common stock;

36




·       changes in the structure of health care payment systems; and

·       period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results.

Moreover, the stock markets in general have experienced substantial volatility that has often been unrelated to the operating performance of individual companies. These broad market fluctuations may also adversely affect the trading price of our common stock.

In the past, following periods of volatility in the market price of a company’s securities, stockholders have often instituted class action securities litigation against those companies. Such litigation, if instituted, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management attention and resources, which could significantly harm our profitability and reputation.

Anti-takeover provisions in our stockholder rights plan and in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws may prevent or frustrate attempts by stockholders to change the board of directors or current management and could make a third-party acquisition difficult.

We are a party to a stockholder rights plan, also referred to as a poison pill, which is intended to deter a hostile takeover of us by making such proposed acquisition more expensive and less desirable to the potential acquirer. The stockholder rights plan and our certificate of incorporation and bylaws, as amended, contain provisions that may discourage, delay or prevent a merger, acquisition or other change in control that stockholders may consider favorable, including transactions in which stockholders might otherwise receive a premium for their shares. These provisions could limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock.

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