TTPA » Topics » Recent Accounting Pronouncements

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 20-F filed May 29, 2009.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In December 2007 the FASB issued SFAS 141 (revised 2008), “Business Combinations”. SFAS 141R will significantly change the accounting for business combinations in a number of areas, including the measurement of assets and liabilities acquired and the treatment of contingent consideration, contingencies, acquisition costs, in-process research and development and restructuring costs. In addition, under SFAS 141R, changes in deferred tax asset valuation allowances and acquired income tax uncertainties in a business combination after the measurement period will affect the income tax provision. SFAS 141R is effective for business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning after December 15, 2008, which means that it will be effective for our fiscal year beginning February 1, 2009. We will apply SFAS 141R to any acquisition after the date of adoption.

In December 2007 the FASB issued SFAS 160, “Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements ”, which establishes accounting and reporting standards for the noncontrolling (minority) interest in a subsidiary and for the deconsolidation of a subsidiary. SFAS 160 is effective for business arrangements entered into in fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2008, which means that it will be effective for our fiscal year beginning February 1, 2009. We do not expect the adoption of SFAS 160 to have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

In March 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 161, “Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities—an Amendment of FASB Statement No. 133” (“SFAS No. 161”). SFAS No. 161 requires companies to provide qualitative disclosures about the objectives and strategies for using derivatives, quantitative data about the fair value of and gains and losses on derivative contracts, and details of credit-risk-related contingent features in their hedged positions. The statement also requires companies to disclose more information about the location and amounts of derivative instruments in financial statements; how derivatives and related hedges are accounted for under SFAS No. 133, “Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities” (“SFAS No. 133”); and how the hedges affect the entity’s financial position, financial performance and cash flows. SFAS No. 161 is effective for years beginning after November 15, 2008. SFAS 161 is effective for us beginning February 1, 2009. We do not expect the adoption of SFAS 160 to have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

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NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

In April 2008, the FASB issued FASB Staff Position (FSP) FAS 142-3, “Determination of the Useful Life of Intangible Assets”. FSP FAS 142-3 amends the factors that should be considered in developing renewal or extension assumptions used to determine the useful life of a recognized intangible asset under FASB Statement No. 142, “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets”. FSP FAS 142-3 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008, which means that it will be effective for our fiscal year beginning February 1, 2009. We do not expect the adoption of FSP FAS 142-3 to have a material impact on our consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 20-F filed Jun 13, 2008.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In September 2006, the FASB issued SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements”. SFAS No. 157 defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. SFAS No. 157 is effective for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2007, which means that it will be effective for our fiscal year beginning February 1, 2008. Any amounts recognized upon adoption as a cumulative effect adjustment will be recorded to the opening balance of retained earnings in the year of adoption. The adoption of SFAS No. 157 is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements or related disclosures.

In February 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities,” which gives entities the option to measure eligible financial assets, financial liabilities and firm commitments at fair value (i.e., the fair value option), on an instrument-by-instrument basis, that are otherwise not permitted to be accounted for at fair value under other accounting standards. The election to use the fair value option is available when an entity first recognizes a financial asset or financial liability or upon entering into a firm commitment. Subsequent changes in fair value must be recorded in earnings. Additionally, SFAS No. 159 allows for a one-time election for existing positions upon adoption, with the transition adjustment recorded to beginning retained earnings. SFAS 159 is effective for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2007, which means that it will be effective for our fiscal year beginning February 1, 2008. The adoption of SFAS No. 159 is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements or related disclosures.

In December 2007 the FASB issued SFAS 141 (revised 2007), “Business Combinations”. SFAS 141R will significantly change the accounting for business combinations in a number of areas, including the measurement of assets and liabilities acquired and the treatment of contingent consideration, contingencies, acquisition costs, in-process research and development and restructuring costs. In addition, under SFAS 141R, changes in deferred tax asset valuation allowances and acquired income tax uncertainties in a business combination after the measurement period will affect the income tax provision. SFAS 141R is effective for business combinations for

 

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NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning after December 15, 2008, which means that it will be effective for our fiscal year beginning February 1, 2009. Early adoption is prohibited. We are in the process of evaluating this standard and therefore have not yet determined the impact that the adoption of SFAS 141R will have on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

In December 2007 the FASB issued SFAS 160, “Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements”, which establishes accounting and reporting standards for the noncontrolling (minority) interest in a subsidiary and for the deconsolidation of a subsidiary. SFAS 160 is effective for business arrangements entered into in fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2008, which means that it will be effective for our fiscal year beginning February 1, 2009. Early adoption is prohibited. We are in the process of evaluating this standard and therefore have not yet determined the impact that the adoption of SFAS 160 will have on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

In March 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 161, “Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities—an Amendment of FASB Statement No. 133” (“SFAS No. 161”). SFAS No. 161 requires companies to provide qualitative disclosures about the objectives and strategies for using derivatives, quantitative data about the fair value of and gains and losses on derivative contracts, and details of credit-risk-related contingent features in their hedged positions. The statement also requires companies to disclose more information about the location and amounts of derivative instruments in financial statements; how derivatives and related hedges are accounted for under SFAS No. 133, “Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities” (“SFAS No. 133”); and how the hedges affect the entity’s financial position, financial performance and cash flows. SFAS No. 161 is effective for years beginning after November 15, 2008. The Company is in the process of evaluating what effect, if any, adoption of SFAS No. 161 may have on the consolidated financial statements.

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 6-K filed Jun 20, 2007.

12. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In September 2006, FASB issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 157, Fair Value Measurements, or SFAS 157, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. The provisions of SFAS 157 are effective as of February 1, 2008. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of adopting SFAS 157 but does not expect that the adoption of SFAS 157 will have any material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In February 2007, FASB issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 159, The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities Including an amendment of FASB Statement No. 115, or SFAS 159. SFAS 159 permits a company to choose, at specified election dates, to measure at fair value certain eligible financial assets and liabilities that are not currently required to be measured at fair value. The specified election dates include, but are not limited to, the date when an entity first recognizes the item, when an entity enters into a firm commitment, or when changes in the financial instrument causes it to no longer qualify for fair value accounting under a different accounting standard. An entity may elect the fair value option for eligible items that exist at the effective date. At that date, the difference between the carrying amounts and the fair values of eligible items for which the fair value option is elected should be recognized as a cumulative effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings. The fair value option may be elected for each entire financial instrument, but need not be applied to all similar instruments. Once the fair value option has been elected, it is irrevocable. Unrealized gains and losses on items for which the fair value option has been elected will be reported in earnings. The accounting provisions of SFAS 159 will be effective for the Company beginning February 1, 2008. The Company is currently assessing the effect of adopting SFAS 159.

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 20-F filed May 29, 2007.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In June 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Interpretation No. 48 (FIN 48), “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes—an Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109”, which clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an entity’s financial statements in accordance with SFAS No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes”. FIN 48 prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. The new standard also provides guidance on derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosures, and transition provisions. FIN 48 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2006 and we will adopt FIN 48 as of February 1, 2007. Based upon our analysis, we do not believe the adoption of FIN 48 will have a material impact on our financial statements.

 

In September 2006, the FASB issued SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements”. SFAS No. 157 defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States, and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. SFAS No. 157 is

 

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TRINTECH GROUP PLC

 

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

effective for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2007, with earlier application encouraged. Any amounts recognized upon adoption as a cumulative effect adjustment will be recorded to the opening balance of retained earnings in the year of adoption. The Company has not yet determined the impact of SFAS No. 157 on its financial condition and results of operations.

 

In February 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities,” which gives entities the option to measure eligible financial assets, financial liabilities and firm commitments at fair value (i.e., the fair value option), on an instrument-by-instrument basis, that are otherwise not permitted to be accounted for at fair value under other accounting standards. The election to use the fair value option is available when an entity first recognizes a financial asset or financial liability or upon entering into a firm commitment. Subsequent changes in fair value must be recorded in earnings. Additionally, SFAS No. 159 allows for a one-time election for existing positions upon adoption, with the transition adjustment recorded to beginning retained earnings. The Company has not yet determined the impact of SFAS No. 159 on its financial condition and results of operations.

 

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 6-K filed Dec 15, 2006.

12. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In July 2006, FASB issued FASB Interpretation No. 48, “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes”—an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109 (“FIN 48”) , which clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in accordance with SFAS 109, “ Accounting for Income Taxes . FIN 48 prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position. FIN 48 indicates that an enterprise shall initially recognize the financial statement effects of a tax position when it is more likely than not of being sustained on examination, based on the technical merits of the position. In addition, FIN 48 indicates that the measurement of a tax position that meets the more likely than not threshold shall consider the amounts and probabilities of the outcomes that could be realized upon ultimate settlement. This interpretation is effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2006. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact of adopting FIN 48 on the Company’s consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

 

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 6-K filed Sep 20, 2006.

12. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2005, the FASB issued SFAS No. 154, “Accounting Changes and Error Corrections” (“SFAS 154”), which replaces APB Opinion No. 20 “Accounting Changes” and SFAS No. 3, “Reporting Accounting Changes in Interim Financial Statements—An Amendment of APB Opinion No. 28”. APB Opinion No. 20 previously required that most voluntary changes in accounting principle be recognized by including in net income of the period of the change the cumulative effect of changing to the new accounting principle. SFAS 154 requires that a voluntary change in accounting principle be applied retrospectively with all prior period financial statements presented on the new accounting principle, unless it is impracticable to do so. SFAS 154 redefines restatement as the revising of previously issued financial statements to reflect the correction of an error. It also requires that a change in depreciation, amortization, or depletion method for long-lived, non-financial assets be accounted for as a change in accounting estimate effected by a change in accounting principle. The standard is effective for accounting changes and errors made in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2005. The Company does not expect the standard to have a material impact on its consolidated results of operations and financial condition.

 

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 6-K filed Jun 16, 2006.

14. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2005, the FASB issued SFAS No. 154, “Accounting Changes and Error Corrections” (“SFAS 154”), which replaces APB Opinion No. 20 “Accounting Changes” and SFAS No. 3, “Reporting Accounting Changes in Interim Financial Statements—An Amendment of APB Opinion No. 28”. APB Opinion No. 20 previously required that most voluntary changes in accounting principle be recognized by including in net income of the period of the change the cumulative effect of changing to the new accounting principle. SFAS 154 requires that a voluntary change in accounting principle be applied retrospectively with all prior period financial statements presented on the new accounting principle, unless it is impracticable to do so. SFAS 154 redefines restatement as the revising of previously issued financial statements to reflect the correction of an error. It also requires that a change in depreciation, amortization, or depletion method for long-lived, non-financial assets be accounted for as a change in accounting estimate effected by a change in accounting principle. The standard is effective for accounting changes and errors made in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2005. The Company does not expect the standard to have a material impact on its consolidated results of operations and financial condition.

 

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 20-F filed May 16, 2006.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2005, the FASB issued SFAS No. 154, “Accounting Changes and Error Corrections” (“SFAS 154”), which replaces APB Opinion No. 20 “Accounting Changes” and SFAS No. 3, “Reporting Accounting Changes in Interim Financial Statements—An Amendment of APB Opinion No. 28”. APB Opinion No. 20 previously required that most voluntary changes in accounting principle be recognized by including in net income of the period of the change the cumulative effect of changing to the new accounting principle. SFAS 154 requires that a voluntary change in accounting principle be applied retrospectively with all prior period financial statements presented on the new accounting principle, unless it is impracticable to do so. SFAS 154 redefines restatement as the revising of previously issued financial statements to reflect the correction of an error. It also requires that a change in depreciation, amortization, or depletion method for long-lived, non-financial assets be accounted for as a change in accounting estimate effected by a change in accounting principle. The standard is effective for accounting changes and errors made in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2005. The Company does not expect the Standard to have a material impact on its consolidated results of operations and financial condition.

 

In December 2004, and as amended in April 2005, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 123R “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS 123R”), which replaces SFAS 123 and supersedes APB 25. SFAS 123R requires all share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, to be recognized in the financial statements based on their fair values. The pro forma

 

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NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

disclosures previously permitted under SFAS 123 no longer will be an alternative to financial statement recognition. SFAS 123R is effective for fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2005. The Company adopted SFAS 123R on February 1, 2006.

 

Public companies are required to adopt the new standard using a modified prospective method and may elect to restate prior periods using the modified retrospective method. Under the modified prospective method, companies are required to record compensation cost for new and modified awards over the related vesting period of such awards prospectively and record compensation cost prospectively for the unvested portion, at the date of adoption, of previously issued and outstanding awards over the remaining vesting period of such awards. No change to prior periods presented is permitted under the modified prospective method. Under the modified retrospective method, companies record compensation costs for prior periods retroactively through restatement of such periods using the exact pro forma amounts disclosed in the companies’ footnotes. Also, in the period of adoption and after, companies record compensation cost based on the modified prospective method. The Company adopted SFAS 123R using the modified prospective method.

 

The Company has not completed its evaluation of the effects of adopting SFAS 123R. However, the Company anticipates it will recognize an aggregate of US$2.4 million as compensation expense in fiscal years 2007 to 2010. This assumes there are no adjustments to compensation expense due to actual cancellations, modifications or new awards granted.

 

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 6-K filed Dec 14, 2005.

14. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In December 2004 the FASB issued SFAS No. 123 (revised 2004), “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS 123(R)”), which is a revision of SFAS 123. SFAS 123(R) supersedes APB No. 25, and amends SFAS 95, “Statement of Cash Flows”. Generally, the approach in SFAS 123(R) is similar to the approach described in SFAS 123. SFAS 123(R) requires all share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, to be recognized in the statement of operations based on their fair values. Pro forma disclosure is no longer an alternative upon the adoption of SFAS 123(R).

 

For the Company, SFAS 123(R) must be adopted no later than the fiscal year beginning on February 1, 2006. Early adoption is permitted in periods in which financial statements have not yet been issued. SFAS 123(R) allows companies to adopt its requirements using one of two methods:

 

  A “modified prospective” method in which compensation cost is recognized beginning with the effective date (a) based on the requirements of SFAS 123(R) for all share-based payments granted after the effective date and (b) based on the requirements of SFAS 123(R) for all awards granted to employees, prior to the effective date of SFAS 123(R), that remain unvested on the effective date.

 

  A “prospective” method which includes the requirements of the modified prospective method described above, but also permits entities to restate based on the amounts previously recognized under SFAS 123(R) for the purposes of pro forma disclosures either for (a) all prior periods presented or (b) prior interim periods of the year of adoption.

 

The Company has not yet decided which method it will adopt. Pro forma disclosure currently required under SFAS 123 is included in Note 12 (Stock-Based Employee Compensation Expense). The Company expects that the adoption of SFAS 123(R) will have a materially adverse affect on its operating results.

 

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 6-K filed Sep 27, 2005.

14. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In December 2004 the FASB issued SFAS No. 123 (revised 2004), “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS 123(R)”), which is a revision of SFAS 123. SFAS 123(R) supersedes APB No. 25, and amends SFAS 95, “Statement of Cash Flows”. Generally, the approach in SFAS 123(R) is similar to the approach described in SFAS 123. SFAS 123(R) requires all share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, to be recognized in the statement of operations based on their fair values. Pro forma disclosure is no longer an alternative upon the adoption of SFAS 123(R).

 

For the Company, SFAS 123(R) must be adopted no later than the fiscal year beginning on February 1, 2006. Early adoption is permitted in periods in which financial statements have not yet been issued. SFAS 123(R) allows companies to adopt its requirements using one of two methods:

 

  A “modified prospective” method in which compensation cost is recognized beginning with the effective date (a) based on the requirements of SFAS 123(R) for all share-based payments granted after the effective date and (b) based on the requirements of SFAS 123(R) for all awards granted to employees, prior to the effective date of SFAS 123(R), that remain unvested on the effective date.

 

  A “prospective” method which includes the requirements of the modified prospective method described above, but also permits entities to restate based on the amounts previously recognized under SFAS 123(R) for the purposes of pro forma disclosures either for (a) all prior periods presented or (b) prior interim periods of the year of adoption.

 

The Company has not yet decided which method it will adopt. Pro forma disclosure currently required under SFAS 123 is included in Note 12 (Stock-Based Employee Compensation Expense). The Company expects that the adoption of SFAS 123(R) will have a materially adverse affect on its operating results.

 

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 6-K filed Jun 23, 2005.

14. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In July 2004, the FASB ratified EITF consensus on Issue No. 02-14, “Whether an Investor Should Apply the Equity Method of Accounting to Investments Other Than Common Stock”, which provides guidance regarding application of the equity method of accounting to investments other than common stock. EITF Issue No. 02-14 will be effective beginning with our second quarter of fiscal 2006. We do not believe the adoption of EITF Issue No. 02-14 will have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In December, 2004 the FASB issued SFAS No. 123 (revised 2004), “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS 123(R)”), which is a revision of SFAS 123. SFAS 123(R) supersedes APB No. 25, and amends SFAS 95, “Statement of Cash Flows”. Generally the approach in SFAS 123(R) is similar to the approach described in SFAS 123. SFAS 123(R) requires all share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, to be recognized in the statement of operations based on their fair values. Pro forma disclosure, is no longer an alternative upon adoption of SFAS 123(R).

 

For the Company, SFAS 123(R) must be adopted no later than the fiscal year beginning on February 1, 2006. Early adoption is permitted in periods in which financial statements have not yet been issued. SFAS 123(R) allows companies to adopt its requirements using one of two methods:

 

  A “modified prospective” method in which compensation cost is recognized beginning with the effective date (a) based on the requirements of SFAS 123(R) for all share-based payments granted after the effective date and (b) based on the requirements of SFAS 123(R) for all awards granted to employees prior to the effective date of SFAS 123(R) that remain unvested on the effective date.

 

  A “prospective” method which includes the requirements of the modified prospective method described above, but also permits entities to restate based on the amounts previously recognized under SFAS 123(R) for purposes of pro forma disclosures either (a) all prior periods presented or (b) prior interim periods of the year of adoption.

 

The Company has not yet decided on which method it will adopt. Pro Forma disclosure currently required under SFAS 123 is included in Note 12 (Stock-Based Employee Compensation Expense). The Company expects that the adoption of SFAS 123(R) will have a materially adverse affect on its operating results.

 

This excerpt taken from the TTPA 20-F filed May 18, 2005.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In July 2004, the FASB ratified EITF consensus on Issue No. 02-14, “Whether an Investor Should Apply the Equity Method of Accounting to Investments Other Than Common Stock”, which provides guidance regarding application of the equity method of accounting to investments other than common stock. EITF Issue No. 02-14 will be effective beginning with our second quarter of fiscal 2006. We do not believe the adoption of EITF Issue No. 02-14 will have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In December, 2004, the FASB issued SFAS No. 123 (revised 2004), “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS No. 123(R)”), which is a revision of SFAS No. 123. SFAS No. 123(R) supersedes APB No. 25, and amends SFAS No. 95, “Statement of Cash Flows”. Generally the approach in SFAS No. 123(R) is similar to the approach described in SFAS No. 123. SFAS No. 123(R) requires all share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, to be recognized in the statement of operations based on their fair values. Pro forma disclosure is no longer an alternative upon adoption of SFAS No. 123(R).

 

For Trintech, SFAS No. 123(R) must be adopted no later than the fiscal year beginning on February 1, 2006. Early adoption is permitted in periods in which financial statements have not yet been issued. SFAS No. 123(R) allows companies to adopt its requirements using one of two methods:

 

    A “modified prospective” method in which compensation cost is recognized beginning with the effective date (a) based on the requirements of SFAS No. 123(R) for all share-based payments granted after the effective date and (b) based on the requirements of SFAS No. 123(R) for all awards granted to employees prior to the effective date of SFAS No. 123(R) that remain unvested on the effective date.

 

    A “Prospective” method which includes the requirements of the modified prospective method described above, but also permits entities to restate based on the amounts previously recognized under SFAS No. 123(R) for purposes of pro forma disclosures either (a) all prior periods presented or (b) prior interim periods of the year of adoption.

 

The Company has not yet decided on which method it will adopt. Pro Forma disclosure currently required under SFAS No. 123 is included in Note 1 Stock-Based Compensation. The Company is currently assessing the impact of SFAS 123(R) on its results of operations.

 

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TRINTECH GROUP PLC

 

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

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