Annual Reports

 
Quarterly Reports

  • 10-Q (Oct 25, 2017)
  • 10-Q (Jul 26, 2017)
  • 10-Q (Apr 26, 2017)
  • 10-Q (Oct 26, 2016)
  • 10-Q (Apr 27, 2016)
  • 10-Q (Oct 21, 2015)

 
8-K

 
Other

Tyler Technologies 10-Q 2017

Documents found in this filing:

  1. 10-Q
  2. Ex-31.1
  3. Ex-31.2
  4. Ex-32.1
  5. Ex-32.1
Document


 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
 
x
 
QUARTERLY REPORT UNDER SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2017
OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.
Commission File Number 1-10485
TYLER TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

DELAWARE
 
75-2303920
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. employer
identification no.)
5101 TENNYSON PARKWAY
PLANO, TEXAS
75024
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip code)
(972) 713-3700
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   Yes   x  No  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data file required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).   Yes   x     No  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See definition of “large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer,” "smaller reporting company," and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large accelerated filer
 
x
  
Accelerated filer
 
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer
 
  
Smaller reporting company
 
 
 
 
 
Emerging growth company
 
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).   Yes       No   x
The number of shares of common stock of registrant outstanding on July 25, 2017 was 37,303,134.
 




PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. Financial Statements
TYLER TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(In thousands, except per share amounts)
(Unaudited)
 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Software licenses and royalties
 
$
17,107

 
$
17,551

 
$
35,330

 
$
34,401

Subscriptions
 
40,947

 
33,968

 
81,049

 
68,057

Software services
 
47,372

 
46,040

 
92,390

 
88,470

Maintenance
 
89,412

 
78,743

 
176,271

 
154,775

Appraisal services
 
6,366

 
6,984

 
12,978

 
13,542

Hardware and other
 
7,919

 
5,686

 
10,647

 
9,020

Total revenues
 
209,123

 
188,972


408,665


368,265

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Software licenses and royalties
 
647

 
666

 
1,378

 
1,304

Acquired software
 
5,360

 
5,680

 
10,770

 
11,139

Software services, maintenance and subscriptions
 
96,172

 
86,717

 
189,712

 
171,987

Appraisal services
 
4,282

 
4,458

 
8,479

 
8,420

Hardware and other
 
6,799

 
4,515

 
8,115

 
6,361

Total cost of revenues
 
113,260

 
102,036

 
218,454

 
199,211

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gross profit
 
95,863

 
86,936

 
190,211

 
169,054

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Selling, general and administrative expenses
 
43,451

 
42,232

 
86,593

 
82,991

Research and development expense
 
11,874

 
10,336

 
23,473

 
20,292

Amortization of customer and trade name intangibles
 
3,463

 
3,453

 
6,921

 
6,815

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating income
 
37,075

 
30,915

 
73,224

 
58,956

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other expense, net
 
(101
)
 
(720
)
 
(291
)
 
(1,187
)
Income before income taxes
 
36,974

 
30,195

 
72,933

 
57,769

Income tax provision
 
5,396

 
5,188

 
9,049

 
14,538

Net income
 
$
31,578

 
$
25,007

 
$
63,884

 
$
43,231

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Earnings per common share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
$
0.85

 
$
0.69

 
$
1.72

 
$
1.19

Diluted
 
$
0.81

 
$
0.65

 
$
1.63

 
$
1.11

See accompanying notes.

2



TYLER TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(In thousands, except par value and share amounts)
 
 
June 30, 2017
(unaudited)
 
December 31, 2016
ASSETS
 
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 
$
55,072

 
$
36,151

Accounts receivable (less allowance for losses of $5,102 in 2017 and $3,396 in 2016)
 
233,831

 
200,334

Short-term investments
 
24,709

 
20,273

Prepaid expenses
 
23,676

 
21,039

Income tax receivable
 
12,206

 
2,895

Other current assets
 
2,784

 
2,268

Total current assets
 
352,278

 
282,960

 
 
 
 
 
Accounts receivable, long-term
 
2,333

 
2,480

Property and equipment, net
 
147,956

 
124,268

Other assets:
 
 
 
 
Goodwill
 
651,721

 
650,237

Other intangibles, net
 
252,874

 
267,259

Non-current investments and other assets
 
31,347

 
30,741

 Total assets
 
$
1,438,509

 
$
1,357,945

 
 
 
 
 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities:
 
 
 
 
Accounts payable
 
$
9,448

 
$
7,295

Accrued liabilities
 
46,006

 
55,989

Deferred revenue
 
304,128

 
298,217

Total current liabilities
 
359,582

 
361,501

 
 
 
 
 
Revolving line of credit
 

 
10,000

Deferred revenue, long-term
 
1,643

 
2,140

Deferred income taxes
 
59,682

 
68,779

 
 
 
 
 
Commitments and contingencies
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
Shareholders' equity:
 
 
 
 
Preferred stock, $10.00 par value; 1,000,000 shares authorized; none issued
 

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized; 48,147,969 shares
   issued and outstanding as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016
 
481

 
481

Additional paid-in capital
 
586,037

 
556,663

Accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax
 
(46
)
 
(46
)
Retained earnings
 
499,760

 
435,876

Treasury stock, at cost; 10,862,030 and 11,381,733 shares in 2017 and 2016, respectively
 
(68,630
)
 
(77,449
)
Total shareholders' equity
 
1,017,602

 
915,525

 Total liabilities and shareholders' equity
 
$
1,438,509

 
$
1,357,945

See accompanying notes.

3



TYLER TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(In thousands)
(Unaudited)
 
 
Six months ended June 30,
 
 
2017
 
2016
Cash flows from operating activities:
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
63,884

 
$
43,231

Adjustments to reconcile net income to cash provided by operations:
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
 
26,366

 
24,850

Share-based compensation expense
 
17,577

 
13,692

Deferred income tax (benefit) expense
 
(9,097
)
 
427

Changes in operating assets and liabilities, exclusive of effects of
   acquired companies:
 
 
 
 
Accounts receivable
 
(33,348
)
 
(35,530
)
Income taxes
 
(9,311
)
 
(3,500
)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
 
(3,984
)
 
(1,435
)
Accounts payable
 
2,152

 
(236
)
Accrued liabilities
 
(11,061
)
 
4,883

Deferred revenue
 
6,397

 
14,459

Net cash provided by operating activities
 
49,575

 
60,841

 
 
 
 
 
Cash flows from investing activities:
 
 
 
 
Additions to property and equipment
 
(30,123
)
 
(21,959
)
Purchase of marketable security investments
 
(21,392
)
 
(10,607
)
Proceeds from marketable security investments
 
17,029

 
6,526

Cost of acquisitions, net of cash acquired
 
(5,855
)
 
(9,394
)
Increase in other
 
(68
)
 
(281
)
Net cash used by investing activities
 
(40,409
)
 
(35,715
)
 
 
 
 
 
Cash flows from financing activities:
 
 
 
 
(Decrease) increase in net borrowings on revolving line of credit
 
(10,000
)
 
69,000

Purchase of treasury shares
 
(7,032
)
 
(94,497
)
Proceeds from exercise of stock options
 
23,360

 
5,793

Contributions from employee stock purchase plan
 
3,427

 
2,818

Net cash provided (used) by financing activities
 
9,755

 
(16,886
)
 
 
 
 
 
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
 
18,921

 
8,240

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
 
36,151

 
33,087

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
 
$
55,072

 
$
41,327

See accompanying notes.

4



Tyler Technologies, Inc.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)
(Tables in thousands, except per share data)
 
 
(1) Basis of Presentation

We prepared the accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements following the requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, or GAAP, for interim reporting. As permitted under those rules, certain footnotes or other financial information that are normally required by GAAP can be condensed or omitted for interim periods. Balance sheet amounts are as of June 30, 2017, and December 31, 2016, and operating result amounts are for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, and 2016, respectively, and include all normal and recurring adjustments that we considered necessary for the fair summarized presentation of our financial position and operating results. As these are condensed financial statements, one should also read the financial statements and notes included in our latest Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016. Revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities can vary during each quarter of the year. Therefore, the results and trends in these interim financial statements may not be the same as those for the full year.
Comprehensive income (loss) is defined as the change in equity of a business enterprise during a period from transactions, and other events and circumstances from non-owner sources and includes all components of net income (loss) and other comprehensive income (loss). We had no items of other comprehensive income (loss) for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016.
Certain amounts for the previous year have been reclassified to conform to the current year presentation.
 
(2) Acquisitions

On May 30, 2017, we acquired all of the capital stock of Modria.com, Inc., a company that specializes in online dispute resolution for government and commercial entities. The purchase price, net of debt assumed, was $5.9 million. The impact of this acquisition on our operating results is not material.


(3) Shareholders’ Equity

The following table details activity in our common stock:
 
 
Six months ended June 30,
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
Shares
 
Amount
 
Shares
 
Amount
Purchases of treasury shares
 
(42
)
 
$
(6,171
)
 
(758
)
 
$
(94,497
)
Stock option exercises
 
534

 
23,360

 
241

 
5,793

Employee stock plan purchases
 
27

 
3,427

 
23

 
2,818

As of June 30, 2017, we had authorization from our board of directors to repurchase up to 2.0 million additional shares of Tyler common stock.
 
 
(4) Other Assets

Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash on deposit with several domestic banks and money market funds.
As of June 30, 2017, we have $37.5 million in investment grade corporate and municipal bonds with maturity dates ranging from 2017 through early 2019. We intend to hold these bonds to maturity and have classified them as such. We believe cost approximates fair value because of the relatively short duration of these investments. The fair values of these securities are considered Level II as they are based on inputs from quoted prices in markets that are not active or other observable market data. These investments are included in short-term investments and non-current investments and other assets.
 

5



We have a $15.0 million investment in convertible preferred stock representing a 20% interest in Record Holdings Pty Limited, a privately held Australian company specializing in digitizing the spoken word in court and legal proceedings. The investment in convertible preferred stock is accounted under the cost method because the Company does not have the ability to exercise significant influence over the investee and the securities do not have readily determinable fair values. Our investment is carried at cost less any impairment write-downs. Annually, the Company’s cost method investments are assessed for impairment. The Company does not reassess the fair value of cost method investments if there are no identified events or changes in circumstances that may have a significant adverse effect on the fair value of the investments. This investment is included in non-current investments and other assets.

(5) Revolving Line of Credit

On November 16, 2015, we entered into a $300.0 million Credit Agreement with various lender parties and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as Administrative Agent (the “Credit Facility”). The Credit Facility provides for a revolving credit line up to $300.0 million, including a $10.0 million sublimit for letters of credit. The Credit Facility matures on November 16, 2020. Borrowings under the Credit Facility may be used for general corporate purposes, including working capital requirements, acquisitions and share repurchases.
 
Borrowings under the Credit Facility bear interest at a rate of either (1) Wells Fargo Bank’s prime rate (subject to certain higher rate determinations) plus a margin of 0.25% to 1.00% or (2) the 30, 60, 90 or 180 day LIBOR rate plus a margin of 1.25% to 2.00%. As of June 30, 2017, the interest rates were 4.50% under the Wells Fargo Bank's prime rate and 2.37% under a 30-day LIBOR contract. The Credit Facility is secured by substantially all of our assets. The Credit Facility requires us to maintain certain financial ratios and other financial conditions and prohibits us from making certain investments, advances, cash dividends or loans, and limits incurrence of additional indebtedness and liens. As of June 30, 2017, we were in compliance with those covenants.
 
As of June 30, 2017, we had no outstanding borrowings and two outstanding letters of credit totaling $2.2 million. Available borrowing capacity under the Credit Facility was $297.8 million.
 
(6) Income Tax Provision

For the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, we had effective income tax rates of 14.6% and 12.4%, respectively, compared to 17.2% and 25.2% for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, respectively. The effective income tax rates for the periods presented were different from the statutory United States federal income tax rate of 35% principally due to excess tax benefits related to stock option exercises. The excess tax benefits related to stock option exercises realized were $8.5 million and $18.6 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, compared to $6.3 million and $7.5 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, respectively. Excluding the excess tax benefits, the effective rates were 37.5% and 37.9% for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, compared to 37.9% and 38.1% for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, respectively. Other differences from our federal statutory income tax rate included state income taxes, non-deductible business expenses, and the tax benefit of the domestic production activities deduction.
We made tax payments of $27.5 million and $17.6 million in the six months ended June 30, 2017 and June 30, 2016, respectively.
 

6



(7) Earnings Per Share

The following table details the reconciliation of basic earnings per share to diluted earnings per share:
 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Numerator for basic and diluted earnings per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
$
31,578

 
$
25,007

 
$
63,884

 
$
43,231

Denominator:
 
 

 
 

 


 


Weighted-average basic common shares outstanding
 
37,154

 
36,160

 
37,144

 
36,316

Assumed conversion of dilutive securities:
 
 
 
 
 

 

Stock options
 
2,047

 
2,579

 
2,067

 
2,550

Denominator for diluted earnings per share
   - Adjusted weighted-average shares
 
39,201

 
38,739

 
39,211

 
38,866

Earnings per common share:
 
 

 
 

 


 


Basic
 
$
0.85

 
$
0.69

 
$
1.72

 
$
1.19

Diluted
 
$
0.81

 
$
0.65

 
$
1.63

 
$
1.11

 
For the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, stock options representing the right to purchase common stock of approximately 1,251,000 shares and 1,205,000 shares, respectively, were not included in the computation of diluted earnings per share because their inclusion would have had an anti-dilutive effect.  For the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, stock options representing the right to purchase common stock of approximately 785,000 shares and 784,000 shares, respectively, were not included in the computation of diluted earnings per share because their inclusion would have had an anti-dilutive effect. 
 
      
 
(8) Share-Based Compensation

The following table summarizes share-based compensation expense related to share-based awards recorded in the statements of income, pursuant to Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 718, Stock Compensation:
 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Cost of software services, maintenance and subscriptions
 
$
2,253

 
$
1,571

 
$
4,350

 
$
2,888

Selling, general and administrative expenses
 
6,648

 
5,641

 
13,227

 
10,804

Total share-based compensation expense
 
$
8,901

 
$
7,212

 
$
17,577

 
$
13,692

 
(9) Segment and Related Information

We provide integrated information management solutions and services for the public sector, with a focus on local governments.
We provide our software systems and services and appraisal services through four business units, which focus on the following products:
financial management, education and planning, regulatory and maintenance software solutions;
financial management, municipal courts, planning, regulatory and maintenance, and land and vital records management software solutions;
courts and justice and public safety software solutions; and
appraisal and tax software solutions and property appraisal services.

7



In accordance with ASC 280-10, Segment Reporting, the financial management, education and planning, regulatory and maintenance software solutions unit; financial management, municipal courts, planning, regulatory and maintenance, and land and vital records management software solutions unit; and the courts and justice and public safety software solutions unit meet the criteria for aggregation and are presented in one reportable segment, the Enterprise Software (“ES”) segment. The ES segment provides municipal and county governments and schools with software systems and services to meet their information technology and automation needs for mission-critical “back-office” functions such as financial management and courts and justice processes; public safety; planning, regulatory and maintenance; and land and vital records management. The Appraisal and Tax (“A&T”) segment provides systems and software that automate the appraisal and assessment of real and personal property as well as property appraisal outsourcing services for local governments and taxing authorities. Property appraisal outsourcing services include: the physical inspection of commercial and residential properties; data collection and processing; computer analysis for property valuation; preparation of tax rolls; community education; and arbitration between taxpayers and the assessing jurisdiction.
We evaluate performance based on several factors, of which the primary financial measure is business segment operating income. We define segment operating income for our business units as income before non-cash amortization of intangible assets associated with their acquisitions, interest expense and income taxes. Segment operating income includes intercompany transactions. The majority of intercompany transactions relate to contracts involving more than one unit and are valued based on the contractual arrangement. Segment operating income for corporate primarily consists of compensation costs for the executive management team and certain accounting and administrative staff and share-based compensation expense for the entire company. Corporate segment operating income also includes revenues and expenses related to a company-wide user conference.
For the three months ended June 30, 2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Enterprise
Software
 
Appraisal and Tax
 
Corporate
 
Totals
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Software licenses and royalties
 
$
15,354

 
$
1,753

 
$

 
$
17,107

Subscriptions
 
39,051

 
1,896

 

 
40,947

Software services
 
42,696

 
4,676

 

 
47,372

Maintenance
 
84,306

 
5,106

 

 
89,412

Appraisal services
 

 
6,366

 

 
6,366

Hardware and other
 
3,295

 

 
4,624

 
7,919

Intercompany
 
2,486

 

 
(2,486
)
 

Total revenues
 
$
187,188

 
$
19,797

 
$
2,138

 
$
209,123

Segment operating income
 
$
54,130

 
$
4,410

 
$
(12,642
)
 
$
45,898


For the six months ended June 30, 2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Enterprise
Software
 
Appraisal and Tax
 
Corporate
 
Totals
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Software licenses and royalties
 
$
31,928

 
$
3,402

 
$

 
$
35,330

Subscriptions
 
77,364

 
3,685

 

 
81,049

Software services
 
83,364

 
9,026

 

 
92,390

Maintenance
 
166,472

 
9,799

 

 
176,271

Appraisal services
 

 
12,978

 

 
12,978

Hardware and other
 
6,023

 

 
4,624

 
10,647

Intercompany
 
4,649

 

 
(4,649
)
 

Total revenues
 
$
369,800

 
$
38,890

 
$
(25
)
 
$
408,665

Segment operating income
 
$
106,181

 
$
8,624

 
$
(23,890
)
 
$
90,915




8



For the three months ended June 30, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Enterprise
Software
 
Appraisal and Tax
 
Corporate
 
Totals
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Software licenses and royalties
 
$
16,439

 
$
1,112

 
$

 
$
17,551

Subscriptions
 
32,316

 
1,652

 

 
33,968

Software services
 
42,159

 
3,881

 

 
46,040

Maintenance
 
74,110

 
4,633

 

 
78,743

Appraisal services
 

 
6,984

 

 
6,984

Hardware and other
 
2,942

 

 
2,744

 
5,686

Intercompany
 
1,612

 

 
(1,612
)
 

Total revenues
 
$
169,578

 
$
18,262

 
$
1,132

 
$
188,972

Segment operating income
 
$
46,109

 
$
3,990

 
$
(10,051
)
 
$
40,048



For the six months ended June 30, 2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Enterprise
Software
 
Appraisal and Tax
 
Corporate
 
Totals
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Software licenses and royalties
 
$
32,093

 
$
2,308

 
$

 
$
34,401

Subscriptions
 
64,301

 
3,756

 

 
68,057

Software services
 
80,763

 
7,707

 

 
88,470

Maintenance
 
145,510

 
9,265

 

 
154,775

Appraisal services
 

 
13,542

 

 
13,542

Hardware and other
 
5,977

 
16

 
3,027

 
9,020

Intercompany
 
2,772

 

 
(2,772
)
 

Total revenues
 
$
331,416

 
$
36,594

 
$
255

 
$
368,265

Segment operating income
 
$
86,778

 
$
8,821

 
$
(18,689
)
 
$
76,910


 
 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
Reconciliation of reportable segment operating income to the Company's consolidated totals:
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Total segment operating income
 
$
45,898

 
$
40,048

 
$
90,915

 
$
76,910

Amortization of acquired software
 
(5,360
)
 
(5,680
)
 
(10,770
)
 
(11,139
)
Amortization of customer and trade name intangibles
 
(3,463
)
 
(3,453
)
 
(6,921
)
 
(6,815
)
Other expense, net
 
(101
)
 
(720
)
 
(291
)
 
(1,187
)
Income before income taxes
 
$
36,974

 
$
30,195

 
$
72,933

 
$
57,769

 
(10) Commitments and Contingencies

Other than routine litigation incidental to our business, there are no material legal proceedings pending to which we are party or to which any of our properties are subject.
 

9



(11) New Accounting Pronouncements

Revenue from Contracts with Customers. On May 28, 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issued ASU No. 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers.” This ASU is the result of a convergence project between the FASB and the International Accounting Standards Board. The core principle behind ASU No. 2014-09 is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods and services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for delivering those goods and services. This model involves a five-step process that includes identifying the contract with the customer, identifying the performance obligations in the contract, determining the transaction price, allocating the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract and recognizing revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies the performance obligations. The ASU allows two methods of adoption: a full retrospective approach where three years of financial information are presented in accordance with the new standard, and a modified retrospective approach where the ASU is applied to the most current period presented in the financial statements. We currently anticipate adopting the standard using the full retrospective method to restate each prior reporting period presented. Our ability to adopt using the full retrospective method is dependent on system readiness, including software procured from third-party providers, and the completion of our analysis of information necessary to restate prior period financial statements.

The new standard requires application no later than annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim reporting periods therein; however, public entities are permitted to elect to early adopt the new standard. We are assessing the financial impact of adopting the new standard and the methods of adoption; however, we are currently unable to provide a reasonable estimate regarding the financial impact. We will adopt the new standard in fiscal year 2018.

We anticipate this standard will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements. While we are continuing to assess all potential impacts of the standard, we currently believe the most significant impact relates to our accounting for software license fees, installation fees, and incremental cost of obtaining a contract. Specifically, under the new standard we expect software license fees under perpetual agreements will no longer be subject to 100% discount allocations from other elements in the contract. Discounts in arrangements will be allocated across all deliverables increasing license revenues and decreasing revenues allocated to other performance obligations. In addition, in most cases, net license fees (total license fees less any allocated discounts) will be recognized at the point in time that control of the software license transfers to the customer versus our current policy of recognizing revenue only to the extent billable per the contractual terms. Time-based license fees currently recognized over the license term will no longer be recognized over the period of the license and will instead be recognized at the point in time that control of the software license transfers to the customer. We expect revenue related to our software as a service (“SaaS”) offerings and professional services to remain substantially unchanged. Due to the complexity of certain contracts, the actual revenue recognition treatment required under the standard will be dependent on contract-specific terms and may vary in some instances from recognition at the time of billing. Application of the new standard requires that incremental costs directly related to obtaining a contract (typically sales commissions plus any associated fringe benefits) must be recognized as an asset and expensed on a systematic basis that is consistent with the transfer to the customer of the goods and services to which the asset relates, unless that life is less than one year. Currently, we defer sales commissions and recognize expense over the relevant initial contractual term. With the adoption of the new standard, we expect amortization periods to extend past the initial term.
Leases. On February 25, 2016, the FASB issued its new lease accounting guidance in ASU No. 2016-02, “Leases (Topic 842).” Under the new guidance, lessees will be required to recognize the following for all leases (with the exception of short-term leases) at the commencement date:
A lease liability, which is a lessee‘s obligation to make lease payments arising from a lease, measured on a discounted basis; and
A right-of-use asset, which is an asset that represents the lessee’s right to use, or control the use of, a specified asset for the lease term.
Lessees (for capital and operating leases) and lessors (for sales-type, direct financing, and operating leases) must apply a modified retrospective transition approach for leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements. The modified retrospective approach would not require any transition accounting for leases that expired before the earliest comparative period presented. Lessees and lessors may not apply a full retrospective transition approach.  
The ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods therein. Early application is permitted for all business entities upon issuance. We are assessing the financial impact of adopting the new standard, however; we are currently unable to provide a reasonable estimate regarding the financial impact. We expect to adopt the new standard in fiscal year 2019.  


10



ITEM 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
CAUTIONARY NOTE CONCERNING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This document contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 that are not historical in nature and typically address future or anticipated events, trends, expectations or beliefs with respect to our financial condition, results of operations or business. Forward-looking statements often contain words such as “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “foresees,” “forecasts,” “estimates,” “plans,” “intends,” “continues,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “projects,” “might,” “could” or other similar words or phrases. Similarly, statements that describe our business strategy, outlook, objectives, plans, intentions or goals also are forward-looking statements. We believe there is a reasonable basis for our forward-looking statements, but they are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties and actual results could differ materially from the expectations and beliefs reflected in the forward-looking statements. We presently consider the following to be among the important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations and beliefs: (1) changes in the budgets or regulatory environments of our clients, primarily local and state governments, that could negatively impact information technology spending; (2) our ability to protect client information from security breaches and provide uninterrupted operations of data centers; (3) our ability to achieve growth or operational synergies through the integration of acquired businesses, while avoiding unanticipated costs and disruptions to existing operations; (4) material portions of our business require the Internet infrastructure to be adequately maintained; (5) our ability to achieve our financial forecasts due to various factors, including project delays by our clients, reductions in transaction size, fewer transactions, delays in delivery of new products or releases or a decline in our renewal rates for service agreements; (6) general economic, political and market conditions; (7) technological and market risks associated with the development of new products or services or of new versions of existing or acquired products or services; (8) competition in the industry in which we conduct business and the impact of competition on pricing, client retention and pressure for new products or services; (9) the ability to attract and retain qualified personnel and dealing with the loss or retirement of key members of management or other key personnel; and (10) costs of compliance and any failure to comply with government and stock exchange regulations. A detailed discussion of these factors and other risks that affect our business are described in Item 1A, “Risk Factors.” We expressly disclaim any obligation to publicly update or revise our forward-looking statements.
GENERAL
We provide integrated information management solutions and services for the public sector, with a focus on local governments. We develop and market a broad line of software products and services to address the IT needs of cities, counties, schools and other local government entities. In addition, we provide professional IT services to our clients, including software and hardware installation, data conversion, training, and for certain clients, product modifications, along with continuing maintenance and support for clients using our systems. We also provide subscription-based services that utilize the Tyler private cloud such as e-filing, which simplifies the filing and management of court related documents. We also provide property appraisal outsourcing services for taxing jurisdictions.
Our products generally automate six major functional areas: (1) financial management and education, (2) courts and justice, (3) public safety, (4) property appraisal and tax, (5) planning, regulatory and maintenance, and (6) land and vital records management. We report our results in two segments. The Enterprise Software (“ES”) segment provides municipal and county governments and schools with software systems and services to meet their information technology and automation needs for mission-critical “back-office” functions such as financial management; courts and justice processes; public safety; planning, regulatory and maintenance; and land and vital records management. The Appraisal and Tax (“A&T”) segment provides systems and software that automate the appraisal and assessment of real and personal property as well as property appraisal outsourcing services for local governments and taxing authorities. Property appraisal outsourcing services include: the physical inspection of commercial and residential properties; data collection and processing; computer analysis for property valuation; preparation of tax rolls; community education; and arbitration between taxpayers and the assessing jurisdiction.
Our total employee count increased to 3,972 at June 30, 2017, from 3,723 at June 30, 2016.


11



CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES
The discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our condensed consolidated financial statements. These condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared following the requirements of accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) for the interim period and require us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to revenue recognition and amortization and potential impairment of intangible assets and goodwill and share-based compensation expense. As these are condensed financial statements, one should also read expanded information about our critical accounting policies and estimates provided in Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” included in our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016. There have been no material changes to our critical accounting policies and estimates from the information provided in our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016.
ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
 
Percent of Total Revenues
 
 
Second Quarter
 
Six Months Ended
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2017
 
2016
Revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Software licenses and royalties
 
8.2
 %
 
9.3
 %
 
8.6
 %
 
9.3
 %
Subscriptions
 
19.6

 
18.0

 
19.8

 
18.5

Software services
 
22.7

 
24.4

 
22.6

 
24.0

Maintenance
 
42.7

 
41.7

 
43.2

 
42.0

Appraisal services
 
3.0

 
3.7

 
3.2

 
3.7

Hardware and other
 
3.8

 
2.9

 
2.6

 
2.5

Total revenues
 
100.0

 
100.0

 
100.0

 
100.0

Cost of revenues:
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Software licenses, royalties and acquired software
 
2.9

 
3.4

 
3.0

 
3.4

Software services, maintenance and subscriptions
 
46.0

 
45.9

 
46.4

 
46.7

Appraisal services
 
2.0

 
2.4

 
2.1

 
2.3

Hardware and other
 
3.3

 
2.4

 
2.0

 
1.7

Selling, general and administrative expenses
 
20.8

 
22.3

 
21.2

 
22.5

Research and development expense
 
5.7

 
5.5

 
5.7

 
5.5

Amortization of customer and trade name intangibles
 
1.7

 
1.8

 
1.7

 
1.9

Operating income
 
17.6

 
16.3

 
17.9

 
16.0

Other (expense), net
 

 
(0.2
)
 
(0.1
)
 
(0.2
)
Income before income taxes
 
17.6

 
16.1

 
17.8

 
15.8

Income tax provision
 
2.6

 
2.7

 
2.2

 
3.9

Net income
 
15.0
 %
 
13.4
 %
 
15.6
 %
 
11.9
 %


12



Revenues
Software licenses and royalties
The following table sets forth a comparison of our software licenses and royalties revenue for the periods presented as of June 30:
 
 
Second Quarter
 
Change
 
Six Months Ended
 
Change
($ in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
ES
 
$
15,354

 
$
16,439

 
$
(1,085
)
 
(7
)%
 
$
31,928

 
$
32,093

 
$
(165
)
 
(1
)%
A&T
 
1,753

 
1,112

 
641

 
58

 
3,402

 
2,308

 
1,094

 
47

Total software licenses and royalties revenue
 
$
17,107

 
$
17,551

 
$
(444
)
 
(3
)%
 
$
35,330

 
$
34,401

 
$
929

 
3
 %
 
Software license revenue and royalties decreased 3% and increased 3% for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, compared to the prior year period. The increase in software license revenue and royalties for the six months ended June 30, 2017 is attributed to additions to our implementation staff, which increased our capacity to deliver backlog. The decline for the three months ended June 30, 2017 was impacted by an increase in the number of clients choosing our subscription-based option, rather than purchasing the software under a traditional perpetual software arrangement. 
 
Although the mix of new contracts between subscription-based and perpetual license arrangements may vary from quarter to quarter and year to year, we expect our longer-term software license growth rate to continue to be negatively impacted by a growing number of customers choosing our subscription-based options, rather than purchasing the software under a traditional perpetual software license arrangement. Subscription-based arrangements result in lower software license revenue in the initial year as compared to perpetual software license arrangements but generate higher overall revenue over the term of the contract. Our new client mix for the six months ended June 30, 2017 was approximately 52% selecting perpetual software license arrangements and approximately 48% selecting subscription-based arrangements compared to a client mix for the six months ended June 30, 2016 of approximately 66% selecting perpetual software license arrangements and approximately 34% selecting subscription-based arrangements. 105 and 197 new clients entered into subscription-based software arrangements for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, compared to 74 and 139 new clients for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, respectively.
Subscriptions
The following table sets forth a comparison of our subscriptions revenue for the periods presented as of June 30:
 
 
Second Quarter
 
Change
 
Six Months Ended
 
Change
($ in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
ES
 
$
39,051

 
$
32,316

 
$
6,735

 
21
%
 
$
77,364

 
$
64,301

 
$
13,063

 
20
 %
A&T
 
1,896

 
1,652

 
244

 
15

 
3,685

 
3,756

 
(71
)
 
(2
)
Total subscriptions revenue
 
$
40,947

 
$
33,968

 
$
6,979

 
21
%
 
$
81,049

 
$
68,057

 
$
12,992

 
19
 %
Subscriptions revenue primarily consists of revenue derived from our SaaS arrangements, which utilize the Tyler private cloud. As part of our subscription-based services, we also provide e-filing arrangements that simplify the filing and management of court related documents for courts and law offices. E-filing revenue is derived from transaction fees and fixed fee arrangements.
Subscriptions revenue grew 21% and 19% for the three and six months ending June 30, 2017, respectively, compared to the prior year. New SaaS clients as well as existing clients who converted to our SaaS model provided the majority of the subscriptions revenue increase. In the three and six months ending June 30, 2017, respectively, we added 105 and 197 new SaaS clients and 37 and 54 existing on-premises clients converted to our SaaS model. Since June 30, 2016, we added 308 new SaaS clients and 78 existing on-premises clients converted to our SaaS model. Also, e-filing services contributed approximately $1.7 million and $3.2 million to the subscriptions revenue increase for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, due to the addition of new e-filing clients, as well as increased volumes as the result of several existing clients mandating e-filing.

13



Software services
The following table sets forth a comparison of our software services revenue for the periods presented as of June 30:
 
 
Second Quarter
 
Change
 
Six Months Ended
 
Change
($ in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
ES
 
$
42,696

 
$
42,159

 
$
537

 
1
%
 
$
83,364

 
$
80,763

 
$
2,601

 
3
%
A&T
 
4,676

 
3,881

 
795

 
20

 
9,026

 
7,707

 
1,319

 
17

Total software services revenue
 
$
47,372

 
$
46,040

 
$
1,332

 
3
%
 
$
92,390

 
$
88,470

 
$
3,920

 
4
%
 
Software services revenue primarily consists of professional services billed in connection with implementing our software, converting client data, training client personnel, custom development activities and consulting. New clients who purchase our proprietary software licenses generally also contract with us to provide for the related software services. Existing clients also periodically purchase additional training, consulting and minor programming services. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, software services revenue grew 3% and 4% compared to the prior year period. This growth is primarily due to additions to our implementation and support staff which increased our capacity to deliver backlog and partially due to completing recognition of a majority of the acquisition-related deferred service revenue that was fair valued at rates below Tyler's average service rate in prior periods.
Maintenance
The following table sets forth a comparison of our maintenance revenue for the periods presented as of June 30:
 
 
Second Quarter
 
Change
 
Six Months Ended
 
Change
($ in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
ES
 
$
84,306

 
$
74,110

 
$
10,196

 
14
%
 
$
166,472

 
$
145,510

 
$
20,962

 
14
%
A&T
 
5,106

 
4,633

 
473

 
10

 
9,799

 
9,265

 
534

 
6

Total maintenance revenue
 
$
89,412

 
$
78,743

 
$
10,669

 
14
%
 
$
176,271

 
$
154,775

 
$
21,496

 
14
%
We provide maintenance and support services for our software products and certain third-party software. Maintenance revenue grew 14% for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, compared to the prior year. Maintenance revenue increased mainly due to annual maintenance rate increases and growth in our installed customer base from new software license sales. In addition, the increase is partially due to completing recognition of a majority of the acquisition-related deferred maintenance revenue that was fair valued at rates below Tyler's average maintenance rate in prior periods.
Appraisal services
The following table sets forth a comparison of our appraisal services revenue for the periods presented as of June 30:
 
 
Second Quarter
 
Change
 
Six Months Ended
 
Change
($ in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
ES
 
$

 
$

 
$

 
 %
 
$

 
$

 
$

 
 %
A&T
 
6,366

 
6,984

 
(618
)
 
(9
)
 
12,978

 
13,542

 
(564
)
 
(4
)
Total appraisal services revenue
 
$
6,366

 
$
6,984

 
$
(618
)
 
(9
)%
 
$
12,978

 
$
13,542

 
$
(564
)
 
(4
)%
 
Appraisal services revenue for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, decreased by 9% and 4%. The appraisal services business is somewhat cyclical and driven in part by statutory revaluation cycles in various states.
 

14



Cost of Revenues and Gross Margins
The following table sets forth a comparison of the key components of our cost of revenues for the periods presented as of June 30:
 
 
Second Quarter
 
Change
 
Six Months Ended
 
Change
($ in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
Software licenses and royalties
 
$
647

 
$
666

 
$
(19
)
 
(3
)%
 
$
1,378

 
$
1,304

 
$
74

 
6
 %
Acquired software
 
5,360

 
5,680

 
(320
)
 
(6
)
 
10,770

 
11,139

 
(369
)
 
(3
)
Software services, maintenance and subscriptions
 
96,172

 
86,717

 
9,455

 
11

 
189,712

 
171,987

 
17,725

 
10

Appraisal services
 
4,282

 
4,458

 
(176
)
 
(4
)
 
8,479

 
8,420

 
59

 
1

Hardware and other
 
6,799

 
4,515

 
2,284

 
51

 
8,115

 
6,361

 
1,754

 
28

Total cost of revenues
 
$
113,260

 
$
102,036

 
$
11,224

 
11
 %
 
$
218,454

 
$
199,211

 
$
19,243

 
10
 %
 
The following table sets forth a comparison of gross margin percentage by revenue type for the periods presented as of June 30:
 
 
Second Quarter
 
 
 
Six Months Ended
 
 
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
Change
 
2017
 
2016
 
Change
Software licenses, royalties and acquired software
 
64.9
%
 
63.8
%
 
1.1
 %
 
65.6
%
 
63.8
%
 
1.8
 %
Software services, maintenance and subscriptions
 
45.9

 
45.4

 
0.5

 
45.8

 
44.8

 
1.0

Appraisal services
 
32.7

 
36.2

 
(3.5
)
 
34.7

 
37.8

 
(3.1
)
Hardware and other
 
14.1

 
20.6

 
(6.5
)
 
23.8

 
29.5

 
(5.7
)
Overall gross margin
 
45.8
%
 
46.0
%
 
(0.2
)%
 
46.5
%
 
45.9
%
 
0.6
 %
Software licenses, royalties and acquired software. Amortization expense for acquired software comprises the majority of costs of software licenses, royalties and acquired software. We do not have any direct costs associated with royalties. In the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, our software licenses, royalties and acquired software gross margin increased 1.1% and 1.8% compared to the prior year period due to higher incremental margins on software license revenues, in part due to slightly lower amortization expense for acquired software resulting from acquisitions.
Software services, maintenance and subscriptions. Cost of software services, maintenance and subscriptions primarily consists of personnel costs related to installation of our software, conversion of client data, training client personnel and support activities and various other services such as custom client development and on-going operation of SaaS and e-filing arrangements. The software services, maintenance and subscription gross margin in the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, was 0.5% and 1.0% higher than the comparable prior year period. Our implementation and support staff has grown by 197 employees since June 30, 2016. Many of these additions occurred in early to mid-2016 and are contributing to revenue in 2017. Costs related to maintenance and various other services such as SaaS and e-filing typically grow at a slower rate than related revenue due to leverage in the utilization of support and maintenance staff and economies of scale. Reduced recognition of acquisition-related deferred revenue associated with software services and maintenance obligations completed in prior periods also resulted in higher gross margins.
Appraisal services. Appraisal services revenue comprised approximately 3.0% of total revenue. The appraisal services gross margin for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, decreased 3.5% and 3.1% compared to the same period in 2016, due to additional resources brought in to meet the deadline for completion of fieldwork for a large revaluation project. A high proportion of the costs of appraisal services revenue are variable, as we often hire temporary employees to assist in appraisal projects.
 
For the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, our overall gross margin decreased 0.2% and increased 0.6% compared to the prior year period. Our overall gross margin increase for the six month period was mainly due to a product mix that included more higher-margin recurring revenues from subscriptions and maintenance and improved margin on revenues from software licenses. Overall gross margin was negatively impacted by lower-margin revenues from appraisal services as described above.


15



Selling, General and Administrative Expenses
Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses consist primarily of salaries, employee benefits, travel, share-based compensation expense, commissions and related overhead costs for administrative and sales and marketing employees, as well as, professional fees, trade show activities, advertising costs and other marketing related costs.
The following table sets forth a comparison of our SG&A expenses for the periods presented as of June 30:
 
 
Second Quarter
 
Change
 
Six Months Ended

Change
($ in thousands)
 
2017
 
2016
 
$
 
%
 
2017

2016

$