UACL » Topics » Industry

This excerpt taken from the UACL 10-K filed Mar 13, 2009.

Industry

According to the American Trucking Association, or ATA, the trucking industry was estimated at approximately $649.3 billion in revenue in 2007 and accounted for approximately 84.1% of domestic spending on freight transportation. The trucking industry is highly competitive on the basis of service and price and is necessary in many industries operating in the United States. Customers generally choose truck transportation over other surface transportation modes due to the industry’s higher levels of reliability, shipment integrity and speed.

The trucking industry includes both private fleets and “for-hire” carriers. Private fleets consist of trucks owned and operated by shippers that move their own goods and, according to the ATA, accounted for approximately $292.1 billion of revenue in 2007. For-hire carriers include both truckload and less-than truckload operations. We primarily operate in the highly fragmented for-hire truckload segment of this market, which according to the ATA generated revenues of approximately $357.2 billion in 2007. Truckload carriers dedicate an entire trailer to one customer from origin to destination and can be further classified by the trailing equipment they use to haul a customer’s freight, such as dry van, temperature-controlled, tank or flatbed.

Our primary source of revenue results from hauling flatbed and dry van freight, which during the year ended December 31, 2008 accounted for $646.5 million, or 85.1% of our revenues. We believe the private fleet market offers significant opportunities for expansion by for-hire carriers, such as ourselves, because shippers increasingly are focused on operating within and conserving capital for, their core competencies, which often do not include freight transportation. In our intermodal support services, which during the year ended December 31, 2008 accounted for $113.0 million or 14.9% of our revenues, we believe that third party logistics companies, railroads and ocean carriers are increasingly seeking efficiencies gained by using companies with greater service offerings, capacity and geographic coverage than the smaller private operators upon which they have historically relied.

Recent economic trends have led to a consolidation of the truckload industry. We believe that the truckload market will continue to experience further consolidation due to a number of economic factors that have forced many smaller carriers to exit the business, merge or file for bankruptcy. These factors include rising insurance costs, scarcity of capital, volatility of fuel prices, increased prices for new environmentally friendly equipment, purchasing advantages available to larger carriers and customer demand for total service solutions that can only be provided by large carriers. As a result, we believe that larger, better-capitalized companies, like us, will have greater opportunities to gain market share and increase profit margins.

This excerpt taken from the UACL 10-K filed Mar 12, 2008.

Industry

According to the American Trucking Association, or ATA, the trucking industry was estimated at approximately $645.6 billion in revenue in 2006 and accounted for approximately 83.8% of domestic spending on freight transportation. The trucking industry is highly competitive on the basis of service and price and is necessary in many industries operating in the United States. Customers generally choose truck transportation over other surface transportation modes due to the industry’s higher levels of reliability, shipment integrity and speed.

The trucking industry includes both private fleets and “for-hire” carriers. Private fleets consist of trucks owned and operated by shippers that move their own goods and, according to the ATA, accounted for approximately $287.9 billion of revenue in 2006. For-hire carriers include both truckload and less-than truckload operations. We primarily operate in the highly fragmented for-hire truckload segment of this market, which according to the ATA generated revenues of approximately $357.7 billion in 2006. Truckload carriers dedicate an entire trailer to one customer from origin to destination and can be further classified by the trailing equipment they use to haul a customer’s freight, such as dry van, temperature-controlled, tank or flatbed.

Our primary source of revenue results from hauling flatbed and dry van freight, which during the year ended December 31, 2007 accounted for $573.9 million, or 84.4% of our revenues. We believe the private fleet market offers significant opportunities for expansion by for-hire carriers, such as ourselves, because shippers increasingly are focused on operating within and conserving capital for, their core competencies, which often do not include freight transportation. In our intermodal support services, which during the year ended December 31, 2007 accounted for $106.5 million or 15.6% of our revenues, we believe that third party logistics companies, railroads and ocean carriers are increasingly seeking efficiencies gained by using companies with greater service offerings, capacity and geographic coverage than the smaller private operators upon which they have historically relied.

Recent economic trends have led to a consolidation of the truckload industry. We believe that the truckload market will continue to experience further consolidation due to a number of economic factors that have forced many smaller carriers to exit the business, merge, or file for bankruptcy. These factors include rising insurance costs, scarcity of capital, volatility of fuel prices, increased prices for new environmentally friendly equipment, purchasing advantages available to larger carriers and customer demand for total service solutions that can only be provided by large carriers. As a result, we believe that larger, better-capitalized companies, like us, will have greater opportunities to gain market share and increase profit margins.

This excerpt taken from the UACL 10-K filed Mar 20, 2007.

Industry

According to the American Trucking Association, or ATA, the trucking industry was estimated at approximately $622.9 billion in revenue in 2005 and accounted for approximately 84.3% of domestic spending on freight transportation. The trucking industry is highly competitive on the basis of service and price and is necessary in many industries operating in the United States. Customers generally choose truck transportation over other surface transportation modes due to the industry’s higher levels of reliability, shipment integrity and speed.

The trucking industry includes both private fleets and “for-hire” carriers. Private fleets consist of trucks owned and operated by shippers that move their own goods and, according to the ATA, accounted for approximately $280.1 billion of revenue in 2005. For-hire carriers include both truckload and less-than truckload operations. We primarily operate in the highly fragmented for-hire truckload segment of this market, which according to the ATA generated revenues of approximately $298.3 billion in 2005. Truckload carriers dedicate an entire trailer to one customer from origin to destination and can be further classified by the trailing equipment they use to haul a customer’s freight, such as dry van, temperature-controlled, tank or flatbed.

Our primary source of revenue results from hauling flatbed and dry van freight, which during the year ended December 31, 2006 accounted for $505.1 million, or 78.7% of our revenues. We believe the private fleet market offers significant opportunities for expansion by for-hire carriers, such as ourselves, because shippers increasingly are focused on operating within and conserving capital for, their core competencies, which often do not include freight transportation. In our intermodal support services, which during the year ended December 31, 2006 accounted for $136.5 million or 21.3% of our revenues, we believe that third party logistics companies, railroads and ocean carriers are increasingly seeking efficiencies gained by using companies with greater service offerings, capacity and geographic coverage than the smaller private operators upon which they have historically relied.

Recent economic trends have led to a consolidation of the truckload industry. We believe that the truckload market will continue to experience further consolidation due to a number of economic factors that have forced many smaller carriers to exit the business, merge, or file for bankruptcy. These factors include rising insurance costs, scarcity of capital, volatility of fuel prices, increased prices for new environmentally friendly equipment, purchasing advantages available to larger carriers and customer demand for total service solutions that can only be provided by large carriers. As a result, we believe that larger, better-capitalized companies, like us, will have greater opportunities to gain market share and increase profit margins.

 

4


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the UACL 10-K filed Mar 20, 2006.

Industry

According to the American Trucking Association, or ATA, the trucking industry was estimated at approximately $671.2 billion in revenue in 2004 and accounted for approximately 87.7% of domestic spending on freight transportation. The trucking industry is highly competitive on the basis of service and price and is necessary in many industries operating in the United States. Customers generally choose truck transportation over other surface transportation modes due to the industry’s higher levels of reliability, shipment integrity and speed.

The trucking industry includes both private fleets and “for-hire” carriers. Private fleets consist of trucks owned and operated by shippers that move their own goods and, according to the ATA, accounted for approximately $293.9 billion of revenue in 2004. For-hire carriers include both truckload and less-than truckload operations. We primarily operate in the highly fragmented for-hire truckload segment of this market, which according to the ATA generated revenues of approximately $312.0 billion in 2004. Truckload carriers dedicate an entire trailer to one customer from origin to destination and can be further classified by the trailing equipment they use to haul a customer’s freight, such as dry van, temperature-controlled, tank or flatbed.

Our primary source of revenue results from hauling flatbed and dry van freight, which during the year ended December 31, 2005 accounted for $436.6 million, or 82.2% of our revenues. We believe the private fleet market offers significant opportunities for expansion by for-hire carriers, such as ourselves, because shippers increasingly are focused on operating within and conserving capital for, their core competencies, which often do not include freight transportation. In our intermodal support services, which during the year ended December 31, 2005 accounted for $94.7 million or 17.8% of our revenues, we believe that third party logistics companies, railroads and ocean carriers are increasingly seeking efficiencies gained by using companies with greater service offerings, capacity and geographic coverage than the smaller private operators upon which they have historically relied.

Recent economic trends have led to a consolidation of the truckload industry. We believe that the truckload market will continue to experience further consolidation due to a number of economic factors that have forced many smaller carriers to exit the business, merge, or file for bankruptcy. These factors include rising insurance costs, scarcity of capital, volatility of fuel prices, increased prices for new Environmentally freindly, purchasing advantages available to larger carriers and customer demand for total service solutions that can only be provided by large carriers. As a result, we believe that larger, better-capitalized companies, like us, will have greater opportunities to gain market share and increase profit margins.

Wikinvest © 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012. Use of this site is subject to express Terms of Service, Privacy Policy, and Disclaimer. By continuing past this page, you agree to abide by these terms. Any information provided by Wikinvest, including but not limited to company data, competitors, business analysis, market share, sales revenues and other operating metrics, earnings call analysis, conference call transcripts, industry information, or price targets should not be construed as research, trading tips or recommendations, or investment advice and is provided with no warrants as to its accuracy. Stock market data, including US and International equity symbols, stock quotes, share prices, earnings ratios, and other fundamental data is provided by data partners. Stock market quotes delayed at least 15 minutes for NASDAQ, 20 mins for NYSE and AMEX. Market data by Xignite. See data providers for more details. Company names, products, services and branding cited herein may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. The use of trademarks or service marks of another is not a representation that the other is affiliated with, sponsors, is sponsored by, endorses, or is endorsed by Wikinvest.
Powered by MediaWiki