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VSB Bancorp, Inc. 10-K 2010
Unassociated Document
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDEDDECEMBER 31, 2009

o TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER 0-50237
 
 
VSB Bancorp, Inc.
 
 
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
     
 
New York
 
 
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
 
     
 
11 - 3680128
 
 
(I. R. S. Employer Identification No.)
 
     
 
4142 Hylan Boulevard, Staten Island, New York 10308
 
 
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
     
 
(718) 979-1100
 
 
Issuer’s telephone number
 
     
 
Common Stock
 
 
(Title of Class)
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant  (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.                     
Yes x No o
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K o.
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company.  See the definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large Accelerated Filer o     Accelerated Filer o    Non-Accelerated Filer o    Smaller Reporting Company  x
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act): 
Yes o No x
 
The aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant at June 30, 2009 was $17,743,638.
Number of shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding as of March 12, 2010: 1,762,191 shares.
 
 
 

 
 
Documents incorporated by reference:
 
Portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement filed on or about March 26, 2010 into Part III of this Form 10-K.
 
Forward-Looking Statements
 
When used in this Form 10-K, or in any written or oral statement made by us or our officers, directors or employees, the words and phrases “will result,” “expect,” “will continue,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “project,” or similar terms are intended to identify “forward-looking statements.”  A variety of factors could cause our actual results and experiences to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in any forward-looking statements. Some of the risks and uncertainties that may affect our operations, performance, development and results, the interest rate sensitivity of our assets and liabilities, and the adequacy of our loan loss allowance, include, but are not limited to:
 
 
deterioration in local, regional, national or global economic conditions which could result in, among other things, an increase in loan delinquencies, a decrease in property values, or a change in the real estate turnover rate;
 
changes in market interest rates or changes in the speed at which market interest rates change;
 
changes in laws and regulations affecting the financial service industry;
 
changes in the public’s perception of financial institutions in general and banks in particular;
 
changes in competition; and
 
changes in consumer preferences by our customers or the customers of our business borrowers.
 
      Please do not place undue reliance on any forward-looking statement, which speaks only as of the date made. There are many factors, including those described above, that could affect our future business activities or financial performance and could cause our actual future results or circumstances to differ materially from those we anticipate or project.  We do not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statement after it is made.
 
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PART I
 
Item 1. Description of Business>.
 
Business of VSB Bancorp, Inc.
 
VSB Bancorp, Inc. (referred to using terms such as “we,” “us,” or the “Company”) became the holding company for Victory State Bank (the “Bank”), a New York chartered commercial bank, upon the completion of a reorganization of the Bank into the holding company form of organization. The reorganization was effective in May 2003.  All the outstanding stock of Victory State Bank was exchanged for stock of VSB Bancorp, Inc. on a three for two basis so that the stockholders of Victory State Bank became the owners of VSB Bancorp, Inc. and VSB Bancorp, Inc. owns all the stock of Victory State Bank. The common stock we issued in the transaction qualifies as exempt securities under Section 3(a)(12) of the Securities Act of 1933.  Our primary business is owning all of the issued and outstanding stock of the Bank.  Our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Market, effective on August 4, 2008.  We continue to trade under the symbol “VSBN”.
 
The main office of the Company and the Bank is at 4142 Hylan Boulevard, Staten Island, New York 10308, telephone (718) 979-1100. We maintain an Internet web site at www.victorystatebank.com.
 
Victory State Bank
 
Victory State Bank is a New York State chartered commercial bank, founded in November 1997.  The Bank is supervised by the New York State Banking Department and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”).  The Bank’s principal business has been and continues to be attracting commercial deposits from primarily the general public and investing those deposits, together with funds generated from operations and repayments on existing investments, primarily in loans for business purposes and investment securities.  The Bank’s revenues are derived principally from interest on our commercial loan and investment securities portfolios.  The Bank’s primary sources of funds are deposits and principal and interest payments on loans and investment securities.
 
Victory State Bank serves its primary market of Staten Island, New York through its five banking offices. The Bank opened its original main office in the Oakwood section of Staten Island in November 1997 which was closed in February 2007 as the lease expired at that location; its first branch was opened in the West Brighton section of Staten Island in June 1999; its second branch in the St. George section of Staten Island in January 2000; its third branch in the Dongan Hills section of Staten Island in December 2002 and its fourth branch in the Rosebank section of Staten Island in April 2006. In February 2007, the Bank opened its new main office in the Great Kills section of Staten Island.   The Bank’s deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation up to the maximum amounts permitted by law. Victory State Bank also serves its customers through its website, www.victorystatebank.com.
 
Market Area and Competition
 
Victory State Bank has been, and continues to be, a community-oriented, state-chartered commercial bank offering a variety of traditional financial services to meet the needs of the communities in which it operates. Management considers our reputation for customer service as its major competitive advantage in attracting and retaining customers in its market area.
 
Our primary market area is concentrated in the neighborhoods surrounding our branches in the New York City Borough of Staten Island.  Management believes that our branch offices are located in communities that can generally be characterized as stable, residential neighborhoods of predominantly one- to four-family residences and middle income families.
 
 
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From 1990 to 2000, Staten Island’s population grew to 443,728 from 378,977, or a 17% increase. According to U.S. Census Department estimates, this growth rate has slowed, with the population estimated to have increased by only an additional 8.5% through July 1, 2007. The decline in the growth rate has itself accelerated, with the Census Department’s estimated year to year rate of increase generally declining throughout this decade. There was a modest shift from the 20 to 44 year age group to the 45 to 64 year age group during the decade of the 1990s. As a percentage of population, the 45 to 64 year age group increased from 19.8% to 23.4% during the decade. The Census Department estimates that this trend continued through at least 2006, when the 45 to 64 year age group increased to 26.3% of the total population. The largest age group continued to be the 20 to 44 age group, at 35.2% of total population in 2006, down from 37.0% in 2000.
 
However, the population news is not all negative when compared to the rest of New York State. Most notably, Staten Island fairs the highest among all 62 New York Counties when natural internal population growth is excluded and migration into the county is estimated. The U.S. Census estimates that net migration into the county was the highest in the entire state. Only 13 counties had an estimated net migration into the county during the period from the end of the 2000 census through July 1, 2007, and Staten Island was the best of those.
 
Median household income increased to $55,039 from $50,064 during the decade of the 90’s. Per capita income in 1999 was $23,905 in Staten Island, slightly higher than $23,389, the per capita income of New York State. One third of the households in Staten Island had household income of more than $75,000 in 1999. These income levels compare favorably with the national household median of $41,994 and the national per capita median of $21,587. The Census Department has not published comparable data for recent years, but management believes that median household income continues to be strong and that these income levels in Staten Island provide satisfactory support for personal home ownership, in turn supporting the home building industry, which is a major industry focus for Victory State Bank. However, recent economic disruption will have an adverse effect on local income levels because of increased unemployment, a reduction in wage increases, and possible wage reductions for employed persons. Although according to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate in Staten Island and the New York metro area is below the national average, the unemployment rate has increased substantially in the past year and may increase in the future as financial service firms report continuing layoffs.
 
Until the recent decline in the residential housing market, the median sales price of existing single family homes increased steadily from 2000 through 2006. According to the New York State Association of Realtors, the median price increased from $211,000 to $425,000 during that period. According to a report by the Center for an Urban Future, this means that the cost of a single family home on Staten Island is now out of reach to many middle-class families. As the population grew during the 1990s, total housing units increased as well, to 163,993 in 2000, as compared to 139,726 in 1990, an increase of 17.4%. However, perhaps confirming the reduction in affordability to the middle class, the growth in housing units has slowed, with an estimated 177,368 housing units at June 30, 2006, an increase of 8.2% since April 1, 2000. This slowing growth presents challenges to management because of our focus on the home building industry and related sectors of the local economy.
 
Declines in the residential housing market in the past few years creates problems faced by Staten Island, its residents and its businesses. According to Zillow.com, a real estate information service, the estimated median home value has declined 2.5% in the past year. The Center for an Urban Future report already noted an increase in foreclosures on Staten Island during 2006 which exceeded the increase in the rest of New York City. The decline in the price of homes and the economic downturn may accelerate this increase in foreclosed properties, which could exacerbate the decline in real estate values.
 
The New York City metropolitan area has a high density of financial institutions, many of which are significantly larger and have greater financial resources than we have, and all of which are our competitors to varying degrees. Our competition for loans comes principally from commercial banks, savings banks and insurance companies. Our most direct competition for deposits has come from commercial banks and savings banks. In addition, we face competition for deposits from non-bank institutions such as brokerage firms and insurance companies in such areas as short-term money market funds, corporate and government securities funds, mutual funds and annuities.
 
 
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Risk Factors
 
Bank lending is an inherently risky business.>  A substantial portion of our assets are invested in loans, and loans necessarily present many risks. We must first rely on our borrowers to repay their loans, and if they are unable to do so, we must rely on the value of the collateral, if any, for the loan. Changing business conditions, increases in unemployment, personal problems that a borrower may experience, changes in the regulations that apply to a borrower’s business, changes in the political climate or in public policy, and many other factors outside our control, could adversely affect the ability of our borrowers to repay their loans or the value of the collateral we have received. Although we seek to reduce these risks through underwriting procedures that we believe are prudent, it is impossible for us to completely eliminate the risks which arise from making loans except by eliminating our lending operations.
 
The current turmoil in the economy in general and among financial institutions in particular could adversely affect our customers and thus have an indirect adverse effect on us. >The economy in the United States, including the economy in Staten Island, was, and may still be, in a recession. There is substantial stress on many financial institutions and financial products. The federal government has intervened by making hundreds of billions of dollars in capital contributions to the banking industry. We draw a substantial portion of our customer base from local businesses, especially those in the building trades and related industries. Some of our customers have been adversely affected by the economic downturn, and if the recession continues, or the recovery is slow, it will become more difficult for us to conduct prudent and profitable business in our community.
 
Making permanent residential mortgage loans is not a material part of our business, and our investments in mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations have been made with a view towards avoiding the types of securities that are backed by low quality mortgage-related assets. However, one of the primary focuses of our local business is receiving deposits from, and making loans to, businesses involved in the construction and building trades industry on Staten Island. Construction loans represented a significant component of our loan portfolio, reaching 39.8% of total loans at year end 2005. As we monitored the economy and the strength of the local construction industry, we elected to reduce our portfolio of construction loans, which totaled 16.8% of total loans at December 31, 2009. However, developers and builders provide not only a source of loans, but they also provide us with deposits and other business. If the weakness in the economy continues or worsens, then that could have a substantial adverse effect on our customers and potential customers, making it more difficult for us to find satisfactory loan opportunities and low-cost deposits. This could compel us to invest in lower yielding securities instead of higher-yielding loans and could also reduce low cost funding sources such as checking accounts and require that we replace them with higher cost deposits such as time deposits. Either or both of those shifts could reduce our net income.
 
Fluctuations in interest rates could have an adverse affect on our profitability.  >Our principal source of income is the difference between the interest income we earn on interest-earning assets, such as loans and securities, and our cost of funds, principally interest paid on deposits. These rates of interest change from time to time, depending upon a number of factors, including general market interest rates. However, the frequency of the changes varies among different types of assets and liabilities. For example, for a five-year loan with an interest rate based upon the prime rate, the interest rate may change every time the prime rate changes. In contrast, the rate of interest we pay on a five-year certificate of deposit adjusts only every five years, based upon changes in market interest rates.
 
In general, the interest rates we pay on deposits adjust more slowly than the interest rates we earn on loans because our loan portfolio consists primarily of loans with interest rates that fluctuate based upon the prime rate. In contrast, although many of our deposit categories have interest rates that could adjust immediately, such as interest checking accounts and savings accounts, changes in the interest rates on those accounts are at our discretion. Thus, the rates on those accounts, as well as the rates we pay on certificates of deposit, tend to adjust more slowly. As a result, the declines in market interest rates that occurred through the end of 2008 initially had an adverse effect on our net income because the yields we earn on our loans declined more rapidly than our cost of funds. However, many of our prime-based loans had minimum interest rates, or floors, below which the interest rate does not decline despite further decreases in the prime rate. As our loans reached their interest rate floors, our loan yields stabilized while our deposit costs continued to decline.  This had a positive effect on our net interest income.  When market interest rates begin increasing, which we expect will occur at some point in the future, we anticipate an initial adverse effect on our net income. We anticipate that this will occur because our deposit rates should begin to rise while loan yields remain relatively steady until the prime rate increases sufficiently that our loans begin to reprice above their interest rate floors.  Once our loan rates exceed the interest rate floors, increases in market interest rates should increase our net interest income because our cost of deposits should probably increase more slowly than the yields on our loans. However, customer preferences and competitive pressures may negate this positive effect because customers may choose to move funds into higher-earning deposit types as higher interest rates make them more attractive, or competitors offer premium rates to attract deposits.  We also have a substantial portfolio of investment securities with fixed rates of interest, most of which are mortgage-backed securities with an estimated average life of not more than 5 years.

 
 
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The limited trading market for our common stock may make it difficult for stockholders to sell their stock for full value.> Our common stock is listed on the NASDAQ Global Market, which listing was effective on August 4, 2008. We continue to trade under the symbol “VSBN.” We are listed on the Global Market in the hope that it would increase the trading market in our stock and make it easier for individuals to buy and sell our stock. However, our stock does not trade every day and the average daily trading volume is limited. During the twelve months ended February 26, 2010, there were trades reported on only 91 out of 251 trading days, or slightly more than one out of every three trading days, and our average daily trading volume during that period was 928 shares for all trading days and 2,560 shares per day for the 91 days on which trades occurred. During the twelve months ended February 26, 2010, 43.2% of all reported trading volume represented stock repurchases by us pursuant to our announced stock repurchase programs. We currently have approximately 149 stockholders of record and we believe based upon reports we have received from broker/dealers, that there are approximately an additional 250 stockholders who own their shares in street name.
 
The geographic concentration of our loans increases the risk that adverse economic conditions could affect our net income.  >Substantially all of our loans are mortgage loans on property located in Staten Island, New York, or loans to residents of or businesses on Staten Island.  Staten Island has experienced an economic down turn in recent years. In addition, due to the importance of the home building trade on Staten Island, the recent adverse conditions in the residential real estate market has had an additional negative impact on many local businesses that make up our core customer base. A continued economic slow-down or decline in the local economy could have an adverse effect on us for a number of reasons. Adverse economic conditions could hurt the ability of our borrowers to repay their loans. If real estate values decline, reductions in the value of real estate collateral could make it more difficult for us to recover the full amount due on loans which go into default. Furthermore, economic difficulties can also increase deposit outflows as customers must use savings to pay bills. This could increase our cost of funds because of the need to replace the deposit outflow. All of these factors might combine to reduce significantly our net income.
 
Adverse financial results of other financial institutions could adversely affect our net income or our reputation.  >In the past two years, there have been many failures and near-failures among financial institutions. The number of FDIC-insured banks that have failed has increased, and the FDIC insurance fund reserve ratio, representing the ratio of the fund to the level of insured deposits, has declined due to losses caused by bank failures. As a result, the FDIC has increased its deposit insurance premiums on remaining institutions, including well-capitalized institutions like Victory State Bank, in order to replenish the insurance fund. If bank failures continue to occur, and more so if the level of failures increases, the FDIC insurance fund will further decline, and the FDIC may impose higher premiums on healthy banks. Thus, despite the prudent steps we may take to avoid the mistakes made by other banks, our costs of operations may increase as a result of those mistakes by others.  Furthermore, the public perception of banks in general may decline due to the failures of other banks, which could cause some of our customers to reduce or terminate their business with us.
 
Our FDIC insurance premium was $369,965 in 2009.  In 2009, the FDIC announced an increase in deposit insurance premiums so institutions like our Bank, even though we pay premiums in the lowest premium category, will be subject to an assessment rate between seven (7) and twelve (12) basis points per annum. This is higher than the lowest assessment rate in 2008 of from five (5) to seven (7) basis points.  Additionally, the FDIC imposed a 5 basis point special assessment, based on June 30, 2009 total assets net of Tier 1 capital, that we paid on September 30, 2009. The special assessment amounted to $101,950 and we accrued it prior to the quarter in which it was paid because it was based upon assets at June 30. The increase in the assessment rate and the special assessment significantly increased our deposit insurance expense in 2009. The FDIC also required that FDIC-insured banks prepay, by the end of 2009, their entire projected FDIC premium assessment through the end of 2012. The prepaid amount will be expensed for financial reporting purposes gradually each quarter during the prepayment period. If our actual FDIC assessment during that period is less than the amount we prepay, the excess prepayment will be applied to future premiums we owe, and any excess prepayment remaining on December 31, 2014 would be refunded to us. Although the prepayment had no direct income statement effect when made, it reduced the funds we have available for investment in interest-earning assets because the FDIC will not pay interest on the prepayment.  At December 31, 2009, we prepaid $1,025,945 to satisfy this requirement.
 
 
 
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Changes in the federal or state regulation of financial institutions could have an adverse effect on future operations.  >Federal and New York State banking laws and regulations have a substantial, regular and every-day effect on our business. Federal and state regulatory authorities have extensive discretion in connection with their supervision of Victory State Bank, such as the right to impose restrictions on operations and the insistence that we increase our allowance for loan losses. Any change in the regulatory structure or statutes or regulations applicable to banks, bank holding companies, or their competitors, whether by the Congress, the FDIC, the Federal Reserve System, the New York State legislature, the New York State Banking Department or any other regulator, could have a material impact on our operations and profitability.
 
Since the substantial decline in the national housing market and the advent of the increase in bank failures over the past few years, there have been many proposals at both the state and federal level to change the way banks do business or change the entire structure under which banks and their operations are regulated and examined. Proposals at the federal level could, for example, increase competition by facilitating cross-state branching or increase competitive pressures by permitting banks to pay interest on business checking accounts.
 
There have recently been changes at both the state and the federal level in the laws and regulations applicable to residential mortgage lenders and other entities in the residential real estate business. We are not a residential mortgage lender and we do not expect that these proposals, if adopted, will have a direct negative effect on us. However, the proposals could reduce residential development, increase the cost of housing, and restrict the ability of small local businesses in that sector to compete with larger companies with greater resources. That could have an adverse effect on our customer base.  Furthermore, proposals to permit what are commonly known as “cram downs” in bankruptcies involving residential mortgage loans could have a direct adverse effect on the value of the collateral for existing residential mortgage loans, and thus an indirect effect on mortgage-backed securities in which we invest.
 
Delays in foreclosure proceedings may adversely affect our ability to realize upon the value of collateral.  >The length of time it takes to prosecute a foreclosure action and be able to sell real estate collateral in New York has substantially lengthened. It is not unusual for it to take more than a full year from the date a foreclosure action is commenced until the property is sold even in uncontested cases, and some uncontested cases can take as long as two years. This problem, if it continues or gets worse, could have a substantial adverse effect on the value of the Bank’s collateral for loans in default. Especially in the case of construction loans, where property value deterioration during a lengthy foreclosure is more likely, the inability to realize upon collateral increases the loss to the Bank in the event of a default.
 
We operate in an extremely competitive environment.  >We operate in one of the most competitive environments for financial products in the world. Many of the world’s largest financial institutions have offices in our local communities, and they have far greater financial resources than we have. We seek to distinguish ourselves from those institutions by providing personalized service and providing the same level of care to small community based businesses that only Fortune 500 companies can obtain from the largest banks.  Furthermore, changes in statutes and regulations, such as a proposal now being discussed in Congress to increase interstate bank branch flexibility, could increase competition.
 
 
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The loss of key personnel could impair our future success. >Our future success depends in part on the service of our executive officer, other key management officers, as well as our staff, and our ability to continue to attract, motivate, and retain additional highly qualified employees.  The loss of one or more of our key personnel or our inability to timely recruit replacements for such personnel, or otherwise attract, motivate, or retain qualified personnel could have an adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.
 
Lending Activities
 
Loan Portfolio Composition.  Our loan portfolio consists primarily of commercial mortgage loans and unsecured commercial loans. At December 31, 2009, we had total unsecured commercial loans outstanding of $10,966,874, or 13.9% of total loans, and commercial real estate loans of $48,767,729, or 61.7% of total loans.  There were $13,258,000 of construction loans secured by real estate, $10,964,000 of which were construction loans to businesses for the construction of either commercial property or residential property for sale, representing 13.9% of  total loans. Other loans in our portfolio principally included commercial loans secured by assets other than real estate totaling $1,138,308 or 1.4% of total loans at December 31, 2009; residential mortgage loans of $2,914,956, or 3.7% of total loans and consumer non-mortgage loans of $532,498 or 0.7% of total loans. Although we generally do not make traditional permanent residential mortgage loans, we occasionally make residential mortgage loans to the principals of commercial customers.  For the year ended December 31, 2009, approximately $57,748,986, or 73.1%, of loans for business purposes had adjustable interest rates based on the prime rate of interest.
 
The following table sets forth the composition of our loan portfolio in dollar amounts and in percentages at the dates indicated.
 
      At December 31,  
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
   
2006
   
2005
 
         
%
         
%
         
%
         
% of
         
% of
 
     Amount     of Total     Amount     of Total     Amount     of Total     Amount    
Total
   
Amount
   
Total
 
                                                             
Commercial loans:
                                                           
Commercial secured
  $ 1,138,308       1.4 %   $ 1,177,796       1.8  %   $ 1,171,152       1.9 %   $ 1,231,880       1.8 %   $ 1,584,484       2.1 %
Commercial unsecured
    10,966,874       13.9       9,558,296       14.4       10,981,044       17.5       10,882,002       16.3       11,078,101       14.9  
Total commercial loans
    12,105,182       15.3       10,736,092       16.2       12,152,196       19.4       12,113,882       18.1       12,662,585       17.0  
Real Estate loans:
                                                                               
Commercial
    48,767,729       61.7       39,918,879       60.1       31,607,039       50.6       33,215,627       49.9       29,794,108       40.1  
One-to-four family
    2,914,956       3.7       2,548,159       3.8       2,314,716       3.7       165,801       0.2       298,779       0.4  
Total real estate loans
    51,682,685       65.4       42,467,038       63.9       33,921,755       54.3       33,381,428       50.1       30,092,887       40.5  
Construction loans:
                                                                               
Commercial
    10,964,000       13.9       10,996,432       16.5       13,585,698       21.7       17,552,797       26.4       26,623,846       35.8  
Owner occupied one-to-four family
    2,294,000       2.9       900,000       1.4       1,523,895       2.4       1,825,000       2.7       2,987,500       4.0  
Total construction loans
    13,258,000       16.8       11,896,432       17.9       15,109,593       24.1       19,377,797       29.1       29,611,346       39.8  
Other loans:
                                                                               
Consumer loans
    532,498       0.7       599,293       0.9       566,356       0.9       826,528       1.2       1,477,366       2.0  
Other loans
    1,455,224       1.8       757,481       1.1       827,122       1.3       974,278       1.5       486,009       0.7  
Total other loans
    1,987,722       2.5       1,356,774       2.0       1,393,478       2.2       1,800,806       2.7       1,963,375       2.7  
                                                                                 
Total loans
    79,033,589       100.0 %     66,456,336       100.0  %     62,577,022       100.0 %     66,673,913       100.0 %     74,330,193       100.0 %
                                                                                 
Less:
                                                                               
Unearned discounts, net and deferred loan fees, net
    199,433               209,684               203,944               263,236               386,088          
Allowance for loan losses
    1,063,454               987,876               927,161               1,128,824               1,153,298          
Loans, net
  $ 77,770,702             $ 65,258,776             $ 61,445,917             $ 65,281,853             $ 72,790,807          
 
 
8

 
 
The following table sets forth our loan originations and principal repayments for the periods indicated.  We did not purchase or sell any loans in 2009, 2008 or 2007.
 
   
Year Ended
   
Year Ended
   
Year Ended
 
   
December 31,
   
December 31,
   
December 31,
 
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
 
                   
Commercial Loans (gross):
                 
 At beginning of period
  $ 10,736,092     $ 12,152,196     $ 12,113,882  
Commercial loans originated:
                       
Secured
    1,178,006       1,841,943       857,106  
Unsecured
    30,778,779       30,451,244       66,749,010  
Total commercial loans
    31,956,785       32,293,187       67,606,116  
Principal repayments
    (30,587,695 )     (33,709,291 )     (67,567,802 )
At end of period
  $ 12,105,182     $ 10,736,092     $ 12,152,196  
                         
Real Estate loans:
                       
At beginning of period
  $ 42,467,038     $ 33,921,755     $ 33,381,428  
Real estate loans originated:
                       
Commercial
    16,934,000       12,217,500       7,735,374  
One-to-four family
    535,000       4,180,000       2,200,000  
Total real estate loans
    17,469,000       16,397,500       9,935,374  
Principal repayments
    (8,253,353 )     (7,852,217 )     (9,395,047 )
At end of period
  $ 51,682,685     $ 42,467,038     $ 33,921,755  
Construction loans
                       
At beginning of period
  $ 11,896,432     $ 15,109,593     $ 19,377,797  
Construction loans originated
    5,938,000       8,422,000       17,280,000  
Principal repayments
    (4,576,432 )     (11,635,161 )     (21,548,204 )
At end of period
  $ 13,258,000     $ 11,896,432     $ 15,109,593  
Other loans (gross):
                       
At beginning of period
  $ 1,356,774     $ 1,393,478     $ 1,800,806  
Other loans originated
    798,536       769,067       717,098  
Principal repayments
    (167,588 )     (805,771 )     (1,124,426 )
At end of period
  $ 1,987,722     $ 1,356,774     $ 1,393,478  
 
Loan Maturity. The following table shows the contractual maturity of our loans at December 31, 2009. As we have decreased construction loans as a percentage of our loan portfolio and increased other real estate mortgage loans, we have increased the average contractual maturity of our loan portfolio. However, to limit interest rate risk, we have continued to concentrate our efforts principally on the origination of loans with adjustable interest rates and minimum interest rate floors.
 
 
    At December 31, 2009  
                                     
   
Commercial
   
Commercial
               
Other
       
   
Unsecured
   
Secured
   
Construction
   
Real Estate
   
Loans
   
Total
 
                                     
Amounts due:
                                   
Within one year
  $ 7,376,870     $ 626,320     $ 11,190,500     $ 10,290,041     $ 1,851,091     $ 31,334,822  
After one year:
                                               
One to five years
    3,590,004       511,988       2,067,500       7,909,943       136,631       14,216,066  
After five years
                      33,482,701             33,482,701  
Total amount due
    10,966,874       1,138,308       13,258,000       51,682,685       1,987,722       79,033,589  
                                                 
Less:
                                               
Unearned fees
                31,076       168,357             199,433  
Allowance for loan losses
    460,474       8,124       71,968       458,517       64,371       1,063,454  
Loans, net
  $ 10,506,400     $ 1,130,184     $ 13,154,956     $ 51,055,811     $ 1,923,351     $ 77,770,702  
 
 
9

 
 
The following table sets forth at December 31, 2009, the dollar amount of all loans, due after December 31, 2010, and whether such loans have fixed or variable interest rates.
 
     Due After December 31, 2010  
   
Fixed
   
Variable
   
Total
 
                   
Commercial Business Loans:
             
 
 
Unsecured
  $ 139,906     $ 3,450,098     $ 3,590,004  
Secured
    349,531       162,457       511,988  
Real Estate
                       
Commercial
    5,809,626       34,868,062       40,677,688  
One-to-four
    714,956             714,956  
Construction
    880,000       1,187,500       2,067,500  
Other loans
    136,631             136,631  
Total loans
  $ 8,030,650     $ 39,668,117     $ 47,698,767  
 
Commercial Business Lending. We originate commercial business loans directly to the professional and business community in our market area.  We target small to medium sized businesses and professionals such as lawyers, doctors and accountants. Applications for commercial business loans are obtained primarily from the efforts of our directors and senior management, who have extensive contacts in the local business community, or from branch referrals.  As of December 31, 2009, commercial business loans totaled $12,105,182 or 15.3% of total loans.
 
Commercial business loans we originate generally have terms of five years or less and have adjustable interest rates tied to the Wall Street Journal Prime Rate plus a margin. Most of our commercial business loans have terms of less than one year and one of the challenges facing management is the constant effort to originate commercial business loans as existing loans are repaid. Such loans may be secured or unsecured.  Secured commercial business loans can be collateralized by receivables, inventory and other assets.  All these loans are either loans to individuals for which they have personal liability or loans to entities backed by the personal guarantee of principals of the borrower.  The loans generally have shorter maturities and higher yields than real estate mortgage loans.  Management has extensive experience in originating commercial business loans within our marketplace.
 
Commercial business loans generally carry the greatest credit risks of the loans in our portfolio because repayment is more dependent on the success of the business operations of the borrower. Some of these loans are unsecured and those that are secured frequently have collateral that rapidly depreciates or is difficult to control in the event of a default.
 
Commercial Real Estate Lending. We originate commercial real estate loans that are generally secured by properties used for business purposes such as retail stores, other mixed-use (business and residential) properties, restaurants, light industrial buildings and small office buildings located in our primary market area. Our commercial real estate loans are generally made in amounts up to 70% of the appraised value of the property.  These loans are most commonly made with terms up to five years with interest rates that adjust to 100 or 150 basis points above the floating prime rate.  A significant portion of these loans are subject to an interest rate floor ranging between 7.00% and 8.00%.  Our underwriting standards consider the collateral of the borrower, the net operating income of the property and the borrower’s expertise, credit history and profitability.  We require personal guarantees from the borrower or the principals of the borrowing entity.  At December 31, 2009, our commercial real estate loans totaled $51,682,685, or 65.4% of total loans.
 
Loans secured by commercial real estate are generally larger and have traditionally been considered to involve greater risks than one-to-four family residential mortgage loans, but generally lesser risks than commercial business loans. Because payments on loans secured by commercial real estate properties are often dependent on the successful operation and management of the properties, repayment of such loans may be subject to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy, to a greater extent than other types of loans. We seek to minimize these risks through our lending policies and underwriting standards, which restrict new originations of such loans to our primary lending area and qualify such loans on the basis of the property’s income stream, collateral value and debt service ratio.
 
 
10

 
 
Construction Lending. Our construction loans primarily have been made to builders and developers to finance the construction of one- to four-family residential properties and, to a lesser extent, multi-family residential real estate properties. Our policies provide that construction loans may be made in amounts up to the lesser of 80% of the total hard and soft costs of the project. We generally require personal guarantees. Construction loans generally are made with prime-based interest rates with terms up to 18 months.  Loan proceeds are disbursed in increments as construction progresses and as inspections warrant.  At December 31, 2009, our construction loans totaled $13,258,000 or 16.8% of total loans. This represents a reduction of our construction loan portfolio over the past three years as economic conditions in the construction industry caused us to be more cautious in originating these loans while also reducing the number of satisfactory loan opportunities available to us.
 
Construction loans on non-owner occupied real estate generally carry greater credit risks than permanent mortgage loans on comparable completed properties because their repayment is more dependent on the borrower’s ability to sell or rent units under construction and the general as well as local economic conditions. Because payments on construction loans are often dependent on the successful completion of construction project and the management of the project, repayment of such loans may be subject to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy, to a greater extent than other types of loans.  In addition, in the event of a default, buildings under construction may deteriorate rapidly and it may be more difficult to realize upon the value of the building compared to an existing building that is ready for occupancy or already rented to third party tenants.
 
Loan Approval Procedures and Authority. All unsecured loans in excess of $250,000 and all secured loans over $400,000, are reviewed and approved by the Loan Committee, which consists of seven directors of Victory State Bank, prior to commitment. Smaller loans may be approved by underwriters designated by the Bank’s Chief Executive Officer. Consumer loans not secured by real estate and unsecured consumer loans, depending on the amount of the loan and the loan to value ratio, where applicable, require the approval of the Bank’s Chief Lending Officer and/or Chief Executive Officer.
 
Upon receipt of a completed loan application from a prospective borrower, we order a credit report and we verify other information.  If necessary, we request additional financial information.  An independent appraiser we designate performs an appraisal of the real estate intended to secure the proposed loan. The Board of Victory State Bank annually approves the independent appraisers and approves the Bank’s appraisal policy.  It is our policy to obtain title insurance on all real estate first mortgage loans and on substantially all subordinate mortgage loans.  Borrowers must also obtain hazard insurance prior to closing.  Some borrowers are required to make monthly escrow deposits which we then use to pay items such as real estate taxes.
 
Delinquencies and Classified Assets
 
Delinquent Loans. Our collection procedures for mortgage loans include sending a past due notice at 15 days and a late notice after payment is 30 days past due. In the event that payment is not received after the late notice, letters are sent or phone calls are made to the borrower. We attempt to obtain full payment or work out a repayment schedule with the borrower to avoid foreclosure. Generally, we authorize foreclosure proceedings when a loan is over 90 days delinquent.  We record property acquired in foreclosure as real estate owned at the lower of its appraised value less costs to dispose, or cost.  We cease to accrue interest on all loans 90 days past due and reverse all accrued but unpaid interest when the loan becomes non-accrual. We continue to accrue interest on construction loans that are 90 days past the maturity date of the loan if we expect the loan to be paid in full in the next 60 days and all interest is paid up to date.
 
The collection procedures for non-mortgage other loans generally include telephone calls to the borrower after ten days of the delinquency and late notices at 15 and 25 days past due. Letters and telephone calls generally continue until the matter is referred to a collection attorney or resolved. After the loan is 90 days past due, the loan is referred to counsel and is written-off.
 
 
11

 
 
Classified Assets. Federal regulations and our Loan Review and Risk Rating Policy provide for the classification of loans and other assets we consider to be of lesser quality as “Substandard”, “Doubtful” or “Loss” assets. An asset is considered “Substandard” if it is inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any. “Substandard” assets include those characterized by the “distinct possibility” that the insured institution will sustain “some loss” if the deficiencies are not corrected.  Assets classified as “Doubtful” have all of the weaknesses inherent in those classified “Substandard” with the added characteristic that the weaknesses present make “collection or liquidation in full,” on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions, and values, “highly questionable and improbable.”  Assets classified as “Loss” are those considered “uncollectible” and of such little value that their continuance as assets without the establishment of a specific loss reserve is not warranted.  Assets which do not currently expose us to sufficient risk to warrant classification but which possess weaknesses are designated “Special Mention” by management.
 
At December 31, 2009, we had thirty two (32) loans, in the aggregate amount of $11,191,987, designated as special mention.  We had seventeen (17) loans, in the aggregate amount of $4,098,640, classified as substandard, thirteen of which, in the aggregate amount of $4,028,909, are secured by real estate. Special mention loans totaled $4,402,731 and substandard loans totaled $3,999,240 at year end 2008. We believe that the increase in loans designated special mention reflects the effects of the adverse conditions in the economy on our borrowers. The Bank actively monitors all special mention loans to seek to avoid deterioration in the quality of the loan. The Bank is actively collecting the substandard loans and expects to collect substantially all the amounts due.  We had no loans classified as doubtful or loss as of December 31, 2009.
 
When we classify an asset as Substandard or Doubtful, we provide, as part of our general allowance for loan losses, an amount management deems prudent to recognize the risks pertaining to the asset.  A general allowance represents a loss allowance which has been established to recognize the inherent risk associated with lending activities, but which, unlike a specific allowance, has not been allocated to particular problem assets.  When we classify an asset as “Loss,” we either establish a specific allowance for losses equal to 100% of the amount of the asset or charge off that amount.
 
Victory State Bank’s Loan Review Officer and Board of Directors regularly review problem loans and review all classified assets on a quarterly basis. We believe our policies are consistent with the regulatory requirements regarding classified assets.  Our determination as to the classification of our assets and the amount of our valuation allowances is subject to review by the New York State Banking Department and the FDIC, which can order the establishment of additional general or specific loss allowances.
 
 
12

 
 
The following table sets forth delinquencies in our loan portfolio as of the dates indicated:
 
    At December 31, 2009  
    60-89 Days     90 Days or more  
   
Number
   
Principal
   
Number
   
Principal
 
                         
Commercial real estate
    9     $ 3,848,990       7     $ 1,176,114  
Commercial construction
                2       480,000  
Commercial unsecured
    4       61,907       1       41,037  
Real Estate - one-to-four family
    3       2,299,322              
Total
    16     $ 6,210,219       10     $ 1,697,151  
Delinquent loans to total loans
            7.86 %             2.15 %
 
     At December 31, 2008  
    60-89 Days     90 Days or more  
   
Number
   
Principal
   
Number
   
Principal
 
                                 
Commercial real estate
    2     $ 207,047       5     $ 1,453,846  
Commercial construction
                2       480,000  
Commercial unsecured
                7       345,221  
Total
    2     $ 207,047       14     $ 2,279,067  
Delinquent loans to total loans
            0.31 %             3.43 %
 
      At December 31, 2007  
    60-89 Days     90 Days or more  
   
Number
   
Principal
   
Number
   
Principal
 
                                 
Commercial real estate
    2     $ 1,406,936       3     $ 459,371  
Commercial construction
    2       2,944,000       6       2,505,134  
Commercial unsecured
    1       300,000       2       14,970  
Other
                1       5,877  
Total
    5     $ 4,650,936       12     $ 2,985,352  
Delinquent loans to total loans
            7.43 %             4.77 %
 
    At December 31, 2006  
    60-89 Days     90 Days or more  
   
Number
   
Principal
   
Number
   
Principal
 
                                 
Commercial real estate
        $       3     $ 773,924  
Commercial unsecured
    2       29,648       1       20,709  
Other
    1       9,676              
Total
    3     $ 39,324       4     $ 794,633  
Delinquent loans to total loans
            0.06 %             1.19 %
 
    At December 31, 2005  
     60-89 Days      90 Days or more  
   
Number
   
Principal
   
Number
   
Principal
 
                                 
Commercial real estate
        $       6     $ 1,123,081  
Commercial construction
                2       579,000  
Commercial unsecured
    1       8,420              
Total
    1     $ 8,420       8     $ 1,702,081  
Delinquent loans to total loans
            0.01 %             2.29 %
 
Loans 90 days or more past due represent non-accrual loans and loans that are contractually past due maturity but are still accruing interest. Loans past due 90 days or more and still on accrual were $0 for 2009 and 2008, $2,025,000 for 2007, $585,000 for 2006, and $46,000 for 2005.
 
 
13

 
 
Non-performing Assets.  The following table sets forth information about our non-performing assets at December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007.
 
   
At December 31,
   
At December 31,
   
At December 31,
 
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
 
                   
Non-performing assets:
                 
Commercial loans:
                 
Unsecured
  $ 41,037     $ 345,221     $ 14,970  
Commercial real estate
    1,176,114       1,453,846       459,371  
Construction
    480,000       480,000       480,000  
Consumer loan
                5,877  
                         
Total non-performing assets
  $ 1,697,151     $ 2,279,067     $ 960,218  
                         
 
                       
Non-performing loans to total loans
    2.15 %     3.43 %     1.53 %
Non-performing loans to total assets
    0.72 %     1.07 %     0.47 %
Non-performing assets to total assets
    0.72 %     1.07 %     0.47 %
 
The gross interest income that would have been recorded in 2009 if the non-accrual loans had been current in accordance with their original terms was $108,719. The amount of interest income on those loans that was included in net income for 2009 was $15,447.
 
The following table sets forth the aggregate carrying value of our assets classified as Substandard, Doubtful and Loss according to asset type:
 
    At December 31, 2009  
    Substandard     Doubtful  
   
Number
   
Amount
   
Number
   
Amount
 
Classification of assets:
                       
Commercial Loans:
                       
    Unsecured
    4     $ 69,731           $  
Commercial Real Estate
    11       3,548,909              
Construction
    2       480,000              
    Total loans
    17     $ 4,098,640              

No assets were classified as Loss at year end 2009 or 2008.
 
 
14

 

Non-Performing Loans

Management closely monitors non-performing loans and other assets with potential problems on a regular basis. We had ten non-performing loans, totaling $1,697,151, at December 31, 2009, compared to thirteen non-performing loans, totaling $2,279,067, at December 31, 2008.  The following is information about the four largest non-performing loans, totaling $1,256,964 in outstanding principal balance at December 31, 2009. Management believes it has taken appropriate steps with a view towards maximizing recovery and minimizing loss on these loans.
 
  ●  
$859,968 in three construction loans to a builder secured and cross-collateralized by first mortgage liens on three lots in Staten Island on which single family houses are near completion. The loans are past maturity and we commenced foreclosure actions in 2008.  The foreclosure sale was held in January 2010 and the Bank was the successful bidder.  We have an agreement with a builder to assign our bid to the builder upon the payment to us of an amount sufficient to exceed the value of the loans on our books, and thus we will not record any loss upon the foreclosure sale and the subsequent assignment of our bid to the builder.
     
  ●  
$396,996 in a loan to a local business in which we are a participant in the loan with another bank.  We are not the lead lender. The loan is in arrears and the lead lender has commenced a foreclosure action.  The loan is secured by a first mortgage on a commercial building, a security interest in the business, and the personal guaranties of the principals.
 
Allowance for Loan Losses

It is our policy to provide a valuation allowance for probable incurred losses on loans based on our past loan loss experience, known and inherent risks in the loan portfolio, adverse situations which may affect the borrower’s ability to repay, estimated value of underlying collateral and current economic conditions in our lending area.  The allowance is increased by provisions for loan losses charged to earnings and is reduced by charge-offs, net of recoveries.  While management uses available information to estimate losses on loans, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based upon any changes in economic conditions or if our loan portfolio increases. In addition, various regulatory agencies, as an integral part of their examination process, periodically review the Bank’s allowance for loan losses.  Such agencies may require the Bank to recognize additions to the allowance based on judgments different from those of management.  Management believes, based upon all relevant and available information, that the allowance for loan losses is appropriate.

When analyzing whether the level of the allowance for loan losses is appropriate, management considers performing loans in our loan portfolio that have no material identified weaknesses. Management establishes an amount equal to a fixed percentage of the performing loans in each of our five principal loan categories to be included in the allowance to cover inherent weaknesses in the broad category of loans. The fixed percentages are based upon historical loss experience in each category, the state of the economy, special risks in that particular category, and other factors that management deems relevant.  Management also analyzes each loan that has been identified as having specific weaknesses to determine the appropriate level of the allowance for that loan. This analysis considers both the general factors which are considered in assessing performing loans as well as specific facts pertinent to each loan, such as collateral value, borrower’s income and ability to repay, payment history, the reasons for and length of the delinquency, and the value of any credit support. Although loans may be analyzed individually or in groups to determine the allowance, the entire allowance is available for any losses that occur.

In order to assist in determining the allowance, an independent loan review firm, senior management and the Bank’s Board of Directors review the allowance for loan losses quarterly. If they determine that the allowance is inappropriate, then management increases or decreases the provision for loan losses to bring the allowance to the appropriate level.

As of December 31, 2009, our allowance for loan losses was $1,063,454 or 1.35% of total loans.  Based upon all relevant and presently available information, management believes that the allowance for loan losses is appropriate. We continue to monitor and modify the level of the allowance for loan losses in order to maintain the allowance at a level which management considers appropriate. While management uses available information to recognize losses on loans, future additions to the allowance may be necessary, based on changes in economic and local market conditions beyond management’s control. In addition, federal and state bank regulatory agencies periodically review Victory State Bank’s loan loss allowance as part of their periodic safety and soundness examinations of the Bank. They may recommend or seek to compel increases in the allowance if they believe that weaknesses in the loan portfolio are more significant than management’s assessment.
 
 
15

 
 
The following table sets forth the activity in our allowance for loan losses:
 
               
 
             
       
For the Year Ended
             
     December 31,  
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
   
2006
   
2005
 
                               
Allowance for Loan Losses:
                             
   Balance at beginning of period
  $ 987,876     $ 927,161     $ 1,128,824     $ 1,153,298     $ 1,299,520  
   Charge-offs:
                                       
   Real estate loans:
                                       
     Commercial
    (110,241 )                        
   Commercial loans:
                                       
     Unsecured
    (412,112 )     (483,326 )     (254,986 )     (62,181 )     (318,399 )
   Consumer loan
    (18,606 )     (7,959 )           (17,511 )      
   Other loans
    (15,679 )     (3,503 )     (8,639 )     (28,111 )     (25,302 )
Total charge-offs
    (556,638 )     (494,788 )     (263,625 )     (107,803 )     (343,701 )
Recoveries
    72,216       270,503       66,962       148,329       257,479  
Net (charge-offs) / recoveries
    (484,422 )     (224,285 )     (196,663 )     40,526       (86,222 )
Provision charged to income
    560,000       285,000       (5,000 )     (65,000 )     (60,000 )
Balance at end of period
  $ 1,063,454     $ 987,876     $ 927,161     $ 1,128,824     $ 1,153,298  
                                         
Ratio of net charge-offs / (recoveries) during the period to average loans outstanding during the period
    0.68 %     0.35 %     0.32 %     -0.06 %     0.12 %
Ratio of allowance for loan losses to total loans at the end of period
    1.35 %     1.49 %     1.48 %     1.69 %     1.55 %
Ratio of allowance for loan losses to non-performing loans at the end of the period
    62.66 %     43.35 %     96.56 %     538.61 %     72.03 %
Ratio of allowance for loan losses to non-performing assets at the end of the period
    62.66 %     43.35 %     96.56 %     538.61 %     72.03 %
 
The following table sets forth the allocation of our allowance for loan losses among each of the categories listed.

    At December 31,     At December 31,      At December 31,     At December 31,     At December 31,  
     2009      2008     2007     2006      2005  
       
% of Loans
       
% of Loans
       
% of Loans
       
% of Loans
       
% of Loans
 
       
in Category
       
in Category
       
in Category
       
in Category
       
in Category
 
       
to
       
to
       
to
       
to
       
to
 
   
Amount
 
Total Loans
   
Amount
 
Total Loans
   
Amount
 
Total Loans
   
Amount
 
Total Loans
   
Amount
 
Total Loans
 
                                                   
Allowance:
                                                 
Commercial loans:
                                                 
Unsecured
  $ 460,474     13.9 %   $ 372,803     14.4 %   $ 330,355     17.5 %   $ 337,054     16.3 %   $ 360,532     14.9 %
Secured
    8,124     1.4       7,451     1.8       19,877     1.9       10,859     1.8       2,349     2.1  
Commercial real estate
    418,215     61.7       449,525     60.1       345,407     50.6       518,620     49.9       363,072     40.1  
Residential real estate
    40,302     3.7       25,686     3.8       15,887     3.7       12,501     0.2       7,835     0.4  
Construction loans
    71,968     16.8       100,737     17.9       166,437     24.1       198,901     29.1       362,590     39.8  
Other loans
    64,371     2.5       31,674     2.0       49,198     2.2       50,889     2.7       56,920     2.7  
Total allowances
  $ 1,063,454     100.0 %   $ 987,876     100.0 %   $ 927,161     100.0 %   $ 1,128,824     100.0 %   $ 1,153,298     100.0 %

Investment Activities

State-chartered banking institutions have the authority to invest in various types of liquid assets, including United States Treasury Obligations, securities of various federal agencies, certain certificates of deposits of insured banks and savings institutions, certain bankers’ acceptances, repurchase agreements and federal funds. Additionally, it is appropriate for us to maintain investments for ongoing liquidity needs and we have maintained liquid assets at a level believed to be adequate to meet our normal daily activities.

Our investment policy, established by the Board of Directors of Victory State Bank and implemented by its Asset/Liability Committee, attempts to provide and maintain liquidity, generate a favorable return on investments without incurring undue interest rate and credit risk, and complement our lending activities. Although we classify most of our securities portfolio as available for sale, it is our practice to retain most of our securities until they mature.
 
 
16

 
 
Our policies generally limit investments to government and federal agency securities or AAA rated securities, including corporate debt obligations, which are investment grade with weighted average lives of seven years or less.  Our policies provide that all investment purchases be ratified by the Bank’s Board and may only be initiated by the President or Chief Financial Officer of the Bank.  Investment securities consist of collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMO”) with estimated average lives, based upon prepayment assumptions that management believes are reasonable, of 4.5 years or less, mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) with maturities of seven years or less and U.S. Agency notes with a maturity of less than 15 years.  These CMOs and MBS are backed by federal agencies such as Federal National Mortgage Association (“FNMA”) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC”) or are “AAA” rated whole loan securities.  No investment securities in our portfolio have experienced ratings down grades.  At December 31, 2009, we had investment securities with a cost basis of $110,914,773 and a fair value of $113,912,404.  All investment securities at December 31, 2009, were either CMO’s or MBS’s.  The entire investment portfolio at December 31, 2009 was classified as available for sale and is accounted on a fair market value basis.
 
The following table sets forth certain information regarding the amortized cost and fair values of the investment securities, available for sale portfolio at the dates indicated.   The excess of fair value over amortized cost at year end 2009 is the result of the effect of recent low market interest rates on the value of previously-purchased investment securities. If market interest rates were to increase, we anticipate that this excess would decrease and, under certain circumstances depending upon the timing of securities purchases and the rate of increase in interest rates, amortized cost may exceed fair value.
 
   
At December 31,
 
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
 
   
Amortized
   
Fair
   
Amortized
   
Fair
   
Amortized
   
Fair
 
   
Cost
   
Value
   
Cost
   
Value
   
Cost
   
Value
 
                                     
Investments securities, available for sale
                                   
FNMA
  $ 4,855,213     $ 5,040,820     $ 6,646,320     $ 6,690,593     $ 5,762,683     $ 5,746,955  
FHLMC
                37,411       37,643       161,513       162,752  
GNMA
    1,265,428       1,321,240       1,576,764       1,632,790       1,892,949       1,849,267  
Whole Loan MBS
    1,860,603       1,856,893       2,620,965       2,559,037       3,135,102       3,103,907  
Collateralized mortgage obligations
    102,933,529       105,693,451       108,331,330       109,368,525       107,571,610       106,951,236  
                                                 
    $ 110,914,773     $ 113,912,404     $ 119,212,790     $ 120,288,588     $ 118,523,857     $ 117,814,117  
 
The table below sets forth certain information regarding the amortized cost, weighted average yields and stated maturities of our investment securities at December 31, 2009 and 2008.

   
At December 31, 2009
 
         
Weighted
         
Weighted
         
Weighted
         
Weighted
       
   
Less Than
   
Average
   
1 To 5
   
Average
   
5 To 10
   
Average
   
Over 10
   
Average
       
   
1 Year
   
Yield
   
Years
   
Yield
   
Years
   
Yield
   
Years
   
Yield
   
Total
 
                                                               
Investment Securities:
                                                             
FNMA
  $     - %     $ 1,390,603     4.49 %     $ 1,682,752     4.42 %     $ 1,781,857     3.95 %     $ 4,855,212  
FHLMC
                                                     
GNMA
                            1,265,428     4.38                     1,265,428  
Whole Loan MBS
                            1,860,603     4.64                     1,860,603  
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
                1,941,530     4.82         37,530,714     4.43         63,461,286     4.32         102,933,530  
                                                                         
Total
  $     - %     $ 3,332,133     4.68 %     $ 42,339,497     4.44 %     $ 65,243,143     4.31 %     $ 110,914,773  
 
17

 
 
   
At December 31, 2008
 
         
Weighted
         
Weighted
         
Weighted
         
Weighted
       
   
Less Than
   
Average
   
1 To 5
   
Average
   
5 To 10
   
Average
   
Over 10
   
Average
       
   
1 Year
   
Yield
   
Years
   
Yield
   
Years
   
Yield
   
Years
   
Yield
   
Total
 
                                                               
Investment Securities:
                                                             
FNMA
  $     - %     $ 1,897,587     4.47 %     $ 2,190,239     4.41 %     $ 2,558,494     3.74 %     $ 6,646,320  
FHLMC
    37,411     2.79                                             37,411  
GNMA
                            1,576,764     4.39                     1,576,764  
Whole Loan MBS
                            2,620,965     4.44                     2,620,965  
Collateralized Mortgage Obligations
                2,187,168     5.13         47,617,983     4.41         58,526,179     4.76         108,331,330  
                                                                         
Total
  $ 37,411     2.79 %     $ 4,084,755     4.82 %     $ 54,005,951     4.41 %     $ 61,084,673     4.72 %     $ 119,212,790  
 
Source of Funds

General.  Deposits are the primary source of our funds for use in lending, investing and for other general purposes.  In addition to deposits, we obtain funds from principal repayments and prepayments on loans and securities.  Loan and securities repayments are a relatively stable source of funds, while deposit inflows and outflows as well as unscheduled prepayments are influenced by general interest rates and money market conditions.

Deposits.  We offer a variety of deposit accounts having a range of interest rates and terms.  Our deposits consist of non-interest bearing checking accounts, money market accounts, time deposit (“certificate”) accounts, statement savings and NOW accounts.  The flow of deposits is influenced significantly by general economic conditions, changes in money market rates, prevailing interest rates and competition.  Our deposits are obtained primarily from the areas in which our offices are located.  We do not actively solicit certificate accounts in excess of $100,000, nor do we use brokers to obtain deposits. However, in connection with our efforts in establishing banking development districts in Staten Island, we accept large balance municipal deposits as part of the New York State and New York City banking development district programs.  These municipal deposits total $35 million, are at a subsidized rate, and mature on a quarterly or an annual basis.  There can be no assurance that the Bank will be able to retain these municipal deposits or be able to renew them at subsidized rates as compared to current market rates at that time. Management constantly monitors our deposit accounts and, based on historical experience, management believes it will retain a large portion of such accounts upon maturity.  Deposit account terms we offer vary according to the minimum balance required, the time periods that the funds must remain on deposit and the interest rates, among other factors.  In determining the characteristics of the deposit account programs we offer, we consider potential profitability, matching terms of the deposits with loan products, the attractiveness to the customers and the rates offered by our competitors.

Our focus on customer service, primarily for the business and professional community in our marketplace, has facilitated our retention of non-interest bearing checking accounts and low costing NOW and savings accounts, which generally have interest rates substantially less than certificate of deposits.  At December 31, 2009, these types of low cost deposit accounts amounted to $117,876,314, or 55.9% of total deposits.
 
 
18

 
 
The following table presents deposit activity for the periods indicated.
 
                   
   
Year Ended
   
Year Ended
   
Year Ended
 
   
December 31,
   
December 31,
   
December 31,
 
   
2009