Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates (VSEA)

 
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  • 10-Q (Jul 28, 2011)
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Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates 10-Q 2005

Documents found in this filing:

  1. 10-Q
  2. Ex-31.1
  3. Ex-31.2
  4. Ex-32.1
  5. Ex-32.2
  6. Ex-32.2
FORM 10-Q
Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

x QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended April 1, 2005

 

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from                      to                     

 

Commission File Number: 0-25395

 

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

State or other jurisdiction of

Incorporation or organization:

 

IRS Employer

Identification No.:

Delaware   77-0501994

 

35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts   01930
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip code)

 

(978) 282-2000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Indicate by checkmark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x     No ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is an accelerated filer (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes x No ¨

 

Shares of common stock outstanding at May 2, 2005: 36,814,644.

 

An index of exhibits filed with this Form 10-Q is located on page 31.

 



Table of Contents

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

 

INDEX

 

Item
Number


        Page
Number


PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

    

Item 1.

  

Consolidated Financial Statements

    
    

Unaudited Consolidated Balance Sheets at April 1, 2005 and October 1, 2004

   1
    

Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Income for the three and six month periods ended April 1, 2005 and April 2, 2004

   2
    

Unaudited Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the three and six month periods ended April 1, 2005 and April 2, 2004

   3
    

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

   4

Item 2.

  

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

   15

Item 3.

  

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

   28

Item 4.

  

Controls and Procedures

   29

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

    

Item 1.

  

Legal Proceedings

   30

Item 2.

  

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

   30

Item 3.

  

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

   30

Item 4.

  

Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

   30

Item 5.

  

Other Information

   31

Item 6.

  

Exhibits

   31
    

Signatures

   32

 


Table of Contents

PART 1. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

     April 1,
2005


    October 1,
2004


 
     (Amounts in thousands,
except share data)
 
ASSETS                 

Current assets

                

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 186,767     $ 218,578  

Short-term investments

     249,983       173,891  

Accounts receivable, net

     107,964       123,749  

Inventories

     141,391       104,900  

Deferred income taxes

     27,740       27,691  

Other current assets

     19,964       32,938  
    


 


Total current assets

     733,809       681,747  

Property, plant and equipment, net

     59,290       52,344  

Goodwill

     12,280       12,280  

Other assets

     3,175       3,125  
    


 


Total assets

   $ 808,554     $ 749,496  
    


 


LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY                 

Current liabilities

                

Notes payable and current portion of long-term debt

   $ 715     $ 4,170  

Accounts payable

     48,500       33,980  

Accrued expenses

     45,243       53,234  

Product warranty

     8,239       7,841  

Deferred revenue

     62,814       54,509  
    


 


Total current liabilities

     165,511       153,734  

Long-term accrued expenses

     10,608       10,905  

Deferred income taxes

     4,615       4,615  

Long-term debt

     3,954       4,162  
    


 


Total liabilities

     184,688       173,416  
    


 


Commitments, contingencies and guarantees (Note 14)

                

Stockholders’ equity

                

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized; none issued or outstanding

     —         —    

Common stock, $0.01 par value; 150,000,000 shares authorized; 36,805,846 and 36,408,995 shares issued and outstanding at April 1, 2005 and October 1, 2004, respectively

     368       364  

Capital in excess of par value

     345,312       331,701  

Retained earnings

     283,398       244,320  

Deferred compensation

     (3,285 )     (149 )

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (1,927 )     (156 )
    


 


Total stockholders’ equity

     623,866       576,080  
    


 


Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 808,554     $ 749,496  
    


 


 

The accompanying notes to the unaudited consolidated financial statements are an integral part of these statements.

 

1


Table of Contents

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

 

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

 

     Fiscal Three Months Ended

    Fiscal Six Months Ended

 
     April 1,
2005


    April 2,
2004


    April 1,
2005


    April 2,
2004


 
     (Amounts in thousands, except per share data)  

Revenue

                                

Product

   $ 116,044     $ 109,368     $ 223,132     $ 195,807  

Service

     21,287       16,260       40,682       29,570  

Royalty

     1,766       1,698       23,708       3,792  
    


 


 


 


Total revenue

     139,097       127,326       287,522       229,169  
    


 


 


 


Cost of revenue

                                

Product

     68,870       60,058       127,774       110,505  

Service

     11,961       9,573       25,341       18,587  
    


 


 


 


Total cost of revenue

     80,831       69,631       153,115       129,092  
    


 


 


 


Gross profit

     58,266       57,695       134,407       100,077  
    


 


 


 


Operating expenses

                                

Research and development

     19,077       16,958       37,730       33,223  

Marketing, general and administrative

     24,330       21,011       51,710       40,819  

Restructuring

     914       —         914       —    
    


 


 


 


Total operating expenses

     44,321       37,969       90,354       74,042  
    


 


 


 


Operating income

     13,945       19,726       44,053       26,035  

Interest income

     2,577       1,098       10,404       2,178  

Interest expense

     (173 )     (194 )     (395 )     (418 )

Other income (expense), net

     (82 )     (115 )     2,737       (112 )
    


 


 


 


Income before income taxes

     16,267       20,515       56,799       27,683  

Provision for income taxes

     5,156       6,493       17,721       8,858  
    


 


 


 


Net income

   $ 11,111     $ 14,022     $ 39,078     $ 18,825  
    


 


 


 


Weighted average shares outstanding - basic

     36,601       36,135       36,529       35,819  

Weighted average shares outstanding - diluted

     37,347       37,103       37,269       36,907  

Net income per share - basic

   $ 0.30     $ 0.39     $ 1.07     $ 0.53  

Net income per share - diluted

   $ 0.30     $ 0.38     $ 1.05     $ 0.51  

 

The accompanying notes to the unaudited consolidated financial statements are an integral part of these statements.

 

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Table of Contents

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

 

UNAUDITED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

     Fiscal Six Months Ended

 
     April 1,
2005


    April 2,
2004


 
     (Amounts in thousands)  

Cash flow from operating activities:

                

Net income

   $ 39,078     $ 18,825  

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

                

Depreciation and amortization

     6,263       6,308  

Tax benefit from stock options exercised and employee stock purchase plan

     1,789       13,151  

Deferred income taxes

     (49 )     (164 )

Amortization of investment premiums

     888       502  

Stock-based compensation

     2,914       —    

Changes in assets and liabilities:

                

Accounts receivable

     17,219       (41,252 )

Inventories

     (41,294 )     (22,569 )

Other current assets

     12,974       (1,459 )

Accounts payable

     14,434       6,832  

Accrued expenses

     (9,314 )     (892 )

Product warranty

     373       (952 )

Deferred revenue

     7,532       24,687  

Other

     (145 )     (176 )
    


 


Net cash provided by operating activities

     52,662       2,841  
    


 


Cash flows from investing activities:

                

Purchase of property, plant and equipment

     (8,419 )     (8,000 )

Proceeds from sales and maturities of short-term investments

     35,125       7,104  

Purchase of short-term investments

     (113,589 )     (59,326 )
    


 


Net cash used in investing activities

     (86,883 )     (60,222 )
    


 


Cash flows from financing activities:

                

Proceeds from the issuance of common stock

     5,928       22,206  

Borrowing (repayment) of notes payable

     (3,716 )     105  

Repayment of long-term debt

     (208 )     (191 )
    


 


Net cash provided by financing activities

     2,004       22,120  
    


 


Effects of exchange rates on cash

     406       174  
    


 


Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents

     (31,811 )     (35,087 )

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

     218,578       310,481  
    


 


Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

   $ 186,767     $ 275,394  
    


 


 

The accompanying notes to the unaudited consolidated financial statements are an integral part of these statements.

 

3


Table of Contents

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Note 1. Description of Business and Basis of Presentation

 

Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc. (“Varian Semiconductor”) designs, manufactures, markets and services semiconductor processing equipment used in the fabrication of integrated circuits to customers located both in the United States (“U.S.”) and in international markets. Varian Semiconductor faces risk factors similar to all companies in the semiconductor manufacturing equipment market including, but not limited to, competition, market downturn, technological change, international operations and related foreign currency risks and ability to recruit and retain key employees.

 

These unaudited interim consolidated financial statements have been prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S. have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations. These unaudited interim consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and the notes thereto included in the annual report on Form 10-K filed by Varian Semiconductor with the SEC on December 14, 2004 for the fiscal year ended October 1, 2004. In the opinion of management, the unaudited interim consolidated financial statements include all adjustments, consisting of only normal recurring adjustments, necessary to present fairly the information required to be set forth therein. The results of operations for the three and six month periods ended April 1, 2005 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for a full year or for any other period.

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain items in the prior year’s consolidated financial statements have been reclassified to conform to the current presentation of the financial statements.

 

Note 2. Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation

 

Varian Semiconductor accounts for stock compensation plans in accordance with Accounting Principles Board (“APB”) Opinion No. 25, “Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees”. If Varian Semiconductor had elected to recognize compensation cost based on the fair value of all stock awards at grant date as prescribed by Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Statement No. 123, “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation,” the net income and net income per basic and diluted share for the three and six month periods ended April 1, 2005 and April 2, 2004 would have been reduced to the pro forma amounts shown below:

 

     Fiscal Three Months Ended

    Fiscal Six Months Ended

 
     April 1,
2005


    April 2,
2004


    April 1,
2005


    April 2,
2004


 
     (Amounts in thousands, except per share
amounts)
 

Net income as reported

   $ 11,111     $ 14,022     $ 39,078     $ 18,825  

Add: Compensation expense included in net income

     130       —         2,011       —    

Less: Total stock-based employee compensation expense determined under fair value method for all awards, net of related tax benefit

     (2,741 )     (2,824 )     (7,853 )     (5,566 )
    


 


 


 


Pro forma net income

   $ 8,500     $ 11,198     $ 33,236     $ 13,259  
    


 


 


 


Net income per share - basic, as reported

   $ 0.30     $ 0.39     $ 1.07     $ 0.53  

Net income per share - diluted, as reported

   $ 0.30     $ 0.38     $ 1.05     $ 0.51  

Pro forma net income per share:

                                

Basic

   $ 0.23     $ 0.31     $ 0.91     $ 0.37  

Diluted

   $ 0.23     $ 0.30     $ 0.89     $ 0.36  

 

The $7.9 million in stock based compensation for the six month period ended April 1, 2005 includes $2.1 million resulting from the amendment to the definition of retirement in the Amended and Restated Omnibus Stock Plan by Varian Semiconductor’s Board of Directors on October 5, 2004 and the Retirement Agreement entered into on December 8, 2004 (see Note 11. Retirement Plans).

 

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Table of Contents

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Note 3. Computation of Net Income Per Share

 

Basic net income per share is calculated based on net income and the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the reporting period. Diluted net income per share includes additional dilution from stock issuable pursuant to the exercise of stock options outstanding and restricted stock. For purposes of the diluted net income per share calculation, the additional shares issuable upon exercise of stock options and restricted stock are determined using the treasury stock method.

 

A reconciliation of the numerator and denominator used in the net income per share calculations is presented as follows:

 

     Fiscal Three Months Ended

   Fiscal Six Months Ended

     April 1,
2005


   April 2,
2004


   April 1,
2005


   April 2,
2004


     (amounts in thousands, except per share data)

Numerator:

                           

Net income

   $ 11,111    $ 14,022    $ 39,078    $ 18,825
    

  

  

  

Denominator:

                           

Denominator for basic net income per share:

                           

Weighted average shares outstanding

     36,601      36,135      36,529      35,819

Effect of diluted securities:

                           

Stock options and restricted stock

     746      968      740      1,088
    

  

  

  

Denominator for diluted net income per share

     37,347      37,103      37,269      36,907
    

  

  

  

Net income per share - basic

   $ 0.30    $ 0.39    $ 1.07    $ 0.53

Net income per share - diluted

   $ 0.30    $ 0.38    $ 1.05    $ 0.51

 

For the three and six month period ended April 1, 2005, options to purchase 894,641 and 905,740 common shares at a weighted average exercise price of $48.22 and $48.13, respectively (exercise prices that exceeded the market value of the underlying common stock) were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per share. For the three and six month period ended April 2, 2004, options to purchase 653,986 and 652,433 common shares at a weighted average exercise price of $50.94 and $51.01, respectively (exercise prices that exceeded the market value of the underlying common stock) were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per share.

 

As of April 1, 2005, Varian Semiconductor had outstanding options to purchase an aggregate of 5,371,456 shares of its common stock at a weighted average price of $30.69. Of these options, options to purchase an aggregate of 3,152,199 shares of its common stock at a weighted average price of $28.48 were exercisable.

 

Note 4. Cash, Cash Equivalents and Short-term Investments

 

Varian Semiconductor considers currency on hand, demand deposits, and all highly liquid investments with a remaining maturity of three months or less at the time of acquisition to be cash and cash equivalents. The carrying amounts of cash and cash equivalents approximate estimated fair value because of the short-term maturities of those financial instruments. Cash equivalents at April 1, 2005 and October 1, 2004 were $178.9 million and $212.8 million, respectively. Short-term investments consist primarily of U.S. Treasury, government agency and corporate bonds and certificates of deposit with ratings AA or better with remaining maturity greater than three months at the time of acquisition. Varian Semiconductor manages its cash equivalents and short-term investments as a single portfolio of highly marketable securities that is intended to be available to meet Varian Semiconductor’s current cash requirements.

 

Varian Semiconductor has the intent and ability, if necessary, to liquidate any of its investments in order to meet its liquidity needs in the next 12 months. Accordingly, those investments with contractual maturities greater than one year from the date of acquisition have been classified as short-term.

 

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Table of Contents

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

As of April 1, 2005, a net unrealized loss on short-term investments of $1.9 million had been recorded as accumulated other comprehensive loss. As of October 1, 2004, a net unrealized loss on short-term investments of $0.2 million was recorded as accumulated other comprehensive loss.

 

Short-term investments by security type at April 1, 2005 were as follows:

 

     Cost

   Gross
Unrealized
Gains


   Gross
Unrealized
Losses


    Estimated
Fair Value


     (Amounts in thousands)

Bank certificates of deposit

   $ 24,240    $ —      $ —       $ 24,240

U.S. Treasury and agency securities

     137,656      42      (1,528 )     136,170

Corporate bonds

     90,014      73      (514 )     89,573
    

  

  


 

     $ 251,910    $ 115    $ (2,042 )   $ 249,983
    

  

  


 

 

Short-term investments by security type at October 1, 2004 were as follows:

 

     Cost

   Gross
Unrealized
Gains


   Gross
Unrealized
Losses


    Estimated
Fair Value


     (Amounts in thousands)

Bank certificates of deposit

   $ 24,753    $ —      $ —       $ 24,753

U.S. Treasury and agency securities

     103,944      184      (320 )     103,808

Corporate bonds

     45,350      59      (79 )     45,330
    

  

  


 

     $ 174,047    $ 243    $ (399 )   $ 173,891
    

  

  


 

 

The short-term investment maturities are as follows:

 

     April 1,
2005


   October 1,
2004


     (Amounts in thousands)

Maturing within 1 year

   $ 138,364    $ 92,603

Maturing between 1 year and 5 years

     111,619      81,288
    

  

Total

   $ 249,983    $ 173,891
    

  

 

Note 5. Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivable consist of the following:

 

     April 1,
2005


    October 1,
2004


 
     (Amounts in thousands)  

Billed receivables

   $ 109,143     $ 125,137  

Allowance for doubtful accounts

     (1,179 )     (1,388 )
    


 


Accounts receivable, net

   $ 107,964     $ 123,749  
    


 


 

Substantially all of Varian Semiconductor’s accounts receivable balance relates to trade receivables. Trade accounts receivable are recorded at the invoiced amount and do not bear interest. The allowance for doubtful accounts is Varian Semiconductor’s best estimate of the amount of probable credit losses in its existing accounts receivable. Varian Semiconductor maintains

 

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Table of Contents

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

allowances for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of its customers to make required payments for products and services. Accounts with known financial issues are first reviewed and specific estimates are recorded. The remaining accounts receivable balances are then grouped in categories by the amount of days the balance is past due and the estimated loss is calculated as a percentage of the total category based upon past history. Account balances are charged off against the allowance when it is probable the receivable will not be recovered.

 

Note 6. Inventories

 

The components of inventories are as follows:

 

     April 1,
2005


   October 1,
2004


     (Amounts in thousands)

Raw materials and parts

   $ 60,149    $ 34,874

Work in process

     28,997      33,674

Finished goods

     52,245      36,352
    

  

Total inventories

   $ 141,391    $ 104,900
    

  

 

Note 7. Accrued Expenses

 

The components of accrued expenses are as follows:

 

     April 1,
2005


   October 1,
2004


     (Amounts in thousands)

Payroll and employee benefits

   $ 22,263    $ 25,575

Estimated loss contingencies

     2,805      5,100

Restructuring

     764      87

Income taxes payable

     15,097      16,562

Other

     4,314      5,910
    

  

Total accrued expenses

   $ 45,243    $ 53,234
    

  

 

Note 8. Deferred Revenue

 

The components of deferred revenue are as follows:

 

 

     April 1,
2005


   October 1,
2004


     (Amounts in thousands)

Fully deferred tools and acceptance revenue

   $ 42,286    $ 35,828

Extended warranties

     9,862      7,906

Maintenance and service contracts

     7,653      6,569

Other deferred revenue

     3,013      4,206
    

  

Total deferred revenue

   $ 62,814    $ 54,509
    

  

 

Note 9. Product Warranties

 

Varian Semiconductor warrants that its products will be free from defects in materials and workmanship and will conform to its standard published specifications in effect at the time of delivery for a period of three to twelve months from the date the customer accepts the products. Additionally, Varian Semiconductor warrants that maintenance services will be performed in a workmanlike manner consistent with generally accepted industry standards for a period of ninety days from the completion of any agreed-upon services. Varian Semiconductor provides for the estimated cost of product warranties, the amount of which is based primarily upon historical information, at the time product revenue is recognized. Varian Semiconductor’s warranty obligation is affected by a number of factors, including product failure rates, utilization levels, material usage, service delivery costs incurred in correcting a product failure, and supplier warranties on parts delivered to Varian Semiconductor. Should these factors or other factors affecting warranty costs differ from Varian Semiconductor’s estimates, revisions to the estimated warranty liability would be required.

 

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Table of Contents

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Product warranty activity for the first six months of fiscal year 2005 was as follows:

 

    

Amount of

Liability


 
     (Amounts in
thousands)
 

Balance as of October 1, 2004

   $ 7,841  

Accruals for warranties issued during the period

     1,834  

Increase to pre-existing warranties, net

     492  

Settlements made during the period

     (2,077 )
    


Balance as of December 31, 2004

     8,090  

Accruals for warranties issued during the period

     2,551  

Increase to pre-existing warranties, net

     401  

Settlements made during the period

     (2,803 )
    


Balance as of April 1, 2005

   $ 8,239  
    


 

Note 10. Long-Term Accrued Expenses

 

Long-term accrued expenses are comprised of accruals for post-employment liabilities and environmental costs not expected to be expended within the next year. The current portion is recorded within accrued expenses.

 

Note 11. Retirement Plans

 

On October 5, 2004, Varian Semiconductor’s Board of Directors amended the definition of retirement to mean (i) for non-employee directors, the voluntary cessation of service as a director after completion of at least three years of service as a director, (ii) for employees, other than executive officers as provided in clause (iii) below, the voluntary resignation from employment after completion of at least ten years of service as an employee and the attainment of age 55, and (iii) for executive officers, the voluntary resignation from employment after the attainment of a combined age and years of service as an employee of at least 65, a minimum age of 55, and completion of at least five years of service as an employee.

 

On December 8, 2004, Varian Semiconductor entered into a Retirement Agreement and General Release (the “Retirement Agreement”) with Ernest L. Godshalk, III pursuant to which Mr. Godshalk resigned from his position as a director and as President and Chief Operating Officer of Varian Semiconductor effective as of December 31, 2004 (the “Retirement Date”) due to retirement. As a result, approximately $3.5 million was due to Mr. Godshalk, and expensed in the first quarter of fiscal 2005, of which $2.5 million was a non-cash charge. For more information, please see Item 9B of Part II of the Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended October 1, 2004.

 

Note 12. Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

On October 22, 2004, the President signed the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 (the “Jobs Act”). The Jobs Act creates a temporary incentive for U.S. corporations to repatriate accumulated income earned abroad by providing an 85 percent dividends received deduction for certain dividends from controlled corporations. The deduction is subject to a number of limitations and, as of today, uncertainty remains as to how to interpret numerous provisions of the Jobs Act. As such, Varian Semiconductor is not yet in a position to decide on whether, and to what extent, it might repatriate foreign earnings that have not yet been remitted to the U.S. Varian Semiconductor expects to complete its evaluation of the effects of the repatriation provision within a reasonable period of time following the publication of additional guidance. At this time, the range of earnings that may be repatriated and the potential range of income tax effects of such repatriation cannot be reasonably estimated.

 

In December 2004, the FASB issued FASB Staff Position (“FSP”) No. 109-2, “Accounting and Disclosure Guidance for the Foreign Earnings Repatriation Provision within the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004” (“FSP 109-2”). FSP 109-2 provides guidance under FASB Statement No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes,” (“FASB No. 109”) with respect to recording the potential impact of the repatriation provisions of the Jobs Act on enterprises’ income tax expense and deferred tax liability. The Jobs Act was enacted in October 2004. FSP No. 109-2 states that an enterprise is allowed time beyond the financial reporting

 

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VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

period of enactment to evaluate the effect of the Jobs Act on its plan for reinvestment or repatriation of foreign earnings for purposes of applying FASB No. 109.

 

Under the guidance in FSP No. 109-1, “Application of FASB Statement No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes, to the Tax Deduction on Qualified Production Activities Provided by the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004,” issued in December 2004, the deduction will be treated as a “special deduction” as described in FASB No. 109. As such, the special deduction has no effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities existing at the enactment date. Rather, the impact of this deduction will be reported in the period in which the deduction is claimed on Varian Semiconductor’s tax return. This provision will become effective for Varian Semiconductor in fiscal year 2006.

 

The Jobs Act also provides for a two-year phase-out of the existing extra-territorial income exclusion (the “ETI”) for foreign sales. This provision is effective for transactions entered into after December 31, 2004. Varian Semiconductor expects the net effect of the phase-out of the ETI to result in an increase in the effective tax rate for fiscal year 2005 of less than one percentage point, based on current earnings levels.

 

In November 2004, the FASB issued Statement No. 151, “Inventory Costs — an Amendment of ARB No. 43, Chapter 4” (“FASB No. 151”). FASB No. 151 amends Accounting Research Bulletin (“ARB”) No. 43, Chapter 4, to clarify that abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) should be recognized as current-period charges. In addition, this statement requires that allocation of fixed production overheads to the costs of conversion be based on the normal capacity of the production facilities. The provisions of this statement are effective for inventory costs incurred during fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2005. Varian Semiconductor is in the process of evaluating the impact of FASB No. 151.

 

In December 2004, the FASB issued Statement No. 123 (revised 2004), “Share-Based Payment” (“FASB No. 123(R)”). FASB No. 123(R) will require Varian Semiconductor to measure all stock-based compensation awards using a fair value method and record such expense in its consolidated financial statements. In addition, the adoption of FASB No. 123(R) will require additional accounting related to the income tax effects and additional disclosure regarding the cash flow effects resulting from share-based payment arrangements. FASB No. 123(R), as issued, would have been effective beginning in Varian Semiconductor’s fourth quarter of fiscal year 2005. In April 2005, the SEC extended the effective date to fiscal years (rather than interim periods) beginning after June 15, 2005. Therefore, FASB No. 123(R) will be effective as of October 1, 2005 for Varian Semiconductor. The adoption of FASB No. 123(R) could have a material impact on Varian Semiconductor’s consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows. Varian Semiconductor is in the process of evaluating the impact of implementing FASB No. 123(R).

 

Note 13. Operating Segments and Geographic Information

 

Varian Semiconductor has determined that it operates in one business segment: the manufacturing, marketing and servicing of semiconductor processing equipment for ion implantation systems. Since Varian Semiconductor operates in one segment, all financial segment information required by FASB Statement No. 131, “Disclosures about Segments of an Enterprise and Related Information,” can be found in the consolidated financial statements.

 

During the second quarter of fiscal year 2005, revenue from two customers accounted for 23% and 11%, respectively, of Varian Semiconductor’s total revenue. Varian Semiconductor expects that sales of its products to relatively few customers will continue to account for a high percentage of its revenue in the foreseeable future. During the second quarter of fiscal year 2004, revenue from two customers each accounted for 16% of Varian Semiconductor’s total revenue. During the first six months of fiscal year 2005, revenue from two customers accounted for 17% and 11%, respectively, of Varian Semiconductor’s total revenue. During the first six months of fiscal year 2004, revenue from one customer accounted for 18% of Varian Semiconductor’s total revenue.

 

As of April 1, 2005, two customers represented 16% and 12% of the total accounts receivable balance. As of October 1, 2004, two customers accounted for 15% and 12% of the total accounts receivable balance.

 

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VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

The following table summarizes revenue based on final geographic destination and long-lived assets by geography:

 

     North
America


   Europe

   Taiwan

   Korea

   Other

   Consolidated

     (Amounts in thousands)

Revenue — Three months ended:

                                         

April 1, 2005

   $ 26,294    $ 14,209    $ 18,784    $ 47,312    $ 32,498    $ 139,097

April 2, 2004

     24,110      14,466      33,150      26,758      28,842      127,326

Revenue — Six months ended:

                                         

April 1, 2005

   $ 83,726    $ 30,404    $ 37,110    $ 80,725    $ 55,557    $ 287,522

April 2, 2004

     48,090      28,407      44,473      52,405      55,794      229,169

Property, plant and equipment, net as of:

                                         

April 1, 2005

   $ 53,645    $ 380    $ 348    $ 4,281    $ 636    $ 59,290

October 1, 2004

     46,807      426      353      4,062      696      52,344

 

The $18.9 million in non-recurring royalty revenue received from Applied Materials in the first quarter of fiscal year 2005 is included in the North America six month revenue in the table above.

 

Note 14. Commitments, Contingencies and Guarantees

 

Varian Semiconductor is currently a defendant in a number of legal actions and could incur an uninsured liability in one or more of them. In the opinion of management, the outcome of such litigation will not have a material adverse effect on the consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows of Varian Semiconductor.

 

As permitted under Delaware law, Varian Semiconductor has agreements whereby it indemnifies its officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is, or was, serving in such capacity at the request of Varian Semiconductor. The term of the indemnification period is for the officer’s or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments Varian Semiconductor could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, Varian Semiconductor has a Director and Officer insurance policy that limits its exposure and enables Varian Semiconductor to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. As a result of Varian Semiconductor’s insurance policy coverage, management believes the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements is minimal. Accordingly, Varian Semiconductor has not recorded any liabilities for these agreements as of April 1, 2005.

 

Varian Semiconductor enters into indemnification agreements in the normal course of business. Pursuant to these agreements, Varian Semiconductor indemnifies, holds harmless, and agrees to reimburse the indemnified party for losses suffered or incurred by the indemnified party, generally Varian Semiconductor’s customers, in connection with any patent, copyright or other intellectual property infringement claim by any third party with respect to Varian Semiconductor’s products. The term of these indemnification agreements is generally perpetual any time after execution of the agreement. The maximum potential amount of future payments Varian Semiconductor could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited. Management believes the estimated fair value of these agreements is minimal. Accordingly, Varian Semiconductor has not recorded any liabilities for these agreements as of April 1, 2005.

 

Varian Semiconductor also indemnifies certain customers with respect to damages, losses and liabilities they may suffer or incur relating to personal injury, personal property damage, product liability, and environmental claims relating to the use of Varian Semiconductor’s products and services or resulting from the acts or omissions of Varian Semiconductor, its employees, officers, authorized agents or subcontractors. Varian Semiconductor has general and umbrella insurance policies that limit its exposure under these indemnification obligations and guarantees. As a result of its insurance policy coverage, Varian Semiconductor believes the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements is minimal. Accordingly, Varian Semiconductor has not recorded any liabilities for these agreements as of April 1, 2005.

 

Varian Semiconductor also enters into purchase order commitments in the normal course of business. As of April 1, 2005, Varian Semiconductor has approximately $57.0 million of purchase order commitments with various vendors.

 

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VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Environmental Remediation

 

Prior to the spin-off of Varian Semiconductor from Varian Associates, Inc. (“VAI”) on April 2, 1999, Varian Semiconductor’s business was operated as the Semiconductor Equipment Business (“SEB”) of VAI. On April 2, 1999, VAI contributed its SEB to Varian Semiconductor, its Instruments Business (“IB”) to Varian, Inc. (“VI”), and changed its name to Varian Medical Systems, Inc. (“VMS”). These transactions were accomplished under the terms of several agreements by and among Varian Semiconductor, VI and VMS which include a Distribution Agreement, an Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement, an Intellectual Property Agreement, a Tax Sharing Agreement, and a Transition Services Agreement (collectively, the “Distribution Related Agreements”). VAI has been named by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or third parties as a potentially responsible party under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, at eight sites where VAI is alleged to have shipped manufacturing waste for recycling or disposal. VAI is also involved in various stages of environmental investigation and/or remediation under the direction of, or in consultation with, foreign, federal, state and/or local agencies at certain current or former VAI facilities (including facilities disposed of in connection with VAI’s sale of its Electron Devices business during fiscal year 1995, and the sale of its Thin Film Systems business during fiscal year 1997). The Distribution Related Agreements provide that each of VMS, Varian Semiconductor and VI will indemnify the others for one-third of these environmental investigation and remediation costs, as adjusted for any insurance proceeds and tax benefits expected to be realized upon payment of these costs.

 

For certain of these sites and facilities, various uncertainties make it difficult to assess the likelihood and scope of further investigation or remediation activities or to estimate the future costs of such activities if undertaken. Varian Semiconductor has accrued $1.3 million in estimated environmental investigation and remediation costs for these sites and facilities as of April 1, 2005. As to other sites and facilities, sufficient knowledge has been gained to be able to reasonably estimate the scope and costs of future environmental activities. As such, Varian Semiconductor has accrued $4.5 million, which represents future costs discounted at 7%, net of inflation, to cover Varian Semiconductor’s portion of these costs. This reserve is in addition to the $1.3 million previously described.

 

As of April 1, 2005, Varian Semiconductor’s environmental liability, based upon future environmental-related costs estimated by VMS as of that date and included in current and long-term accrued expenses, totaled $5.8 million, of which $1.0 million is classified as current.

 

The amounts set forth in the foregoing paragraph are only estimates of anticipated future environmental-related costs, and the amounts actually spent in the years indicated may be greater or less than such estimates. The aggregate range of cost estimates reflects various uncertainties inherent in many environmental investigation and remediation activities and the large number of sites where VMS is undertaking such investigation and remediation activities. VMS believes that most of these cost ranges will narrow as investigation and remediation activities progress. Varian Semiconductor believes that its reserves are adequate, but as the scope of the obligations becomes more clearly defined, these reserves may be modified and related charges against income may be made.

 

Although any ultimate liability arising from environmental-related matters described herein could result in significant expenditures that, if aggregated and assumed to occur within a single fiscal year would be material to Varian Semiconductor’s financial statements, the likelihood of such occurrence is considered remote. Based on information currently available to management and its best assessment of the ultimate amount and timing of environmental-related events, Varian Semiconductor’s management believes that the costs of these environmental-related matters are not reasonably likely to have a material adverse effect on the consolidated financial statements of Varian Semiconductor.

 

Varian Semiconductor evaluates its liability for environmental-related investigation and remediation in light of the liability and financial wherewithal of potentially responsible parties and insurance companies where Varian Semiconductor believes that it has rights to contribution, indemnity and/or reimbursement. Claims for recovery of environmental investigation and remediation costs already incurred, and to be incurred in the future, have been asserted against various insurance companies and other third parties. In 1992, VAI filed a lawsuit against 36 insurance companies with respect to most of the above-referenced sites and facilities. VAI received certain cash settlements with respect to these lawsuits in prior years. VMS has also reached an agreement with an insurance company under which the insurance company agreed to pay a portion of Varian Semiconductor’s past and future environmental-related expenditures. Varian Semiconductor therefore has a receivable of $1.1 million in other assets at April 1, 2005, as its portion of the insurance recoveries. Although VMS intends to aggressively pursue additional insurance recoveries, Varian Semiconductor has not reduced any liability in anticipation of recovery with respect to claims made against third parties.

 

As part of the purchase of Varian Semiconductor’s facility located in Newburyport, Massachusetts, Varian Semiconductor has indemnified the lender for any violation of any local, state and federal laws pertaining to environmental regulations,

 

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VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

contamination or clean-up. Varian Semiconductor believes the estimated fair value of this indemnification is minimal. Accordingly, Varian Semiconductor has not recorded any liabilities for this agreement as of April 1, 2005.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

In September 2000, Varian Semiconductor and Applied Materials settled patent infringement and antitrust litigation. After recording a payment to Applied Materials and legal expenses, Varian Semiconductor recorded a gain of $16.0 million ($10.8 million after taxes) relating to this litigation settlement. Varian Semiconductor maintained a provision of $2.7 million in current liabilities to cover any residual indemnification obligations described above. After evaluating all of the facts associated with this transaction, and consultation with counsel, management believes that Varian Semiconductor has no further liability with respect to the settlement. The statute of limitations on the indemnification obligations expired during the first quarter of fiscal year 2005. Consequently, the remaining estimated loss contingency was reversed during the first quarter of fiscal year 2005, and is included as a component of other income, net for the first quarter and the first six months of fiscal year 2005.

 

Varian Semiconductor has agreed to indemnify VMS and VI for any costs, liabilities or expenses relating to Varian Semiconductor’s legal proceedings, including the Applied Materials matter. Under the Distribution Related Agreements, Varian Semiconductor has agreed to reimburse VMS for one-third of the costs, liabilities, and expenses, adjusted for any related tax benefits recognized or realized by VMS, with respect to certain legal proceedings relating to discontinued operations of VMS. Varian Semiconductor believes the estimated fair value of the indemnification agreements is minimal, except as already recorded on the financial statements.

 

Varian Semiconductor’s operations are subject to various foreign, federal, state and/or local laws relating to the protection of the environment. These include laws regarding discharges into soil, water and air, and the generation, handling, storage, transportation and disposal of waste and hazardous substances. In addition, several countries are reviewing proposed regulations that would require manufacturers to dispose of their products at the end of a product’s useful life. These laws have the effect of increasing costs and potential liabilities associated with the conduct of certain operations.

 

Varian Semiconductor is currently the plaintiff in several legal disputes related to breach of contract and certain patents that Varian Semiconductor believes the defendants have infringed. While Varian Semiconductor believes favorable judgments will be rendered with respect to such claims, the timing and amount, if any, of these judgments is uncertain.

 

Note 15. Restructurings

 

Varian Semiconductor’s business is cyclical and depends upon the capital expenditures of semiconductor manufacturers, which in turn depend on the current and anticipated market demand for integrated circuits and products utilizing integrated circuits. The semiconductor industry has historically experienced periodic downturns and in response, Varian Semiconductor has occasionally recorded restructuring charges in connection with cost reduction initiatives implemented in response to the industry downturns. Restructuring charges typically consist of severance, benefits and outplacement services offered to terminated employees and sometimes include charges for remaining lease payments on facilities that are closed.

 

No restructuring costs were recognized during fiscal year 2004 or the first three months of fiscal year 2005. In the second quarter of fiscal year 2005, $0.9 million of restructuring expense was recognized related to downsizing in Europe. These restructuring costs related to reductions in headcount and in facilities. During fiscal year 2003, Varian Semiconductor recognized approximately $1.4 million in restructuring costs. The restructuring costs related to a reduction in headcount of approximately 55 employees and were severance-related. The majority of the remaining restructuring reserve balance as of April 1, 2005 is expected to be paid during fiscal year 2005.

 

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VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Below is a table summarizing the restructuring reserve activity in the first six months of fiscal year 2005:

 

     Reduction in
Work Force


    Facility
Closures


    Total

 
     (Amounts in thousands)  

Balance as of September 27, 2002

   $ 2,167     $ 602     $ 2,769  

New charges

     1,390       45       1,435  

Cash payments

     (3,293 )     (529 )     (3,822 )
    


 


 


Balance as of October 3, 2003

     264       118       382  

Cash payments

     (264 )     (31 )     (295 )
    


 


 


Balance as of October 1, 2004

     —         87       87  

Cash Payments

     —         (46 )     (46 )
    


 


 


Balance as of December 31, 2004

     —         41       41  

New charges

     640       274       914  

Cash payments

     (109 )     (82 )     (191 )
    


 


 


Balance as of April 1, 2005

   $ 531     $ 233     $ 764  
    


 


 


 

Note 16. Derivative Financial Instruments

 

Varian Semiconductor uses derivative instruments to protect its interests from fluctuations in earnings and cash flows caused by volatility in currency exchange rates. Varian Semiconductor continued its policy of hedging its current balance sheet re-measurement and certain foreign currency sales exposures with hedging instruments having terms of up to twelve months.

 

Varian Semiconductor’s international sales are primarily denominated in U.S. dollars. For foreign currency denominated sales, however, the volatility of the foreign currency markets represents risk to Varian Semiconductor. Upon forecasting the exposure, Varian Semiconductor enters into hedges with forward sales contracts whose critical terms are designed to match those of the underlying exposure. These hedges are evaluated for effectiveness at least quarterly by comparing the change in value of the forward contracts to the change in value of the underlying transaction, with the effective portion of the hedge accumulated in Other Comprehensive Income (“OCI”). Any measured ineffectiveness is included immediately in marketing, general and administrative expenses in the consolidated statements of operations. There has been no amount of ineffectiveness recognized during the three and six month periods ended April 1, 2005. OCI associated with hedges of sales denominated in foreign currencies are reclassified to revenue upon recognition in income of the underlying hedged exposure.

 

The following table summarizes OCI activity during the year:

 

    

Amount of

Income


 
     (Amounts in
thousands)
 

Balance as of October 1, 2004

   $ —    

Effective portion of cash flow hedging instruments

     (352 )

Reclassified to revenue

     218  
    


Balance as of December 31, 2004

     (134 )

Effective portion of cash flow hedging instruments

     111  

Reclassified to revenue

     23  
    


Balance as of April 1, 2005

   $ —    
    


 

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VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.

NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Unaudited)

 

Note 17. Comprehensive Income

 

     Fiscal Three Months Ended

   Fiscal Six Months Ended

     April 1, 2005

    April 2, 2004

   April 1, 2005

    April 2, 2004

     (Amounts in thousands)

Net income

   $ 11,111     $ 14,022    $ 39,078     $ 18,825

Other comprehensive income:

                             

Effective portion of cash flow hedging instruments

     111       —        (241 )     —  

Reclassified to revenue

     23       —        241       —  

Unrealized gain (loss) on short-term investments

     (1,038 )     133      (1,771 )     84
    


 

  


 

Comprehensive income

   $ 10,207     $ 14,155    $ 37,307     $ 18,909
    


 

  


 

 

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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

This Form 10-Q contains certain forward-looking statements. For purposes of the safe harbor provisions under The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, any statements using the terms “believes,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “plans” or similar expressions are forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those projected. There are a number of important factors that could cause Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc. (“Varian Semiconductor”)’s actual results to differ materially from those indicated by forward-looking statements made in this report and presented by management from time to time. Some of the important risks and uncertainties that may cause Varian Semiconductor’s financial results to differ are described under the heading “Risk Factors” in this report and in the annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 1, 2004, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on December 14, 2004.

 

The following information should be read in conjunction with the unaudited interim consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in “Item 1. Consolidated Financial Statements” of this quarterly report and the audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto and the section titled “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Varian Semiconductor’s annual report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 1, 2004, filed with the SEC on December 14, 2004.

 

Overview

 

Varian Semiconductor is a leading supplier of ion implantation equipment used in the fabrication of semiconductor chips. Varian Semiconductor designs, manufactures, markets and services semiconductor processing equipment for virtually all of the major semiconductor manufacturers in the United States (“U.S.”), Europe and Asia Pacific. The VIISta® ion implanter products are designed to leverage single-wafer processing technology for the full range of semiconductor implant applications.

 

Varian Semiconductor provides support, training, and after-market products and services that help its customers to obtain high utilization and productivity, reduce operating costs, and extend capital productivity of customer investments through multiple product generations. In 2004, Varian Semiconductor was ranked number one in customer satisfaction in VLSI Research Inc.’s customer survey for all large suppliers of wafer processing equipment, an honor received in seven of the past eight years.

 

Varian Semiconductor’s business is cyclical and depends upon the capital expenditures of semiconductor manufacturers, which in turn depends on the current and anticipated market demand for integrated circuits and products utilizing integrated circuits. In fiscal 2001 and fiscal 2002, the semiconductor equipment manufacturers experienced a significant contraction in the demand for products due to the slowdown in economies worldwide, specifically the slowdown in technology sectors that utilize integrated circuits. In fiscal year 2003, Varian Semiconductor experienced an increase in business activity owing to a generally strengthening economy and increased demand for semiconductors. During fiscal year 2004 and the first half of fiscal year 2005, demand was strong for products in the semiconductor industry. However, visibility is still limited and thus, it is not known whether or not the industry will continue in its current pattern.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Judgments and Accounting Estimates

 

Varian Semiconductor’s discussion and analysis of its financial condition and results of operations are based upon Varian Semiconductor’s consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) in the U.S. The preparation of these consolidated financial statements requires Varian Semiconductor to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On a continual basis, Varian Semiconductor evaluates its estimates, including those related to inventories, accounts receivable, intangible assets, income taxes, warranty obligations, post-retirement benefits, contingencies, and functional currencies. Varian Semiconductor operates in a highly cyclical and competitive industry that is influenced by a variety of diverse factors including, but not limited to, technological advances, product life cycles, customer and supplier lead times, and macroeconomic and geographic economic trends. Estimating product demand beyond a relatively short forecasting horizon is difficult and prone to forecasting error due to the cyclical nature and inherent lack of visibility in the industry. Varian Semiconductor bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. See also the factors discussed below under the section titled “Risk Factors.”

 

Varian Semiconductor believes that the following sets forth the critical accounting policies used by Varian Semiconductor in the preparation of its consolidated financial statements.

 

15


Table of Contents

Revenue Recognition

 

Product revenue includes established products, new products and spare parts.

 

Varian Semiconductor recognizes revenue from product sales upon shipment provided title and risk of loss has passed to the customer, evidence of an arrangement exists, fees are contractually fixed or determinable, collectibility is reasonably assured through historical collection results and regular credit evaluations, and there are no uncertainties regarding customer acceptance.

 

For established and new products, a portion of the total purchase price is typically not due until installation occurs and the customer accepts the product. For established products, the lesser of the amount allocated to the equipment or the contractual amount due upon delivery is recorded as product revenue upon delivery. The amount deferred is recognized as revenue upon customer acceptance. For new products, revenue allocated to the equipment is recognized upon customer acceptance. Revenue related to spare parts and upgrade sales is recognized upon the later of delivery or when the title and risk of loss passes to the customer.

 

Products are classified as established products if post-delivery acceptance provisions and the installation process have been determined to be routine (due to the fact that the acceptance provisions are generally a replication of pre-shipment procedures) and there is a demonstrated history of achieving predetermined installation cost targets. The majority of products are designed and manufactured to meet contractual customer specifications. To ensure customer specifications are satisfied, the systems are tested at Varian Semiconductor’s manufacturing facility prior to shipment. To the extent that customers’ conditions cannot be replicated in Varian Semiconductor’s facilities or if there is not a demonstrated history of meeting newer customer specifications, then the product is treated as new for revenue recognition purposes. Varian Semiconductor has predetermined criteria for changing the classification of a new product to an established product. A new product must achieve a set number of acceptances and a set target for installation cost. Once the criteria have been achieved for a new product, the product is considered established.

 

Service revenue includes revenue from maintenance and service contracts, extended warranties, paid service and installation services. Revenue related to maintenance and service contracts is recognized ratably over the duration of the contracts. Extended warranties are deferred as deferred revenue and recognized ratably over the applicable warranty term. Revenue related to paid service is recorded when earned and revenue related to installation is recorded upon fulfillment of the service obligation and customer acceptance. It takes approximately three to six weeks for Varian Semiconductor technicians to complete the installation of Varian Semiconductor products and perform tests agreed to with customers. Certain customers formally document their acceptance of Varian Semiconductor’s products at this time. Other customers elect to perform additional internal testing prior to formal acceptance, and this process generally takes eight to twelve weeks. Royalty and license revenue is recognized when contractual obligations are met, and in the case of royalties, upon receipt of a royalty report from the customer, evidence of an arrangement exists, fees are fixed or determinable and collection is reasonably assured.

 

When fees are not fixed or determinable, revenue is recorded when payments become due.

 

Varian Semiconductor’s transactions frequently include the sale of systems and services under multiple element arrangements. Revenue under these arrangements is allocated to all elements, except systems, based upon the fair market value of those elements. The amount allocated to installation is based upon hourly rates at the estimated time to complete the service. The fair value of all other elements is based upon the price charged when these amounts are sold separately and unaccompanied by other elements. The amount of revenue allocated to systems is done on a residual method basis. Under this method, the total value of the arrangement is allocated first to the undelivered elements based on their fair values, with the remainder being allocated to systems revenue.

 

Inventory and Purchase Order Commitments

 

Varian Semiconductor values its inventory at the lower of cost or market. The determination of lower of cost or market requires that Varian Semiconductor make significant assumptions about future demand for products and the transition to new product offerings from legacy products. Estimating product demand beyond a relatively short forecasting horizon is difficult and prone to forecasting error due to the cyclical nature and inherent lack of visibility in the industry. Varian Semiconductor also provides for losses on those open purchase order commitments in which Varian Semiconductor’s estimated obligation to receive inventory under these commitments exceeds expected production and field service demand. These assumptions include, but are not limited to, future manufacturing schedules, customer demand, supplier lead time and technological and market obsolescence. Once inventory is written down and a new cost basis has been established, it is not written back up if demand increases. If market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, additional inventory provisions may be required. If market conditions are more favorable than those projected by management, and specific products previously

 

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written down are subsequently sold, gross profit would improve by the amount of the specific write down reversed in the quarter the inventory is sold. In the case of purchase order commitments, more favorable market conditions or successful negotiations with suppliers will result in a reduction of provisions in the quarter the excess purchase order commitments are reduced.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

Varian Semiconductor maintains allowances for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of its customers to make required payments for products and services. Accounts with known financial issues are first reviewed and specific estimates are recorded. The remaining accounts receivable balances are then grouped in categories by the amount of days the balance is past due and the estimated loss is calculated as a percentage of the total category based upon past history. If the financial conditions of Varian Semiconductor’s customers were to deteriorate resulting in their inability to make payments, additional allowances may be required. If accounts previously identified as a risk and reserved for subsequently stabilize and are deemed to no longer be at risk for collection, or categories past due decrease, the allowance for doubtful accounts may be reduced. As a result, a reduction to bad debt expense would be recognized in the period the determination was made.

 

Valuation Allowance on Deferred Tax Assets and Income Tax Provision

 

Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Statement No. 109, “Accounting for Income Taxes,” (“FASB No. 109”) requires that deferred tax assets be reduced by a valuation allowance if it is more likely than not that a portion of the deferred tax asset will not be realized. On a quarterly basis, Varian Semiconductor evaluates both the positive and negative evidence bearing upon the realizability of its deferred tax assets. Varian Semiconductor considers future taxable income, ongoing prudent and feasible tax planning strategies, and the ability to utilize tax losses and credits in assessing the need for a valuation allowance. A valuation allowance related to certain state tax credit carryforwards has been recorded. Management has concluded that it is more likely than not that these credits will not be utilized since historically the annual amount of state credits generated exceeds the amount of credits that can be used. Should Varian Semiconductor determine that it is not able to realize all or part of its other deferred tax assets in the future, a valuation allowance would be required resulting in an expense recorded within the provision for income taxes line in the Statement of Income in the period in which such determination was made. It is reasonably possible that the amount of the deferred tax asset considered realizable could be reduced in the near term if future taxable income is reduced. Varian Semiconductor’s effective tax rate is affected by levels of taxable income in domestic and foreign tax jurisdictions, U.S. tax credits generated and utilized for research and development expenditures, U.S. foreign income exclusion, investment tax credits and other tax incentives specific to domestic and foreign operations. In the normal course of business, Varian Semiconductor and its subsidiaries are examined by various tax authorities, including the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”). The IRS is presently conducting an examination for the tax years 1999 through 2003 as part of its routine examinations of Varian Semiconductor’s income tax returns. The outcome of this examination cannot be determined at this time since fieldwork is still underway. Varian Semiconductor anticipates that the examination may be completed during fiscal year 2005. Once completed, the results of the examination are subject to review by the Joint Committee on Taxation. Varian Semiconductor estimates that this review will be completed early in fiscal year 2006. Unfavorable settlement of any particular issue would require the use of cash. Favorable resolution would result in a reduction to Varian Semiconductor’s effective tax rate in the quarter of resolution. Any additional impact on Varian Semiconductor’s liability for income taxes cannot presently be determined; however, Varian Semiconductor believes its accrued income tax liabilities are adequate.

 

Product Warranties

 

Varian Semiconductor provides for the estimated cost of product warranties, the amount of which is based primarily upon historical information, at the time product revenue is recognized. While Varian Semiconductor engages in extensive product quality programs and processes including actively monitoring and evaluating the quality of its component supplies, Varian Semiconductor’s warranty obligation is affected by product failure rates, utilization levels, material usage, service delivery costs incurred in correcting a product failure, and supplier warranties on parts delivered to Varian Semiconductor. Should actual product failure rates, utilization levels, material usage, service delivery costs or supplier warranties on parts differ from Varian Semiconductor’s estimates, revisions to the estimated warranty liability would be required.

 

Environmental Liabilities

 

Liabilities are recorded when environmental assessments and/or remedial efforts are probable and the costs can be reasonably estimated. Generally, the timing of these accruals coincides with completion of a feasibility study or Varian Semiconductor’s commitment to a formal plan of action. In situations where the various uncertainties make it difficult to assess the likelihood and scope of further investigation or remediation activities or to estimate then future costs, the lower limit of an estimated range is accrued on a non-discounted basis. All other liabilities, which are usually where Varian Semiconductor has generally

 

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sufficient knowledge to be able to better estimate the scope of costs and future activities, are accrued on a discounted basis. Should new information become available and/or different assumptions be applied in the estimation of environmental liabilities, revisions to the accrued environmental liability would be required.

 

Results of Operations

 

Revenue

 

The following table sets forth revenue by category for the three and six month periods ended April 1, 2005 and April 2, 2004:

 

     Fiscal Three Months Ended

              Fiscal Six Months Ended

           
     April 1,
2005


   April 2,
2004


   Change

   Percent
Change


    April 1,
2005


   April 2,
2004


   Change

   Percent
Change


 
     (Amounts in thousands)               (Amounts in thousands)            

Revenue

                                                      

Product

   $ 116,044    $ 109,368    $ 6,676    6 %   $ 223,132    $ 195,807    $ 27,325    14 %

Service

     21,287      16,260      5,027    31 %     40,682      29,570      11,112    38 %

Royalty and license

     1,766      1,698      68    4 %     23,708      3,792      19,916    525 %
    

  

  

  

 

  

  

  

Revenue

   $ 139,097    $ 127,326    $ 11,771    9 %   $ 287,522    $ 229,169    $ 58,353    25 %
    

  

  

  

 

  

  

  

 

Product

 

During the second quarter and first six months of fiscal year 2005, product revenue was $116.0 million and $223.1 million, respectively, compared to $109.4 million and $195.8 million for the same periods a year ago. For the second quarter and first six months of fiscal year 2005, product volume remained relatively consistent with the same periods in fiscal year 2004. However, the mix of products was more heavily weighted towards VIISta products as opposed to legacy products, which have higher average selling prices. Additionally, parts and upgrade volume increased, which led to increased revenue in the first six months of fiscal year 2005 as compared to the same period in 2004.

 

Service

 

Service revenue during the second quarter of fiscal year 2005 was $21.3 million, compared to $16.3 million for the same period a year ago. Service revenue for the first six months of fiscal year 2005 was $40.7 million, compared to $29.6 million for the same period of fiscal year 2004. The increase is a result of increased volume of shipments during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year 2004, which led to higher installation revenue in the first six months of fiscal year 2005.

 

Royalty

 

As a result of an arbitration panel ruling in the second phase of the arbitration between Varian Semiconductor and Applied Materials, Inc. (“Applied Materials”), Varian Semiconductor received $24.6 million during the first quarter of fiscal year 2005 for past due royalties and interest. Of the $24.6 million, $18.9 million was included in royalty revenue and $5.7 million in interest income in the first quarter of fiscal year 2005. Applied Materials is also required to make quarterly unit-based royalty payments to Varian Semiconductor on future sales of certain products found to be within the scope of the patent license agreement (the “Agreement”) through expiration of the Agreement in March 2007.

 

Pursuant to the terms of a Settlement and License Agreement between Varian Semiconductor and Lam Research Corporation (“Lam”), Lam made its last quarterly cash payment of $1.25 million in December 2004. Lam was required to make quarterly cash payments of $1.25 million through December 2004 for use of certain Varian Semiconductor patents.

 

Customers

 

During the second quarter of fiscal year 2005, revenue from two customers accounted for 23% and 11%, respectively, of Varian Semiconductor’s total revenue. Varian Semiconductor expects that sales of its products to relatively few customers will continue to account for a high percentage of its revenue in the foreseeable future. During the second quarter of fiscal year 2004, revenue from two customers each accounted for 16% of Varian Semiconductor’s total revenue. During the first six months of fiscal year 2005, revenue from two customers accounted for 17% and 11%, respectively, of Varian Semiconductor’s total revenue. During the first six months of fiscal year 2004, revenue from one customer accounted for 18% of Varian Semiconductor’s total revenue.

 

Fluctuations in the timing and mix of product shipments, customer requirements for systems, and the completion of the installation of the product will continue to have a significant impact on the timing and amount of revenue in any given period (see also “Risk Factors” and “Critical Accounting Policies - Revenue Recognition”).

 

Cost of Product and Service Revenue. Cost of product revenue was $68.9 million and gross margin was 40.7% for the second quarter of fiscal year 2005, compared to the cost of product revenue of $60.1 million and gross margin of 45.1% for the second

 

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quarter of fiscal year 2004. For the first six months of fiscal year 2005, the cost of product revenue was $127.8 million and gross margin was 42.7%, compared to the cost of product revenue of $110.5 million and gross margin of 43.6% for the first six months of fiscal year 2004. The decrease in gross margin is due to a relative decrease in the mix of revenue recognized upon acceptance of products in the second quarter of fiscal year 2005. Additionally, Varian Semiconductor has experienced increased costs associated with its field support operations and a related increase in levels of field inventory to support the growing base of installed products.

 

Cost of service revenue was $12.0 million and gross margin was 43.8% for the second quarter of fiscal year 2005, compared to a cost of service revenue of $9.6 million and gross margin of 41.1% for the second quarter of fiscal year 2004. For the first six months of fiscal year 2005, the cost of service revenue was $25.3 million and gross margin was 37.7%, compared to the cost of service revenue of $18.6 million and gross margin of 37.1% for the first six months of fiscal year 2004. Service gross margin increased slightly due to the timing and mix of completed installations.

 

Research and Development. Research and development expenses were $19.1 million for the second quarter of fiscal year 2005, compared to $17.0 million for the second quarter of fiscal year 2004. For the first six months of fiscal year 2005, research and development expenses were $37.7 million, compared to $33.2 million for the same period in fiscal year 2004. The quarterly and six month increases were a result of increased labor and material spending associated with the development of new products, particularly high current implanters.

 

Marketing, General and Administrative. Marketing, general and administrative expenses were $24.3 million for the second quarter of fiscal year 2005, compared to $21.0 million in the second quarter of fiscal year 2004. For the first six months of fiscal year 2005, marketing, general and administrative expenses were $51.7 million, compared to $40.8 million for the same period in fiscal year 2004. The increase in the second quarter of fiscal year 2005 was principally due to expenses associated with increased business activity, including increased cost demonstrating the capabilities of Varian Semiconductor’s latest generation of products, and higher costs related to headcount, travel and variable compensation plans. Sarbanes-Oxley compliance expenses also added to the increase for both the second quarter and first six months of fiscal year 2005.

 

The first quarter of fiscal year 2005 included a $3.5 million charge associated with the retirement of the President and Chief Operating Officer of Varian Semiconductor effective as of December 31, 2004. For more information, please see Item 9B of Part II of Varian Semiconductor’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended October 1, 2004.

 

Restructuring In the second quarter of fiscal year 2005, $0.9 million of restructuring expense was recognized related to downsizing in Europe. These restructuring costs related to reductions in headcount and in facilities.

 

Interest Income and Interest Expense. During the second quarter of fiscal year 2005, Varian Semiconductor earned $2.4 million in net interest income, compared to $0.9 million for the second quarter of fiscal year 2004. For the first six months of fiscal year 2005, Varian Semiconductor earned $10.0 million in interest income, compared to $1.8 million earned in the first six months of fiscal year 2004. Interest income in the first six months of fiscal year 2005 included $5.7 million related to past due royalties from Applied Materials as a result of an arbitration ruling (see also Royalty). The remaining increase is due to higher cash balances and rates, along with an increased proportion of investments compared to the total cash and investments balance.

 

Other Income (Expense), Net. Other income (expense), net, was $0.1 million in expense and $2.7 million in income for the three and six month periods ended April 1, 2005, respectively. This is compared to other expenses of $0.1 million for both the three and six month periods ended April 2, 2004, respectively. In the first six months of fiscal year 2005 other income included $2.7 million for the reduction of an estimated loss contingency that had been established to cover any residual indemnification obligations related to patent infringement and antitrust litigation. After evaluating all of the facts associated with this transaction, and consultation with counsel, management believes that Varian Semiconductor has no further liability with respect to the settlement. The statute of limitations on the indemnification obligations expired during the first quarter of fiscal year 2005 (See Note 14. Commitments, Contingencies and Guarantees in the Notes to the Unaudited Interim Consolidated Financial Statements).

 

Provision for Income Taxes. Varian Semiconductor’s effective income tax rate was 31.2% for the six month period ended April 1, 2005 and 32% for the same period ended April 2, 2004. The decrease in the effective rate is due to the increased benefit we expect to receive from higher levels of research and development spending and foreign sales. The rate is lower than the U.S. federal statutory rate principally due to credits and lower-taxed foreign income. Future tax rates may vary from the historic rates depending on the worldwide composition of earnings and the continuing availability of income tax credits as well as the potential resolution of tax contingencies. On October 22, 2004, the President signed the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 (the “Jobs Act”). The Jobs Act creates a temporary incentive for U.S. corporations to repatriate accumulated income earned

 

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abroad by providing an 85 percent dividends received deduction for certain dividends from controlled corporations. The deduction is subject to a number of limitations and, as of today, uncertainty remains as to how to interpret numerous provisions of the Jobs Act. As such, Varian Semiconductor is not yet in a position to decide whether, or to what extent, Varian Semiconductor might repatriate foreign earnings that have not yet been remitted to the U.S. Varian Semiconductor expects to complete its evaluation of the effects of the repatriation provision within a reasonable period of time following the publication of additional guidance. At this time, the range of earnings that may be repatriated and the potential range of income tax effects of such repatriation cannot be reasonably estimated.

 

The Jobs Act also provides for a two-year phase-out of the existing extra-territorial income exclusion (the “ETI”) for foreign sales. This provision is effective for transactions entered into after April 1, 2005. Varian Semiconductor expects the net effect of the phase-out of the ETI to result in an increase in the effective tax rate for fiscal year 2005 of less than one percentage point, based on current earnings levels.

 

In addition, the Jobs Act provides a deduction for income from qualified domestic production activities, which will be phased in from 2005 through 2010. This provision will become effective for Varian Semiconductor in fiscal year 2006.

 

Net Income. As a result of the foregoing factors, in the second quarter and first six months of fiscal year 2005, Varian Semiconductor recorded net income of $11.1 million and $39.1 million, respectively, compared to net income of $14.0 million and $18.8 million for the same respective periods of fiscal year 2004. The net income per diluted share was $0.30 for the second quarter of fiscal year 2005, compared to net income per diluted share of $0.38 for the second quarter of fiscal year 2004. For the first six months of fiscal year 2005, the net income per diluted share was $1.05, compared to net income per diluted share of $0.51 for the same period of fiscal year 2004.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

Varian Semiconductor generated $52.7 million of cash from operations during the first six months of fiscal year 2005, compared to $2.8 million of cash generated from operations during the first six months of fiscal year 2004. Cash provided by operations in the first six months of fiscal year 2005 was primarily a result of net income of $39.1 million, an increase in accounts payable of $14.4 million, and decreases in accounts receivable and other current assets of $17.2 million and $13.0 million, respectively. These increases were partially offset by a $41.3 million increase in inventories and a $9.3 million decrease in accrued expenses. The increase in inventories and the related increase in accounts payable is attributable to a higher anticipated shipments for the third quarter of fiscal year 2005. The decrease in accounts receivable is related to a large portion of receivables coming due during the first part of the second quarter of fiscal year 2005. The decrease in other current assets and accrued expenses is primarily related to the receipt of tax refunds and the remittance of estimated income tax payments. Cash provided by operations in the first six months of fiscal year 2004 was primarily a result of net income of $18.8 million and increases in deferred revenue of $24.7 million and accounts payable of $6.8 million, and tax benefits from stock option exercises of $13.2 million. These changes were partially offset by increases in accounts receivable of $41.3 million and inventories of $22.6 million.

 

Varian Semiconductor used $113.6 million of cash and cash equivalents for the purchase of short-term investments during the first six months of fiscal year 2005, and $8.4 million of cash and cash equivalents for the purchase of property, plant and equipment during the same period. These outflows were partially offset by proceeds from sales and maturities of short-term investments of $35.1 million during the period. In the first six months of fiscal year 2004, Varian Semiconductor used $59.3 million of cash and cash equivalents for the purchase of short-term investments, and $8.0 million of cash and cash equivalents for the purchase of property, plant and equipment. These were partially offset by proceeds from sales and maturities of short-term investments of $7.1 million during the first six months of fiscal year 2004.

 

During the first six months of fiscal year 2005, Varian Semiconductor generated $2.0 million of cash from financing activities, primarily due to $5.9 million from the issuance of common stock, offset by $3.9 million in repayments on short- and long-term borrowings. During the first six months of fiscal year 2004, Varian Semiconductor generated $22.1 million of cash from financing activities, primarily due to $22.2 million from the issuance of common stock upon the exercise of stock options and under the employee stock purchase plan, offset by repayments on short- and long-term borrowings.

 

During the first quarter of fiscal year 2005, Varian Semiconductor’s Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 3.5 million shares of Varian Semiconductor’s common stock from time to time on the open market. Varian Semiconductor has not repurchased any stock to date.

 

Varian Semiconductor’s liquidity is affected by many factors, some based on the normal operations of the business and others related to the uncertainties of the industry and global economies. Varian Semiconductor believes that cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments of $436.8 million at April 1, 2005 will be sufficient to satisfy working capital requirements, commitments for capital expenditures and other purchase commitments, environmental contingencies and cash requirements for the foreseeable future.

 

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Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

Varian Semiconductor does not have any relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as structured finance or special purpose entities, which would have been established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance-sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes. As such, Varian Semiconductor is not exposed to any financing, liquidity, market or credit risk that could arise if Varian Semiconductor had engaged in such relationships.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

Under GAAP, certain obligations and commitments are not required to be included in the consolidated balance sheets and statements of income. These obligations and commitments, while entered into in the normal course of business, may have a material impact on liquidity. The following commitments as of April 1, 2005 have not been included in the consolidated balance sheets and statements of income included under Item 1. Consolidated Financial Statements; however, they have been disclosed in the following table in order to provide a more accurate picture of Varian Semiconductor’s financial position and liquidity.

 

          Payments Due by Period

     Total

   Less than 1
Year


  

1-3

Years


          (Amounts in thousands)

Operating leases

   $ 2,807    $ 1,828    $ 979

Purchase order commitments

     57,009      57,009      —  
    

  

  

Total commitments

   $ 59,816    $ 58,837    $ 979
    

  

  

 

Transactions with Affiliates and Related Parties

 

Operations prior to April 2, 1999 had been part of the former Varian Associates, Inc. (“VAI”), now known as Varian Medical Systems, Inc. (“VMS”) (See Note 14. Commitments, Contingencies and Guarantees in the Notes to the Unaudited Interim Consolidated Financial Statements). On April 2, 1999, VAI contributed its Semiconductor Equipment Business (“SEB”) to Varian Semiconductor, then distributed to the holders of record of VAI common stock one share of common stock of Varian Semiconductor for each share of VAI common stock owned on March 24, 1999. At the same time, VAI contributed its Instruments Business (“IB”) to Varian, Inc. (“VI”) and distributed to the holders of record of VAI common stock one share of common stock of IB for each share of VAI common stock owned on March 24, 1999. VAI retained its Health Care Systems business and changed its name to VMS effective as of April 2, 1999. These transactions were accomplished under the terms of a Distribution Agreement by and among Varian Semiconductor, VAI, hereafter referred to as VMS for periods following the spin-off and VI (the “Distribution Agreement”). For purposes of providing an orderly transition and to define certain ongoing relationships between and among Varian Semiconductor, VMS and VI after the spin-off Varian Semiconductor, VMS and VI also entered into certain other agreements which include an Employee Benefits Allocation Agreement, an Intellectual Property Agreement, a Tax Sharing Agreement and a Transition Services Agreement (collectively, the “Distribution Related Agreements”).

 

The Distribution Related Agreements provide that from and after the spin-off, VMS, VI, and Varian Semiconductor will indemnify each and their respective subsidiaries, directors, officers, employees and agents against all losses arising in connection with shared liabilities (including certain environmental and legal liabilities). All shared liabilities will be managed and administered by VMS and expenses and losses, net of proceeds and other receivables, will be borne one-third each by VMS, VI, and Varian Semiconductor. The Distribution Related Agreements also provide that Varian Semiconductor shall assume all of its liabilities, other than shared liabilities (including accounts payable, accrued payroll and pension liabilities) in accordance with their terms. During fiscal years 2004, 2003 and 2002, Varian Semiconductor was charged $1.6 million, $1.4 million, and $4.0 million, respectively, by VMS in settlement of these obligations. During the first six months of fiscal year 2005, Varian Semiconductor was charged by VMS $0.7 million in settlement of these obligations. During the first six months of fiscal year 2004, Varian Semiconductor was charged by VMS $0.9 million in settlement of these obligations.

 

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Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

On October 22, 2004, the President signed the Jobs Act. The Jobs Act creates a temporary incentive for U.S. corporations to repatriate accumulated income earned abroad by providing an 85 percent dividends received deduction for certain dividends from controlled corporations. The deduction is subject to a number of limitations and, as of today, uncertainty remains as to how to interpret numerous provisions of the Jobs Act. As such, Varian Semiconductor is not yet in a position to decide on whether, and to what extent, it might repatriate foreign earnings that have not yet been remitted to the U.S. Varian Semiconductor expects to complete its evaluation of the effects of the repatriation provision within a reasonable period of time following the publication of additional guidance. At this time, the range of earnings that may be repatriated and the potential range of income tax effects of such repatriation cannot be reasonably estimated.

 

In December 2004, the FASB issued FASB Staff Position (“FSP”) No. 109-2, “Accounting and Disclosure Guidance for the Foreign Earnings Repatriation Provision within the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004” (“FSP 109-2”). FSP 109-2 provides guidance under FASB No. 109 with respect to recording the potential impact of the repatriation provisions of the Jobs Act on enterprises’ income tax expense and deferred tax liability. The Jobs Act was enacted in October 2004. FSP No. 109-2 states that an enterprise is allowed time beyond the financial reporting period of enactment to evaluate the effect of the Jobs Act on its plan for reinvestment or repatriation of foreign earnings for purposes of applying FASB No. 109. At this time, the range of earnings that may be repatriated and the potential range of income tax effects of such repatriation cannot be reasonably estimated.

 

Under the guidance in FSP No. 109-1, “Application of FASB Statement No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes, to the Tax Deduction on Qualified Production Activities Provided by the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004,” issued in December 2004, the deduction will be treated as a “special deduction” as described in FASB No. 109. As such, the special deduction has no effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities existing at the enactment date. Rather, the impact of this deduction will be reported in the period in which the deduction is claimed on Varian Semiconductor’s tax return. This provision will become effective for Varian Semiconductor in fiscal year 2006.

 

The Jobs Act also provides for a two-year phase-out of the existing extra-territorial income exclusion (the “ETI”) for foreign sales. This provision is effective for transactions entered into after April 1, 2005. Varian Semiconductor expects the net effect of the phase-out of the ETI to result in an increase in the effective tax rate for fiscal year 2005 of less than one percentage point, based on current earnings levels.

 

In November 2004, the FASB issued Statement No. 151, “Inventory Costs — an Amendment of ARB No. 43, Chapter 4” (“FASB No. 151”). FASB No. 151 amends Accounting Research Bulletin (“ARB”) No. 43, Chapter 4, to clarify that abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) should be recognized as current-period charges. In addition, this statement requires that allocation of fixed production overheads to the costs of conversion be based on the normal capacity of the production facilities. The provisions of this statement are effective for inventory costs incurred during fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2005. Varian Semiconductor is in the process of evaluating the impact of FASB No. 151.

 

In December 2004, the FASB issued Statement No. 123 (revised 2004), Share-Based Payment (“FASB No. 123(R)”). FASB No. 123(R) will require Varian Semiconductor to measure all stock-based compensation awards using a fair value method and record such expense in its consolidated financial statements. In addition, the adoption of FASB No. 123(R) will require additional accounting related to the income tax effects and additional disclosure regarding the cash flow effects resulting from share-based payment arrangements. FASB No. 123(R), as issued, would have been effective beginning in Varian Semiconductor’s fourth quarter of fiscal year 2005. In April 2005, the SEC extended the effective date to fiscal years (rather than interim periods) beginning after June 15, 2005. Therefore, FASB No. 123(R) will be effective as of October 1, 2005 for Varian Semiconductor. The adoption of FASB No. 123(R) could have a material impact on Varian Semiconductor’s consolidated financial position, results of operations and cash flows. Varian Semiconductor is in the process of evaluating the impact of implementing FASB No. 123(R).

 

Risk Factors

 

The semiconductor industry is cyclical, and a slowdown in demand for Varian Semiconductor’s semiconductor manufacturing equipment could negatively affect financial results.

 

The semiconductor industry historically has been cyclical in nature and has experienced periodic downturns. The industry is currently experiencing volatility in product pricing and in product demand. Volatility may result in significant reductions and delays in the purchase of semiconductor manufacturing equipment and the construction of new fabrication facilities. Even though Varian Semiconductor’s revenues fluctuate significantly from period to period, in order to remain competitive, Varian

 

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Semiconductor continues to invest in research and development to maintain its worldwide customer service and support capability. These investments in the business may adversely affect Varian Semiconductor’s financial results.

 

Varian Semiconductor faces intense competition in the semiconductor equipment industry.

 

Significant competitive factors in semiconductor equipment manufacturing include the strength of customer relationships, pricing, technological performance and timing, distribution capabilities and financial viability. Varian Semiconductor believes that in order to remain competitive in this industry, it will need to devote significant financial resources to research and development, to offer and market a broad range of products, and maintain and enhance customer service and support centers worldwide. The semiconductor equipment industry is increasingly dominated by large manufacturers who have resources to support customers worldwide, and some of Varian Semiconductor’s competitors have substantially greater financial resources and more extensive engineering, manufacturing, marketing, service and support than does Varian Semiconductor. With fewer resources, Varian Semiconductor may not be able to match the product offerings or customer service and technical support offered by its competitors. In addition, there are several smaller companies that provide innovative technology that may have performance advantages over Varian Semiconductor’s systems. If these manufacturers continue to improve their product performance and pricing, enter into strategic relationships, expand their current targeted geographic territory or consolidate with large equipment manufacturers, sales of Varian Semiconductor’s products may suffer.

 

Varian Semiconductor derives a substantial portion of its revenues from a small number of customers, and its business may be harmed by the loss of any one significant customer.

 

Varian Semiconductor has historically sold at least half of its systems in any particular period to its major customers, some of which include Hynix Semiconductor, Inc., International Business Machines Corporation, Infineon Technologies AG, Intel Corporation, Micron Technology, Inc., Samsung Electronics Corporation Limited, Sony Corporation, STMicroelectronics, Texas Instruments, Inc., Taiwan Semiconductor Machines Corporation and United Microelectronics Corporation. During some quarters, some of these customers have individually accounted for more than ten percent of Varian Semiconductor’s total revenue. Varian Semiconductor expects that sales of its products to relatively few customers will continue to account for a high percentage of its revenue in the foreseeable future. Furthermore, Varian Semiconductor may have difficulty attracting additional large customers because its sales depend, in large part, upon the decision of a prospective customer to increase manufacturing capacity in an existing fabrication facility or to transfer a manufacturing process to a new fabrication facility, both of which typically involve a significant capital commitment. Once a semiconductor manufacturer has selected a particular supplier’s capital equipment, the manufacturer generally relies upon that equipment for the specific production line application and frequently will attempt to consolidate its other capital equipment requirements with the same supplier. Consequently, Varian Semiconductor may experience difficulty in selling to a prospective customer if that customer initially selects a competitor’s capital equipment.

 

Varian Semiconductor’s quarterly results of operations are likely to fluctuate, and as a result, Varian Semiconductor may fail to meet the expectations of its investors and securities analysts, which may cause the price of its common stock to decline.

 

Varian Semiconductor has experienced and expects to continue to experience significant fluctuations in its quarterly financial results. From time to time, customers may accelerate, postpone, or cancel shipments, or production difficulties could delay shipments. A cancellation, delay in shipment or delay in customer acceptance of the product upon installation in any quarter may cause revenue in such quarter to fall significantly below expectations, which could cause the market price of Varian Semiconductor’s common stock to decline. Varian Semiconductor’s financial results also fluctuate based on gross profit realized on sales. Gross profit as a percentage of revenue may vary based on a variety of factors, including the mix and average selling prices of products sold, costs to manufacture and customize systems and inventory management. In addition, a number of other factors could impact Varian Semiconductor’s quarterly financial results, including, but not limited to the following:

 

    changing global economic conditions and worldwide political instability;

 

    general conditions in the semiconductor equipment industry;

 

    unexpected procurement or manufacturing difficulties;

 

    pricing of key components;

 

    fluctuations in foreign exchange rates;

 

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    ability to develop, introduce and market new, enhanced and competitive products in a timely manner;

 

    introduction of new products by Varian Semiconductor’s competitors;

 

    legal or technical challenges to Varian Semiconductor’s products and technology; and

 

    adverse weather conditions at its manufacturing facilities or customers facilities.

 

Because Varian Semiconductor’s operating expenses are based on anticipated capacity levels and a high percentage of Varian Semiconductor’s expenses are relatively fixed, a variation in the timing of recognition of revenue and the level of gross profit from a single transaction could cause financial results to vary significantly from quarter to quarter.

 

It is difficult for Varian Semiconductor to predict the quarter in which it will be recognizing revenue from large product orders.

 

During a quarter, Varian Semiconductor customarily sells a relatively small number of ion implantation systems. Consequently, Varian Semiconductor’s revenue and financial results could be negatively impacted for a particular quarter if anticipated orders from even a few customers are not received in time to permit shipment and/or there are delays in customer acceptance of the product upon installation. Varian Semiconductor recognizes all or a portion of the revenue from a product at the time the product is shipped and title and risk of loss has passed to the customer. As a result, it is often difficult to determine the timing of product revenue recognition. In addition, Varian Semiconductor’s product order backlog at the beginning of each quarter may not include all systems needed to achieve expected revenues for that quarter. Because Varian Semiconductor may build systems according to forecast, the absence of a significant backlog for an extended period of time could adversely affect financial results.

 

Varian Semiconductor’s future business depends, in part, on its ability to successfully introduce and manage the transition to new products, and Varian Semiconductor may not succeed in accomplishing these goals.

 

Varian Semiconductor believes that its future success will depend on its ability to develop, manufacture and successfully introduce new systems and product lines with improved capabilities and to continue enhancing existing products; in particular, products that respond to the trend toward single wafer processing and 300mm wafer processing. Varian Semiconductor derives virtually all of its revenue from sales and servicing of ion implantation systems and related products and services. Varian Semiconductor must accurately forecast the demand for new products while managing the transition from older products. In addition, Varian Semiconductor may be unable to complete the development or meet the technical specifications of new systems or enhancements or to manufacture and ship these systems or enhancements in volume and on time, which may harm its reputation and business. In the past, Varian Semiconductor has experienced some delays in manufacturing and shipping systems and enhancements. If any of Varian Semiconductor’s new products have reliability or quality problems, Varian Semiconductor may incur additional warranty and service expenses, experience a decline in product orders or incur higher manufacturing costs to correct such problems, all of which could adversely affect financial results.

 

Varian Semiconductor is subject to the risks of operating internationally and it derives a substantial portion of its revenues from outside the U.S.

 

International revenue accounted for approximately 80%, 61%, and 61% of Varian Semiconductor’s revenue in fiscal years 2004, 2003, and 2002, respectively; and specifically, revenue in Asia has accounted for a substantial portion of this revenue. Sales to Asia accounted for approximately 68%, 46%, and 44% of revenue in fiscal years 2004, 2003 and 2002, respectively. Because Varian Semiconductor relies on sales to customers in Asia for a substantial portion of its revenue, its business is very likely to be adversely impacted by economic downturns and instability in that region. Varian Semiconductor’s business in Asia is affected by demand in each country. In addition, international sales are subject to risks, including, but not limited to:

 

    fluctuations in foreign exchange rates;

 

    changes in legal and regulatory requirements;

 

    political and economic instability and acts of terrorism;

 

    difficulties in accounts receivable collection;

 

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    any public health crisis such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS;

 

    difficulties in staffing cultural diversity and managing international operations; and

 

    foreign trade disputes.

 

If Varian Semiconductor is unable to protect its proprietary rights adequately, it may lose its ability to compete effectively in the semiconductor equipment industry.

 

Varian Semiconductor relies on obtaining and maintaining patent, copyright and trade secret protection for significant new technologies, products and processes and obtaining key licenses because of the length of time and expense associated with bringing new products through the development process to market. Varian Semiconductor intends to continue to file applications as appropriate for patents covering new products and manufacturing processes. However, Varian Semiconductor cannot provide assurance of the following:

 

    that patents will issue from any pending or future patent applications owned by, or licensed to, Varian Semiconductor;

 

    that the claims allowed under any issued patents will be sufficiently broad to protect Varian Semiconductor’s technology position against competitors;

 

    that any issued patents owned by or licensed to Varian Semiconductor will not be challenged, invalidated or circumvented; and

 

    that the rights granted under Varian Semiconductor’s patents will provide it with competitive advantages.

 

Varian Semiconductor also has agreements with third parties for licensing of patented or proprietary technology. These agreements include royalty-bearing licenses and technology cross-licenses.

 

In addition, Varian Semiconductor maintains and enforces its trademarks to increase customer recognition of its products. If its trademarks are used by unauthorized third parties, its business may be harmed. Varian Semiconductor also relies on contractual restrictions on disclosure, copying and transferring title, including confidentiality agreements with vendors, strategic partners, co-developers, employees, consultants and other third parties to protect its proprietary rights. If these contractual agreements are breached, Varian Semiconductor may not have adequate remedies for any such breaches. Varian Semiconductor also cannot provide assurance that its trade secrets will not otherwise become known to or be independently developed by others.

 

Patent claims may be expensive to pursue, defend or settle and may substantially divert Varian Semiconductor’s resources and the attention of management.

 

Varian Semiconductor could incur substantial costs and diversion of management resources in defending patent suits brought against it or in asserting its patent rights against others. If the outcome of any such litigation is unfavorable to Varian Semiconductor, its business may be harmed. Varian Semiconductor may not be aware of pending or issued patents held by third parties that relate to its products or technologies. In the event that a claim is asserted against Varian Semiconductor, it may need to acquire a license to or contest the validity of a competitor’s patent. Varian Semiconductor cannot be certain that it could acquire such a license on commercially acceptable terms, if at all, or that it would prevail in such a proceeding. From time to time Varian Semiconductor has received notices from and has issued notices to such third parties alleging infringement of patent and other intellectual property rights relating to its products. If Varian Semiconductor is subject to future claims of patent infringement, it may be required to make substantial settlement or damages payments and may have to devote substantial resources to reengineering its products.

 

Varian Semiconductor depends on limited groups of suppliers or single source suppliers, the loss of which could impair its ability to manufacture products and systems.

 

Varian Semiconductor obtains some of the components and subassemblies included in its products from a limited group of suppliers, or in some cases a single source supplier. The loss of any supplier, including any single source supplier, would require obtaining one or more replacement suppliers and may also require devoting significant resources to product development to incorporate new parts from other sources into Varian Semiconductor’s products. The need to change suppliers or to alternate between suppliers might cause delays in delivery or significantly increase Varian Semiconductor’s costs.

 

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Although Varian Semiconductor has insurance to protect against loss due to business interruption from these and other sources, Varian Semiconductor cannot provide assurance that such coverage will be adequate or that it will remain available on commercially acceptable terms. Although Varian Semiconductor seeks to reduce its dependence on these limited source suppliers, disruption or loss of these sources could negatively impact its business and damage customer relationships.

 

Varian Semiconductor’s indemnification obligations under the Distribution Related Agreements could be substantial, and Varian Semiconductor may not be fully indemnified in accordance with the Distribution Related Agreements for the expenses it incurs.

 

Under the terms of the Distribution Related Agreements, each of VMS, VI and Varian Semiconductor has agreed to indemnify the other parties (and certain related persons) from and after the spin-off with respect to certain indebtedness, liabilities and obligations which could be significant. The availability of such indemnities will depend upon the future financial strength of the companies. There is a risk that one or more of these companies will not be able to satisfy their indemnification obligations. In addition, the Distribution Related Agreements generally provide that if a court prohibits a company from satisfying its indemnification obligations, then such obligations will be shared equally by the other companies.

 

Failure to comply with present or future environmental regulations could subject Varian Semiconductor to penalties and environmental remediation costs.

 

Varian Semiconductor is subject to a variety of foreign, federal, state and local laws regulating the discharge of materials into the environment and the protection of the environment. These regulations include discharges into the soil, water and air and the generation, handling, storage and transportation and disposal of waste and hazardous substances. These laws increase the costs and potential liabilities associated with the conduct of Varian Semiconductor’s operations.

 

VAI has been named by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and third parties as a potentially responsible party under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, at eight sites where VAI is alleged to have shipped manufacturing waste for recycling or disposal. VAI is also in various stages of environmental investigation and or remediation under the direction of, or in consultation with foreign, federal, state and local agencies at certain current or former VAI facilities (including facilities disposed of in connection with VAI’s sale of its Electron Devices business during fiscal year 1995, and the sale of its TFS business during fiscal year 1997). The Distribution Related Agreements provides that each of VMS, Varian Semiconductor and VI will indemnify the others for one-third of these environmental investigation and remediation costs, as adjusted for any insurance proceeds and tax benefits expected to be realized upon payment of these costs.

 

For certain of these sites and facilities, various uncertainties make it difficult to assess the likelihood and scope of further investigation or remediation activities or to estimate the future costs of such activities if undertaken. Varian Semiconductor has accrued $1.4 million in estimated environmental investigation and remediation costs for these sites and facilities as of October 1, 2004. As to other sites and facilities, sufficient knowledge has been gained to be able to reasonably estimate the scope and costs of future environmental activities. As such, Varian Semiconductor has accrued $4.6 million, which represents future costs discounted at 7%, net of inflation, to cover Varian Semiconductor’s portion of these costs. This reserve is in addition to the $1.4 million previously described.

 

These accrued amounts are only estimates of anticipated future environmental-related costs, and the amounts actually spent may be greater than such estimates. Accordingly, Varian Semiconductor may need to make additional payments to cover its indemnification obligations that would exceed current estimates. In addition, Varian Semiconductor’s present and past facilities have been in operation for many years, and over that time in the course of those operations, such facilities have used substances which are or might be considered hazardous. Varian Semiconductor also may have generated and disposed of wastes which are or might be considered hazardous. Therefore, it is possible that additional environmental issues may arise in the future that Varian Semiconductor cannot now predict.

 

Varian Semiconductor’s ability to manage potential growth or decline, integration of potential acquisitions, and potential disposition of product lines and technologies creates risks.

 

The cyclical nature of the semiconductor industry may cause Varian Semiconductor to experience rapid growth or decline in demand for products and services. As a result, Varian Semiconductor may face significant challenges in maintaining adequate financial and business controls, management processes, information systems and procedures on a timely basis and training, managing and appropriately sizing the work force. Current conditions in the semiconductor equipment industry challenge management to control spending on operating activities. There can be no assurance that Varian Semiconductor will be able to perform such actions successfully.

 

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An important element of Varian Semiconductor’s management strategy is to review acquisition prospects that would complement existing products, augment market coverage and distribution ability, or enhance technological capabilities. In the future, Varian Semiconductor may make acquisitions of complementary companies, products or technologies, or may reduce or dispose of certain product lines or technologies that no longer fit Varian Semiconductor’s long-term strategies. Managing an acquired business, disposing of product technologies or reducing personnel entails numerous operational and financial risks, including difficulties in assimilating acquired operations and new personnel or separating existing business or product groups, diversion of management’s attention to other business concerns, amortization of acquired intangible assets, the incurrence of debt and contingent liabilities and potential loss of key employees or customers of acquired or disposed operations, among others. Varian Semiconductor’s success will depend, to a significant extent, on the ability of its executive officers and other members of its senior management to identify and respond to these challenges effectively. In addition, any acquisitions could result in dilutive issuances of equity securities. There can be no assurance that Varian Semiconductor will be able to achieve and manage successfully any such growth, decline, integration of potential acquisitions, disposition of product lines or technologies, or reduction in personnel, or that management, personnel or systems will be adequate to support continued operations. Any such inabilities or inadequacies would have a material adverse effect on Varian Semiconductor’s business, operating results, financial condition, cash flows and/or the price of Varian Semiconductor common stock.

 

Varian Semiconductor manufactures its products at one primary manufacturing facility and is thus subject to risk of disruption.

 

Varian Semiconductor has one primary manufacturing facility, located in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and its operations are subject to disruption for a variety of reasons, including, but not limited to natural disasters, work stoppages, operational facility constraints and terrorism. Such disruption could cause delays in shipments of products to Varian Semiconductor’s customers and could result in cancellation of orders or loss of customers and could seriously harm Varian Semiconductor’s business.

 

If Varian Semiconductor loses key employees or is unable to attract and retain key employees, it may be unable to pursue business opportunities.

 

Varian Semiconductor’s future success depends to a significant extent on the continued service of key managerial, technical and engineering personnel. Competition for such personnel is intense, particularly in the labor markets around Varian Semiconductor’s facilities in Massachusetts. The available pool of qualified candidates is limited, and Varian Semiconductor may not be able to retain its key personnel or to attract, train, assimilate or retain other highly qualified engineers and technical and managerial personnel in the future. The loss of these persons or Varian Semiconductor’s inability to hire, train or retrain qualified personnel could harm Varian Semiconductor’s business and results of operations.

 

Varian Semiconductor has anti-takeover defenses that could delay or prevent an acquisition and could adversely affect the price of its common stock.

 

Provisions of Varian Semiconductor’s certificate of incorporation and by-laws and of Delaware law could delay, defer or prevent an acquisition or change in control of Varian Semiconductor or otherwise adversely affect the price of its common stock. For example, Varian Semiconductor’s Board of Directors is classified into three classes, and stockholders do not have the right to call special meetings of stockholders. Varian Semiconductor’s certificate of incorporation also permits its Board of Directors to issue shares of preferred stock without stockholder approval. In addition to delaying or preventing an acquisition, the issuance of a substantial number of preferred shares could adversely affect the price of the common stock. Varian Semiconductor has also adopted a stockholders rights plan which may significantly dilute the equity interests of a person seeking to acquire control of Varian Semiconductor without the approval of the Board of Directors.

 

Varian Semiconductor does not anticipate paying dividends on its common stock in the future.

 

Varian Semiconductor has not paid and does not anticipate paying dividends on its common stock. Varian Semiconductor’s Board of Directors has discretion to make decisions to pay dividends to common stockholders in the future. The decision will depend on a number of factors, including results of operations, financial conditions and contractual restrictions, that the Board, in its opinion, deems relevant.

 

Compliance with Internal Controls Evaluation and Attestation Requirements.

 

Pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, Varian Semiconductor will be required, beginning in fiscal 2005, to perform an evaluation of its internal controls over financial reporting and have its independent registered public accounting firm publicly attest to such evaluation. Varian Semiconductor has prepared an internal plan of action for compliance, which includes a timeline and scheduled activities, although as of the date of this filing, Varian Semiconductor has not yet prepared the evaluation. Compliance with these requirements is expected to be expensive and time-consuming. If Varian Semiconductor fails to timely complete this evaluation, or if its independent registered public accounting firm cannot timely attest to its evaluation, Varian Semiconductor could be subject to regulatory scrutiny and a loss of public confidence in its internal controls. In addition, any failure to implement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation, could harm Varian Semiconductor’s operating results or cause Varian Semiconductor to fail to meet its reporting obligations, resulting in an adverse opinion from its independent registered public accounting firm.

 

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ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURE ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

 

As a multinational company, Varian Semiconductor faces exposure to adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates. This exposure may change over time as Varian Semiconductor’s business practices evolve and could have a material adverse impact on Varian Semiconductor’s financial results. Historically, Varian Semiconductor’s primary exposures have resulted from non-U.S. dollar denominated sales in Asia and Europe. Varian Semiconductor does not enter into forward exchange contracts for trading purposes. Varian Semiconductor’s forward exchange contracts generally range from one to six months in original maturity. No forward exchange contract has an original maturity greater than one year.

 

Varian Semiconductor hedges currency exposures that are associated with certain of its assets and liabilities denominated in various non-U.S. dollar currencies. The aggregate exchange loss was immaterial for the first six months of fiscal year 2005.

 

Forward exchange contracts outstanding are summarized as follows (amounts in thousands):

 

     April 1, 2005

   October 1, 2004

     Notional
Value


   Contract
Rate


   Fair
Value


   Notional
Value


   Contract
Rate


   Fair
Value


Foreign currency purchase contracts:

                                     

Euro

   $ 1,769    0.77    $ 1,754    $ —      —      $ —  

New Taiwan Dollar

     1,134    30.88      1,106      1,633    33.81      1,626

Korean Won

     903    1,012.56      898      2,520    1,148.68      2,520

British Pound

     234    0.53      232      125    0.56      126

Japanese Yen

     130    104.71      127      826    109.44      820
    

       

  

       

Total foreign currency purchase contracts

   $ 4,170         $ 4,117    $ 5,104         $ 5,092
    

       

  

       

Foreign currency sell contracts:

                                     

Japanese Yen

   $ 13,709    104.66    $ 13,381    $ —      —      $ —  

Korean Won

     4,177    1,010.88      4,147      6,467    1,155.45      6,504

New Taiwan Dollar

     987    31.21      973      477    33.96      477

Israeli Shekel

     236    4.35      235      —      —        —  

Euro

     —      —        —        745    0.82      760
    

       

  

       

Total foreign currency sell contracts

     19,109           18,736      7,689           7,741
    

       

  

       

Total contracts

   $ 23,279         $ 22,853    $ 12,793         $ 12,833
    

       

  

       

 

Varian Semiconductor also hedges currency exposures that are associated with certain of its product sales denominated in Japanese Yen. In accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 133, “Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities,” these forward foreign exchange contracts are designated as hedges of anticipated product sales, and accordingly the gains and losses resulting from the impact of currency rate movements on these contracts are not recognized in income until the underlying hedged transactions are recognized. Upon recognition, such gains and losses are recorded in revenue as an adjustment to the carrying amount of the underlying transactions in the period in which these transactions are recognized. Should the hedged anticipated product sales not occur within two months of the expiration of the forward foreign exchange contract, any unrealized gain or loss would be recorded in other (loss) income. There was one forward foreign exchange contract designated as a hedge of anticipated product sales in Japanese Yen outstanding at April 1, 2005 totaling $4.0 million. In addition, there was one forward foreign exchange purchase contract in the amount of $4.1 million offsetting the forward sell contract.

 

Interest Rate Risk

 

Although payments under certain of Varian Semiconductor’s overseas borrowing facilities are tied to market indices, Varian Semiconductor is not exposed to material interest rate risk from these borrowing facilities. Varian Semiconductor has no material cash flow exposure due to rate changes for cash equivalents and short-term investments. Varian Semiconductor maintains cash investments primarily in commercial paper, investment-grade money market funds and municipal securities, as well as short-term time deposits with investment grade financial institutions. Cash equivalents at April 1, 2005 and October 1, 2004 were $178.9 million and $212.8 million, respectively. At April 1, 2005 and October 1, 2004, Varian Semiconductor’s

 

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short-term investments were $250.0 million and $173.9 million, respectively and consisted primarily of U.S. Treasury and government agency securities, certificates of deposit and corporate bonds with ratings of AA or better that are available-for-sale with maturities of less than five years.

 

Commodity Price Risk

 

Varian Semiconductor is not exposed to material commodity price risk.

 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

The management of Varian Semiconductor, with the participation of the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures of Varian Semiconductor as of April 1, 2005. The term “disclosure controls and procedures,” as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), means controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported, within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the company’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and management necessarily applies its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. Based on the evaluation of Varian Semiconductor’s disclosure controls and procedures as of April 1, 2005, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as of such date, Varian Semiconductor’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level.

 

No change in Varian Semiconductor’s internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) occurred during the fiscal quarter ended April 1, 2005 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the internal control over financial reporting.

 

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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

Information required by this Item is provided in Note 14. Commitments, Contingencies and Guarantees to the Unaudited Interim Consolidated Financial Statements under Part I, Item 1 and is incorporated herein by reference.

 

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

None

 

ITEM 3. DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

 

None

 

ITEM 4. SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

 

The following items were submitted to a vote of the stockholders at the 2005 Annual Meeting of Stockholders of Varian Semiconductor held on February 24, 2005: (1) the election of two Class III Directors for the ensuing three years; (2) the approval of an amendment to the Omnibus Stock Plan to increase the number of shares of our common stock reserved for issuance under the plan by 1,600,000 shares; (3) the approval of an amendment to the Omnibus Stock Plan to increase the number of shares of our common stock available for grant pursuant to stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, performance units and performance shares by 300,000 shares; (4) the approval of an amendment to the Omnibus Stock Plan to provide that the term of an option may not be longer than eight years from the applicable date of grant; (5) the approval of an amendment to the Omnibus Stock Plan to provide that each non-employee director receives a non-qualified stock option grant to purchase 12,000 shares of our common stock on the date of appointment or initial election, and each non-employee director also receives annually a non-qualified option grant to purchase 6,000 shares of our common stock; and (6) the ratification of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP as our independent accountants for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2005. The number of shares of common stock eligible to vote as of the record date of December 29, 2004 was 36,504,848 shares. Each of these matters was approved by the requisite vote of the stockholders. Set forth below is the number of votes cast for, against, or withheld.

 

Proposal 1 – To elect two Class III Directors for the ensuing three years.

 

     For

   Against

   Withheld

Richard A. Aurelio

   33,234,888    —      1,373,406

Elizabeth E. Tallett

   30,878,721    —      3,729,573

 

Proposal 2 – To approve an amendment to the Omnibus Stock Plan to increase the number of shares of our common stock reserved for issuance under the plan by 1,600,000 shares.

 

    For

   Against

   Withheld

    25,412,537    5,405,585    43,431

 

Proposal 3 – To approve an amendment to the Omnibus Stock Plan to increase the number of shares of our common stock available for grant pursuant to stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, performance units and performance shares by 300,000 shares.

 

    For

   Against

   Withheld

    28,848,689    2,565,851    47,013

 

Proposal 4 – To approve an amendment to the Omnibus Stock Plan to provide that the term of an option may not be longer than eight years from the applicable date of grant.

 

    For

   Against

   Withheld

    29,358,762    1,456,513    46,278

 

Proposal 5 – To approve an amendment to the Omnibus Stock Plan to provide that each non-employee director receives a non-

 

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qualified stock option grant to purchase 12,000 shares of our common stock on the date of appointment or initial election, and each non-employee director also receives annually a non-qualified option grant to purchase 6,000 shares of our common stock.

 

    For

   Against

   Withheld

    28,066,609    2,734,529    60,415

 

Proposal 6 – To ratify the selection of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP as our independent accountants for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2005.

 

    For

   Against

   Withheld

    33,287,313    1,292,720    28,261

 

ITEM 5. OTHER INFORMATION

 

None

 

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS

 

Exhibits

    
31.1    Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
31.2    Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.1    Certification of the Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
32.2    Certification of the Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

VARIAN SEMICONDUCTOR EQUIPMENT ASSOCIATES, INC.
Registrant

By:

  /s/    ROBERT J. HALLIDAY
    Robert J. Halliday
    Executive Vice President, Treasurer and
Chief Financial Officer
    (Principal Financial Officer and
Duly Authorized Officer)

 

Date: May 11, 2005

 

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