VLKAY » Topics » Interest Rates

This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

96


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

96


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

96


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

96


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

96


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

96


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

96


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

96


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

96


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

96


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

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This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 10-K filed Mar 22, 2010.

Interest rates

Interest rate risk is one of the principal market exposures of each Series. Interest rate movements directly affect the price of interest rate futures positions held and indirectly the value of a Trading Company’s stock index and currency positions. Interest rate movements in one country as well as relative interest rate movements between countries materially impact profitability. The primary interest rate exposure is to interest rate fluctuations in the United States and the other G-7 countries. However, the Trading Companies also may take futures positions on the government debt of smaller nations. The Managing Owner anticipates that G-7 interest rates will remain the primary market exposure of each Trading Company and accordingly of each Series for the foreseeable future. The changes in interest rates which are expected to have the most effect on the Series are changes in long-term, as opposed to short-term rates. Most of the speculative positions to be held by the Trading Companies will be in medium- to long-term instruments. Consequently, even a material change in short-term rates is expected to have little effect on the Series if the medium- to long-term rates remain steady. Aggregate interest income from all sources, including assets held at clearing brokers, up to 2% (annualized) is paid to the Managing Owner by the Balanced Series (Class 1 and Class 2 only), Winton Series, Campbell/Graham/Tiverton Series, Currency Series and Winton/Graham Series. For the Frontier Diversified Series, Frontier Dynamic Series, Frontier Long/Short Commodity Series, Frontier Masters, Series, Balanced Series (Class 1a and Class 2a only), Long Only Commodity Series and Managed Futures Index Series, 20% of the total interest allocated to each Series is paid to the Managing Owner. In addition, if interest rates fall below 0.75%, the Managing Owner is paid the difference between the Trust’s annualized interest income that is allocated to each of such Series and 0.75%. Interest income above what is paid to the Managing Owner is retained by the Series.

Currencies

Exchange rate risk is a significant market exposure of each Series of the Trust in general and the Currency Series in particular. For each Series of the Trust in general, and the Currency Series in particular, currency exposure is to exchange rate fluctuations, primarily fluctuations that disrupt the historical pricing relationships between different currencies and currency pairs. These fluctuations are influenced by interest rate changes as well as political and general economic conditions. The Trading Advisors on behalf of a Series trade in a large number of currencies, including cross-rates, which are positions between two currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. The Managing Owner does not anticipate that the risk profile of the Series’ currency sector will change significantly in the future.

Stock Indices

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its primary equity exposure is equity price risk in the G-7 countries as well as other smaller jurisdictions. Each Series of the Trust (other than the Currency Series) is primarily exposed to the risk of adverse price trends or static markets in the major U.S., European and Japanese indices.

Metals

For each Series (other than the Currency Series), its metals market exposure is fluctuations in the price of both precious metals, including gold and silver, as well as base metals including aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc. Some metals, such as gold, are used as surrogate stores of value, in place of hard currency, and thus have an associated currency or interest rate risk associated with them relative to their price in a specific currency. Other metals, such as silver, platinum, copper and steel, have substantial industrial applications, and may be subject to forces affecting industrial production and demand.

 

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This excerpt taken from the VLKAY 20-F filed Feb 23, 2010.

Interest Rates

        We had cash and cash equivalents at November 30, 2009 totaling $51.9 million. These are primarily held in variable interest liquidity funds and overnight deposits.

        For the year ended November 30, 2009 we had average variable rate cash and cash equivalent balances, net of variable rate borrowings, of approximately $28.9 million. A hypothetical 1% change in interest rates during our 2009 fiscal year would have impacted our net interest income by approximately $0.3 million.

        Since November 30, 2009, there has not been a material change to our market risk exposure related to interest rates.

ITEM 12:    DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES

        Not applicable.

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PART II

ITEM 13:    DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES

        None.

ITEM 14:    MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS

        None.

ITEM 15:    CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

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