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Waste Management 10-Q 2010
e10vq
Table of Contents

 
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
     
(Mark One)    
þ
  QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the Quarterly Period Ended June 30, 2010
OR
o
  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the transition period from          to          
 
Commission file number 1-12154
 
     
Delaware   73-1309529
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
1001 Fannin
Suite 4000
Houston, Texas 77002
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(713) 512-6200
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes þ     No o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes þ     No o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large accelerated filer þ Accelerated filer o Non-accelerated filer o Smaller reporting company o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes o     No þ
 
The number of shares of Common Stock, $0.01 par value, of the registrant outstanding at July 27, 2010 was 477,435,789 (excluding treasury shares of 152,846,672).
 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I.
Item 1. Financial Statements.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (In Millions, Except Per Share Amounts) (Unaudited)
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 4. Controls and Procedures.
PART II.
Item 1. Legal Proceedings.
Item 1A. Risk Factors.
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds.
Item 6. Exhibits.
EX-3.1
EX-4,1
EX-4.2
EX-10.1
EX-31.1
EX-31.2
EX-32.1
EX-32.2
EX-101 INSTANCE DOCUMENT
EX-101 SCHEMA DOCUMENT
EX-101 CALCULATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
EX-101 LABELS LINKBASE DOCUMENT
EX-101 PRESENTATION LINKBASE DOCUMENT
EX-101 DEFINITION LINKBASE DOCUMENT


Table of Contents

 
 
Item 1.   Financial Statements.
 
WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(In Millions, Except Share and Par Value Amounts)
 
                 
    June 30,
    December 31,
 
    2010     2009  
    (Unaudited)        
 
ASSETS
Current assets:
               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 1,169     $ 1,140  
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $27 and $31, respectively
    1,485       1,408  
Other receivables
    156       119  
Parts and supplies
    110       110  
Deferred income taxes
    113       116  
Other assets
    123       117  
                 
Total current assets
    3,156       3,010  
Property and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation and amortization of $14,319 and $13,994, respectively
    11,575       11,541  
Goodwill
    5,667       5,632  
Other intangible assets, net
    256       238  
Other assets
    1,105       733  
                 
Total assets
  $ 21,759     $ 21,154  
                 
 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 543     $ 567  
Accrued liabilities
    1,098       1,128  
Deferred revenues
    459       457  
Current portion of long-term debt
    758       749  
                 
Total current liabilities
    2,858       2,901  
Long-term debt, less current portion
    8,827       8,124  
Deferred income taxes
    1,518       1,509  
Landfill and environmental remediation liabilities
    1,427       1,357  
Other liabilities
    721       672  
                 
Total liabilities
    15,351       14,563  
                 
Commitments and contingencies
               
Equity:
               
Waste Management, Inc. stockholders’ equity:
               
Common stock, $0.01 par value; 1,500,000,000 shares authorized; 630,282,461 shares issued
    6       6  
Additional paid-in capital
    4,522       4,543  
Retained earnings
    6,176       6,053  
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    164       208  
Treasury stock at cost, 151,407,591 and 144,162,063 shares, respectively
    (4,769 )     (4,525 )
                 
Total Waste Management, Inc. stockholders’ equity
    6,099       6,285  
Noncontrolling interests
    309       306  
                 
Total equity
    6,408       6,591  
                 
Total liabilities and equity
  $ 21,759     $ 21,154  
                 
 
See notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(In Millions, Except Per Share Amounts)
(Unaudited)
 
                                 
    Three Months
    Six Months
 
    Ended
    Ended
 
    June 30,     June 30,  
    2010     2009     2010     2009  
 
Operating revenues
  $ 3,158     $ 2,952     $ 6,093     $ 5,762  
                                 
Costs and expenses:
                               
Operating
    1,996       1,786       3,877       3,511  
Selling, general and administrative
    345       323       696       660  
Depreciation and amortization
    309       302       600       591  
Restructuring
    (1 )     5       (1 )     43  
(Income) expense from divestitures, asset impairments and unusual items
    (77 )     2       (77 )     51  
                                 
      2,572       2,418       5,095       4,856  
                                 
Income from operations
    586       534       998       906  
                                 
Other income (expense):
                               
Interest expense
    (116 )     (107 )     (228 )     (212 )
Interest income
    2       3       2       7  
Other, net
    (8 )           (6 )      
                                 
      (122 )     (104 )     (232 )     (205 )
                                 
Income before income taxes
    464       430       766       701  
Provision for income taxes
    206       163       316       264  
                                 
Consolidated net income
    258       267       450       437  
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
    12       20       22       35  
                                 
Net income attributable to Waste Management, Inc. 
  $ 246     $ 247     $ 428     $ 402  
                                 
Basic earnings per common share
  $ 0.51     $ 0.50     $ 0.89     $ 0.82  
                                 
Diluted earnings per common share
  $ 0.51     $ 0.50     $ 0.88     $ 0.81  
                                 
Cash dividends declared per common share
  $ 0.315     $ 0.29     $ 0.63     $ 0.58  
                                 
 
See notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(In Millions)
(Unaudited)
 
                 
    Six Months
 
    Ended
 
    June 30,  
    2010     2009  
 
Cash flows from operating activities:
               
Consolidated net income
  $ 450     $ 437  
Adjustments to reconcile consolidated net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
               
Depreciation and amortization
    600       591  
Deferred income tax (benefit) provision
    25       (35 )
Interest accretion on landfill liabilities
    40       39  
Interest accretion on and discount rate adjustments to environmental remediation liabilities and recovery assets
    15       (29 )
Provision for bad debts
    19       28  
Equity-based compensation expense
    20       9  
Net gain on disposal of assets
    (10 )     (4 )
Effect of (income) expense from divestitures, asset impairments and unusual items
          51  
Excess tax benefits associated with equity-based transactions
    (1 )      
Equity in net losses of unconsolidated entities, net of dividends
    5       1  
Change in operating assets and liabilities, net of effects of acquisitions and divestitures:
               
Receivables
    (110 )     22  
Other current assets
    (18 )     (11 )
Other assets
    8       (4 )
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
    (98 )     (16 )
Deferred revenues and other liabilities
    31       (12 )
                 
Net cash provided by operating activities
    976       1,067  
                 
Cash flows from investing activities:
               
Acquisitions of businesses, net of cash acquired
    (237 )     (59 )
Capital expenditures
    (475 )     (583 )
Proceeds from divestitures of businesses (net of cash divested) and other sales of assets
    27       12  
Net receipts from restricted trust and escrow accounts
    26       71  
Investments in unconsolidated entities
    (161 )     (3 )
Other
    (3 )     (1 )
                 
Net cash used in investing activities
    (823 )     (563 )
                 
Cash flows from financing activities:
               
New borrowings
    706       908  
Debt repayments
    (213 )     (1,014 )
Common stock repurchases
    (286 )      
Cash dividends
    (305 )     (285 )
Exercise of common stock options
    13       8  
Excess tax benefits associated with equity-based transactions
    1        
Distributions paid to noncontrolling interests
    (22 )     (22 )
Other
    (17 )     (51 )
                 
Net cash used in financing activities
    (123 )     (456 )
                 
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
    (1 )      
                 
Increase in cash and cash equivalents
    29       48  
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    1,140       480  
                 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 1,169     $ 528  
                 
 
See notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
(In Millions, Except Shares in Thousands)
(Unaudited)
 
                                                                                 
                Waste Management, Inc. Stockholders’ Equity        
                                        Accumulated
                   
                                        Other
                   
                            Additional
          Comprehensive
                   
          Comprehensive
    Common Stock     Paid-In
    Retained
    Income
    Treasury Stock     Noncontrolling
 
    Total     Income     Shares     Amounts     Capital     Earnings     (Loss)     Shares     Amounts     Interests  
 
Balance, December 31, 2009
  $ 6,591               630,282     $ 6     $ 4,543     $ 6,053     $ 208       (144,162 )   $ (4,525 )   $ 306  
Comprehensive Income:
                                                                               
Net income
    450     $ 450                         428                         22  
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of taxes:
                                                                               
Unrealized losses resulting from changes in fair value of derivative instruments, net of taxes of $21
    (33 )     (33 )                             (33 )                  
Realized gains on derivative instruments reclassified into earnings, net of taxes of $0
                                                           
Unrealized gains on marketable securities, net of taxes of $0
                                                           
Foreign currency translation adjustments
    (10 )     (10 )                             (10 )                  
Change in funded status of post-retirement benefit obligations, net of taxes of $0
    (1 )     (1 )                             (1 )                  
                                                                                 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
    (44 )     (44 )                                                                
                                                                                 
Comprehensive income
    406     $ 406                                                                  
                                                                                 
Cash dividends declared
    (305 )                               (305 )                        
Equity-based compensation transactions, including dividend equivalents, net of taxes
    33                           (21 )                 1,705       54        
Common stock repurchases
    (298 )                                           (8,957 )     (298 )      
Distributions paid to noncontrolling interests
    (22 )                                                       (22 )
Noncontrolling interests in acquired businesses
    34                                                         34  
Deconsolidation of variable interest entities
    (31 )                                                       (31 )
Other
                                                6              
                                                                                 
Balance, June 30, 2010
  $ 6,408               630,282     $ 6     $ 4,522     $ 6,176     $ 164       (151,408 )   $ (4,769 )   $ 309  
                                                                                 
 
See notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(Unaudited)
 
1.   Basis of Presentation
 
The financial statements presented in this report represent the consolidation of Waste Management, Inc., a Delaware corporation; Waste Management’s wholly-owned and majority-owned subsidiaries; and certain variable interest entities for which Waste Management or its subsidiaries are the primary beneficiary. Waste Management is a holding company and all operations are conducted by its subsidiaries. When the terms “the Company,” “we,” “us” or “our” are used in this document, those terms refer to Waste Management, Inc., its consolidated subsidiaries and consolidated variable interest entities. When we use the term “WMI,” we are referring only to Waste Management, Inc., the parent holding company.
 
We manage and evaluate our principal operations through five Groups. Our four geographic operating Groups, which include our Eastern, Midwest, Southern and Western Groups, provide collection, transfer, recycling and disposal services. Our fifth operating Group is the Wheelabrator Group, which provides waste-to-energy services. We also provide additional services that are not managed through our five Groups, which are presented in this report as “Other.” These five Groups are presented as our reportable segments, and additional information related to our segments can be found in Note 10.
 
The Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements as of and for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010 and 2009 are unaudited. In the opinion of management, these financial statements include all adjustments, which, unless otherwise disclosed, are of a normal recurring nature, necessary for a fair presentation of the financial position, results of operations, and cash flows for the periods presented. The results for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of results for the entire year. The financial statements presented herein should be read in connection with the financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
In preparing our financial statements, we make numerous estimates and assumptions that affect the accounting for and recognition and disclosure of assets, liabilities, equity, revenues and expenses. We must make these estimates and assumptions because certain information that we use is dependent on future events, cannot be calculated with a high degree of precision from data available or simply cannot be readily calculated based on generally accepted methods. In some cases, these estimates are particularly difficult to determine and we must exercise significant judgment. In preparing our financial statements, the most difficult, subjective and complex estimates and the assumptions that present the greatest amount of uncertainty relate to our accounting for landfills, environmental remediation liabilities, asset impairments, reserves associated with our uninsured claims and reserves and recoveries associated with our insured claims. Actual results could differ materially from the estimates and assumptions that we use in the preparation of our financial statements.
 
 
Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities — In June 2009, the FASB issued revised authoritative guidance associated with the consolidation of variable interest entities. The revised guidance replaced the previous quantitative-based assessment for determining whether an enterprise is the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity, and is, therefore, required to consolidate the entity, with an approach that is now primarily qualitative. This qualitative approach focuses on identifying the enterprise that has (i) the power to direct the activities of the variable interest entity that can most significantly impact the entity’s performance; and (ii) the obligation to absorb losses and the right to receive benefits from the variable interest entity that could potentially be significant to such entity. The revised guidance also requires that the enterprise continually reassess whether it is the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity rather than conducting a reassessment only upon the occurrence of specific events.
 
As a result of our implementation of this guidance, effective January 1, 2010, we deconsolidated certain capping, closure, post-closure and environmental remediation trusts for which power over significant activities is


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
shared. Our financial interests in these entities are discussed below. The deconsolidation of these trusts has not materially affected our financial position, results of operations or cash flows during the periods presented.
 
Following is a description of our financial interests in variable interest entities that we consider significant, including (i) those for which we have determined that we are the primary beneficiary of the entities and, therefore, have continued to consolidate the entities into our financial statements; and (ii) those that represent a significant interest in an unconsolidated entity.
 
 
Waste-to-Energy LLCs — In June 2000, two limited liability companies were established to purchase interests in existing leveraged lease financings at three waste-to-energy facilities that we lease, operate and maintain. We own a 0.5% interest in one of the LLCs (“LLC I”) and a 0.25% interest in the second LLC (“LLC II”). John Hancock Life Insurance Company owns 99.5% of LLC I, and 99.75% of LLC II is owned by LLC I and the CIT Group. In 2000, Hancock and CIT made an initial aggregate investment of $167 million in the LLCs, which was used to purchase the three waste-to-energy facilities and assume the seller’s indebtedness.
 
Income, losses and cash flows of the LLCs are allocated to the members based on their initial capital account balances until Hancock and CIT achieve targeted returns; thereafter, we will receive 80% of the earnings of each of the LLCs and Hancock and CIT will be allocated the remaining 20% proportionate to their respective equity interests. All capital allocations made through June 30, 2010 have been based on initial capital account balances as the target returns have not yet been achieved.
 
Our obligations associated with our interests in the LLCs are primarily related to the lease of the facilities. In addition to our minimum lease payment obligations, we are required to make cash payments to the LLCs for differences between fair market rents and our minimum lease payments. We may also be required under certain circumstances to make capital contributions to the LLCs based on differences between the fair market value of the facilities and defined termination values as provided for in the underlying lease agreements, although we believe the likelihood of the occurrence of these circumstances is remote.
 
We have determined that we are the primary beneficiary of the LLCs because (i) all of the equity owners of the LLCs are considered related parties for purposes of applying this accounting guidance; (ii) the equity owners share power over the significant activities of the LLCs; and (iii) we are the entity within the related party group whose activities are most closely associated with the LLCs.
 
As of June 30, 2010, our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet includes $325 million of net property and equipment associated with the LLCs’ waste-to-energy facilities and $237 million in noncontrolling interests associated with Hancock’s and CIT’s interests in the LLCs. As of June 30, 2010, all debt obligations of the LLCs have been paid in full and, therefore, the LLCs have no liabilities. We recognized expense of $12 million and $25 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2010 and June 30, 2009, respectively, for Hancock’s and CIT’s noncontrolling interests in the LLCs’ earnings. The LLCs’ earnings relate to the rental income generated from leasing the facilities to our subsidiaries, reduced by depreciation expense. The LLCs’ rental income is eliminated in WMI’s consolidation.


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
Significant Unconsolidated Variable Interest Entities
 
Trusts for Capping, Closure, Post-Closure or Environmental Remediation Obligations — We have significant financial interests in trust funds that were created to settle certain of our capping, closure, post-closure or environmental remediation obligations. We have determined that, under the current guidance, we are not the primary beneficiary of certain of these trust funds because power over the trusts’ significant activities is shared.
 
The deconsolidation of these variable interest entities as of January 1, 2010 decreased our restricted trust and escrow accounts by $109 million; increased investments in unconsolidated entities by $27 million; increased receivables, principally long-term, by $51 million; and decreased noncontrolling interests by $31 million. Beginning in 2010, our interests in these variable interest entities have been accounted for as investments in unconsolidated entities. Our investments and receivables related to the trusts had a fair value of $105 million as of January 1, 2010 and $107 million as of June 30, 2010. We continue to reflect our interests in the unrealized gains and losses on marketable securities held by these trusts as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income. The deconsolidation of these variable interest entities has not materially affected our financial position or results of operations for the periods presented.
 
As the party with primary responsibility to fund the related capping, closure, post-closure or environmental remediation activities, we are exposed to risk of loss as a result of potential changes in the fair value of the trusts assets. The fair value of trust assets can fluctuate due to (i) changes in the market value of the investments held by the trusts; and (ii) credit risk associated with trust receivables. Although we are exposed to changes in the fair value of the trust assets, we currently expect the trust funds to continue to meet the statutory requirements for which they were established.
 
Federal low-income housing tax credits — In April 2010, we acquired a noncontrolling interest in a limited liability company established to invest in and manage low-income housing properties. Our consideration for this investment totaled $221 million, which was comprised of a $215 million note payable and an initial cash payment of $6 million. We determined that we are not the primary beneficiary of this entity as we do not have the power to direct the entity’s activities. At June 30, 2010, our investment balance was $213 million. Additional information related to this investment is discussed in Note 5.
 
2.   Landfill and Environmental Remediation Liabilities
 
Liabilities for landfill and environmental remediation costs are presented in the table below (in millions):
 
                                                 
    June 30, 2010     December 31, 2009  
          Environmental
                Environmental
       
    Landfill     Remediation     Total     Landfill     Remediation     Total  
 
Current (in accrued liabilities)
  $ 129     $ 42     $ 171     $ 125     $ 41     $ 166  
Long-term
    1,167       260       1,427       1,142       215       1,357  
                                                 
    $ 1,296     $ 302     $ 1,598     $ 1,267     $ 256     $ 1,523  
                                                 


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
The changes to landfill and environmental remediation liabilities for the year ended December 31, 2009 and the six months ended June 30, 2010 are reflected in the table below (in millions):
 
                 
          Environmental
 
    Landfill     Remediation  
 
December 31, 2008
  $ 1,218     $ 299  
Obligations incurred and capitalized
    39        
Obligations settled
    (80 )     (43 )
Interest accretion
    80       6  
Revisions in estimates and interest rate assumptions
    5       (7 )
Acquisitions, divestitures and other adjustments
    5       1  
                 
December 31, 2009
    1,267       256  
Obligations incurred and capitalized
    22        
Obligations settled
    (30 )     (17 )
Interest accretion
    40       3  
Revisions in estimates and interest rate assumptions(a)
    (6 )     63  
Acquisitions, divestitures and other adjustments
    3       (3 )
                 
June 30, 2010
  $ 1,296     $ 302  
                 
 
 
(a) The revisions in estimates associated with our environmental remediation liabilities were primarily related to (i) charges totalling $39 million for the revisions of estimates associated with remediation liabilities at two sites, as described further under the Environmental matters section of Note 8, and (ii) the impact of changes in the risk-free discount rate used to measure the liabilities. As of December 31, 2009, we used a risk-free discount rate for these obligations of 3.75%. The applicable rate decreased to 3.0% as of June 30, 2010. The change in discount rate resulted in a $12 million increase to our environmental remediation liabilities and a corresponding increase to “Operating” expenses for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010.
 
At several of our landfills, we provide financial assurance by depositing cash into restricted trust funds or escrow accounts for purposes of settling capping, closure, post-closure and environmental remediation obligations. Generally, these trust funds are established to comply with statutory requirements and operating agreements and we are the sole beneficiary of the restricted balances. However, certain of the funds have been established for the benefit of both the Company and the host community in which we operate.
 
The fair value of trust funds and escrow accounts for which we are the sole beneficiary was $124 million at June 30, 2010. As discussed in Note 1, effective January 1, 2010, we deconsolidated the trusts for which power over significant activities of the trust is shared, which reduced our restricted trust and escrow accounts by $109 million as of January 1, 2010. Beginning in 2010, our interests in these variable interest entities have been accounted for as investments in unconsolidated entities and receivables. The fair value of our investment in these entities was $107 million as of June 30, 2010. These amounts are included in “Other receivables” and as long-term “Other assets” in our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet.


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
3.   Debt
 
The following table summarizes the major components of debt at each balance sheet date (in millions) and provides the maturities and interest rate ranges of each major category as of June 30, 2010:
 
                 
    June 30,
    December 31,
 
    2010     2009  
 
Revolving credit facility
  $     $  
Letter of credit facilities
           
Canadian credit facility (weighted average interest rate of 1.3% at June 30, 2010 and December 31, 2009)
    243       255  
Senior notes and debentures, maturing through 2039, interest rates ranging from 4.75% to 7.75% (weighted average interest rate of 6.6% at June 30, 2010 and 6.8% at December 31, 2009)
    6,066       5,465  
Tax-exempt bonds maturing through 2039, fixed and variable interest rates ranging from 0.25% to 7.4% (weighted average interest rate of 3.2% at June 30, 2010 and 3.5% at December 31, 2009)
    2,696       2,749  
Tax-exempt project bonds, principal payable in periodic installments, maturing through 2029, fixed and variable interest rates ranging from 0.2% to 5.4% (weighted average interest rate of 3.0% at June 30, 2010 and 3.1% at December 31, 2009)
    156       156  
Capital leases and other, maturing through 2050, interest rates up to 12%
    424       248  
                 
      9,585       8,873  
Current portion of long-term debt
    758       749  
                 
    $ 8,827     $ 8,124  
                 
 
 
As of June 30, 2010, we had $1,100 million of debt maturing within twelve months. We have classified $342 million of these borrowings as long-term as of June 30, 2010 based on our intent and ability to refinance these borrowings on a long-term basis.
 
 
The significant changes in our debt balances from December 31, 2009 to June 30, 2010 are related to the following:
 
Canadian credit facility — The decrease in the carrying value is primarily due to $9 million of net debt repayments during the six months ended June 30, 2010. The remaining change in the carrying value is due to currency translation adjustments, which were partially offset by the impact of interest accretion.
 
Senior notes — In June 2010, we issued $600 million of 4.75% senior notes due June 2020. The net proceeds from the debt issuance were $592 million. We intend to use the proceeds together with cash on hand to repay $600 million of 7.375% senior notes that mature in August 2010.
 
Tax-exempt bonds — During the six months ended June 30, 2010, we repaid $52 million of our tax-exempt bonds with available cash.
 
Capital leases and Other — The significant increase in our capital leases and other debt obligations for the six-month period ended June 30, 2010 is primarily related to our federal low-income housing investment discussed in Note 5, which increased our debt obligations by $215 million. This increase was offset by $38 million of repayments of various borrowings at their scheduled maturities.


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
Revolving Credit and Letter of Credit Facilities
 
As of June 30, 2010, we had an aggregate committed capacity of $2.5 billion for letters of credit under various credit facilities. Our primary source of letter of credit capacity is a three-year, $2.0 billion revolving credit facility that was executed in June 2010 to replace the $2.4 billion credit facility that would have expired in August 2011. Our remaining letter of credit capacity is provided under facilities with maturities that extend from June 2013 to June 2015. As of June 30, 2010, we had an aggregate of $1.7 billion of letters of credit outstanding under our revolving credit facility and letter of credit facilities. There have not been any borrowings outstanding under these credit facilities during 2010.
 
4.   Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities
 
The following table summarizes the fair values of derivative instruments recorded in our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet (in millions):
 
                     
        June 30,
    December 31,
 
Derivatives Designated as Hedging Instruments   Balance Sheet Location   2010     2009  
 
Interest rate contracts
  Current other assets   $ 3     $ 13  
Interest rate contracts
  Long-term other assets     43       32  
                     
Total derivative assets
      $ 46     $ 45  
                     
Interest rate contracts
  Current accrued liabilities   $ 13     $  
Foreign exchange contracts
  Current accrued liabilities     13       18  
Electricity commodity contracts
  Current accrued liabilities     1        
Interest rate contracts
  Long-term accrued liabilities     24        
                     
Total derivative liabilities
      $ 51     $ 18  
                     
 
For information related to the methods used to measure our derivative assets and liabilities at fair value, refer to Note 12.
 
Interest Rate Derivatives
 
Interest Rate Swaps
 
We use interest rate swaps to maintain a portion of our debt obligations at variable market interest rates. As of June 30, 2010, the outstanding principal of our fixed-rate senior notes was approximately $6.0 billion. The interest payments on $1.1 billion, or 18%, of these senior notes have been swapped to variable interest rates to protect the debt against changes in fair value due to changes in benchmark interest rates.
 
We have designated our interest rate swaps as fair value hedges of our fixed-rate senior notes. Fair value hedge accounting for interest rate swap contracts increased the carrying value of debt instruments by $94 million as of June 30, 2010 and $91 million as of December 31, 2009.
 
Gains or losses on the derivatives, as well as the offsetting losses or gains on the hedged items attributable to our interest rate swaps, are recognized in current earnings. We include gains and losses on our interest rate swaps as adjustments to interest expense, which is the same financial statement line item where offsetting gains and losses on the related hedged items are recorded. The following table summarizes the impact of changes in the fair value of our interest rate swaps and the underlying hedged items on our results of operations (in millions):
 
                             
Three Months Ended
  Statement of Operations
  Gain (Loss) on
  Gain (Loss) on
June 30,   Classification   Swap   Fixed-Rate Debt
 
  2010       Interest expense     $ 13     $ (13 )
  2009       Interest expense     $ (31 )   $ 31  


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
                             
Six Months Ended
  Statement of Operations
  Gain (Loss) on
  Gain (Loss) on
June 30,   Classification   Swap   Fixed-Rate Debt
 
  2010       Interest expense     $ 14     $ (14 )
  2009       Interest expense     $ (40 )   $ 40  
 
We also recognize the impacts of (i) net periodic settlements of current interest on our active interest rate swaps and (ii) the amortization of previously terminated interest rate swap agreements as adjustments to interest expense. The following table summarizes the impact of periodic settlements of active swap agreements and the impact of terminated swap agreements on our results of operations (in millions):
 
                                 
    Three Months
    Six Months
 
    Ended
    Ended
 
Reductions to Interest Expense Due to
  June 30,     June 30,  
Hedge Accounting for Interest Rate Swaps   2010     2009     2010     2009  
 
Periodic settlements of active swap agreements(a)
  $ 8     $ 11     $ 18     $ 23  
Terminated swap agreements
    6       5       11       11  
                                 
    $ 14     $ 16     $ 29     $ 34  
                                 
 
 
(a) These amounts represent the net of our periodic variable-rate interest obligations and the swap counterparties’ fixed-rate interest obligations. Our variable-rate obligations are based on a spread from the three-month LIBOR.
 
 
During the third quarter of 2009, we entered into Treasury rate locks with a total notional amount of $200 million to hedge the risk of changes in semi-annual interest payments for a portion of the senior notes that the Company planned to issue in June 2010. The Treasury rate locks were terminated contemporaneously with the actual issuance of such senior notes and we paid cash of $7 million upon settlement. We designated our Treasury rate lock derivatives as cash flow hedges and, accordingly, losses related to changes in the fair value of the derivatives have been deferred and recognized as a component of our “Accumulated other comprehensive income.”
 
During the three and six months ended June 30, 2010, the fair value of these Treasury rate locks decreased by $8 million and $11 million, respectively. The after-tax losses associated with the decreases in fair value that were recognized as a component of “Other comprehensive income” for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2010 were $5 million and $7 million, respectively. The $5 million of accumulated deferred losses, net of taxes, associated with these Treasury rate locks will be reclassified to “Interest expense” over the life of the related senior notes, which mature in June 2020. There was no significant ineffectiveness associated with these hedges during the three and six months ended June 30, 2010.
 
Our “Accumulated other comprehensive income” also includes deferred losses, net of taxes, of $14 million as of June 30, 2010 and $16 million as of December 31, 2009 related to Treasury rate locks that had been executed in previous years in anticipation of senior note issuances. As these instruments also were designated as cash flow hedges, the deferred losses are being reclassified to earnings over the term of the hedged cash flows, which extend through 2032.
 
 
The Company currently expects to issue fixed-rate debt in March 2011, November 2012 and March 2014 and has executed forward-starting interest rate swaps for these anticipated debt issuances with notional amounts of $150 million, $200 million and $175 million, respectively. We entered into the forward-starting interest rate swaps during the fourth quarter of 2009 to hedge the risk of changes in the anticipated semi-annual interest payments due


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
to fluctuations in the forward ten-year LIBOR swap rate. Each of the forward-starting swaps has an effective date of the anticipated date of debt issuance and a term of ten years.
 
We have designated our forward-starting interest rate swaps as cash flow hedges. As of June 30, 2010, the fair value of these interest rate derivatives is comprised of $13 million of current liabilities and $24 million of long-term liabilities. We recognized pre-tax and after-tax losses of $41 million and $25 million, respectively, to other comprehensive income for changes in the fair value of our forward-starting interest rate swaps during the three months ended June 30, 2010 and $46 million and $28 million, respectively, during the six months ended June 30, 2010. There was no significant ineffectiveness associated with these hedges during the three and six months ended June 30, 2010.
 
 
Certain of our interest rate derivative instruments contain provisions related to the Company’s credit ratings. If the Company’s credit rating were to fall below investment grade, the counterparties have the ability to cancel the derivative agreements and request immediate payment of any net liability positions. We do not have any derivative instruments with credit-risk-related contingent features that are in a net liability position at June 30, 2010.
 
 
We use foreign currency exchange rate derivatives to hedge our exposure to changes in exchange rates for anticipated intercompany cash transactions between Waste Management Holdings, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary we acquired in 1998 (“WM Holdings”), and its Canadian subsidiaries. As of June 30, 2010, we have foreign currency forward contracts outstanding for all of the anticipated cash flows associated with a debt arrangement between these wholly-owned subsidiaries. The hedged cash flows include C$370 million of principal, which is scheduled for repayment on December 31, 2010, and C$22 million of interest payments scheduled for December 31, 2010. We have designated our foreign currency derivatives as cash flow hedges.
 
Gains or losses on the derivatives and the offsetting losses or gains on the hedged items attributable to foreign currency exchange risk are recognized in current earnings. We include gains and losses on our foreign currency forward contracts as adjustments to other income and expense, which is the same financial statement line item where offsetting gains and losses on the related hedged items are recorded. The following table summarizes the pre-tax impacts of our foreign currency cash flow derivatives on our results of operations and comprehensive income (in millions):
 
                         
    Amount of Gain or
      Amount of Gain or
    (Loss) Recognized
      (Loss) Reclassified
    in OCI on
      from AOCI into
Three Months Ended
  Derivatives
  Statement of Operations
  Income
June 30,   (Effective Portion)   Classification   (Effective Portion)
 
  2010     $ 17     Other income (expense)   $ 17  
  2009     $ (24 )   Other income (expense)   $ (24 )
 
                         
    Amount of Gain or
      Amount of Gain or
    (Loss) Recognized
      (Loss) Reclassified
    in OCI on
      from AOCI into
Six Months Ended
  Derivatives
  Statement of Operations
  Income
June 30,   (Effective Portion)   Classification   (Effective Portion)
 
  2010     $ 5     Other income (expense)   $ 5  
  2009     $ (12 )   Other income (expense)   $ (12 )
 
Amounts reported in other comprehensive income and accumulated other comprehensive income are reported net of tax. Adjustments to other comprehensive income for changes in the fair value of our foreign currency cash flow hedges resulted in the recognition of after-tax gains of $10 million and $3 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2010, respectively. Adjustments for the reclassification of gains from accumulated other


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
comprehensive income into income were $11 million and $3 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2010, respectively. There was no significant ineffectiveness associated with these hedges during the three and six months ended June 30, 2010.
 
We recognized an after-tax loss to other comprehensive income for changes in the fair value of our foreign currency cash flow hedges of $15 million during the three months ended June 30, 2009 and $7 million during the six months ended June 30, 2009. After-tax losses reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income into income were $15 million and $8 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2009, respectively.
 
Electricity Commodity Derivatives
 
During the first quarter of 2010, we entered into “receive fixed, pay variable” electricity swaps to mitigate the variability in our revenues and cash flows caused by fluctuations in the market prices for electricity. The electricity swaps in place as of June 30, 2010 mature in December 2010 and are expected to hedge 287,040 megawatt hours, or approximately 21% of our Wheelabrator Group’s 2010 merchant electricity sales.
 
During the three and six months ended June 30, 2010, the fair value of our electricity commodity derivatives decreased by $3 million and $2 million, respectively. The after-tax losses associated with the decreases in fair value that were recognized as a component of “Other comprehensive income” for the three- and six-month periods ended June 30, 2010 were $2 million and $1 million, respectively. Adjustments for the reclassification of losses from “Accumulated other comprehensive income” into earnings reduced our revenues by $2 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010. The realized losses were $1 million on an after-tax basis for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010. The fair value of our electricity commodity derivative liabilities as of June 30, 2010 was $1 million and is included as a current liability in our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet. There was no significant ineffectiveness associated with these hedges during the three and six months ended June 30, 2010.
 
5.   Income Taxes
 
Our effective tax rate for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010 was 44.2% and 41.2%, respectively, compared with 37.9% and 37.6% for the comparable prior-year periods. The differences between federal income taxes computed at the federal statutory rate and reported income taxes for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010 were primarily due to (i) a $37 million increase in our current period provision for state deferred income taxes to reflect the impact of changes in the estimated tax rate at which existing temporary differences will be realized, which increased our effective rate for the three-month period by 8.1 percentage points and for the six-month period by 4.9 percentage points; and (ii) the unfavorable impact of state and local taxes. Since the state deferred tax charges relate to existing temporary differences, they are not expected to impact our effective tax rate in future periods, absent prospective changes in income apportionment or state tax rates. These increases in our effective rate for the reported periods were partially offset by the favorable impact of federal low-income housing tax credits, which decreased our effective rate for the three-month period by 1.6 percentage points and for the six-month period by 1.0 percentage points. The differences between federal income taxes computed at the federal statutory rate and reported income taxes for the three and six months ended June 30, 2009 were primarily due to the unfavorable impact of state and local income taxes. We evaluate our effective tax rate at each interim period and adjust it accordingly as facts and circumstances warrant.
 
Federal low-income housing tax credits — In April 2010, we acquired a noncontrolling interest in a limited liability company established to invest in and manage low-income housing properties. Our consideration for this investment totaled $221 million, which was comprised of a $215 million note payable and an initial cash payment of $6 million. The entity’s low-income housing investments qualify for federal tax credits that are expected to be realized through 2020 in accordance with Section 42 of the Internal Revenue Code.
 
We account for our investment in this entity using the equity method of accounting and recognize a charge to “Equity in net earnings (losses) of unconsolidated entities,” which is a component of “Other, net” within our Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations, for reductions in the value of our investment. We recognized $8 million of expense during the three and six months ended June 30, 2010. We also recognized $1 million of interest expense related to this investment during the current period. Our tax provision for the three and six months


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
ended June 30, 2010 was reduced by $11 million (including $8 million of tax credits) as a result of this investment, which more than offset the pre-tax expense realized during the period.
 
Healthcare legislation update — The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which was signed into law in March 2010, includes a provision that eliminates the tax deductibility of retiree health care costs to the extent that retiree prescription drug benefits are reimbursed under Medicare Part D coverage. Although this provision of the Act does not take effect until 2013, we were required to recognize the full accounting impact of the change in law on our deferred tax assets during the first quarter of 2010, the period in which the law was enacted. The re-measurement of our deferred tax assets did not affect our financial position or results of operations as of and for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010.
 
6.   Comprehensive Income
 
Comprehensive income was as follows (in millions):
 
                                 
    Three Months
    Six Months
 
    Ended
    Ended
 
    June 30,     June 30,  
    2010     2009     2010     2009  
 
Consolidated net income
  $ 258     $ 267     $ 450     $ 437  
                                 
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of taxes:
                               
Unrealized losses resulting from changes in fair value of derivative instruments, net of taxes
    (22 )     (15 )     (33 )     (7 )
Realized (gains) losses on derivative instruments reclassified into earnings, net of taxes
    (9 )     16             9  
Unrealized gains (losses) on marketable securities, net of taxes
    (1 )     6             3  
Foreign currency translation adjustments
    (37 )     49       (10 )     28  
Change in funded status of post-retirement benefit obligations, net of taxes
    (1 )           (1 )      
                                 
Other comprehensive income (loss)
    (70 )     56       (44 )     33  
                                 
Comprehensive income
    188       323       406       470  
Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests
    (12 )     (24 )     (22 )     (37 )
                                 
Comprehensive income attributable to Waste Management, Inc. 
  $ 176     $ 299     $ 384     $ 433  
                                 
 
The components of accumulated other comprehensive income, which is included as a component of Waste Management, Inc. stockholders’ equity, were as follows (in millions):
 
                 
    June 30,
    December 31,
 
    2010     2009  
 
Accumulated unrealized loss on derivative instruments, net of taxes
  $ (41 )   $ (8 )
Accumulated unrealized gain on marketable securities, net of taxes
    2       2  
Cumulative foreign currency translation adjustments
    202       212  
Funded status of post-retirement benefit obligations, net of taxes
    1       2  
                 
    $ 164     $ 208  
                 


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
7.   Earnings Per Share
 
Basic and diluted earnings per share were computed using the following common share data (shares in millions):
 
                                 
    Three Months
    Six Months
 
    Ended
    Ended
 
    June 30,     June 30,  
    2010     2009     2010     2009  
 
Number of common shares outstanding at end of period
    478.9       492.2       478.9       492.2  
Effect of using weighted average common shares outstanding
    3.2       0.2       2.6       (0.1 )
                                 
Weighted average basic common shares outstanding
    482.1       492.4       481.5       492.1  
Dilutive effect of equity-based compensation awards and other contingently issuable shares
    3.7       1.3       3.1       1.5  
                                 
Weighted average diluted common shares outstanding
    485.8       493.7       484.6       493.6  
                                 
Potentially issuable shares
    15.7       14.2       15.7       14.2  
Number of anti-dilutive potentially issuable shares excluded from diluted common shares outstanding
    0.2       5.4       3.7       3.3  
 
8.   Commitments and Contingencies
 
Financial instruments — We have obtained letters of credit, performance bonds and insurance policies and have established trust funds and issued financial guarantees to support tax-exempt bonds, contracts, performance of landfill capping, closure and post-closure requirements, environmental remediation, and other obligations. Letters of credit generally are supported by our revolving credit facility and other credit facilities established for that purpose. We obtain surety bonds and insurance policies from an entity in which we have a noncontrolling financial interest. We also obtain insurance from a wholly-owned insurance company, the sole business of which is to issue policies for us. In those instances where our use of financial assurance from entities we own or have financial interests in is not allowed, we generally have available alternative financial assurance mechanisms.
 
Management does not expect that any claims against or draws on these instruments would have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial statements. We have not experienced any unmanageable difficulty in obtaining the required financial assurance instruments for our current operations. In an ongoing effort to mitigate risks of future cost increases and reductions in available capacity, we continue to evaluate various options to access cost-effective sources of financial assurance.
 
Insurance — We carry insurance coverage for protection of our assets and operations from certain risks, including automobile liability, general liability, real and personal property, workers’ compensation, directors’ and officers’ liability, pollution legal liability and other coverages we believe are customary in the industry. Our exposure to loss for insurance claims is generally limited to the per incident deductible under the related insurance policy. Our exposure, however, could increase if our insurers are unable to meet their commitments on a timely basis.
 
We have retained a significant portion of the risks related to our automobile, general liability and workers’ compensation insurance programs. For our self-insured retentions, the exposure for unpaid claims and associated expenses, including incurred but not reported losses, is based on an actuarial valuation and internal estimates. The accruals for these liabilities could be revised if future occurrences or loss development significantly differ from our assumptions used. We do not expect the impact of any known casualty, property, environmental or other contingency to have a material impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
 
Guarantees — In the ordinary course of our business, WMI and WM Holdings enter into guarantee agreements associated with their subsidiaries’ operations. Additionally, WMI and WM Holdings have each guaranteed


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
all of the senior debt of the other entity. No additional liabilities have been recorded for these intercompany guarantees because all of the underlying obligations are reflected in our Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.
 
We also have guaranteed the obligations of, and provided indemnification to, third parties in the ordinary course of business. Guarantee agreements outstanding as of June 30, 2010 include (i) guarantees of unconsolidated entities’ financial obligations maturing through 2020 for maximum future payments of $12 million; and (ii) agreements guaranteeing the market value of homeowners’ properties adjacent to or near certain of our landfills. Our indemnification obligations generally arise in divestitures and provide that we will be responsible for liabilities associated with our operations for events that occurred prior to the sale of the operations. Additionally, under certain of our acquisition agreements, we have provided for additional consideration to be paid to the sellers if established financial targets are achieved post-closing. Effective January 1, 2009, we have recognized liabilities for these contingent obligations based on an estimate of the fair value of these contingencies at the time of acquisition. Contingent obligations related to indemnifications arising from our divestitures and contingent consideration provided for by our acquisitions are not expected to be material to our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
 
Environmental matters — A significant portion of our operating costs and capital expenditures could be characterized as costs of environmental protection, as we are subject to an array of laws and regulations relating to the protection of the environment. Under current laws and regulations, we may have liabilities for environmental damage caused by our operations, or for damage caused by conditions that existed before we acquired a site. In addition to remediation activity required by state or local authorities, such liabilities include potentially responsible party, or PRP, investigations. The costs associated with these liabilities can include settlements, certain legal and consultant fees, as well as incremental internal and external costs directly associated with site investigation and clean-up.
 
Estimating our degree of responsibility for remediation is inherently difficult. We recognize and accrue for an estimated remediation liability when we determine that such liability is both probable and reasonably estimable. Determining the method and ultimate cost of remediation requires that a number of assumptions be made. There can sometimes be a range of reasonable estimates of the costs associated with the investigation of the extent of environmental impact and identification of likely site-remediation alternatives. In these cases, we use the amount within the range that constitutes our best estimate. If no amount within a range appears to be a better estimate than any other, we use the amount that is the low end of such range. If we used the high ends of such ranges, our aggregate potential liability would be approximately $125 million higher than the $302 million recorded in the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements as of June 30, 2010.
 
Our ongoing review of our remediation liabilities could result in revisions to our accruals that could cause upward or downward adjustments to income from operations. These adjustments could be material in any given period. During the three months ended June 30, 2010, we revised our accruals for estimated liabilities principally related to two sites where environmental liabilities were not previously reasonably estimable beyond the feasibility study. The accruals for these sites now include an estimate of approximately $39 million resulting from (i) recording at one site our allocated share of the estimated cost of implementing the remediation alternative that the EPA has recently proposed; and (ii) recording at a second site our allocated share of the low-end cost estimate of the four remediation alternatives that were included in the draft feasibility study submitted to the EPA during the second quarter of 2010 and that are presently under consideration by the EPA. At the second site, we recorded the low-cost estimate of the four remediation alternatives because, in our opinion, no alternative is more likely than the others. In both cases, our liabilities arose from operations and conduct of predecessor companies at landfills that were closed prior to our acquisition of such companies. We believe that the ultimate settlement of our obligations with respect to these two sites will not have a material impact on our future financial position, results of operations or liquidity.
 
As of June 30, 2010, we had been notified that we are a PRP in connection with 74 locations listed on the EPA’s National Priorities List, or NPL. Of the 74 sites at which claims have been made against us, 16 are sites we own. Each of the NPL sites we own was initially developed by others as a landfill disposal facility. At each of these facilities, we are working in conjunction with the government to characterize or remediate identified site problems, and we have either agreed with other legally liable parties on an arrangement for sharing the costs of remediation or


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
are working toward a cost-sharing agreement. We generally expect to receive any amounts due from other participating parties at or near the time that we make the remedial expenditures. The other 58 NPL sites, which we do not own, are at various procedural stages under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, known as CERCLA or Superfund.
 
The majority of these proceedings involve allegations that certain of our subsidiaries (or their predecessors) transported hazardous substances to the sites, often prior to our acquisition of these subsidiaries. CERCLA generally provides for liability for those parties owning, operating, transporting to or disposing at the sites. Proceedings arising under Superfund typically involve numerous waste generators and other waste transportation and disposal companies and seek to allocate or recover costs associated with site investigation and remediation, which costs could be substantial and could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial statements. At some of the sites at which we have been identified as a PRP, our liability is well defined as a consequence of a governmental decision and an agreement among liable parties as to the share each will pay for implementing that remedy. At other sites, where no remedy has been selected or the liable parties have been unable to agree on an appropriate allocation, our future costs are uncertain.
 
Litigation — In April 2002, two former participants in the ERISA plans of WM Holdings, filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in a case entitled William S. Harris, et al. v. James E. Koenig, et al. The lawsuit named as defendants WM Holdings; the members of WM Holdings’ Board of Directors prior to July 1998; the administrative and investment committees of WM Holdings’ ERISA plans and their individual members; WMI’s retirement savings plan; the investment committees of WMI’s plan and its individual members; and State Street Bank & Trust, the trustee and investment manager of the ERISA plans. The lawsuit attempts to increase the recovery of a class of ERISA plan participants based on allegations related to both the events alleged in, and the settlements relating to, the securities class action against WM Holdings that was settled in 1998 and the securities class action against WMI that was settled in 2001. The defendants filed motions to dismiss the complaints on the pleadings, and the Court granted in part and denied in part the defendants’ motions in the first quarter of 2009. However, in December 2009, the Court granted the plaintiffs’ motion for leave to file a fourth amended complaint to overcome the dismissal of certain claims and the motion for leave to file a substitute fourth amended complaint to add two new claims. Each of Mr. Pope, Mr. Rothmeier and Ms. San Juan Cafferty, members of our Board of Directors, was a member of the WM Holdings’ Board of Directors and therefore was a named defendant in these actions. Additionally, Mr. Simpson, our Chief Financial Officer, is a named defendant in these actions by virtue of his membership on the WMI ERISA plan Investment Committee at that time. The defendants again moved to dismiss the fourth amended complaint, and during the second quarter of 2010, the Court dismissed certain claims against individual defendants, including the claims against Messrs. Pope and Rothmeier and Ms. San Juan Cafferty. All of the remaining defendants intend to continue to defend themselves vigorously.
 
Two separate wage and hour lawsuits were commenced in October 2006 and March 2007, respectively, that are pending against certain of our subsidiaries in California, each seeking class certification. The actions were coordinated to proceed in San Diego County Superior Court. Both lawsuits make the same general allegations that the defendants failed to comply with certain California wage and hour laws, including allegedly failing to provide meal and rest periods and failing to properly pay hourly and overtime wages. Additionally, in July 2008, we were named as a defendant in a purported class action in the Circuit Court of Bullock County, Alabama, which was subsequently removed to the United States District Court for the Northern District of Alabama. This suit pertains to our fuel and environmental charge and generally alleges that such charges were not properly disclosed, were unfair, and were contrary to contract. We filed a motion to dismiss that is pending. We deny the claims in all of these actions and intend to continue to vigorously defend these matters. Given the inherent uncertainties of litigation, the ultimate outcome of these cases cannot be predicted at this time, nor can possible damages, if any, be reasonably estimated.
 
From time to time, we also are named as defendants in personal injury and property damage lawsuits, including purported class actions, on the basis of having owned, operated or transported waste to a disposal facility that is alleged to have contaminated the environment or, in certain cases, on the basis of having conducted environmental remediation activities at sites. Some of the lawsuits may seek to have us pay the costs of monitoring of allegedly affected sites and health care examinations of allegedly affected persons for a substantial period of time even where


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
no actual damage is proven. While we believe we have meritorious defenses to these lawsuits, the ultimate resolution is often substantially uncertain due to the difficulty of determining the cause, extent and impact of alleged contamination (which may have occurred over a long period of time), the potential for successive groups of complainants to emerge, the diversity of the individual plaintiffs’ circumstances, and the potential contribution or indemnification obligations of co-defendants or other third parties, among other factors.
 
As a large company with operations across the United States and Canada, we are subject to various proceedings, lawsuits, disputes and claims arising in the ordinary course of our business. Many of these actions raise complex factual and legal issues and are subject to uncertainties. Actions filed against us include commercial, customer, and employment-related claims, including, as noted above, purported class action lawsuits related to our customer service agreements and purported class actions involving federal and state wage and hour and other laws. The plaintiffs in some actions seek unspecified damages or injunctive relief, or both. These actions are in various procedural stages, and some are covered in part by insurance. We currently do not believe that any such actions will ultimately have a material adverse impact on our consolidated financial statements.
 
WMI’s charter and bylaws require indemnification of its officers and directors if statutory standards of conduct have been met and allow the advancement of expenses to these individuals upon receipt of an undertaking by the individuals to repay all expenses if it is ultimately determined that they did not meet the required standards of conduct. Additionally, WMI has entered into separate indemnification agreements with each of the members of its Board of Directors as well as its President and Chief Executive Officer, and its Chief Financial Officer. The Company may incur substantial expenses in connection with the fulfillment of its advancement of costs and indemnification obligations in connection with current actions involving former officers of the Company or its subsidiaries or other actions or proceedings that may be brought against its former or current officers, directors and employees.
 
In April 2010, we settled our previously disclosed lawsuit relating to a revenue management system. We received a one-time cash payment, and all parties dismissed their claims with prejudice.
 
Item 103 of the SEC’s Regulation S-K requires disclosure of certain environmental matters when a governmental authority is a party to the proceedings and the proceedings involve potential monetary sanctions that we reasonably believe could exceed $100,000. The following matter pending as of June 30, 2010 is disclosed in accordance with that requirement:
 
On April 4, 2006, the EPA issued a Finding and Notice of Violation (“FNOV”) to Waste Management of Hawaii, Inc., an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of WMI, and to the City and County of Honolulu for alleged violations of the federal Clean Air Act, based on alleged failure to submit certain reports and design plans required by the EPA, and the failure to begin and timely complete the installation of a gas collection and control system (“GCCS”) for the Waimanalo Gulch Sanitary Landfill on Oahu. The EPA has also indicated that it will seek penalties and injunctive relief as part of the FNOV enforcement for elevated landfill temperatures that were recorded after installation of the GCCS. The FNOV did not propose a penalty amount and the parties have been in confidential settlement negotiations. Pursuant to an indemnity agreement, any penalty assessed will be paid by the Company, and not by the City and County of Honolulu.
 
Multi-Employer, Defined Benefit Pension Plans — Over 20% of our workforce is covered by collective bargaining agreements, which are with various union locals across the United States. As a result of some of these agreements, certain of our subsidiaries are participating employers in a number of trustee-managed multi-employer, defined benefit pension plans for the affected employees. One of the multi-employer pension plans in which we participate is the Central States Southeast and Southwest Areas Pension Plan (“Central States Pension Plan”), which has reported that it adopted a rehabilitation plan as a result of its actuarial certification for the plan year beginning January 1, 2008. The Central States Pension Plan is in “critical status,” as defined by the Pension Protection Act of 2006.


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
In connection with our ongoing re-negotiation of various collective bargaining agreements, we may discuss and negotiate for the complete or partial withdrawal from one or more of these pension plans. In the first quarter of 2010, we recognized a $28 million charge to “Operating” expenses for the agreed-upon withdrawals of three bargaining units from the Central States Pension Plan in connection with our negotiations of those units’ agreements. We do not believe that our withdrawals from multi-employer plans, individually or in the aggregate, will have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or liquidity. However, depending on the number of employees withdrawn in any future period and the financial condition of the multi-employer plans at the time of withdrawal, such withdrawals could materially affect our results of operations in the period of the withdrawal.
 
Tax Matters — We are currently in the examination phase of IRS audits for the tax years 2009 and 2010 and expect these audits to be completed within the next six and 18 months, respectively. We participate in the IRS’s Compliance Assurance Program, which means we work with the IRS throughout the year in order to resolve any material issues prior to the filing of our year-end tax return. We are also currently undergoing audits by various state and local jurisdictions that date back to 1999 and examinations in Canada that date back to 1998. To provide for certain potential tax exposures, we maintain a liability for unrecognized tax benefits, the balance of which management believes is adequate. Results of audit assessments by taxing authorities are not currently expected to have a material adverse impact on our results of operations or cash flows.
 
9.   Restructuring
 
In January 2009, we took steps to streamline our organization by (i) consolidating many of our Market Areas; (ii) integrating the management of our recycling operations with the remainder of our solid waste business; and (iii) realigning our corporate organization with this new structure in order to provide support functions more efficiently.
 
This reorganization eliminated over 1,500 employee positions throughout the Company. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2009, we recognized $5 million and $43 million, respectively, of pre-tax restructuring charges associated with this reorganization, of which $2 million and $38 million, respectively, were related to employee severance and benefit costs. During the remainder of 2009, we incurred an additional $7 million of pre-tax restructuring charges associated with this reorganization, of which $3 million was related to employee severance and benefit costs. The remaining charges were primarily related to operating lease obligations for property that will no longer be utilized. The following table summarizes the charges recognized for this restructuring by each of our current reportable segments and our Corporate and Other organization for the three and six months ended June 30, 2009 (in millions):
 
                 
    Three Months Ended
    Six Months Ended
 
    June 30, 2009     June 30, 2009  
 
Eastern
  $ 2     $ 10  
Midwest
    1       9  
Southern
    1       9  
Western
    1       6  
Wheelabrator
           
Corporate and Other
          9  
                 
Total
  $ 5     $ 43  
                 
 
For the three and six months ended June 30, 2010, we recognized $1 million of income related to the reversal of pre-tax restructuring charges. Through June 30, 2010, we have paid approximately $38 million of the employee severance and benefit costs incurred as a result of this restructuring. The length of time we are obligated to make severance payments varies, with the longest obligation continuing through the fourth quarter of 2010.


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
10.   Segment and Related Information
 
We currently manage and evaluate our operations primarily through our Eastern, Midwest, Southern, Western and Wheelabrator Groups. These five Groups are presented below as our reportable segments. Our four geographic operating Groups provide collection, transfer, disposal (in both solid waste and hazardous waste landfills) and recycling services. Our Wheelabrator Group provides waste-to-energy services and manages waste-to-energy facilities and independent power production plants. We serve commercial, industrial, municipal and residential customers throughout the United States and in Puerto Rico and Canada. The operations not managed through our five operating Groups are presented herein as “Other.”
 
Summarized financial information concerning our reportable segments for the three and six months ended June 30 is shown in the following tables (in millions):
 
                                 
    Gross
    Intercompany
    Net
       
    Operating
    Operating
    Operating
    Income from
 
    Revenues     Revenues     Revenues     Operations  
 
Three Months Ended:
                               
                                 
June 30, 2010
                               
Eastern
  $ 774     $ (140 )   $ 634     $ 143  
Midwest
    780       (119 )     661       141  
Southern
    876       (104 )     772       206  
Western
    799       (112 )     687       141  
Wheelabrator
    217       (29 )     188       47  
Other
    225       (9 )     216       (26 )
                                 
      3,671       (513 )     3,158       652  
Corporate and Other
                      (66 )
                                 
Total
  $ 3,671     $ (513 )   $ 3,158     $ 586  
                                 
June 30, 2009
                               
Eastern
  $ 756     $ (143 )   $ 613     $ 119  
Midwest
    723       (112 )     611       116  
Southern
    840       (111 )     729       191  
Western
    785       (104 )     681       146  
Wheelabrator
    212       (32 )     180       54  
Other
    146       (8 )     138       (28 )
                                 
      3,462       (510 )     2,952       598  
Corporate and Other
                      (64 )
                                 
Total
  $ 3,462     $ (510 )   $ 2,952     $ 534  
                                 
Six Months Ended:
                               
                                 
June 30, 2010
                               
Eastern
  $ 1,459     $ (253 )   $ 1,206     $ 252  
Midwest
    1,474       (217 )     1,257       223  
Southern
    1,699       (201 )     1,498       406  
Western
    1,563       (215 )     1,348       270  
Wheelabrator
    423       (60 )     363       83  
Other
    440       (19 )     421       (55 )
                                 
      7,058       (965 )     6,093       1,179  
Corporate and Other
                      (181 )
                                 
Total
  $ 7,058     $ (965 )   $ 6,093     $ 998  
                                 


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
                                 
    Gross
    Intercompany
    Net
       
    Operating
    Operating
    Operating
    Income from
 
    Revenues     Revenues     Revenues     Operations  
 
June 30, 2009
                               
Eastern
  $ 1,448     $ (265 )   $ 1,183     $ 211  
Midwest
    1,372       (207 )     1,165       201  
Southern
    1,673       (218 )     1,455       388  
Western
    1,542       (204 )     1,338       274  
Wheelabrator
    413       (58 )     355       93  
Other
    278       (12 )     266       (59 )
                                 
      6,726       (964 )     5,762       1,108  
Corporate and Other
                      (202 )
                                 
Total
  $ 6,726     $ (964 )   $ 5,762     $ 906  
                                 
 
Fluctuations in our operating results may be caused by many factors, including period-to-period changes in the relative contribution of revenue by each line of business and operating segment and by general economic conditions. In addition, our revenues and income from operations typically reflect seasonal patterns. Our operating revenues tend to be somewhat higher in the summer months, primarily due to the traditional seasonal increase in the volume of construction and demolition waste. The volumes of industrial and residential waste in certain regions where we operate also tend to increase during the summer months. Our second and third quarter revenues and results of operations typically reflect these seasonal trends.
 
Additionally, certain destructive weather conditions that tend to occur during the second half of the year, such as hurricanes typically experienced by our Southern Group, can actually increase our revenues in the areas affected. However, for several reasons, including significant mobilization costs, such revenue often generates earnings at comparatively lower margins. Certain weather conditions, including severe winter storms, may result in the temporary suspension of our operations, which can significantly affect the operating results of the affected regions. The operating results of our first quarter also often reflect higher repair and maintenance expenses because we rely on the slower winter months, when waste flows are generally lower, to perform scheduled maintenance at our waste-to-energy facilities.
 
From time to time, the operating results of our reportable segments are significantly affected by unusual or infrequent transactions or events. During the first quarter of 2010, our Midwest Group recognized a $28 million charge as a result of employees of three bargaining units in Michigan and Ohio agreeing to our proposal to withdraw them from an under-funded multi-employer pension plan. During the second quarter of 2009, employees of a bargaining unit in New Jersey agreed to a similar proposal and our Eastern Group recognized a charge of $9 million. Refer to Note 8 for additional information related to our participation in multi-employer pension plans. Further, as disclosed in Note 9, the income from operations of each of our geographic Groups for the three and six months ended June 30, 2009 was affected by our January 2009 reorganization.
 
Segment assets — Consistent with our continued focus on the expansion of our waste-to-energy business, we completed two investments during the six months ended June 30, 2010 which increased total assets of our Wheelabrator segment by $298 million, or 13%, from December 31, 2009 to June 30, 2010. In the first quarter of 2010, we paid $142 million to acquire a 40% equity investment in Shanghai Environment Group (“SEG”), a subsidiary of Shanghai Chengtou Holding Co., Ltd. As a joint venture partner in SEG, we will participate in the operation and management of waste-to-energy and other waste services in the Chinese market. SEG will also focus on building new waste-to-energy facilities in China. In April 2010, we paid $150 million for the acquisition of a waste-to-energy facility in Portsmouth, Virginia. These investments did not have a significant impact on our operating revenues or income from operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010.

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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
11.   (Income) Expense from Divestitures, Asset Impairments and Unusual Items
 
Through December 31, 2008, we capitalized $70 million of accumulated costs associated with the development of a new waste and recycling revenue management system. A significant portion of these costs was specifically associated with the purchase of a license for waste and recycling revenue management software and the efforts required to develop and configure that software for our use. After a failed pilot implementation of the software in one of our smallest Market Areas, the development efforts associated with the revenue management system were suspended in 2007. During 2009, we determined to enhance and improve our existing revenue management system and not pursue alternatives associated with the development and implementation of the licensed software. Accordingly, in 2009, we recognized a non-cash charge of $51 million, $49 million of which was recognized during the first quarter of 2009 and $2 million of which was recognized during the fourth quarter of 2009, for the abandonment of the licensed software.
 
We filed a lawsuit in March 2008 related to the revenue management software implementation that was suspended in 2007 and abandoned in 2009. In April 2010, we settled the lawsuit and received a one-time cash payment. The settlement, included in “(Income) expense from divestitures, asset impairments and unusual items,” which is included in our “Income from operations,” resulted in an increase for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010 of $77 million.
 
12.   Fair Value Measurements
 
 
As of June 30, 2010, our assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis include the following (in millions):
 
                                 
          Fair Value Measurements Using  
          Quoted
    Significant
       
          Prices in
    Other
    Significant
 
          Active
    Observable
    Unobservable
 
          Markets
    Inputs
    Inputs
 
    Total     (Level 1)     (Level 2)     (Level 3)  
 
Assets:
                               
Cash equivalents
  $ 1,036     $ 1,036     $     $  
Available-for-sale securities
    174       174              
Interest in available-for-sale securities of unconsolidated entities
    107       107              
Interest rate derivatives
    46             46        
                                 
Total assets
  $ 1,363     $ 1,317     $ 46     $  
                                 
Liabilities:
                               
Interest rate derivatives
  $ 37     $     $ 37     $  
Foreign currency derivatives
    13             13        
Electricity commodity derivatives
    1             1        
                                 
Total liabilities
  $ 51     $     $ 51     $  
                                 
 
 
At June 30, 2010, the carrying value of our debt was approximately $9.6 billion compared with $8.9 billion at December 31, 2009. The carrying value of our debt includes adjustments for both the unamortized fair value adjustments related to terminated hedge arrangements and fair value adjustments of debt instruments that are currently hedged.


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
The estimated fair value of our debt was approximately $10.2 billion at June 30, 2010 and approximately $9.3 billion at December 31, 2009. The estimated fair value of our senior notes is based on quoted market prices. The carrying value of remarketable debt approximates fair value due to the short-term nature of the interest rates. The fair value of our other debt is estimated using discounted cash flow analysis, based on rates we would currently pay for similar types of instruments. The increase in the fair value of our debt when comparing June 30, 2010 with December 31, 2009 is primarily related to an increase in outstanding debt balances.
 
Although we have determined the estimated fair value amounts using available market information and commonly accepted valuation methodologies, considerable judgment is required in interpreting market data to develop the estimates of fair value. Accordingly, our estimates are not necessarily indicative of the amounts that we, or holders of the instruments, could realize in a current market exchange. The use of different assumptions and/or estimation methodologies could have a material effect on the estimated fair values. The fair value estimates are based on information available as of June 30, 2010 and December 31, 2009. These amounts have not been revalued since those dates, and current estimates of fair value could differ significantly from the amounts presented.
 
13.   Condensed Consolidating Financial Statements
 
WM Holdings has fully and unconditionally guaranteed all of WMI’s senior indebtedness. WMI has fully and unconditionally guaranteed all of WM Holdings’ senior indebtedness. None of WMI’s other subsidiaries have guaranteed any of WMI’s or WM Holdings’ debt. As a result of these guarantee arrangements, we are required to present the following condensed consolidating financial information (in millions):


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING BALANCE SHEETS
 
June 30, 2010
(Unaudited)
 
                                         
          WM
    Non-Guarantor
             
    WMI     Holdings     Subsidiaries     Eliminations     Consolidated  
 
ASSETS
Current assets:
                                       
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 1,032     $ 3     $ 134     $     $ 1,169  
Other current assets
    12             1,975             1,987  
                                         
      1,044       3       2,109             3,156  
Property and equipment, net
                11,575             11,575  
Investments in and advances to affiliates
    10,661       13,252       2,376       (26,289 )      
Other assets
    94       17       6,917             7,028  
                                         
Total assets
  $ 11,799     $ 13,272     $ 22,977     $ (26,289 )   $ 21,759  
                                         
 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current liabilities:
                                       
Current portion of long-term debt
  $ 602     $     $ 156     $     $ 758  
Accounts payable and other current liabilities
    113       17       1,970             2,100  
                                         
      715       17       2,126             2,858  
Long-term debt, less current portion
    4,961       599       3,267             8,827  
Other liabilities
    24             3,642             3,666  
                                         
Total liabilities
    5,700       616       9,035             15,351  
Equity:
                                       
Stockholders’ equity
    6,099       12,656       13,633       (26,289 )     6,099  
Noncontrolling interests
                309             309  
                                         
      6,099       12,656       13,942       (26,289 )     6,408  
                                         
Total liabilities and equity
  $ 11,799     $ 13,272     $ 22,977     $ (26,289 )   $ 21,759  
                                         


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING BALANCE SHEETS (Continued)
 
December 31, 2009
 
                                         
          WM
    Non-Guarantor
             
    WMI     Holdings     Subsidiaries     Eliminations     Consolidated  
 
ASSETS
Current assets:
                                       
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 1,093     $     $ 47     $     $ 1,140  
Other current assets
    24       1       1,845             1,870  
                                         
      1,117       1       1,892             3,010  
Property and equipment, net
                11,541             11,541  
Investments in and advances to affiliates
    10,174       12,770       2,303       (25,247 )      
Other assets
    62       17       6,524             6,603  
                                         
Total assets
  $ 11,353     $ 12,788     $ 22,260     $ (25,247 )   $ 21,154  
                                         
 
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current liabilities:
                                       
Current portion of long-term debt
  $ 580     $ 35     $ 134     $     $ 749  
Accounts payable and other current liabilities
    90       17       2,045             2,152  
                                         
      670       52       2,179             2,901  
Long-term debt, less current portion
    4,398       601       3,125             8,124  
Other liabilities
                3,538             3,538  
                                         
Total liabilities
    5,068       653       8,842             14,563  
Equity:
                                       
Stockholders’ equity
    6,285       12,135       13,112       (25,247 )     6,285  
Noncontrolling interests
                306             306  
                                         
      6,285       12,135       13,418       (25,247 )     6,591  
                                         
Total liabilities and equity
  $ 11,353     $ 12,788     $ 22,260     $ (25,247 )   $ 21,154  
                                         


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
Three Months Ended June 30, 2010
(Unaudited)
 
                                         
          WM
    Non-Guarantor
             
    WMI     Holdings     Subsidiaries     Eliminations     Consolidated  
 
Operating revenues
  $     $     $ 3,158     $     $ 3,158  
Costs and expenses
                2,572             2,572  
                                         
Income from operations
                586             586  
                                         
Other income (expense):
                                       
Interest income (expense)
    (78 )     (9 )     (27 )           (114 )
Equity in subsidiaries, net of taxes
    293       299             (592 )      
Other, net
                (8 )           (8 )
                                         
      215       290       (35 )     (592 )     (122 )
                                         
Income before income taxes
    215       290       551       (592 )     464  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (31 )     (3 )     240             206  
                                         
Consolidated net income
    246       293       311       (592 )     258  
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
                12             12  
                                         
Net income attributable to Waste Management, Inc. 
  $ 246     $ 293     $ 299     $ (592 )   $ 246  
                                         
 
Three Months Ended June 30, 2009
(Unaudited)
 
                                         
          WM
    Non-Guarantor
             
    WMI     Holdings     Subsidiaries     Eliminations     Consolidated  
 
Operating revenues
  $     $     $ 2,952     $     $ 2,952  
Costs and expenses
                2,418             2,418  
                                         
Income from operations
                534             534  
                                         
Other income (expense):
                                       
Interest income (expense)
    (69 )     (11 )     (24 )           (104 )
Equity in subsidiaries, net of taxes
    289       296             (585 )      
                                         
      220       285       (24 )     (585 )     (104 )
                                         
Income before income taxes
    220       285       510       (585 )     430  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (27 )     (4 )     194             163  
                                         
Consolidated net income
    247       289       316       (585 )     267  
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
                20             20  
                                         
Net income attributable to Waste Management, Inc. 
  $ 247     $ 289     $ 296     $ (585 )   $ 247  
                                         


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)
 
Six Months Ended June 30, 2010
(Unaudited)
 
                                         
          WM
    Non-Guarantor
             
    WMI     Holdings     Subsidiaries     Eliminations     Consolidated  
 
Operating revenues
  $     $     $ 6,093     $     $ 6,093  
Costs and expenses
                5,095             5,095  
                                         
Income from operations
                998             998  
                                         
Other income (expense):
                                       
Interest income (expense)
    (153 )     (19 )     (54 )           (226 )
Equity in subsidiaries, net of taxes
    521       533             (1,054 )      
Other, net
                (6 )           (6 )
                                         
      368       514       (60 )     (1,054 )     (232 )
                                         
Income before income taxes
    368       514       938       (1,054 )     766  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (60 )     (7 )     383             316  
                                         
Consolidated net income
    428       521       555       (1,054 )     450  
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
                22             22  
                                         
Net income attributable to Waste Management, Inc. 
  $ 428     $ 521     $ 533     $ (1,054 )   $ 428  
                                         
 
Six Months Ended June 30, 2009
(Unaudited)
 
                                         
          WM
    Non-Guarantor
             
    WMI     Holdings     Subsidiaries     Eliminations     Consolidated  
 
Operating revenues
  $     $     $ 5,762     $     $ 5,762  
Costs and expenses
                4,856             4,856  
                                         
Income from operations
                906             906  
                                         
Other income (expense):
                                       
Interest income (expense)
    (133 )     (21 )     (51 )           (205 )
Equity in subsidiaries, net of taxes
    483       496             (979 )      
                                         
      350       475       (51 )     (979 )     (205 )
                                         
Income before income taxes
    350       475       855       (979 )     701  
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes
    (52 )     (8 )     324             264  
                                         
Consolidated net income
    402       483       531       (979 )     437  
Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
                35             35  
                                         
Net income attributable to Waste Management, Inc. 
  $ 402     $ 483     $ 496     $ (979 )   $ 402  
                                         


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
 
Six Months Ended June 30, 2010
(Unaudited)
 
                                         
          WM
    Non-Guarantor
             
    WMI     Holdings     Subsidiaries     Eliminations     Consolidated  
 
Cash flows from operating activities:
                                       
Consolidated net income
  $ 428     $ 521     $ 555     $ (1,054 )   $ 450  
Equity in earnings of subsidiaries, net of taxes
    (521 )     (533 )           1,054        
Other adjustments
    9       (2 )     519             526  
                                         
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
    (84 )     (14 )     1,074             976  
                                         
Cash flows from investing activities:
                                       
Acquisitions of businesses, net of cash acquired
                (237 )           (237 )
Capital expenditures
                (475 )           (475 )
Proceeds from divestitures of businesses (net of cash divested) and other sales of assets
                27             27  
Net receipts from restricted trust and escrow accounts and other, net
                (138 )           (138 )
                                         
Net cash used in investing activities
                (823 )           (823 )
                                         
Cash flows from financing activities:
                                       
New borrowings
    592             114             706  
Debt repayments
    (17 )     (35 )     (161 )           (213 )
Common stock repurchases
    (286 )                       (286 )
Cash dividends
    (305 )                       (305 )
Exercise of common stock options
    13                         13  
Distributions paid to noncontrolling interests and other
    (13 )           (25 )           (38 )
(Increase) decrease in intercompany and investments, net
    39       52       (91 )            
                                         
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
    23       17       (163 )           (123 )
                                         
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
                (1 )           (1 )
                                         
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
    (61 )     3       87             29  
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    1,093             47             1,140  
                                         
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 1,032     $ 3     $ 134     $     $ 1,169  
                                         


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATING STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (Continued)
 
Six Months Ended June 30, 2009
(Unaudited)
 
                                         
          WM
    Non-Guarantor
             
    WMI     Holdings     Subsidiaries     Eliminations     Consolidated  
 
Cash flows from operating activities:
                                       
Consolidated net income
  $ 402     $ 483     $ 531     $ (979 )   $ 437  
Equity in earnings of subsidiaries, net of taxes
    (483 )     (496 )           979        
Other adjustments
    7       (1 )     624             630  
                                         
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
    (74 )     (14 )     1,155             1,067  
                                         
Cash flows from investing activities:
                                       
Acquisitions of businesses, net of cash acquired
                (59 )           (59 )
Capital expenditures
                (583 )           (583 )
Proceeds from divestitures of businesses (net of cash divested) and other sales of assets
                12             12  
Net receipts from restricted trust and escrow accounts and other, net
                67             67  
                                         
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
                (563 )           (563 )
                                         
Cash flows from financing activities:
                                       
New borrowings
    793             115             908  
Debt repayments
    (810 )           (204 )           (1,014 )
Cash dividends
    (285 )                       (285 )
Exercise of common stock options
    8                         8  
Distributions paid to noncontrolling interests and other
                (73 )           (73 )
(Increase) decrease in intercompany and investments, net
    377       14       (391 )            
                                         
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
    83       14       (553 )           (456 )
                                         
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
                             
                                         
Increase in cash and cash equivalents
    9             39             48  
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period
    450             30             480  
                                         
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period
  $ 459     $     $ 69     $     $ 528  
                                         


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WASTE MANAGEMENT, INC.
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS — (Continued)
 
14.   New Accounting Pronouncement Pending Adoption
 
Multiple-Deliverable Revenue Arrangements — In October 2009, the FASB amended authoritative guidance associated with multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements. This amended guidance addresses the determination of when individual deliverables within an arrangement may be treated as separate units of accounting and modifies the manner in which consideration is allocated across the separately identifiable deliverables. The amendments to authoritative guidance associated with multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements are effective for the Company on January 1, 2011, although the FASB does permit early adoption of the guidance provided that it is retroactively applied to the beginning of the year of adoption. The new accounting standard may be applied either retrospectively for all periods presented or prospectively to arrangements entered into or materially modified after the date of adoption. We are in the process of assessing the provisions of this new guidance and currently do not expect that the adoption will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements. However, our adoption of this guidance may significantly impact our accounting and reporting for future revenue arrangements to the extent they are material.


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Item 2.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
 
The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and notes thereto included under Item 1 and our Consolidated Financial Statements and notes thereto and related Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
In an effort to keep our stockholders and the public informed about our business, we may make “forward-looking statements.” Forward-looking statements usually relate to future events and anticipated revenues, earnings, cash flows or other aspects of our operations or operating results. Forward-looking statements are often identified by the words, “will,” “may,” “should,” “continue,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “expect,” “plan,” “forecast,” “project,” “estimate,” “intend” and words of similar nature and generally include statements containing:
 
  •  projections about accounting and finances;
 
  •  plans and objectives for the future;
 
  •  projections or estimates about assumptions relating to our performance; or
 
  •  our opinions, views or beliefs about the effects of current or future events, circumstances or performance.
 
You should view these statements with caution. These statements are not guarantees of future performance, circumstances or events. They are based on the facts and circumstances known to us as of the date the statements are made. All phases of our business are subject to uncertainties, risks and other influences, many of which we do not control. Any of these factors, either alone or taken together, could have a material adverse effect on us and could change whether any forward-looking statement ultimately turns out to be true. Additionally, we assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statement as a result of future events, circumstances or developments. The following discussion should be read together with the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and the notes thereto.
 
Some of the risks that we face and that could affect our financial statements for 2010 and beyond and that could cause actual results to be materially different from those that may be set forth in forward-looking statements made by the Company include the following:
 
  •  volatility and deterioration in the credit markets, inflation and other general and local economic conditions may negatively affect the volumes of waste generated;
 
  •  economic conditions may negatively affect parties with whom we do business, which could result in late payments or the uncollectability of receivables as well as the non-performance of certain agreements, including expected funding under our credit agreement, which could negatively impact our liquidity and results of operations;
 
  •  competition may negatively affect our profitability or cash flows, our price increases may have negative effects on volumes, and price roll-backs and lower than average pricing to retain and attract customers may negatively affect our average yield on collection and disposal business;
 
  •  our existing and proposed service offerings to customers may require that we develop or license, and protect, new technologies; and our inability to obtain or protect new technologies could impact our services to customers and development of new revenue sources;
 
  •  we may be unable to maintain or expand margins if we are unable to control costs or raise prices;
 
  •  we may not be able to successfully execute or continue our operational or other margin improvement plans and programs, including: pricing increases; passing on increased costs to our customers; reducing costs; and divesting under-performing assets and purchasing accretive businesses, any failures of which could negatively affect our revenues and margins;
 
  •  weather conditions cause our quarter-to-quarter results to fluctuate, and harsh weather or natural disasters may cause us to temporarily shut down operations;
 
  •  possible changes in our estimates of costs for site remediation requirements, final capping, closure and post-closure obligations, compliance and regulatory developments may increase our expenses;


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  •  regulations may negatively impact our business by, among other things, restricting our operations, increasing costs of operations or requiring additional capital expenditures;
 
  •  climate change legislation, including possible limits on carbon emissions, may negatively impact our results of operations by increasing expenses related to tracking, measuring and reporting our greenhouse gas emissions and increasing operating costs and capital expenditures that may be required to comply with any such legislation;
 
  •  if we are unable to obtain and maintain permits needed to open, operate, and/or expand our facilities, our results of operations will be negatively impacted;
 
  •  limitations or bans on disposal or transportation of out-of-state, cross-border, or certain categories of waste, as well as mandates on the disposal of waste, can increase our expenses and reduce our revenue;
 
  •  fuel price increases or fuel supply shortages may increase our expenses or restrict our ability to operate;
 
  •  increased costs or the inability to obtain financial assurance or the inadequacy of our insurance coverages could negatively impact our liquidity and increase our liabilities;
 
  •  possible charges as a result of shut-down operations, uncompleted development or expansion projects or other events may negatively affect earnings;
 
  •  fluctuations in commodity prices may have negative effects on our operating results;
 
  •  trends requiring recycling, waste reduction at the source and prohibiting the disposal of certain types of waste could have negative effects on volumes of waste going to landfills and waste-to-energy facilities;
 
  •  efforts by labor unions to organize our employees may increase operating expenses and we may be unable to negotiate acceptable collective bargaining agreements with those who have chosen to be represented by unions, which could lead to labor disruptions, including strikes and lock-outs, which could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flows;
 
  •  negative outcomes of litigation or threatened litigation or governmental proceedings may increase our costs, limit our ability to conduct or expand our operations, or limit our ability to execute our business plans and strategies;
 
  •  problems with the operation of our current information technology or the development and deployment of new information systems could decrease our efficiencies and increase our costs;
 
  •  the adoption of new accounting standards or interpretations may cause fluctuations in reported quarterly results of operations or adversely impact our reported results of operations;
 
  •  we may reduce or suspend capital expenditures, acquisition activity, dividend declarations or share repurchases if we suffer a significant reduction in cash flows; and
 
  •  we may be unable to incur future indebtedness on terms we deem acceptable or to refinance our debt obligations, including near-term maturities, on acceptable terms and higher interest rates and market conditions may increase our expenses.
 
 
Our principal executive offices are located at 1001 Fannin Street, Suite 4000, Houston, Texas 77002. Our telephone number at that address is (713) 512-6200. Our website address is http://www.wm.com. Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K are all available, free of charge, on our website as soon as practicable after we file the reports with the SEC. Our stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “WM.”
 
We are the leading provider of integrated waste services in North America. Using our vast network of assets and employees, we provide a comprehensive range of waste management services. Through our subsidiaries we provide collection, transfer, recycling, disposal and waste-to-energy services. In providing these services, we actively pursue projects and initiatives that we believe make a positive difference for our environment, including recovering and processing the methane gas produced naturally by landfills into a renewable energy source. Our customers include commercial, industrial, municipal and residential customers, other waste management companies, electric utilities and governmental entities.


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Through the first half of 2010, we have seen improvements in our results, which reflect our discipline in pricing and cost control, as well as an improvement in the general economic environment. Highlights of our financial results for the current quarter include:
 
  •  Revenues of $3,158 million compared with $2,952 million in the second quarter of 2009, an increase of $206 million, or 7.0%. This increase in revenues is primarily attributable to:
 
  •  Increases from recyclable commodity prices of $123 million; increases from our fuel surcharge program of $27 million; and increases from foreign currency translation of $22 million; and
 
  •  Internal revenue growth from yield on collection and disposal business measured as a percentage of the related business of 2.3% in the current period;
 
  •  Internal revenue growth from volume was negative 2.9% in the second quarter of 2010, compared with negative 8.6% in the second quarter of 2009;
 
  •  Operating expenses of $1,996 million, or 63.2% of revenues, compared with $1,786 million, or 60.5% of revenues, in the second quarter of 2009. This increase of $210 million, or 11.8%, is due primarily to higher recyclable commodity prices, higher fuel prices and increases in our environmental remediation reserves;
 
  •  Selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $22 million, or 6.8%, from $323 million in the comparable prior year period to $345 million in the second quarter of 2010. These costs increased in support of the Company’s strategic plan to grow into new markets and provide expanded service offerings and in support of our current focus on improving our information technology systems;
 
  •  Income from operations of $586 million, or 18.6% of revenues, for the second quarter of 2010 compared with $534 million, or 18.1% of revenues, for the second quarter of 2009; and
 
  •  Net income attributable to Waste Management, Inc. of $246 million, or $0.51 per diluted share for the current quarter, as compared with $247 million, or $0.50 per diluted share, for the prior year period.
 
The comparability of our results for the second quarter of 2010 with the second quarter of 2009 has been affected by certain items management believes are not representative or indicative of our results. The results of the second quarter of 2010 were significantly affected by the following:
 
  •  The recognition of a pre-tax cash benefit of $77 million related to the settlement of a lawsuit related to the abandonment of revenue management software, which had a favorable impact of $0.10 on our diluted earnings per share;
 
  •  The recognition of a tax charge of $37 million principally related to refinements in estimates of our deferred state income taxes, which had a negative impact of $0.08 on our diluted earnings per share; and
 
  •  The recognition of a pre-tax non-cash charge of $39 million related to increases in our environmental remediation reserves principally related to two landfill sites, which had a negative impact of $0.05 on our diluted earnings per share.
 
The results of the second quarter of 2009 were significantly affected by the following:
 
  •  The recognition of a pre-tax charge of $5 million related to our 2009 restructuring, which was primarily related to severance and benefit costs. The restructuring charge reduced diluted earnings per share for the quarter by $0.01; and
 
  •  The recognition of a pre-tax charge of $9 million related to the partial withdrawal from a Teamsters’ under-funded multi-employer pension plan, which had a negative $0.01 impact on our diluted earnings per share.
 
Our second quarter results are particularly noteworthy in light of the continued challenges we faced during the quarter due to continued weakness in industrial collection volumes, caused in large part by sustained reductions in residential and commercial construction, and the negative pressures on our earnings and margins from rising fuel costs.


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We are optimistic about the lessening rate of revenue decline due to lower volumes. However, we expect that throughout 2010 we may continue to face challenges related to the economy and rising fuel prices. Additionally, we are mindful of trends toward waste reduction at the source, diversion from landfills and customers seeking alternative methods of disposal. We are continuing to implement measures that we believe will grow our business, improve our current operations performance and enhance and expand our services.
 
Through our continued focus on the expansion of our waste-to-energy business, during the second quarter of 2010, we paid $150 million to purchase a waste-to-energy facility in Portsmouth, Virginia, which was approved by both the Southeastern Public Service Authority of Virginia, or SPSA, and the Virginia Resources Authority in the first quarter of 2010.
 
 
As is our practice, we are presenting free cash flow, which is a non-GAAP measure of liquidity, in our disclosures because we use this measure in the evaluation and management of our business. We define free cash flow as net cash provided by operating activities, less capital expenditures, plus proceeds from divestitures of businesses (net of cash divested) and other sales of assets. We believe it is indicative of our ability to pay our quarterly dividends, repurchase common stock, fund acquisitions and other investments and, in the absence of refinancings, to repay our debt obligations. Free cash flow is not intended to replace “Net cash provided by operating activities,” which is the most comparable U.S. GAAP measure. However, we believe free cash flow gives investors useful insight into how we view our liquidity. Nonetheless, the use of free cash flow as a liquidity measure has material limitations because it excludes certain expenditures that are required or that we have committed to, such as declared dividend payments and debt service requirements.
 
Our calculation of free cash flow and reconciliation to “Net cash provided by operating activities” is shown in the table below (in millions), and may not be calculated the same as similarly titled measures presented by other companies:
 
                                 
    Three Months
    Six Months
 
    Ended
    Ended
 
    June 30,     June 30,  
    2010     2009     2010     2009  
 
Net cash provided by operating activities
  $ 480     $ 548     $ 976     $ 1,067  
Capital expenditures
    (220 )     (258 )     (475 )     (583 )
Proceeds from divestitures of businesses (net of cash divested) and other sales of assets
    15       7       27       12  
                                 
Free cash flow
  $ 275     $ 297     $ 528     $ 496  
                                 
 
When comparing our cash flow from operating activities for the three months and six months ended June 30, 2010 to the comparable periods in 2009, the current year decreases were driven by increases in our receivable balances due to seasonal trends generally experienced during the second quarter, which were not significant in 2009 due to economic conditions. Further, increases in our income tax payments and interest payments have negatively affected our cash flow from operations this year. These current year reductions were partially offset by a favorable cash benefit of $77 million resulting from a litigation settlement in April 2010 and prior year payments related to severance and benefit costs associated with our 2009 restructuring. The decrease in capital expenditures when comparing the first half of 2010 with the prior year period can generally be attributed to timing differences associated with cash payments for the previous years’ fourth quarter capital spending. We generally use a significant portion of our free cash flow on capital spending in the fourth quarter of each year. A less significant portion of our fourth quarter 2009 spending was paid in cash in 2010 than in the preceding year.
 
 
Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities — In June 2009, the FASB issued revised authoritative guidance associated with the consolidation of variable interest entities. This revised guidance replaced the previous quantitative-based assessment for determining whether an enterprise is the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity, and is, therefore, required to consolidate an entity, with an approach that is now primarily qualitative.


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This qualitative approach focuses on identifying the enterprise that has (i) the power to direct the activities of the variable interest entity that can most significantly impact the entity’s performance; and (ii) the obligation to absorb losses and the right to receive benefits from the variable interest entity that could potentially be significant to such entity. This revised guidance also requires that the enterprise continually reassess whether it is the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity rather than conducting a reassessment only upon the occurrence of specific events.
 
We adopted this revised guidance effective January 1, 2010. This change in accounting has not materially affected our financial position, results of operations or cash flows during the periods presented. For information related to our interests in variable interest entities, refer to Note 1 to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
 
Multiple-Deliverable Revenue Arrangements — In October 2009, the FASB amended authoritative guidance associated with multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements. This amended guidance addresses the determination of when individual deliverables within an arrangement may be treated as separate units of accounting and modifies the manner in which consideration is allocated across the separately identifiable deliverables. The amendments to authoritative guidance associated with multiple-deliverable revenue arrangements are effective for the Company on January 1, 2011, although the FASB does permit early adoption of the guidance provided that it is retroactively applied to the beginning of the year of adoption. The new accounting standard may be applied either retrospectively for all periods presented or prospectively to arrangements entered into or materially modified after the date of adoption. We are in the process of assessing the provisions of this new guidance and currently do not expect that the adoption will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements. However, our adoption of this guidance may significantly impact our accounting and reporting for future revenue arrangements to the extent they are material.
 
 
In preparing our financial statements, we make numerous estimates and assumptions that affect the accounting for and recognition and disclosure of assets, liabilities, equity, revenues and expenses. We must make these estimates and assumptions because certain information that we use is dependent on future events, cannot be calculated with a high degree of precision from data available or simply cannot be readily calculated based on generally accepted methods. In some cases, these estimates are particularly difficult to determine and we must exercise significant judgment. In preparing our financial statements, the most difficult, subjective and complex estimates and the assumptions that present the greatest amount of uncertainty relate to our accounting for landfills, environmental remediation liabilities, asset impairments, reserves associated with our uninsured claims and reserves and recoveries associated with our insured claims, as described in Item 7 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009. Actual results could differ materially from the estimates and assumptions that we use in the preparation of our financial statements.
 
Results of Operations
 
Operating Revenues
 
We manage and evaluate our principal operations through five Groups. Our four geographic Groups, which include our Eastern, Midwest, Southern and Western Groups, provide collection, transfer, recycling and disposal services. Our fifth Group is the Wheelabrator Group, which provides waste-to-energy services. We also provide additional services that are not managed through our five Groups, including recycling brokerage services, electronic recycling services, in-plant services and landfill gas-to-energy services. These operations are presented as “Other.”


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Shown below (in millions) is the contribution to revenues during each period provided by our five Groups and our Other waste services:
 
                                 
    Three Months
    Six Months
 
    Ended
    Ended
 
    June 30,     June 30,  
    2010     2009     2010     2009  
 
Eastern
  $ 774     $ 756     $ 1,459     $ 1,448  
Midwest
    780       723       1,474       1,372  
Southern
    876       840       1,699       1,673  
Western
    799       785       1,563       1,542  
Wheelabrator
    217       212       423       413  
Other
    225       146       440       278  
Intercompany
    (513 )     (510 )     (965 )     (964 )
                                 
Total
  $ 3,158     $ 2,952     $ 6,093     $ 5,762  
                                 
 
The mix of operating revenues from our major lines of business is reflected in the table below (in millions):
 
                                 
    Three Months
    Six Months
 
    Ended
    Ended
 
    June 30,     June 30,  
    2010     2009     2010     2009  
 
Collection
  $ 2,082     $ 1,999     $ 4,056     $ 3,951  
Landfill
    664       663       1,226       1,263  
Transfer
    351       366       663       687  
Wheelabrator
    217       212       423       413  
Recycling
    281       165       550       308  
Other
    76       57       140       104  
Intercompany
    (513 )     (510 )     (965 )     (964 )
                                 
Total
  $ 3,158     $ 2,952     $ 6,093     $ 5,762  
                                 
 
The following table provides details associated with the period-to-period change in revenues (dollars in millions) along with an explanation of the significant components of the current period changes:
 
                                 
    Period-to-Period Change
    Period-to-Period Change
 
    for the Three Months Ended
    for the Six Months Ended
 
    June 30,
    June 30,
 
    2010 vs. 2009     2010 vs. 2009  
          As a % of
          As a % of
 
          Total
          Total
 
    Amount     Company(a)     Amount     Company(a)  
 
Average yield(b)
  $ 209       7.1 %   $ 402       7.0 %
Volume
    (86 )     (2.9 )     (228 )     (4.0 )
                                 
Internal revenue growth
    123       4.2       174       3.0  
Acquisitions
    62       2.1       110       1.9  
Divestitures
    (1 )           (2 )      
Foreign currency translation
    22       0.7       49       0.8  
                                 
    $ 206       7.0 %   $ 331       5.7 %
                                 
 
 
(a) Calculated by dividing the amount of current-year period increase or decrease by the prior-year period’s total company revenue ($2,952 million and $5,762 million for the three- and six-month periods, respectively)


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adjusted to exclude the impacts of divestitures for the current-year period ($1 million and $2 million for the three- and six-month periods, respectively).
 
(b) The amounts reported herein represent the changes in our revenue attributable to average yield for the total Company. We analyze the changes in average yield in terms of related business revenues in order to differentiate the changes in yield attributable to our pricing strategies from the changes that are caused by market-driven price changes in commodities. The following table summarizes changes in revenues from average yield on a related-business basis:
 
                                 
    Period-to-Period Change
    Period-to-Period Change
 
    for the Three Months Ended
    for the Six Months Ended
 
    June 30,
    June 30,
 
    2010 vs. 2009     2010 vs. 2009  
          As a % of
          As a % of
 
          Related
          Related
 
    Amount     Business(i)     Amount     Business(i)  
 
Average yield:
                               
Collection, landfill and transfer
  $ 56       2.2 %   $ 99       2.0 %
Waste-to-energy disposal
    6       5.7       13       6.4  
                                 
Collection and disposal
    62       2.3       112       2.2 (ii)
Recycling commodities
    123       78.8       262       90.3  
Electricity
    (3 )     (4.5 )     (11 )     (7.9 )
Fuel surcharges and mandated fees
    27       31.8       39       22.8  
                                 
Total
  $ 209       7.1     $ 402       7.0  
                                 
 
(i) Calculated by dividing the increase or decrease for the current-year period by the prior-year period’s related business revenue, adjusted to exclude the impacts of divestitures for the current-year period. The table below summarizes the related business revenues for the three and six months ended June 30, 2009 adjusted to exclude the impacts of divestitures:
 
                 
    Denominator  
    Three
    Six
 
    Months
    Months
 
    Ended
    Ended
 
    June 30     June 30  
 
Related business revenues:
               
Collection, landfill and transfer
  $ 2,537     $ 4,957  
Waste-to-energy disposal
    106       202  
                 
Collection and disposal
    2,643       5,159  
Recycling commodity
    156       290  
Electricity
    67       140  
Fuel surcharges and mandated fees
    85       171  
                 
Total Company
  $ 2,951     $ 5,760  
                 
 
(ii) Reflects a refinement to the calculation of the number of “standard workdays” per month used in this calculation for our commercial and residential lines of business. This revision was applied retrospectively to the calculation for the entire six-month period ended June 30, 2010 and resulted in an increase from 1.8% to 2.0% for the first quarter of 2010.
 
Our revenues increased $206 million, or 7.0%, for the three months ended June 30, 2010 as compared with the prior year period and $331 million, or 5.7%, for the six months ended June 30, 2010 as compared with the prior year period. During the three- and six-month periods, our current period revenue growth has been driven by (i) market factors, including higher recyclable commodity prices; foreign currency translation, which affects revenues from our Canadian operations; and higher diesel fuel prices, which increase revenues provided by our fuel surcharge program; (ii) revenue growth from average yield on our collection and disposal operations; and (iii) acquisitions. Offsetting these revenue increases were revenue declines due to lower volumes, which have generally resulted from pricing competition and continued reductions in consumer and business spending, which results in less waste being generated.


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The following provides further details associated with our period-to-period change in revenues.
 
 
Collection and disposal average yield — This measure reflects the effect on our revenue from the pricing activities of our collection, transfer, landfill and waste-to-energy disposal operations, exclusive of volume changes. Revenue growth from collection and disposal average yield includes not only base rate changes and environmental and service fee increases, but also (i) certain average price changes related to the overall mix of services, which are due to both the types of services provided and the geographic locations where our services are provided; (ii) changes in average price from new and lost business; and (iii) price decreases to retain customers.
 
For the first six months in 2010, our revenue growth from yield on our collection and disposal lines of business of $112 million, or 2.2%, demonstrates our commitment to our pricing strategies even in the current economic environment. This increase in revenue from yield was driven by our collection operations, which experienced yield growth in all lines of business and in every geographic operating Group. As discussed below, increased collection revenues due to pricing have been more than offset by revenue declines from lower collection volumes. However, revenue growth from yield on base business and a focus on controlling variable costs have provided margin improvements in our collection line of business.
 
The current quarter revenue growth from collection and disposal average yield was $62 million, or 2.3%, due, in part, to the successful execution of our pricing strategies. This yield increase is an improvement from the first quarter of this year. We have found that increasing our yield in today’s market is a challenge given the reduced volume levels resulting from the economic slowdown. Additionally, a significant portion of our collection revenues are generated under long-term franchise agreements with municipalities or similar local or regional authorities. These agreements generally tie pricing adjustments to inflation indices, which have been extremely low, and in some cases negative, in recent periods. We consider all of these trends in executing our pricing strategies, but are committed to maintaining pricing discipline in order to improve yield on our base business, particularly during the second half of 2010. We are pleased to see that, despite these negative pricing pressures, we were able to sequentially improve our yield.
 
During the second quarter of 2010, we increased our environmental fee from 6.0% to 7.5%. Revenues from our environmental fee, which are included in average yield on collection and disposal, increased by $10 million for the three-month period and $9 million for the six-month period. These revenues were $66 million and $117 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2010, respectively, and $56 million and $108 million in the comparable prior-year periods.
 
Recycling commodities — Increases in the prices of the recycling commodities we process resulted in an increase in revenues of $123 million for the three months ended June 30, 2010 and $262 million for the six months ended June 30, 2010 as compared with the prior year periods. During the fourth quarter of 2008 and the first quarter of 2009, recycling commodity prices were sharply lower as a result of a significant decrease in the demand for commodities both domestically and internationally. However, since the first quarter of 2009, prices for recyclable commodities have increased significantly. For the first six months of this year, overall commodity prices have increased over 90% compared with the first six months of last year.
 
Electricity — The changes in revenue from yield provided by our waste-to-energy business are largely due to fluctuations in rates we can receive for electricity under our power purchase contracts and in merchant transactions. In most of the markets in which we operate, electricity prices correlate with natural gas prices. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2010, we experienced declines in revenue from yield at our waste-to-energy facilities of $3 million and $11 million, respectively, due to the expiration of certain above market contracts, resulting in greater exposure to market pricing. Overall, market pricing for electricity has shown slight improvement year-over-year. During the second quarter and first half of 2010, approximately 46% of the electricity revenue at our waste-to-energy facilities was subject to current market rates, which is an increase from 32% during the second quarter and first half of 2009. Our waste-to-energy facilities’ exposure to market price volatility will continue to increase as more long-term contracts expire.


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Fuel surcharges and mandated fees — Revenue predominantly generated by our fuel surcharge program increased by $27 million and $39 million during the three and six months ended June 30, 2010, respectively. This increase is directly attributable to higher crude oil index prices that we use for our fuel surcharge program. The mandated fees included in this line item are primarily related to the pass-through of fees and taxes assessed by various state, county and municipal governmental agencies at our landfills and transfer stations. These mandated fees have not had a significant impact on the comparability of revenues for the periods included in the table above.
 
Volume — Our revenue decline due to volume was $86 million, or 2.9%, and $228 million, or 4.0%, for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010, respectively. This is a notable improvement in the rate of revenue decline from the prior-year period when revenue declines due to volume were $299 million, or 8.6%, and $564 million, or 8.4%, for the three and six months ended June 30, 2009, respectively, and also a sequential improvement compared with the first quarter of this year.
 
Volume declines are generally attributable to economic conditions, pricing, competition and recent trends of waste reduction and diversion by consumers. Additionally, we had certain infrequent items this year that affected our volumes, including the severe weather conditions experienced during the first quarter, which lowered volumes, and clean-up activities in the gulf coast region during the second quarter, which increased volumes.
 
Volume declines from our collection business accounted for $63 million and $174 million of the total volume-related revenue decline for the three and six months ended June 30, 2010, respectively. Our industrial collection operations continue to be the most significantly affected by the current economic environment due to the construction slowdown across the United States. Our commercial and residential collection lines of business tend to be more recession resistant than our other lines of business. However, we still experienced some commercial and residential collection volume declines during the first six months in 2010 that we attribute to the recessionary economic environment, as well as the effects of pricing and competition.
 
Revenue from third party volumes at our landfills was flat during the second quarter of 2010 when compared with the second quarter of 2009, principally due to higher special waste volumes in our Eastern, Midwest and Southern geographic Groups, which were offset primarily by a decrease in our construction and demolition waste streams. When comparing the year-over-year decline in commercial and demolition waste streams in the second quarter of 2010 with the year-over-year decline in the first quarter of 2010, we noted these volumes declined at a significantly less rapid pace. For the six months ended June 30, 2010, we experienced a $25 million decline in third party revenue due to lower volumes at our landfills primarily as a result of (i) a reduction in the transportation component of our disposal business; and (ii) volume declines in the first quarter of 2010 in our more economically-sensitive construction and demolition business. Lower third party volumes in our transfer station operations also caused revenue declines and can generally be attributed to economic conditions and the effects of pricing and competition. Finally, negative economic impacts on the amount of waste being generated reduced the amount of materials available to recycle, causing volume declines in our recycling operations.
 
We are optimistic about the lessening rate of revenue decline due to lower