WBSN » Topics » Industry Background

These excerpts taken from the WBSN 10-K filed Feb 27, 2009.

Industry Background

As part of their overall business strategies, many organizations use the Internet to enable critical business applications that are accessed over their corporate networks. Many employees also use their organization’s computing resources for recreational “Web surfing,” peer-to-peer file sharing, downloading of high-bandwidth content, instant messaging and other personal matters. However, unmanaged use of corporate computing

 

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resources, including Internet access, can result in increased risk and cost to the organization, including increased security risks, the loss of critical business data, lost employee productivity, increased network bandwidth consumption, and potential legal liability. In recent years, the same activities that made employees efficient and productive—doing research over the Internet, sharing files and sending instant messages and emails to customers and co-workers—have also made IT infrastructures and valuable corporate data vulnerable to external threats such as malicious code, spyware, viruses, trojan horses and phishing and pharming exploits.

Additionally, as organizations create collaborative networks with their customers, suppliers, technology partners and other stakeholders, they increase the amount of confidential and sensitive data that travels across these networks. Securing this data from internal threats, such as inadequate business process controls, employee error and malfeasance, as well as undetected data-stealing malicious code, has become a top priority for information technology executives.

Given the necessity of corporate email and Internet access and the continuing worldwide adoption of the Web as a mass communication, entertainment, information and commerce medium, we believe there is a significant opportunity for Web security, messaging security and DLP solutions. Although the Web and email are the primary drivers of Internet traffic today, the rapid emergence of Internet-enabled applications creates the need for software that applies management and security policies to different data types, applications, and protocols, at multiple points in the information technology infrastructure and across multiple communication technologies. To effectively address the needs of connected organizations in today’s Internet-enabled business environment, software tools that implement policy-based security measures must be user, content and destination aware. In order to protect against external and internal threats, organizations must be able to manage who uses what information as well as where and how the information can be sent or shared.

Industry Background

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">As part of their overall business strategies, many organizations use the Internet to enable critical business applications that are accessed over their corporate networks. Many employees also use their
organization’s computing resources for recreational “Web surfing,” peer-to-peer file sharing, downloading of high-bandwidth content, instant messaging and other personal matters. However, unmanaged use of corporate computing

 


2







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resources, including Internet access, can result in increased risk and cost to the organization, including increased security risks, the loss of critical
business data, lost employee productivity, increased network bandwidth consumption, and potential legal liability. In recent years, the same activities that made employees efficient and productive—doing research over the Internet, sharing files
and sending instant messages and emails to customers and co-workers—have also made IT infrastructures and valuable corporate data vulnerable to external threats such as malicious code, spyware, viruses, trojan horses and phishing and pharming
exploits.

Additionally, as organizations create collaborative networks with their customers, suppliers, technology partners and other
stakeholders, they increase the amount of confidential and sensitive data that travels across these networks. Securing this data from internal threats, such as inadequate business process controls, employee error and malfeasance, as well as
undetected data-stealing malicious code, has become a top priority for information technology executives.

Given the necessity of corporate
email and Internet access and the continuing worldwide adoption of the Web as a mass communication, entertainment, information and commerce medium, we believe there is a significant opportunity for Web security, messaging security and DLP solutions.
Although the Web and email are the primary drivers of Internet traffic today, the rapid emergence of Internet-enabled applications creates the need for software that applies management and security policies to different data types, applications, and
protocols, at multiple points in the information technology infrastructure and across multiple communication technologies. To effectively address the needs of connected organizations in today’s Internet-enabled business environment, software
tools that implement policy-based security measures must be user, content and destination aware. In order to protect against external and internal threats, organizations must be able to manage who uses what information as well as where and how the
information can be sent or shared.

These excerpts taken from the WBSN 10-K filed Feb 28, 2008.

Industry Background

        As part of their overall business strategies, many organizations use the Internet to enable critical business applications that are accessed over their corporate networks. Many employees also use their organization's computing resources for recreational "Web surfing," peer-to-peer file sharing, downloading of high-bandwidth content, instant messaging and other personal matters. However, unmanaged use of corporate computing resources, including Internet access, can result in increased risk and cost to the organization, including increased security risks, lost employee productivity, increased

4



network bandwidth consumption, and potential legal liability. In recent years, the same activities that made employees efficient and productive—doing research over the Internet, sharing files and sending instant messages and emails to customers and co-workers—have also made IT infrastructures and valuable corporate data vulnerable to external threats such as mobile malicious code, spyware, viruses, Trojan horses and phishing and pharming exploits.

        Additionally, as organizations create collaborative networks with their customers, suppliers, technology partners and other stakeholders, they increase the amount of confidential and sensitive data that travels across these networks. Securing this data from internal threats, such as inadequate business process controls, employee error and malfeasance as well as undetected malicious code, has become a top priority for information technology executives.

        Given the necessity of corporate email and Internet access and the continuing worldwide adoption of the Web as a mass communication, entertainment, information and commerce medium, we believe there is a significant opportunity for Web security, messaging security and data loss prevention solutions. Although the Web and e-mail are the primary drivers of Internet traffic today, the rapid emergence of Internet-enabled applications creates the need for software that applies management and security policies to different data types, applications, and protocols, at multiple points in the information technology infrastructure and across multiple communication technologies. To effectively address the needs of connected organizations in today's Internet-enabled business environment, software tools implement policy-based security measures that are user, content and destination aware. In order to protect against external and internal threats, organizations must be able to manage who uses what information as well as where and how the information can be sent or shared.

Industry Background



        As part of their overall business strategies, many organizations use the Internet to enable critical business applications that are accessed over their corporate
networks. Many employees also use their organization's computing resources for recreational "Web surfing," peer-to-peer file sharing, downloading of high-bandwidth
content, instant messaging and other personal matters. However, unmanaged use of corporate computing resources, including Internet access, can result in increased risk and cost to the organization,
including increased security risks, lost employee productivity, increased



4











network
bandwidth consumption, and potential legal liability. In recent years, the same activities that made employees efficient and productive—doing research over the Internet, sharing
files and sending instant messages and emails to customers and co-workers—have also made IT infrastructures and valuable corporate data vulnerable to external threats such as
mobile malicious code, spyware, viruses, Trojan horses and phishing and pharming exploits.



        Additionally,
as organizations create collaborative networks with their customers, suppliers, technology partners and other stakeholders, they increase the amount of confidential and
sensitive data that travels across these networks. Securing this data from internal threats, such as inadequate business process controls, employee error and malfeasance as well as undetected
malicious code, has become a top priority for information technology executives.




        Given
the necessity of corporate email and Internet access and the continuing worldwide adoption of the Web as a mass communication, entertainment, information and commerce medium, we
believe there is a significant opportunity for Web security, messaging security and data loss prevention solutions. Although the Web and e-mail are the primary drivers of Internet traffic
today, the rapid emergence of Internet-enabled applications creates the need for software that applies management and security policies to different data types, applications, and protocols, at
multiple points in the information technology infrastructure and across multiple communication technologies. To effectively address the needs of connected organizations in today's Internet-enabled
business environment, software tools implement policy-based security measures that are user, content and
destination aware. In order to protect against external and internal threats, organizations must be able to manage who uses what information as well as where and how the information can be sent or
shared.



This excerpt taken from the WBSN 10-K filed Feb 28, 2007.

Industry Background

As part of their overall business strategies, many organizations use the Internet to enable critical business applications that are accessed over their corporate networks. Many employees also use their organization’s computing resources for recreational “Web surfing,” peer-to-peer file sharing, downloading of high-bandwidth content, instant messaging and other personal matters. However, unmanaged use of corporate computing resources, including Internet access, can result in increased risk and cost to the organization, including increased security risks, lost employee productivity, increased network bandwidth consumption, and potential legal liability. In recent years, the same activities that made employees efficient and productive—doing research over the Internet, sharing files and sending instant messages and emails to customers and co-workers—have also made IT infrastructures and valuable corporate data vulnerable to external threats such as mobile malicious code, spyware, viruses, Trojan horses and phishing and pharming exploits.

Additionally, as organizations create collaborative networks with their customers, suppliers, technology partners and other stakeholders, they increase the amount of confidential and sensitive data that travels across these networks. Securing this data from internal threats, such as inadequate business process controls, employee error and malfeasance and undetected malicious code, has become a top priority for information technology executives.

Traditionally, organizations have sought to protect against external security risks with a combination of firewalls, intrusion detection/prevention software and anti-virus software. With the growth in spyware, key logging applications, and phishing sites, and the proliferation of blended attacks on computing networks, combined with the rapid increase in employee use of instant messaging and peer-to-peer file sharing, organizations are finding that existing security measures leave significant time and technology gaps in their protection. Firewalls can provide protection against external threats such as hacking, but do little to prevent employees from hacking into their own organization’s data from inside the corporate firewall. Anti-virus software provides protection from e-mail borne viruses, but does not prevent the possible theft or corruption of corporate data by spyware, and offers only limited protection against viruses that proliferate via peer-to-peer networks and instant messaging. Existing anti-virus and anti-spyware software also requires time for the vendor to identify and reverse engineer the new virus or spyware application before they can be remediated and removed from infected systems. According to a 2006 FBI study, approximately 65 percent of organizations that deploy these traditional security measures still have their networks or data compromised by viruses and other malicious attacks.

Technology efforts to protect against internal threats to confidential data have been even less effective than security solutions for external threats. While organizations have had some success protecting against employee malfeasance and malicious code attacks, there have been fewer technology solutions to protect against inadvertent or deliberate outbound disclosure of an organization’s confidential information. Recent changes in the regulatory environment, designed to protect individual privacy, have also created specific requirements for regulated industries such as banks and credit unions to implement data security measures.

Given the necessity of corporate Internet access and the continuing worldwide adoption of the Web as a mass communication, entertainment, information and commerce medium, we believe there is a significant opportunity for Web filtering, Web security and information leak prevention solutions that effectively address the needs of organizations to protect themselves from Web-based threats and manage

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employee usage of the computing environment and confidential data. Additionally, although the Web and e-mail are the primary drivers of Internet traffic today, the rapid emergence of Internet-enabled applications creates the need for software that applies management and security policies to different data types, applications, and protocols, as well as Web pages, at multiple points in the information technology infrastructure and across multiple communication technologies. Software tools are needed to protect against internal and external threats to data security and implement granular policy-based security measures that are user, content and destination aware.

This excerpt taken from the WBSN 10-K filed Mar 3, 2006.
Industry Background

As part of their overall business strategies, many organizations use the internet to enable critical business applications that are accessed over their corporate networks. Many employees also use their organization’s computing resources for recreational “web surfing,” peer-to-peer file sharing, downloading of high-bandwidth content, instant messaging and other personal matters. However, unmanaged use of organizational computing and network resources, including internet access, can result in increased risk and cost to the organization, including increased security risks, lost employee productivity, increased network bandwidth consumption, and potential legal liability. In recent years, the same activities that made employees efficient and productive—doing research over the Internet, sharing files and sending instant messages and emails to customers and co-workers—have also made IT infrastructures vulnerable to mobile malicious code, spyware, viruses, Trojan horses and phishing and pharming exploits.

Traditionally, organizations have attempted to mitigate the legal liability, productivity and bandwidth waste risks through written policies governing acceptable employee use of computing resources, and they have sought to protect against external security risks with a combination of firewalls, intrusion detection/prevention software and anti-virus software. With the growth in spyware, key logging applications, and phishing sites, combined with the rapid increase in employee use of instant messaging and peer-to-peer file sharing and the proliferation of blended attacks on computing networks, organizations are finding  that  existing security measures leave significant time and technology gaps in their protection. Written internet access and software application usage policies are easily ignored, difficult to enforce and do not proactively curtail undesirable internet and software application usage. Firewalls can provide protection against external threats such as hacking, but do little to prevent employees from hacking into their own organization’s data from inside the corporate firewall. Anti-virus software provides protection from e-mail borne viruses, but does not prevent the possible theft or corruption of corporate data by spyware, and offers only limited protection against viruses that proliferate via peer-to-peer networks and instant messaging. Existing anti-virus and anti-spyware software also requires time to identify and reverse engineer the virus or spyware application before it can be remediated and removed from infected systems.

Given the necessity of corporate internet access and the continuing adoption of the web as a mass communication, entertainment, information and commerce medium, we believe there is a significant opportunity for employee internet management and web security solutions that effectively address the needs of organizations to protect themselves from web-based threats and manage employee usage of the computing environment, including internet access and desktop application use. Additionally, although the web and e-mail are the primary drivers of internet traffic today, the rapid emergence of internet-enabled applications creates the need for software that applies management policies to file types, applications, and protocols, as well as web pages, at multiple points on the information technology infrastructure. Software tools are needed to implement policy-based bandwidth management and regulation of applications such as instant messaging, peer-to-peer file exchange tools, interactive games and desktop software applications. These solutions must also be adaptable enough to manage new applications and technologies as they are developed.

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This excerpt taken from the WBSN 10-K filed Mar 4, 2005.

Industry Background

 

As part of their overall business strategies, many organizations use the internet to enable critical business applications that are accessed over their corporate networks. Many employees also use their organization’s computing resources for recreational “web surfing,” peer-to-peer file sharing, downloading of high-bandwidth content, instant messaging and other personal matters. However, unmanaged use of organizational computing and network resources, including internet access, can result in increased risk and cost to the organization, including increased security risks, lost employee productivity, increased network bandwidth consumption, and potential legal liability.

 

Traditionally, organizations have attempted to mitigate the legal liability, productivity and bandwidth waste risks through written policies governing acceptable employee use of computing resources, and they have sought to protect against external security risks with a combination of firewalls, intrusion detection/prevention software and anti-virus software. With the growth in spyware, key logging applications, and phishing sites, combined with the rapid increase in employee use of instant messaging and peer-to-peer file sharing and the proliferation of blended attacks on computing networks, organizations are finding that existing security measures leave significant time and technology gaps in their protection. Written internet access and software application use policies are easily ignored, difficult to enforce and do not proactively curtail undesirable internet and software application usage.  Firewalls can provide protection against external threats such as hacking, but do little to prevent employees from accessing unauthorized data from within an organization. Anti-virus software provides protection from e-mail borne viruses, but does not prevent the possible theft or corruption of corporate data by spyware and offers only limited protection against viruses that proliferate via peer-to-peer networks and instant

 

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messaging.  Existing anti-virus and anti-spyware software also requires time to identify and reverse engineer the virus or spyware application before it can be remediated and removed from infected systems.

 

Given the necessity of corporate internet access and the continuing adoption of the web as a mass communication, entertainment, information and commerce medium, we believe there is a significant opportunity for an employee internet management solution that effectively addresses the needs of organizations to manage employee usage of the computing environment, including internet access and desktop application use. Additionally, although the web and e-mail are the primary drivers of internet traffic today, the rapid emergence of internet-enabled applications creates the need for software that applies management policies to file types, applications, and protocols, as well as web pages, at multiple points on the information technology infrastructure. Software tools are needed to implement policy-based bandwidth management and regulation of applications such as instant messaging, peer-to-peer file exchange tools, interactive games and desktop software applications.  These solutions must also be adaptable enough to manage new applications and technologies as they are developed.

 

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