WTSLA » Topics » Executive Overview

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Jun 2, 2009.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers aged 13 to 35 years old. As of May 2, 2009, we operated 493 retail stores in 47 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Our products can also be purchased online.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—For purposes of measuring comparable store sales, sales include merchandise sales as well as membership fee revenues recognized under our Wet Seal division’s frequent buyer program during the applicable period. Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant remodel/relocation, which we define to be a square footage increase or decrease of at least 20%. Stores that are remodeled or relocated with a resulting square footage change of less than 20% are maintained in the comparable store base with no interruption. However, stores that are closed for four or more days in a fiscal month, due to remodel, relocation or other reasons, are removed from the comparable store base for that fiscal month as well as for the comparable fiscal month in the following fiscal year. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Average transaction counts—We consider the trend in the average number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset the decrease, if any, in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically cumulative mark-on, markups, markdowns, shrink, buying costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or in inventory shrink, or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income —We view operating income as a key indicator of our financial success. The key drivers of operating income are comparable store sales, gross margins, and the changes we experience in operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs.

 

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This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-K filed Apr 2, 2009.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers aged 13 to 35 years old. We operate two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B”. At January 31, 2009, we had 496 retail stores in 47 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 496 stores, there were 409 Wet Seal stores and 87 Arden B stores.

We report our results of operations as two reportable segments representing our two retail divisions (“Wet Seal” and “Arden B”). Internet operations for Wet Seal and Arden B are included in their respective operating segments. Although the two operating segments are similar in their products, production processes, distribution methods and regulatory environment, in fiscal 2007, due to the poor profit performance of the Arden B division and the disparity in financial performance between the two segments, we concluded that we no longer considered these operating segments to be economically similar.

Our fiscal year ends on the Saturday closest to the end of January. Fiscal 2008 and fiscal 2007 each include 52 weeks of operations and fiscal 2006 includes 53 weeks of operations.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—For purposes of measuring comparable store sales, sales include merchandise sales as well as membership fee revenues recognized under our Wet Seal division’s frequent buyer program during the applicable period. Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant remodel/relocation, which we define to be a square footage increase or decrease of at least 20%. Stores that are remodeled or relocated with a resulting square footage change of less than 20% are maintained in the comparable store base with no interruption. However, stores that are closed for four or more days in a fiscal month, due to remodel, relocation or other reasons, are removed from the comparable store base for that fiscal month as well as for the comparable fiscal month in

the following fiscal year. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general, and administrative expenses and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating

 

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leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Average transaction counts—We consider the trend in the average number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically cumulative mark-on, markups, markdowns, shrink, buying costs, distribution costs and store occupancy costs. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or in inventory shrink, or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income—We view operating income as a key indicator of our financial success. The key drivers of operating income are comparable store sales, gross margins and the changes we experience in operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Dec 4, 2008.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers aged 13 to 35 years old. As of November 1, 2008, we operated 500 retail stores in 47 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Our products can also be purchased online.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—For purposes of measuring comparable store sales, sales include merchandise sales as well as membership fee revenues recognized under our Wet Seal division’s frequent buyer program during the applicable period. Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant remodel/relocation, which we define to be a square footage increase or decrease of at least 20%. Stores that are remodeled or relocated with a resulting square footage change of less than 20% are maintained in the comparable store base with no interruption. However, stores that are closed for four or more days in a fiscal month, due to remodel, relocation or other reasons, are removed from the comparable store base for that fiscal month as well as for the comparable fiscal month in the following fiscal year. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Average transaction counts—We consider the trend in the average number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically cumulative mark-on, markups, markdowns, shrink, buying costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or in inventory shrink, or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income (loss)—We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our financial success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and the changes we experience in operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs.

 

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This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Sep 4, 2008.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers aged 13 to 35 years old. As of August 2, 2008, we operated 497 retail stores in 47 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Our products can also be purchased online.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—For purposes of measuring comparable store sales, sales include merchandise sales as well as membership fee revenues recognized under our Wet Seal division’s frequent buyer program during the applicable period. Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant remodel/relocation, which we define to be a square footage increase or decrease of at least 20%. Stores that are remodeled or relocated with a resulting square footage change of less than 20% are maintained in the comparable store base with no interruption. However, stores that are closed for four or more days in a fiscal month, due to remodel, relocation or other reasons, are removed from the comparable store base for that fiscal month as well as for the comparable fiscal month in the following fiscal year. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Average transaction counts—We consider the trend in the average number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically cumulative mark-on, markups, markdowns, shrink, buying costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or in inventory shrink, or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income—We view operating income as a key indicator of our financial success. The key drivers of operating income are comparable store sales, gross margins, and the changes we experience in operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs.

 

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This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Jun 10, 2008.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers aged 13 to 35 years old. As of May 3, 2008, we operated 496 retail stores in 47 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Our products can also be purchased online.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—For purposes of measuring comparable store sales, sales include merchandise sales as well as membership fee revenues recognized under our Wet Seal division’s frequent buyer program during the applicable period. Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant remodel/relocation, which we define to be a square footage increase or decrease of at least 20%. Stores that are remodeled or relocated with a resulting square footage change of less than 20% are maintained in the comparable store base with no interruption. However, stores that are closed for four or more days in a fiscal month, due to remodel, relocation or other reasons, are removed from the comparable store base for that fiscal month as well as for the comparable fiscal month in the following fiscal year. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Average transaction counts—We consider the trend in the average number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically cumulative mark-on, markups, markdowns, shrink, buying costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or in inventory shrink, or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income—We view operating income as a key indicator of our financial success. The key drivers of operating income are comparable store sales, gross margins, and the changes we experience in operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-K filed Apr 10, 2008.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers aged 13 to 35. We operate two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B”. At February 2, 2008, we had 494 retail stores in 47 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 494 stores, there were 399 Wet Seal stores and 95 Arden B stores.

We report our results of operations as two reportable segments representing our two retail divisions (“Wet Seal” and “Arden B”). Internet operations for Wet Seal and Arden B are included in their respective operating segments. Although the two operating segments are similar in their products, production processes, distribution methods and regulatory environment, in fiscal 2007, due to the poor profit performance of the Arden B division and the disparity in financial performance between the two segments, we concluded that we no longer consider these operating segments to be economically similar.

Our fiscal year ends on the Saturday closest to the end of January. Fiscal 2006 includes 53 weeks of operations and fiscal 2007 and fiscal 2005 each include 52 weeks of operations.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—For purposes of measuring comparable store sales, sales include merchandise sales as well as membership fee revenues recognized under our Wet Seal division’s frequent buyer program during the applicable period. Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant remodel/relocation, which we define to be a square footage increase or decrease of at least 20%. Stores that are remodeled or relocated with a resulting square footage change of less than 20% are maintained in the comparable store base with no interruption. However, stores that are closed for four or more days in a fiscal month, due to remodel, relocation or other reasons, are removed from the comparable store base that fiscal month as well as for the comparable fiscal month in the following fiscal year. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses

 

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while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Average transaction counts—We consider the trend in the average number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically cumulative mark-on, markups, markdowns, shrink, buying costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or in inventory shrink, or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income (loss)—We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our financial success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and the changes we experience in operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Dec 13, 2007.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers aged 15 to 35. We operate two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B”. As of November 3, 2007, we operated 490 retail stores in 47 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Our products can also be purchased online.

We consider the following to be key indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—For purposes of measuring comparable store sales, sales include merchandise sales as well as membership fee revenues recognized under our Wet Seal concept’s frequent buyer program during the applicable period. Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant remodel/relocation, which we define to be a square footage increase or decrease of at least 20%. Stores that are remodeled or relocated with a resulting square footage change of less than 20% are maintained in the comparable store base with no interruption. However, stores that are closed for four or more days in a fiscal month, due to remodel, relocation or other reasons, are removed from the comparable store base that fiscal month as well as for the comparable fiscal month in the following fiscal year. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Average transaction counts—We consider the trend in the average number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically cumulative mark-on, markups, markdowns, buying costs, distribution costs, shrink and store occupancy costs. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or in inventory shrink, or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income (loss)—We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and the changes we experience in operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Sep 13, 2007.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers aged 15 to 45. We operate two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B”. As of August 4, 2007, we operated 458 retail stores in 47 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Our products can also be purchased online.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—For purposes of measuring comparable store sales, sales include merchandise sales as well as membership fee revenues recognized under our Wet Seal concept’s frequent buyer program during the applicable period. Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant remodel/relocation, which we define to be a square footage increase or decrease of at least 20%. Stores that are remodeled or relocated with a resulting square footage change of less than 20% are maintained in the comparable store base with no interruption. However, stores that are closed for four or more days in a fiscal month, due to remodel, relocation or other reasons, are removed from the comparable store base that fiscal month as well as for the comparable fiscal month in the following fiscal year. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Average transaction counts—We consider the trend in the average number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically cumulative mark-on, markups, markdowns, buying costs, distribution costs, shrink and store occupancy costs. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income—We view operating income as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income are comparable store sales, gross margins, and the changes we experience in operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs.

 

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This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Jun 13, 2007.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers aged 15 to 45. We operate two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B”. As of May 5, 2007, we operated 448 retail stores in 47 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Our products can also be purchased online.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant remodel/relocation, which we define to be a square footage increase or decrease of at least 20%. Stores that are remodeled or relocated with a resulting square footage change of less than 20% are maintained in the comparable store base with no interruption. However, stores that are closed for four or more days in a fiscal month, due to remodel, relocation or other reasons, are removed from the comparable store base that fiscal month as well as for the comparable fiscal month in the following fiscal year. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Average transaction counts—We consider the trend in the average number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically initial markups and markdowns, buying costs, distribution costs, shrink and store occupancy costs. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income—We view operating income as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income are comparable store sales, gross margins, and our ability to control operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. We expect that our cash on hand and cash flows from operations will be sufficient to finance operations without borrowing under our senior revolving credit facility, or the Facility, for at least the next 12 months.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-K filed Apr 17, 2007.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers aged 15 to 45. We are a Delaware corporation that operates two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B”. At February 3, 2007, we had 430 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 430 stores, there were 338 Wet Seal stores and 92 Arden B stores.

We report our results of operations as one reportable segment representing the aggregation of our two retail brands and our Internet business due to the similarities of the economic and operating characteristics of the operations represented by our two store concepts and Internet business.

Our fiscal year ends on the Saturday closest to the end of January. Fiscal 2006 includes 53 weeks of operations and fiscal 2005 and 2004 each includes 52 weeks of operations.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant remodel/relocation, which we define to be a square footage increase or decrease of at least 20%. Stores that are remodeled or relocated with a resulting square footage change of less than 20% are maintained in the comparable store base with no interruption. However, stores that are closed for four or more days in a fiscal month, due to remodel, relocation or other reasons, are removed from the comparable store base that fiscal month as well as for the comparable fiscal month in the following fiscal year. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Average transaction counts—We consider the trend in the average number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores

 

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that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically initial markups and markdowns, buying costs, distribution costs, shrink and store occupancy costs. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income (loss)—We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and our ability to control operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. We expect that our cash on hand and cash flows from operations will be sufficient to finance operations without borrowing under our senior revolving credit facility, or the Facility, for at least the next 12 months.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Dec 12, 2006.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for women. We are a Delaware corporation that operates two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B.” At April 29, 2006, we had 401 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 401 stores, there were 309 locations within the Wet Seal chain and 92 Arden B locations.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales— Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or expansion/relocation. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, store occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Transaction counts— We consider the trend in the number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offsets any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins— We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically initial markups and markdowns, buying costs, planning and allocation costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs, as a percentage of net sales. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income (loss)— We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and our ability to control operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. We expect that our cash on hand and cash flows from operations will be sufficient to finance operations without borrowing under our senior credit facility for at least the next 12 months.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-K filed Dec 12, 2006.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers. We operate two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B.” At January 28, 2006, we had 400 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 400 stores, there were 308 Wet Seal stores and 92 Arden B. stores.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or expansion/relocation. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, store occupancy, depreciation, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Transaction counts—We consider the trend in the number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offsets any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically initial markups and markdowns, buying costs, planning and allocation costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs, as a percentage of net sales. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

 

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Operating income (loss)—We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and our ability to control operating costs. For a discussion of the changes in the components comprising operating income (loss), see “Results of Operations” in this section.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. We expect that our cash on hand and cash flows from operations will be sufficient to finance operations without borrowing under our senior credit facility for at least the next 12 months.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Dec 12, 2006.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for women. We are a Delaware corporation that operates two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B.” At July 29, 2006, we had 406 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 406 stores, there were 314 Wet Seal stores and 92 Arden B stores.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales— Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or expansion/relocation. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Transaction counts— We consider the trend in the number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins— We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically initial markups and markdowns, buying costs, planning and allocation costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs, as a percentage of net sales. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income (loss)— We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and our ability to control operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. We expect that our cash on hand and cash flows from operations will be sufficient to finance operations without borrowing under our senior credit facility (the “Facility”) for at least the next 12 months.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Dec 12, 2006.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for women. We are a Delaware corporation that operates two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B”. At October 28, 2006, we had 416 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. of the 416 stores, there were 326 Wet Seal stores and 90 Arden B stores.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales— Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or significant expansion/relocation. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Transaction counts— We consider the trend in the number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins— We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically initial markups and markdowns, buying costs, planning and allocation costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs, as a percentage of net sales. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income (loss)— We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and our ability to control operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. We expect that our cash on hand and cash flows from operations will be sufficient to finance operations without borrowing under our senior revolving credit facility (the “Facility”) for at least the next 12 months.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Sep 7, 2006.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for women. We are a Delaware corporation that operates two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B”. At July 29, 2006, we had 406 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 406 stores, there were 314 Wet Seal stores and 92 Arden B stores.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales— Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or expansion/relocation. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Transaction counts— We consider the trend in the number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offset any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins— We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically initial markups and markdowns, buying costs, planning and allocation costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs, as a percentage of net sales. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income (loss)— We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and our ability to control operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. We expect that our cash on hand and cash flows from operations will be sufficient to finance operations without borrowing under our senior credit facility (the “Facility”) for at least the next twelve months.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Jun 8, 2006.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for women. We are a Delaware corporation that operates two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B” At April 29, 2006, we had 401 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 401 stores, there were 309 locations within the Wet Seal chain and 92 Arden B locations.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales— Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or expansion/relocation. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, store occupancy, depreciation and amortization, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Transaction counts— We consider the trend in the number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offsets any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins— We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically initial markups and markdowns, buying costs, planning and allocation costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs, as a percentage of net sales. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income (loss)— We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and our ability to control operating costs.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. We expect that our cash on hand and cash flows from operations will be sufficient to finance operations without borrowing under our senior credit facility for at least the next twelve months.

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-K filed Apr 13, 2006.

Executive Overview

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers. We operate two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B.” At January 28, 2006, we had 400 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 400 stores, there were 308 Wet Seal stores and 92 Arden B. stores.

We consider the following to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

Comparable store sales—Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the one-year anniversary of their opening or expansion/relocation. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, store occupancy, depreciation, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

Transaction counts—We consider the trend in the number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores that more than offsets any decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

Gross margins—We analyze the components of gross margin, specifically initial markups and markdowns, buying costs, planning and allocation costs, distribution costs, and store occupancy costs, as a percentage of net sales. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups, a significant increase in our use of markdowns or an inability to generate sufficient sales leverage on other components of cost of sales could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

Operating income (loss)—We view operating income (loss) as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income (loss) are comparable store sales, gross margins, and our ability to control operating costs. For a discussion of the changes in the components comprising operating income (loss), see “Results of Operations” in this section.

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital)—We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. We expect that our cash on hand and cash flows from operations will be sufficient to finance operations without borrowing under our senior credit facility for at least the next twelve months.

 

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Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Dec 7, 2005.

Executive Overview

 

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers. We are a Delaware corporation that operates two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B.”. At October 29, 2005, we had 402 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 402 stores, there were 309 locations within the Wet Seal chain and 93 Arden B. locations. As a part of our financial turn-around strategy to improve our company’s operating results, we announced on December 28, 2004 our plans to close approximately 150 Wet Seal stores. We initially completed the closure of 153 Wet Seal stores by March 5, 2005. Subsequently, we decided to close three additional Wet Seal stores and, in addition, re-open eight previously closed Wet Seal stores as of October 29, 2005.

 

We operated a chain, Zutopia, which was not successful in generating profits. We made the determination to discontinue this chain of 31 stores at the end of fiscal year 2003. The 39-week period ending October 30, 2004 included a $4.2 million loss from discontinued operations, net of income taxes, for the Zutopia chain.

 

We consider the following items to be key performance indicators in evaluating our performance:

 

Comparable store sales – Stores are deemed comparable stores on the first day of the month following the thirteen full month of operation after opening or expansion/relocation. We consider comparable store sales to be an important indicator of current performance. Comparable store sales results are important in achieving operating leverage on certain expenses such as store payroll, store occupancy, depreciation, general and administrative expenses, and other costs that are at least partially fixed. Positive comparable store sales results generate greater operating leverage on expenses while negative comparable store sales results negatively affect operating leverage. Comparable store sales results also have a direct impact on our total net sales, cash, and working capital.

 

Transaction counts – We consider the trend in the number of sales transactions occurring in our stores to be a key performance metric. To the extent we are able to increase transaction counts in our stores without a commensurate decrease in the average dollar sale per transaction, we will generate increases in our comparable store sales.

 

Merchandise margins – We analyze the components of merchandise margins, specifically initial markup and markdowns as a percentage of net sales. Any inability to obtain acceptable levels of initial markups or any significant increase in our use of markdowns could have an adverse impact on our gross margin results and results of operations.

 

Operating income – We view operating income as a key indicator of our success. The key drivers of operating income are comparable store sales, merchandise margins, and our ability to control operating costs. For a discussion of the changes in the components comprising operating income, see “Results of Operations” in this section.

 

Cash flow and liquidity (working capital) – We evaluate cash flow from operations, liquidity and working capital to determine our short-term operational financing needs. We expect our cash on hand, cash flows from operations, and proceeds from our issuance of convertible preferred stock on May 3, 2005, will be sufficient to finance operations without borrowing under our Facility during fiscal 2005.

 

21


Table of Contents
This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Sep 8, 2005.

Executive Overview

 

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers. We are a Delaware corporation that operates two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B.”. At July 30, 2005, we had 396 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 396 stores, there were 305 locations within the Wet Seal chain and 91 were Arden B. locations. As a part of our financial turn-around strategy to improve our company’s operating results, we announced on December 28, 2004 our plans to close approximately 150 Wet Seal stores. We initially completed the closure of 153 Wet Seal stores by March 5, 2005. Subsequently, we decided to close three additional Wet Seal stores and in addition, re-open seven previously closed Wet Seal stores (of which four had re-opened as of July 30, 2005).

 

We operated a chain, Zutopia, which was not successful in generating profits. We made the determination to discontinue this chain of 31 stores at the end of fiscal year 2003. The 26-week period ending July 30, 2004 included a $4.2 million loss from discontinued operations, net of income taxes, for the Zutopia chain during the period.

 

This excerpt taken from the WTSLA 10-Q filed Jun 14, 2005.

Executive Overview

 

We are a national specialty retailer operating stores selling fashionable and contemporary apparel and accessory items designed for female customers. We are a Delaware corporation that operates two nationwide, primarily mall-based, chains of retail stores under the names “Wet Seal” and “Arden B.”. At April 30, 2005, we had 398 retail stores in 46 states, Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. Of the 398 stores, there were 307 locations within the Wet Seal chain and 91 were Arden B. locations. As a part of our financial turn-around strategy to improve our company’s operating results, we announced on December 28, 2004 our plans to close approximately 150 Wet Seal stores. We completed the closure of 153 Wet Seal stores, related to our announced store closure plans on March 5, 2005.

 

We operated a chain, Zutopia, which was not successful in generating profits. We made the determination to discontinue this chain of 31 stores at the end of fiscal year 2003. For the 13-week period ended May 1, 2004, the loss from our discontinued Zutopia division, net of income taxes, was $4.2 million.

 

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