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Financial Times  May 7  Comment 
ISS urges shareholders to withhold support because of Libor fine and co-CEO fraud charges
Clusterstock  May 6  Comment 
LONDON (Reuters) - The London trial of Tom Hayes, a former UBS and Citigroup trader who is the first person in the world to face a jury trial over allegations of a conspiracy to rig Libor interest rates, has been delayed by two weeks. The...
Mondo Visione  May 1  Comment 
Intercontinental Exchange (NYSE: ICE), the leading global network of exchanges and clearing houses, has published a feedback statement on the responses received to the ICE Benchmark Administration (IBA) position paper on the evolution and...
Euromoney  Apr 30  Comment 
A series of reports by regulators around the German bank’s $2.5 billion fine raise more questions than answers, while serving up embarrassment to remaining senior management.
Forbes  Apr 25  Comment 
Deutsche Bank has been issued with the largest fine of any bank for rigging international bank offer rates – what the UK’s Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) calls “IBORs”. There are several of these rates: the best-known is Libor –...
Financial Times  Apr 24  Comment 
White House confirms a US drone strike has killed two western hostages
Mondo Visione  Apr 23  Comment 
Today we announce the latest law enforcement action in our ongoing criminal investigation of the manipulation of LIBOR, the London Interbank Offered Rate, which is a critical benchmark interest rate used throughout the world.  I am pleased to be...
Financial Times  Apr 23  Comment 
Passage of time takes heat out of Libor manipulation scandal
Financial Times  Apr 23  Comment 
Transcripts of emails, instant messages and phone calls between traders inside and outside the bank




 
TOP CONTRIBUTORS

The graph to the left is for the 3 month LIBOR.

LIBOR, or the London Interbank Offered Rate, is the average interest rate between banks in the London interbank market. LIBOR is a widely used short-term interest rate benchmark since it is designed to reflect the cost of borrowing between some of the world's largest, most reputable banks.

What is LIBOR?

There isn't just one LIBOR; there are numerous rates determined by two variables:

Every business day at just after 11:00 am London time, the British Bankers' Association, in conjunction with Reuters, releases new rates for each combination of these.[3] For example, there's a new 3-month LIBOR for the yen, overnight LIBOR for the euro, and 2-week LIBOR for the pound released daily. These rates indicate both the health of the currencies (and their respective economies) relative to one another and expectations about future economic conditions.

There are ten LIBOR panels, one for each of the ten currencies for which the rate is determined. Each panel is composed of at least eight contributor banks, chosen for their reputations and their perceived expertise in a given currency. The BBA takes the daily deposit rates reported by its designated contributor banks and calculates the mean of the middle 50%; the resulting number is the LIBOR for the currency in question.[4] The average rates at which these banks say they would lend to one another is taken as an indication of the health of the banking systems of the ten LIBOR currencies. A list of the panels and their members as of May 30, 2008, can be found here on the British Bankers' Association's website.

Why is LIBOR important?

Not only does LIBOR provide information about the cost of borrowing in different currencies, it actually influences it. LIBOR is used as the basis for other interest rates across the globe. IE, variable interest rate loans such as mortgages and car loans will often be quotes at LIBOR + a percentage. For example, a loan that was LIBOR + 5% would charge 10% interest when the LIBOR is 5%, and 7% when the LIBOR is 2%.

Estimates for the total value of financial products with rates tied to LIBOR vary widely, from as low as $150 trillion,[5] to $360 trillion, [6]to as high as $500 trillion.[7]

LIBOR impacts financial instruments and products including:

Additionally, the difference between the libor rate and the interest rate on treasury bills is a key marker of the financial health of banks. For more information, see TED Spread.

Criticism

On May 29, 2008, the Wall Street Journal reported that certain banks had been reporting lower rates to the BBA than what WSJ analysis suggested they should have been.[8] Given the trillions of dollars tied to the LIBOR, even a small inaccuracy in either direction can cost lenders, borrowers, companies, or even whole economies billions of dollars. The WSJ study estimated that, if true, the artificially low U.S. dollar LIBOR saved U.S. borrowers about $45 billion over the first four months of 2008.[9] The banks, however, denied this claim and stuck by the rates they'd reported to the BBA and Reuters.

Charts





References

  1. British Bankers' Association - BBA LIBOR Panels
  2. BBA - Historic LIBOR Rates
  3. BBA LIBOR Frequently Asked Questions, British Bankers' Association.
  4. London Interbank Offered Rate - Wikipedia
  5. Yanked from Obscurity: Why Finance Experts Are Rethinking LIBOR - Knowledge@Wharton
  6. We are the World: We are LIBOR - LIBORATED.com
  7. Bankers Cast Doubt On Key Rate Amid Crisis - WSJ.com
  8. Study Casts Doubt on Key Rate - WSJ.com
  9. Study Casts Doubt on Key Rate - WSJ.com
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