Long-Term Care Insurance

Forbes  Aug 18  Comment 
About 7.2 million Americans currently own traditional long-term care insurance policies, a number that’s held steady for the last seven years. But who are they? And what does it say about the future of long-term care insurance?
Forbes  Aug 1  Comment 
Last week, the federal government announced that premiums for nearly all of its existing long-term care insurance policies will increase—by an average of 83 percent. In other words, they will almost double for federal employees and retirees.
Motley Fool  May 21  Comment 
What you need to know to help you understand and plan for long-term care.
Forbes  Feb 22  Comment 
For three years, I’ve been working with a diverse group of policy experts to create a consensus framework for financing long-term supports and services (LTSS). This morning, the Long-Term Care Financing Collaborative, released its...
Forbes  Jan 15  Comment 
The state of Hawaii is about to have a fascinating debate over whether to create a first-in-the-nation universal long-term care insurance program. The benefit would be modest—about $70-per-day for a year-- but it would be available to all...
New York Times  Dec 25  Comment 
Policies grow more costly the longer you wait to buy or if you are in poor health. Hybrid policies combine coverage with annuities and life insurance.
New York Times  Dec 18  Comment 
Premiums have increased sharply, and comparisons are difficult, which helps explain why only 20 percent of those over age 65 own a policy.
MarketWatch  Oct 8  Comment 
New study suggests a key reason is cognitive impairment
MarketWatch  Sep 17  Comment 
Insurance is all about planning for the “what if’s,” by protecting yourself and your loved ones, against worst-case scenarios.
New York Times  Sep 2  Comment 
As insurers seek to curb losses, many states have been approving large increases in premiums for older policies, but there are ways to cope.


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Long-term care insurance helps provide for the cost of long-term care beyond a predetermined period. Long-term care insurance covers care generally not covered by health insurance, Medicare, or Medicaid.

Individuals who require long-term care are generally not sick in the traditional sense, but instead, are unable to perform the basic activities of daily living (ADLs) such as dressing, bathing, eating, toileting, continence, transferring (getting in and out of a bed or chair), and walking.

Age is not a determining factor in needing long-term care. About 60 percent of individuals over age 65 will require at least some type of long-term care services during their lifetime. About 40% of those receiving long-term care today are between 18 and 64. Once a change of health occurs long-term care insurance may not be available.

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